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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  May 7, 2018 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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the disaster widens. new cracks in the kileau volcano. inside the danger zone. >> giuliani's sunday bombshell. he says the president does not have to comply if subpoenaed in the russia investigation. >> we can assert the same privilege. >> chicago's alarming surge in gun violence. more than 50 people shot just this week. >> a flash flood emergency aboard a cruise ship. passengers say it looked like a scene from "titanic." >> first official photos of the baby prince, snapped by his royal mom.
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this is the cbs "overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. the volcano emergency on hawaii's big island is far from over. the kilauea volcano erupting since wednesday sending lava into neighborhoods and toxic gas into the air. at least 9 homes have been destroyed. more cracks opened in the ground this weekend. and there are now at least 9 active fissures releasing lava. the island has mhad more than 20 earthquakes in 24 hours. following friday's 6.9 earthquake, the most powerful quake to hit hawaii in more than 40 years. carter evan is there. >> the volcanic trail cuts right through the community sitting ato atop the eastern slope of kilauea, spewing lava and ash.
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fissures spontaneously. we watched as smoke engulfed this house. >> it is like a roaring, like a, goliath, like, like, a roaring jet engine. >> sam knox lives 100 yard away from one of the eruptions. did they ask ask you to evacuate? >> told me mandatory evacuation. by law, i don't have to leave. >> why did you choose to stay? >> because this is where i live, right here. i have faith, faith in, in the gods, that my house is going to be okay. >> two more cracks broke open. bringing the total to nine. with fountains of lava exploding into the night sky just feet from homes on residential streets. >> just a few hours ago this street was wide open and now you can seep it is covered in a bout 6 feet of lava. it cools pretty quickly. almost walk on it now. if you look inside you can see where it is glowing red. >> the lava spread quickly through lava tubes, scientists
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describe as long tunnels underground. it erupts almost as if a hose has been sliced wise. >> the prognosis is for this to continue. we so no slowdown in activity. seismic and data from the region, in date magma accumulating below the general area. >> that means new eruptive fissures could open, unleashing lava and toxic gasses into the community. these eruptions have made streets impassible all over this community. see where it blocked the road here. this isn't the only one. one of the reasons they have shut this area down. the concern is, that people might get trapped inside. and first responders won't be able to reach them. elaine. carter, thank you. >> president from's lawyer, former new york city mayor giuliani, set the stage today for a possible subpoena showdown with special counsel robert mueller in the russia investigation. errol barnett has more from the
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white house. >> my issue with getting up to speed on the facts here. halfway there. >> president trump's lawyer, rudy giuliani further explained inconsistencies in his defendant of mr. trump. and suggested the president might resist a subpoena from special counsel robert mueller compelling him to testify under oath. >> we don't have to. he is the president of the united states. we can assert the same privileges other presidents have. >> democrats say the president must cooperate. >> he is going to need to comply with subpoena if they take the case to court they're going to lose. >> so what up, girl. >> stormy daniels who alleges an affair with mr. trump suing to get out of a nondisclosure agreement appeared on tv joking abut the risk her case poess to trump's presidency. >> what do you need for this to all go away? >> a resignation. >> questions remain over payments trump made to his personal lawyer, michael cohen, for alleged hush money paid to daniels during the election. giuliani says it was all legal. >> number one it was not a
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campaign contribution would have been done any way. even if it was kidded a cconsid campaign contribution it was reimbursed. >> daniels lawyer, reacted. >> i think it is obvious this is a cover-up. that they are making it up as they go along. >> president trump's adviser, kellyann conway told face the nation, giuliani's remarks that, trump's. >> the president character iesziesz ized it. >> she explained why the president said no when asked. >> the president told me yesterday that, when he said no on air force one, last month, he is talking about when the payment occurred. >> now, kellyann conway went on to say the white house is anxious about the three detained americans currently health in north korea. but she could not confirm their release was expected any time soon. as president trump's lawyer, rudy giuliani suggested as
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recently as yesterday. elaine. >> errol barnett. thank you. there has been an alarming surge of gun violence in america's third largest city. chicago. more than 50 people have been shot in the past seven days. at least five have died. nicky batiste has the the latest. >> reporter: gun violence returned to the streets of chicago. resulting in a week marked by tragedy and death. the recent warm weather may have played a role in the crime surge. after a frigid first four months of 2018, city had seen a 22% drop in murders. and a 26% decrease in shootings compared with the same peer yupd last year. but this week's gun violence seems to have put an end to safer streets. since saturday morning, bullets killed two men and wounded 16 others including a 12-year-old boy. 28 people were shot since friday. with more than 50 shootings this week. law enforcement officers were not spared.
