Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 11, 2018 3:00am-4:00am PDT

3:00 am
in your area for the free event that's going to show you how to make money in real estate by flipping properties in a snap. >> if you want to make money from the house-flipping craze... >> ...but don't want to invest a lot of time or money... >> ...or do any of the renovation work... >> guys, then you really need to start snap-flipping. >> so, are you ready? [ cheers and applause ] >> announcer: now may be one of the best times in history to make money in real estate. in fact, the average profit from fixing and flipping a house is currently more than $58,000. and now, a new craze called snap-flipping is sweeping the nation. here's how it works. most people know that in traditional house flipping, an investor purchases a home, improves it, and flips it for a profit. but what most people don't know is that many investors get their properties from snap-flippers. snap-flipping is a unique real estate strategy being done in all 50 states that allows you to get paid for simply helping investors find properties to flip. as a snap-flipper, you never have to buy a property, put any
3:01 am
of your own money at risk, or do any rehab work. you simply help investors locate properties to flip, hand them off, and get paid. >> with this event, we learned to explore opportunities that we'd never thought about before. >> now that i've been to the event, i know that i can do this. i can get my first deal and then just go from there. my plan is, within a year, i'm done. i'm retired and i'm on my own. >> in your mind and in your heart, you know that you're going to do the deals and you're gonna make the money. >> announcer: snap-flipping requires no special licenses and can be done with no cash, no credit, and no previous real estate experience. you can even do it part-time in your spare time. and, right now, the demand for snap-flippers in your area is so strong, that two of hgtv's hottest stars, drew levin and danny perkins, are hosting free lunch and dinner events right here in the local area to show you exactly how to do it and help you get started. >> this event is the most exciting event i've ever been
3:02 am
to. >> we're definitely able to jump in and make an income. >> anybody can do this. we're both retired. anybody can do this. >> announcer: at the event, you'll discover how to become a snap-flipper, how to immediately connect with investors in your area, ready to pay you right now, how to quickly locate the type of properties they need, and how to receive all your snap-flipping checks in a snap! >> now that you've learned exactly how this works, how many of you are confident that you could do a deal? [ cheers and applause ] >> wow! that's amazing! whoo! >> it's definitely one of those things that sounds too good to be true, but it is true. >> we're gonna make this happen faster than we thought. >> can't wait for our first deal. >> this event is amazing! >> so exciting! >> [ laughs ] >> announcer: call or go online now to receive two free tickets for you and a guest to attend one of drew and danny's life-changing lunch or dinner events, coming to the local area. see the event dates that are listed on your screen. there are several convenient
3:03 am
locations to choose from, but seating is generally limited to the first 100 people. so don't wait! call for your free tickets right now. and compliments of the event sponsors, you'll also receive a free copy of drew and danny's brand-new book "flipping in a snap," plus a free edition of drew and danny's vip quick-start package pre-loaded onto a usb flash drive, and a free mp3 player. a $250 value, yours free. and listen to this -- the first 50 people will even qualify for a free laptop computer. there's no strings attached, no catches, and there will be no high-pressure sales pitch at the event. so what are you waiting for? pick up the phone or go online to claim your free tickets and free gifts right now. >> the properties are out there just waiting for you. >> the investors are out there waiting for you. >> and the money is waiting for you, too. >> so the only question is -- are you ready to start snap-flipping? [ cheers and applause ]
3:04 am
>> this show is almost over, and it's time to take action. >> you've heard from real people who have attended our events, have had their lives changed all because they learned how to snap flip. >> think about it. if you keep plugging through your life doing the same old thing every day, you're gonna keep getting the same old result. >> to enjoy more financial freedom, you have to try something new, and snap-flipping could be the perfect answer. you can do it part-time in your spare time. >> just a few years ago, danny and i were dead broke. >> getting involved in real estate was the smartest thing we've ever done. it totally turned our financial lives around. >> snap-flipping is the perfect way for you to get your start in real estate. >> and we and our team are ready to show you the ins and outs of snap-flipping, so you can put yourself on the road to financial success. >> announcer: there's only
3:05 am
seconds left before this tv program is over. so call or go online to claim your two free tickets and free gifts right now. >> the preceding was a sponsored presentation for drew and danny's "snap-flipping your way to real estate success" free lunch and dinner events. you could save energy
3:06 am
by living off the grid. completely. you could generate your own energy, at home. maybe you could save energy by weaving your own shoes... out of flax. or... just set the washing machine to cold. do your thing, with energy upgrade california. >> it would be with absolute