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a >> on friday an agent for bureau of alcohol poe back co-firearms working undercover was shot in the face in one of the most dangerous parts of city. >> i ordered specialized units into the area to ensure safety of community residents and to conduct a manhunt for any one involved in this crime. >> hundreds of officers are searching for suspects. >> they came in through the door. a lot of agents. >> focus on finding the person involved in the atf agent's attack infuriated local residents. they say, gunfire in their neighborhoods happens daily. but they dent son't see the sam police response. >> just because you are wearing a badge it matters more. how does that, how does that, how do you think that, that makes us feel? >> reporter: chicago police say they want to build relationships with residents in that neighborhood. more than 60,000 dollars offered as reward for any information in
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leading to an arrest in the
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in eastern afghanistan, at least 14 people were killed, and dozens wounded when a bomb exploded inside a mosque that was being use ford voter registration. no group has claimed responsibility, but isis carried out a deadly suicide bombing last month. at a voter registration center in kabul. afghanistan's parliamentary elections are in october. ahead of vladamir putin's inauguration monday, russia staged a military parade in moscow's red square. some of the weapons on displace likely used in an on going battle between russian forces and ukrainian troops backed by
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the u.s. military. holly williams has more on what is being called the forgotten war. it was an ambush in a frozen pine forest. russian backed separatists surprised these ukrainian soldiers. in the chaos they took cover and fought back. but they fired blanks. this was an exercise run by the u.s. military. this is a counterattack exercise, and these ukrainian soldiers will be heading to the real front line very soon. >> the u.s. is supporting its ally, ukraine, in a war against russian backed militants. they have seized swaths of territory in eastern ukraine since 2014 in a conflict that killed 10,000 people by some counts. >> apache 6. soldiers from the new york army national guard directed the training. which is close to real life. lieutenant colonel william
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murphy has been here since november. and told us the ukrainians don't have the equipment they need. >> what they can do with the lit that they have is exceptional. >> the u.s. is ramping up its support for ukraine. more than 200 anti-tank missiles were delivered this month. >> they learn from us. the newest experience of the hybrid war against russia. and we learn from them. that, tactics, and strategy, which make, my army much more efficient. >> ukraine's president, petro porishenko wants more weapons from the u.s. and u.n. peacekeepers. he told us his country is the front line in a new cold war with russia. >> they want to have soviet union back. >> so you think that vladamir putin wants to reconquer ukraine. >> reconquer ukraine. rebuild russian empire. whatever you want. >> ukraine says thousand of russians are fighting in the east. while moscow repeatedly denied
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it is involved. colonel dennis dealey, leading the american trainers is also reminded of the cold war. the ukrainians use old soviet era tanks, the type the russian enemy used when he serve in europe in the 1980s. >> when you come around the corner see a russian tank. t-64 tank its barrel pointed at you makes you hesitate when you are coming around the corner with your vehicle. >> reporter: the cold war ended in 1991. but now ukraine's dangerous conflict, once again, pits russia against the west. holly williams, cbs news, ukraine. thousands of cruise ship passengers returned from the caribbean today with quite a story. and dramatic images of a flash flood emergency aboard their ship. here is meg oliver. >> rushing water flooded a carnival cruise ship thursday reminding some of the eerie scenes from the movie "titanic." this passenger initially wrote on facebook, we are flooding on
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a cruise. we heard the violins and the sill very ware all came crashing down. >> a later post shows crew members jumped into the action, filling buckets as the the water line breaks and deluge of water pouring out of the pipes. the carnival "dream" depart nude or leans sunday on seven day cruise through the western caribbean. the cruise line says walter flooded 50 staterooms, despite drat m the dramatic video carnival said the water main break had no effect on the save operation of the ship. the safety and security of our guests and crew is our top priority. within six hours, the crew managed to replace most of the carpeting and the damaged areas. so passengers could return to their rooms. others slept on yoga mats in the spa. >> our cruise director and captain told us about it. when we came out of believes, when the ship turned it put pressure on the pipe. one of the pipes burst. >> nearly 3,500 passengers returned to port sunday morning.
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>> i have been in the navy 19 years. not worried going on a ship out to sea. that's easy day. >> passengers received a full refund and 50% off any future cruise. they were also offered the option to fly home the day after the water conditions developed. elaine. >> meg oliver. thank you. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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its kind of a big dill.it sr toughest stains. seventh generation. powered by plants a growing number of cities are introducing bike and scooter sharing programs. they help to reduce pollution, traffic and noise. but so-called dockless systems where riders use a smart phone app to find and unlock a bike have create aid new problem. bike litter. kris van cleave has mr. on thors
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you. can see why the scooters and dockless bikes have the nickname litter bikes. people can and are leaving them just about anywhere. in the middle of a busy walk way on the national mall. up a tree in seattle. on the shoulder of a highway in virginia. or, in the water, this man, was arrested after throwing one on to the tracks in front of a dcmetro train. >> what's the biggest challenge to operating in a city. >> parking. >> line bike which operates in 50 cities says riders tend to learn proper etiquette quickly and technology is changing how people get around. >> it's making movement for short distances more convenient and alug peoplowing people not on a car. >> riders find them with an app and can ride for $1. the scooter can hit speeds of $15. riders are encouraged to wear health melts. use bike lanes. >> i like the dockless ones you can drop off wherever. >> most established bike share
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programs typically use docking stations. they can cost cities millions to install and maintain. the dockless bikes are privately owned. require no taxpayer dollars and can be left anywhere. >> just hate when they're scattered all over the sidewalks. >> in san francisco, that's become a problem. while the city rolls out a permitting plan. cease and see cyst letters were sent to three companies to submit plans to satisfy state and local requirements. the companies say they will work with the city. after impounding at least 55 of the scooters. austin, texas. passed an ordinance fining companies up to $200 per bike or scooter. with ride thaerz prs they're po. they're offering dockless bikes or the skooecooters. city says its test period, sparked tremendous feedback. most positive. >> line bike tells us it has technology to i didn't tie people who park like jerks. if fines were to become a thing. they could track down those
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responsible. companies are pledging not to flood cities with devices but grow as demand grows. and promising to pick the devices up every night in some cases sharing revenue with cities to help build infrastructure like bike lanes. kris van cleave, cbs news, washington. still ahead, a pioneering assistant coach. aims to make nba history. melatonin is the body's own sleep ingredient. only remfresh uses ion-powered melatonin to deliver up to 7 hours of sleep support. number one sleep doctor recommended remfresh-your nightly sleep companion. available in the natural sleep section at walmart.
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saturday night is prom night for students in parkland, florida. nearly three months after 17 students and staff members were killed in a shooting massacre. more than 800 students attended the prom in fort lauderdale. there were special trib ulutes the four seniors who were killed. becky hammond, asissant coach for the san antonio spurs aiming to make nba league history as the first female head coach. reportedly interviewing for the head coaching job of milwaukee bucks. hammond current leap the first full time female assistant in
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the league. se was a six-time, wnba all-star and played college basketball at colorado state. kensington palace released the first official photos of prince louis. they were taken by his mother. duchess of cambridge, kate middleton. here louis is wearing a hand-me-down onesy from sister charlotte. the other photo shows 3-year-old charlotte planting a kiss on the sleeping prince. she is wearing a hand-me-down sweater from her 4-year-old brother, prince george. up next, a series of stunning portraits designed to inspire confidence and creativity in young african-americans.
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why end through the lens of a husband and wife team of photographers from atlanta. their company creative soul shot a stunning series of portraits aimed at empowering young african-americans to embrace their natural beauty and let their imaginations run wild. here is mireya villarreal. >> reporter: 11-year-old rain green is prepping for the first photo shoot. >> does this hurt at all when you are getting your hair braided. you can be honest. you can't hear you, promise. >> a little bit. >> it is a painstaking process she is willing to face head-on, for a chance to work with the team behind these afro art
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pictures. >> when you saw that what did you think? >> i thought it was pretty awesome. and that -- it's my first time seeing girls hair like that. >> go ahead. sit right here for me. >> the couple, the creative souls that started the afro art series in 2016. it is a collection of photos meant to celebrate the versatility of black hair. >> you look jewelry? >> yes. me too. >> what are you hoping this says to other young black women? >> i am hoping it send a message that, you know they can be beautiful with their own natural curls, with, with, you know their skin, the culture. >> is that your best smile? >> at the root of the project is her experiences being bullied as a child and her determination to prove that being different isn't bad. >> sometimes because of their hair and because of their look that they get bullied for that? >> they do. >> did they share that with you? >> yes, we had a model here. that was her story.