3:07 am
firmness that we move forward with retaliatory measures on july 1. >> what's not in good faith when you leave there, you fly out of there, and the host, canadian prime minister starts taking whacks at you. pot shots at you. on the eve of this korean summit. >> aboard air force one, president trump accused trudeau of making false statements while calling him very dishonest and weak. >> it is a remarkable public rebuke of a long time u.s. ally. punctuating a rocky summit which found president trump facing off with traditionally close counter parts. >> i would rather see russia in the g-8 as opposed to the g-7. >> a divide underscored by the president's suggestion russia be readmitted to the group despite annexation of crimea. >> i think it would be an asset. >> republican senator lindsay graham, bristled at that suggestion. >> expanding the g-7 to the g-8 would be a mistake. there is no way i would legitimize him. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
3:08 am
3:09 am
♪ south l.a. is very medically underserved. when the old hospital closed people in the community lived with untreated health problems for years. so, with the county's help we built a new hospital from the ground up and having citi as an early investor worked as a signal to others to invest. with citi's help we built a wonderful maternity ward and we were able to purchase an mri machine. we've made it possible for the people who live here to lead healthier lives and that's invaluable. ♪
3:10 am
the pentagon has released the name of the special operations soldier killed in an attack in somalia. staff sergeant alexander conrad of chandler arizona was 26 years old. his unit was attacked friday by al-shabab militants. four u.s. military members were wounded. the u.s. military has 500 troops in somalia, working with local fors in the fight against the terror group. >> massive explosion rocked a neighborhood in cleveland today. at least one person was killed. one home was destroyed. neighboring homes caught fire and had windows blown out.
3:11 am
the cause of the blast is under investigation. people in the area said, they smelled gas. and immigration battle is brewing in washington state. over a federal immigration policy, being used to deter illegal border crossings. immigration officials confirm more than 650 might grant children have been separated from their parents after entering the u.s. here is mireya villarreal. >> the people united will never be divided. >> at a rally outside a federal detention center. fighting to stop an immigration policy he says unfairly removes children from their parents who cross the border illegally. some, who are seeking asylum. >> ripping sons from their mothers. and young women from their fathers. >> mint to act as deterrent, for people to come into the country
3:12 am
illegally. department of homeland security secretary, kirsten neilson. >> they're separated for breaking the law. coming across the border, breaking the loss law. if you break the loss you go to jail and separated from your family. >> how many of your parents got deported? >> at this elementary school, the twins, may look like every other stuf dendent. they struggled to fit in. >> they told us we would be able to go back last year. because the original plan was for us to stay here, three months and then go back. the twins are u.s. citizens. two out of an estimated 54,000 american children, living in mexico. their situation has become a byproduct of the immigration debate. families being deported, or forced to leave because they're afraid of being 10-year-old, and his mom, are both american. but his dad is a mexican citizen. >> why put yourself through all of this? >> well, just to be with his dad
3:13 am
and have our family together. >> a difficult choice, but one families are willing to make it it means staying together. mireya villarreal, cbs news, tijuana, mexico. federal health officials are tracking a new salmonella outbreak blamed on precut melon. the recalled melon from a food facility in indianapolis has been distributed to major retailers in eight states in the midwest and the south. at least 60 people have been sickened. more than 30 have gone off to the hospital. no one has died. the annual puerto rican day parade drew a huge crowd as usual along new york's fifth avenue today. but this year, there were special tributes and remembrances for the victims of hurrica hurrica hurricane marimaria. including those struggling to recover nine months after the storm. cbs news correspondent, david begnaud, provided coverage of the crisis was among the honorees leading the parade. >> in paris, rafael nadal
3:14 am
displayed a masterpiece in clay winning his 11th french open title. nadal defeated the austrian. the only player who has beaten nadal on clay in recent years. nadal currently the top man in tennis, has won 17 grand slam singles titles, three short of roger federer. now, ranked at number two. coming up, a new warning about sweepstakes scams. where those who think they have won have actually lost. won have actually lost. and the i was wondering if an electric toothbrush really cleans better than a manual. and my hygienist says it does but they're not all the same. who knew? i had no idea. so she said, look for one that's shaped like a dental tool with a round brush head. go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head surrounds each tooth to gently remove more plaque, and oral-b is the first electric toothbrush brand accepted by the american dental association for its effectiveness and safety. my mouth feels so clean. i'll only use an oral-b. oral-b.