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she was booing bueing bullied. >> support is pouring in for the breakout venture the after the first big exhibit near atlanta. more art galleries plan to display they work. talks to create a book full of photos and their pictures have been shared around the world inspiring young girls like this one in england. >> when i saw this i got inspired. i wanted everyone to look at this. and to be able to encourage them to let their inner personality shine. >> every time one of these photos is shared on social media it gets thousands of likes and comments. that include word like, stunning. amazing. and phenomenal. for the bettencourt's, proof that bold beauty goes far beyond the eye of the beholder. >> perfect. >> mireya villarreal, cbs news, los angeles. beautiful. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others. check back with us later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. the volcano emergency on hawaii's big island, is far from over. the kilauea volcano erupting since wednesday. at least nine homes have been destroyed. more cracks opened in the ground this weekend, and there are now at least 9 active fissures releasing lava. the island has also had more than 200 earthquakes in the past 24 hours. that follows friday's magnitude 6.9 earthquake, the most powerful quake to hit hawaii in more than 40 years. carter evan is there.
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carter evan is there. >> the volcanic trail cuts right through the community sitting atop the eastern slope of kilauea, spewing lava and ash. large cracks or fissures spontaneously erupted in a line through the neighborhood, setting several homes on fire. we watched as smoke engulfed this house. >> it is like a roaring, like a, goliath, like, like, a roaring jet engine. >> sam knox lives 100 yard away from one of the eruptions. did they ask ask you to evacuate? >> told me mandatory evacuation. by law, i don't have to leave. >> reporter: why did you choose to stay? >> because this is where i live, right here. i have faith, faith in, in the gods, that my house is going to be okay. >> two more cracks broke open. bringing the total to nine. with fountains of lava exploding into the night sky just feet from homes on residential streets. >> just a few hours ago this street was wide open and now you
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can see it is covered in six feet of lava. it cools pretty quickly. almost walk on it now. if you look inside you can see where it is glowing red. >> the lava spread quickly through lava tubes, scientists describe as long tunnels underground. it erupts almost as if a hose has been sliced wise. >> the prognosis is for this to continue. we so no slowdown in activity. seismic and data from the region, in date magma accumulating below the general area. >> that means new eruptive fissures could open, unleashing lava and toxic gasses into the community. these eruptions have made streets impassible all over this community. see where it blocked the road here. this isn't the only one. one of the reasons they have shut this area down. the concern is, that people might get trapped inside. and first responders won't be able to reach them. elaine. carter, thank you.
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>> president trump's lawyer, former new york city mayor, rudy giuliani set the stage today for a possible subpoena showdown with special counsel robert mueller in the russia investigation. errol barnett has more from the white house. >> my issue with getting up to speed on the facts here. halfway there. >> president trump's lawyer, rudy giuliani further explained inconsistencies in his defendant -- defense of mr. trump. and suggested the president might resist a subpoena from special counsel robert mueller compelling him to testify under oath. >> we don't have to. he is the president of the united states. we can assert the same privileges other presidents have. >> democrats say the president must cooperate. >> he is going to need to comply with subpoena if they take the case to court they're going to lose. >> so what up, girl. >> stormy daniels who alleges an affair with mr. trump suing to get out of a nondisclosure agreement appeared on tv joking
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about the risk her case poses to trump's presidency. >> what do you need for this to all go away? >> a resignation. >> questions remain over payments trump made to his personal lawyer, michael cohen, for alleged hush money paid to daniels during the election. giuliani says it was all legal. >> number one it was not a campaign contribution would have been done any way. even if it was considered a campaign contribution it was reimbursed. >> daniels lawyer, reacted. >> i think it is obvious this is a cover-up. that they are making it up as they go along. >> president trump's adviser, kellyann conway told face the nation, giuliani's remarks that trump's repayments were campaign expenditures is wrong. >> the president himself characterized it as not a campaign expenditure. >> she explained why the president said no when asked. if he knew about cohen's payments to daniels. >> the president told me yesterday that, when he said no on air force one, last month, he is talking about when the payment occurred. >> now, kellyann conway went on to say the white house is
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anxious about the three detained americans currently health in north korea. but she could not confirm their release was expected any time soon. as president trump's lawyer, rudy giuliani suggested as recently as yesterday. elaine. >> errol barnett. thank you. >> margaret brennan discussed the white house's shifting explanations of the stormy daniels saga with daniels lawyer. >> no question it has the gotten considerably stronger stronger this morning. the more they talk the better our case gets. here's why. they can't keep their stories straight. can't keep their lies straight. they keep providing further explanations upon explanations because they don't want to tell the american people the truth about what happened here. i mean, you just heard kellyann conway state that basically no doesn't mean no. i've mean they're now redefining what the word no means on "air force one" trying to reshape the answer to that question. and margaret, i have off to tell you, i would urge people to go back, take a look at the statement michael cohen issued
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in late february, early march, where he denied basically that mr. trump had reimbursed the payment. and he claimed he had done it all on his own. i mean we now know that was an absolute lie. and at the time, he was representing the president. it's pretty clear to people, what is going on here. and it is a cover-up. >> there has been an alarm rg surge of gun violence in america's third largest city. chicago. more than 50 people have been shot in the past seven days. at least five have died. nicky batiste has the the latest. >> reporter: gun violence returned to the streets of chicago. resulting in a week marked by tragedy and death. the recent warm weather may have played a role in the crime surge. after a frigid first four months of 2018, city had seen a 22% drop in murders. and a 26% decrease in shootings compared with the same peer yupd last year. but this week's gun violence seems to have put an end to safer streets.
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since saturday morning, bullets killed two men and wounded 16 others including a 12-year-old boy. 28 people were shot since friday. with more than 50 shootings this week. law enforcement officers were not spared. >> on friday an agent for bureau of alcohol, tobacco, and firearms was working undercover was shot in the face in one of the most dangerous parts of city. >> i ordered specialized units into the area to ensure safety of community residents and to conduct a manhunt for any one involved in this crime. >> hundreds of officers are searching for suspects. >> they came in through the door. a lot of agents. >> focus on finding the person involved in the atf agent's attack infuriated local residents. they say, gunfire in their neighborhoods happens daily. but they don't see the same police response. >> just because you are wearing a badge it matters more. how does that, how does that, how do you think that, that makes us feel? >> reporter: chicago police say they want to build relationships
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one of the finest collections of art ever assembled heads to the auction block tomorrow. the personal collection of david and peggy rock femefeller expec to fetch more than $1 billion when the gavel comes down at christy's new york. not only paintings and sculpture up for auction. anthony mason. >> david and peggy rockefeller's four homes were filled with master pieces. we never bought a painting with a view towards forming a collection, david rockefeller once wrote. but simply because in the end, we couldn't resist it. >> welcome to the annual meeting of chase manhattan corporation. >> the long-time chief of chase
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manhattan bank. he was the grandson of america's first build yillionaire. john d. rockefeller who made his fortune in standard oil. david's father built rockefeller center where in a 2002 interview for sunday morning he gave me a tour of the family offices. >> this is a painting that actually belonged to gertrude stein. >> here he surrounded himself with masters of modern art. is collecting for you a compulsion? >> it is a pleasure. >> a pleasure he could indulge in as a member of what many considered america's most powerful family. >> was the name ever a burden for you? >> i don't feel so. i was certainly conscious of it. there were moments i may have felt awkward or embarrassed. but even early on it us obvious there were advantages as well as the disadvantages. >> the name and the fortune behind it helped david and his
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wife peggy, accumulate one of the 20th century's great art collections. >> how significant collection is this? >> the most important collection of paintings and sculpture ever been sold. >> rockefellers were crazy about ceramics. >> mark porter is chairman of christy's americas which will hold the auction over three days next week. the sale includes, this monet, estimate, $50 million. >> matisse's painting. >> this matisse painted in 1924 is the greatest matisse to come to market in 50 years. >> estimate $70 million. >> and arguably the crown jewel of the collection. >> she looks pretty good. >> the 1905 painting, young girl with a flower basket. from picasso's rose period. >> the estimate on this picture is what? >> we are giving guidance of about $100 million. >> $100 million. >> the picasso which hung in the
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family's new york library had belonged to american writer gertrude stein. one of 47 works bought in 1968, by a syndicate that included david rockefeller, his brother, new york governor nelson rockefeller, and cbs founder, william paley. they chose lots out of a felt hat to get first pick. >> as luck would have it. david rockefeller got choice number one. >> the building you are in now, the time life building. >> yes. >> the auction which will be held in rockefeller center, was arranged by david rockefeller junior, after his father died last year at 101. >> what was it like growing up with all of that around you? >> it limited the amount of ball play in the house, that was the negative part. but, it did train us to appreciate beautiful things. >> the rockefeller kids were also given an early lesson in philanthropy.