3:15 am
brush like a pro. still nervous [about buying a house? a little. thought i could de-stress with some zen gardening. at least we don't have to worry about homeowners insurance. just call geico. geico helps with homeowners insurance? good to know. been doing it for years. that's really good to know. i should clean this up. i'll get the dustpan. behind the golf clubs. get to know geico. and see how easy homeowners and renters insurance can be.
3:16 am
make the most of a few minutes with ky natural feeling with aloe vera
3:17 am
the better business bureau is out with a warning abut sweepstakes, lottery, prize schemes. experts say scammers are using ever changing method to steal your money. seniors most frequent targets. here is anna werner. >> congratulations, mr. walker, you have won the jamaica sweepstakes. >> allen walker moved off to st. louis in 2015 when the call came in on his cell phone telling him he had won $94,000. it would be delivered soon. and all he had to do was send them a fee for taxes. >> they kept on telling me, oreoh, it will be there soon. >> walker sent them two checks totaling $5,500. all his savings. they didn't show up with the prize. then he got repeated calls to
3:18 am
send money to different people. and that's when he realized it was a scam. >> i really feel kind of empty inside and ridiculous that i got, got, you know, beat like that. >> steve baker is the lead investigator for the better business bureau. >> most of the people that are cold calling you are from, either, jamaica or costa rica. >> baker says nearly 3,000 people, reported sweet stakes and lottery scams to the scam tracker in 2017. that same year, the ftc and fbi come of bind received more than $145,000 complaints about the scams. losses topped over $100 million. the bbb study says scammers contract their victims to get their personal information everywhere they can. through cold calling, text messages, internet pop-ups, the mail and social media like face book. >> the fact that they really migrated to social media says it is a huge new audienceinoduc ho >> face book told us the scams
3:19 am
strie late o violate our policies. we have a team and systems to detect and block the scams. baker encourages relatives and friends of older consumers to help them avoid becoming fraud vick imti victims. >> if somebody wants money for taxes, third party or any other reason. they're crooks do not send money. >> anna werner, cbs news, new york. >> still ahead. researchers say it could be a melatonin is the body's own sleep ingredient. only remfresh uses ion-powered melatonin to deliver up to 7 hours of sleep support. number one sleep doctor recommended remfresh - your nightly sleep companion. available in the natural sleep section at walmart.
3:20 am
make the most of a few minutes with ky natural feeling with aloe vera
3:21 am
about 116 americans die every day from opioid abuse. in response to the crisis, scientists across the country and around the world, are trying to develop nonaddictive painkillers. as kenneth craig reports, researchers in massachusetts, say they're making progress. >> not many people know they're addicts until they start using. >> he felt a gratification from painkillers with his very first pill. prescribed by a doctor for sports injury.
3:22 am
it was the beginning of an opioid addiction that consumed his 20s and nearly cost him his life. >> ended up wrapping my work truck around the telephone pole on the way from work. that wasn't enough. >> mark is in treatment at saint christopher's inn run by ministry of the franciscan fryares of atonement. staggering number of americans swept up in the opioid epidemic. now the three harvard trained scientists believe they developed a breakthrough. nonnarcotic painkiller, 50 times more powerful than morphine but nonaddictive. >> we were told the same thing about painkillers on the market that they were nonaddictive, no risk for dependency. look where we are now. >> the onus is on all of us to make sure the scientific rigor is maintained. >> the team at blue therapeutics believe the answer lies in blue 181. it works by clinging to a different receptor in the central nervous system than
3:23 am
opioids, eliminating the narcotic high abuse and dependence risks. >> it targets receptors in the spinal cord. where, you're able to reduce the perception of pain. without targeting areas of the brain which lead to, you know, the addiction side effects. >> dr. robert griffin specializes in pain management. >> it takes a long time to really know all of the long term effect and really, to prove that something has no risk of addiction over time. >> do you see this -- your concept as, part of the solution to combatting the epidemic? absolutely. a lot of us are in pain. if we don't give painkillers we'll never solve the problem. >> blue therapeutics says it could be five years before the drugmakers it through clinical trials to see if they confirm its claims. kenneth craig, cbs news, cambridge, massachusetts. up next, how a horse named
3:24 am
justify made history.