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>> usually allowance was given on sunday morning and church was next. >> so you're parting with at lou ans. >> you lost 10% in the first hour. all of the proceed from this go to charity. >> all. >> by some estimates it could bring $1 billion to the beneficiaries. which include, harvard, and rockefeller universities. the museum of modern art. and the council on foreign relations. there are 1600 lots in the sale. >> everything in the family houses. >> everything from, three or four houses. >> including furniture, prized porcelain. >> this is napoleon's ice cream bowl. >> dispenser. >> ice cream bowl. ice underneath. ice team on top. then go to town. >> the family jewelry. >> this may be my favorite thing in the auction. >> along with many other people i think. >> this is a rockefeller center money clip. >> what better to hold a stack of bills? >> it also includes some of the
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collection of rockefeller carriages. >> so how far back in family history would some go? >> well, certainly 100 years. because my grandfather was driving carriages both before and after cars were invented. >> will you be at the aukttion? >> yes, i will. >> rooting it on in effect? >> darn right. we are going to see the, disper sal in effect of one of the great art collections of all time. is that in any sense difficult for you how to watch? >> maybe it will be that night. but i am -- i am thinking, the better it goes, the happier i will be. i think yeah, that matisse if it getz into hands where i think i will never see it again that will be hard for me. other than that, this is a game and i am on the same side as christy's on this one, because we are both trying to create a huge success for the benefit of
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stop fearing your alarm clock... with new*! zzzquil pure zzzs. a drug-free blend of botanicals with melatonin ...that supports your natural sleep cycle... ...so you can seize the morning. new! zzzquil pure zzzs. history will be made in louisiana when the mayor of new orleans is sworn in. the first woman and first african-american woman ever elected to the office. cantrall will replace mitch andrew who after a lifetime claims he is finished with politics. jamie wax has his story.
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>> a lifelong new orleans resident, and built a pre file many political observers speculated could lead to a presidential run. >> are you out of politics after may 7? >> i hope to be the i do hope to be. people say you are a rising star. i say, yeah, it took me 30 years to become an overnight sensation. >> reporter: it may have taken mitch landreau to build a name across the country but always a household name in new orleans. >> all right, you ready to get started. >> his father led city for eight years in the 1970s. >> i wanted to be a professional actor my first dream and love. >> landreau, hedged his bets. double majoring in theater and political science at catholic university of america. >> people understand what theater school, not adding characters. it is stripping down so you can be authentic. go look at shakespeare, look at the script written for "hamilton" there are central truths. all the stills wound up helping
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me when i after law school decided to go into politics. >> this position i am running for is a key position. >> in between unsuccessful runs for mayor, landreau would serve as louisiana's lieutenant-governor. elect the city mayor in 2010. >> these monuments celebrate a fictionalized confederacy. >> seven years later the speech on removal of the four confederate monuments caught the country and himself by surprise. >> of the title of the speech actually its truth. it was the truth as i saw it. not meant to, a speech to a national audience. but it evidently spoke to something that touched people across the country. >> if we take down the statues and don't change to become open inclusive society then all of this would have been in vain. >> the speech beef came impetus for the book in the shadow of statues a white southerner confronts history released in march. landreau writes about inability to get contractors or equipment
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in state after approval from the legislative, judicial and executive branches of government. >> even after that, these individuals, engaged in what would i would call domestic terrorism, threatening the lives of people that worked for the government, contracted with the government and said if you take that down we will ruin your life. or we will hurt you. >> what about the krit sicritic empty column in the middle of lee circle. >> okay. >> big pedestal at city park. >> not a bad thing for them to sit there so people can look at them. and contemplate what was there and what could have been. that's part of the curation process as well. >> landreau's father warned about the risks. it was a rogue moon landreau, civil rights advocate in the city helped pave. >> great moment in the book you talk about your father. tells you to go into every corner bar. >> he had gone to the corner bars.