3:25 am
when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
3:26 am
3:27 am
in the homestretch of tonight's broadcast racing towards the finish line with a story of a champion athlete who reached the pinnacle of his sport this weekend. meg oliver tells us how justify earned his place in horse racing stable of legends. he is just perfect and immortal. >> electrifying finish at the belmont stakes. >> justify has done it. >> justify defied the odds becoming only the 13th horse to capture the triple crown. a remarkable achievement considering he only started racing in february. barreled around the track to the roar of 90,000 in the crowd.
3:28 am
since 1932, 23 horses have won the first two legs of the triple crown, the kentucky derby, and the preakness. but, fell short at the bell belmont. in 1973, racing legend. secretariat captured the crown and set a record at the belmont leaving competitors in the dust. seattle slew and affirmed follows with sweeps in 1977, and 1978. but then there was a 37 year drought. broken by american pharaoh in 2015. racing fans didn't have to wait long. for a repeat performance. three years later, bob baffort brought justify off to the track. a privilege to have a horse. we're the coach. athletes and jockeys get it done. >> justify turned heads at kentucky derby charging through the slop for the win. victory followed at the preakness. finally, a fairy tale ending at the belmont for jockey mike
3:29 am
smith. at 52, he is the oldest jockey to win the triple crown. >> just puts an old man out there, sit still. stays out of the way. let a good horse be a good horse. before the crown, justify's breeding rights were negotiated for $60 million. justified price tag now expected to skyrocket for an undefeated champion. >> that's the "overnight news" for monday. for some the news continues.
3:30 am
welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. final preparations are under way in singapore for one of the most important summits in recent world history. president trump is hours away from meeting north korean leader kim jong-un, to try to diffuse a long running standoff over his pursuit of nuclear weapons. a fill year of di policemen see could lead at strofic war. not long ago, the two were exch destruction.
3:31 am
"cbs evening news" anchor jeff glor in singapore. >> president trump told reporters on the tarmac he was feeling very good about the upcoming meeting. the two men, leaders of countries with nearly 70 years of animosity and diplomatic tension between them are expected to meet face to face on tuesday morning. >> a little more than 36 hours before the scheduled meeting, president trump was greeted at singapore's air base by dignitaries in singapore. hours earlier an air china 747, carrying kim jong-un, landed at singapore's commercial airport. it is only the fourth time out of north korea for kim since he took power. his farthest trip since 2011. his motorcade, flanked by a jogging security team, snaked through the streets. delivering kim to singapore's prime minister who said the young leader's upcoming meeting with president trump affects the security of the region and the world. the trump administration's goal, get pyongyang to shuttle down its nuclear program which it says is capable of striking the united states, and decimating the korean peninsula. >> we have to get
3:32 am
denuclearization. >> saturday, speaking from the g-7, president trump said he will use his instincts when he becomes the first sitting president to meet a north korean leader. >> thisis a leader who really is an unknown personality, people don't know much about him. i think that -- that he is going to surprise on the upside. we are going in with a very positive attitude. i think we are going to come out fine. but i have said it many times, who knows. who knows. may not. may not work out. it's a good chance it won't work out. there is probably an even better chance that it will take a period of time it will be a process. >> jeff, this meeting could have happened anywhere in the world. why was singapore chosen to play host? well, in part because singapore has the solid relationships with both countries. and with china. by the way. singapore's long been neutral. the foreign minister here said we are here to serve tea and coffee.
3:33 am
not to inject ourselves into negotiations. that said, singapore is not a meek nation. it is an economic powerhouse, with infrastructure and the moxy to pull off a meeting like this one. its prime minister told the press the summit is expected to cost them around $20 million. they have that money. it is the cost they are willing to pay as our contribution to an international endeavor. elaine. "cbs evening news" anchor, jeff glor in singapore. thank you. how did the u.s. and north korea come from what seemed to be the brink of war, just months ago, to a joint appearance on the world stage? ben tracy takes us through the twists and turns on the bumpy road to singapore. > missile launches earned kim jong-un one of president trump's most memorable and divisive nicknames. >> rocketman is on a suicide mission for himself. >> north korea pulled no punches.