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many at the time wher whiere wh bars. my father was credited working with african am can community. the white community never forgave him. bothered me about it. aggravated me. i saddled up to a guy, hey, i'm mitch landreau, i know who you are, i hate your father. i will never vote for you. >> go to any other bars? >> no. never again. i remember lying to him. he said how did you do. i said, they love you. not a problem. >> reporter: all of the family's political experience has then't shielded him frommer use that traditionally plagued new orleans. murder and incarceration rates for young african-american men have remained highest in the country under his tenure. >> you think the removal of the stachize direct corollary to that issue? >> the message that the statues are sending it a message that's been sent since, slavery has been here. you know the monuments in a real way are death. they're not things that are enabling people to do better. they're actually destroying people's souls.
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>> just last year, he seemed caught off-guard when a number of the city emergency drainage pumps stopped working after a storm causing flooding and forcing resignation of top city officials. >> you look back, do you have different perspective about the situation? >> when i took the city over. the city was broken. infrastructure related to pumping is older than calvin coolidge. we spent every waking moment in eight years trying to fix the system. can't fix it overnight. the city has been wet more times than you can count. it is going to get welt again. you can't fix what you don't have the money for. why a lot of mayors are frustrated infrastructure bill is stuck in congress. it takes billions and billions and billions of dollars to do this. you see it in flint michigan you. seep it all over the place. you see it in new york with the subway. mayors have been really raising their voices. >> he boasts about new business investment in new orleans and construction of a $1 billion airline terminal. >> whoo.
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>> along with record 11 million visitors last year. more than 50,000 new residents. >> we created 20,000 jobs. helping build the rocket going to mars. the city of new orleans, people thing of it as the mardi gras and fun. we have knowledge based econ me. as washington gets stuck. cities are getting smarter, faster, entrepreneurial. try to fix things and get them done. >> reporter: last month, he helped celebrate 300th ears le city he loves. >> you know there is an adage you have to walk by faith not by sight. that doesn't mean by ignorance. get an intuition over time about what the right pathway is. like everybody we make lots of mistakes. if you don't make a mistake, you are not trying. i think we got it pretty right most of the time.
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4-year-old superman in alabama can teach us a lesson about caring for others. steve hartman found his story on the road. >> he is faster than a speeding stroller. more adorable than a wet kitten. and able to get a stranger's attention with a single courtesy. >> excuse me. >> this is america's latest super hero. >> don't forget to show love. >> the only super hero with the power to feed the homeless. >> now why dude you do that? >> you know what, mr. steve, just the right thing to do. >> is it? >> yes. >> you want honey? >> by day, austin is a 4-year-old from birmingham, alabama. once a week he turns into alter ego the a superhero set on
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feeding as many homeless people as possible. >> thank you. >> what is your super hero name? >> president austin. >> president austin. >> that's his need of what the president is supposed to do. i was like, buddy, you have no idea. but hey i'm going along with it. >> tj says this all began when they were watching a tv show about pandas. it showed a mama panda abandoning a baby. tj told his son the cub was now less. >> he says what's homeless? hom? >> when i was a 4-year-old i didn't care about helping peemg. >> i did. >> i see. >> once austin learned some people are homeless, and some are even hungry he launched this caped crusade. told his mom and dad he wanted all his allowance and money they would spend on toys. >> here you go. >> to go toward chicken sandwiches instead. >> thank you, baby.
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>> you're welcome. don't forget to show love. >> after he gives out each sandwich. he gives each person that same bit of advice. >> don't forget to show love. >> don't forget to show love he tells them. and most do. >> why, thank you. >> it warms my heart to see him. >> it will warm any one's heart. >> yeah, he really did. >> raymont boss says this kid gives him hope. >> that's where it starts. >> don't forget to show love. >> everyone who meets austin, leaves with hope. which is why, with any luck, some day president austin, won't be a super hero anymore. >> feeding the homeless is the high light of my life. >> he will just be, a president. >> all right, come on, austin. steve hartman on the road. in birmingham, alabama. beautiful. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning.
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from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. captioning funded by cbs it's monday, may 7, 2018. >> it was roaring scarlet knights high. it was thundering, rocks flying out of the ground. >> no end in sight. lava flow intensifies destroying dozens of homes and more fissures are opening up. rudy giuliani says president trump could defy the potentialal

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