3:34 am
calling the president, old, senile, and mentally deranged. the rhetorical fire and fury stopped in january when kim jong-un offered to send north korean athletes to the february olympics in south korea. and pro posed a summit with moon. but first, in march, kim jong-un paid a visit to president ping of china the north's ally and trading partner. this was the north korean dictator's first meeting with a head of state and first trip outside north korea as its leader. then the historic north/south summit one month later where kim jong-un showed off a previously well hidden personality. even inviting president moon to ke ariefit into the north. the 34-year-old suddenly looked
3:35 am
less like an international pariah and more like a savvy politician. offering to dismantle his nuclear program and officially end the korean war. and now the ultimate prize. a sit down with the president of the united states. kim jong-un its getting something very significant simply by doing the meeting. a member of the national security council during the bush and obama administrations. >> are you impressed with what he has accomplished in a short period of time? >> one has the to admit he has played a relatively weak hand very cleverly. >> now it all comes done to the negotiation here in singapore. president trump seems to be hedging his bets a bit saying he may not reach a deal with kim jong-un to give up his nuclear weapons or if he does it could become a process that takes some time. elaine. >> ben tracy, thank you. cbs news will have updates from singapore through out the summit. jeff glor will join cbs this
3:36 am
morning first thing tomorrow and he will anchor the "cbs evening news" from singapore monday. and tuesday. president trump attended another summit miss weekend with g 7 leaders in canada. mr. trump arrived late.left. and on his way to singapore, withdrew from a joint statement with u.s. allies on trade. errol barnett has more on the escalating trump trudeau trade tensions. >> he really kind of stabbed us in the back. >> in explaining why the u.s. rejected the g 7 communique it initially agreed to, president trump's economic adviser, larry kudlow said canadian prime minister justin true doe betrayed the administration >> because canadians, we are polite. we are reasonable. but we also will not be pushed around. >> speaking after president trump left the summit early, true doe true doe said canada will respond to u.s. tariffs. >> it would be with absolute firmness that we move forward with retaliatory measures on
3:37 am
july 1. >> what's not in good faith when you leave there, you fly out of there, and the host, canadian prime minister starts taking whacks at you. pot shots at you. >> aboard air force one, president trump accused trudeau of making false statements while calling him very dishonest and weak. >> it is a remarkable public rebuke of a long time u.s. ally. punctuating a rocky summit which found president trump facing off with traditionally close counter parts. >> i would rather see russia in the g-8 as opposed to the g-7. >> a divide underscored by the president's suggestion russia be readmitted to the group despite annexation of crimea. >> i think it would be an asset. >> republican senator lindsay graham, bristled at that suggestion. >> expanding the g-7 to the g-8 would be a mistake. there is no way i would legitimize him. the weekend ends with president
3:38 am
from temperature with optimism for north korea and russia while openly criticizing an ally. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. 60% of women wear the wrong size pad and can experience leaks. you don't have to with always my fit try the next size up and get up to 20% better coverage day or night. because better coverage means better protection always
3:39 am
3:40 am
the tragic deaths of two celebrities this past week has many people struggling with hard questions about suicide. and huh to prevent it. experts say it is a national public health crisis, that has only been getting worse. here is tony dokoupil. >> she was the woman behind the handbags. her name a byword for elegance. while he was proudly inelegant. new york chef whose tv shows turned food into adventure. but this past week, kate spade and anthony bourdain so different in life, shared something in death. both took their own lives.
3:41 am
spade, at home in manhattan. bourdain in a hotel in france. by themselves, but far from alone. >> can you relate to -- >> yeah, of course. >> kate spade and anthony bourdain. >> anyone who has either died by suicide or attempted suicide i can relate to. >> how come? >> because i know what it is look to be that desperate and to feel like you don't have any other options to feel like -- you know, every, every breath is an effort. >> when she 'twas 19, caitlyn coleman, after years of deepening depression, attempted suicide. this week, she reacted to the news about spade and bourdain with sadness but not shock. unlike many americans, she knew wealth or even fame won't protect a person from despair. >> none of us know these people. everybody has a public persona.
3:42 am
>> so when you have quotes from these people's families and friends saying, i never saw it coming. >> they probably didn't. because they didn't want you to see it coming. >> and so what we are left with are questions, how could two people with so much have nothing to live for. what becomes of their children? and most important, perhaps, what could anyone have done to stop it? >> in these situations like, i can't pretend to know. >> last year, mike shinota of the genre bending band lincoln park. lost his friend, and the band's frontman, chester bennington to suicide. just weeks after celebrating a sixth number one album. ♪ who cares it one more light goes out ♪ ♪ in the sky of a million stars ♪
3:43 am
♪ it flickers, flickers >> i would say like one feeling i had that was really weird was a guilt for feeling sometimes like mad. like mad at him, sometimes a little bit. but like mad about just everything else. >> he says he is left with a tangle of emotions. >> it's just chaos. like, one min you the are happy. one minute sad. one minute angry. so on. >> next week, he has a new album. post-traumatic, made while mourning bennington. ♪ they'll tell you i don't care anymore ♪ ♪ and i hope you'll know that a lie ♪ ♪ maybe it sound crazy, but i do, i do, i do sometimes like, just talk to chester. like, man, i wish you were here, you would really love this. >> high profile suicides always make for busy days at the national suicide prevention life
3:44 am
line. no doubt, you have seen the number. >> the suicide prevention, life line number is. >> 1-800-273-8255. >> we have 12.5 million with suicidal ideation every year. >> thinking about it. >> we answered 2 million calls last year. a lot of calls. a lot more people to reach. >> john draper, is executive director. >> how often do the callers in this room save a life? >> probably right now. >> every day. >> every day. >> and arguably, every minute. >> if you think you are worried about somebody. you think something might be going on. you don't know how bad it is, ask them directly. are you thinking about suicide? we found from research that asking that question doesn't scare people. they feel relief. >> what perhaps should scare people is this. suicide now takes more lives annually than car d twice as many as murder. and it is on the rise.
3:45 am
up 25% since 199. in half the country, the spike is more than 30%. >> of if you were a heart doctor and report from the cdc came out that showed 30% increase in deaths by heart attack. >> ridiculous. >> how do you feel when you get the numbers? >> i live with it every day. >> it is appalling. everybody goes my goodness, what's happening. why is this? apparent why. our country has a dysfunctional and inadequate health care policy and particularly when it comes to mental health care. >> dr. jeffrey lieberman is chair of the psychiatry department at columbia university and new york presbyterian hospital. because suicides have trended upward through good economic times and bad. researchers are still trying to determine the causes. but some factors are constants. >> suicide does not happen spontaneously, abruptly out of the blue. 90% of individuals who commit
3:46 am
suicide have a pre-existing mental disorder, whether it is, a diagnosed and treated or not. and most people who commit suicide have been thinking about a long time. the question is when does it reach a threshold that they're impelled to do this. >> when? >> often it happens impulsively after something happens in their life. >> largest spikes in soup side is among people, 45 to 64, like anthony bourdaine. and women, like kate spade. the suicide rate for white, middle-aged women leapt 80% 1989. >> the gender gap between men and women an suicide is diminishing. because, the gender gap in all areas of our life and in a good way is diminishing. >> but dr. lieberman says there is reason for optimism. >> we're better today at predicting and preventing suicide than we were, 10, 20 years ago. >> absolutely. better today than we were in human history.
3:47 am
death should not be an outcome of mental illness. and, zero suicide is an absolutely achievable goal. >> now is awesome. >> today at 35. caitlyn coleman says she is happy. excited by her life. and clear about what suicide is and is not. >> suicide is easy. >> no. >> suicide is selfish. >> oh, god, no. no. >> suicide is, unstoppable? >> suicide is, unstoppable? >> no. make the most of a few minutes with ky natural feeling with aloe vera
3:48 am
3:49 am
theseare heading back home.y oil thanks to dawn, rescue workers only trust dawn, because it's tough on grease yet gentle. i am home, i am home, i am home
3:50 am
3:51 am
sicientists could be on the break through that could turn the tide. researchers in massachusetts say they created a painkiller that is 50 times more powerful noon morphine but is not addictive. it is called. blue 181. kenneth craig spoke to the team behind it. >> the team at blue therapeutic wanted to make a drug a total replacement for the opioids on the market. something that people could safely stop using without the possible dangerous side effects. >> not many people know they're addicts until they start us addicts until they start using. >> he felt a gratification from painkillers with his very first pill. prescribed by a doctor for sports injury. it was the beginning of an opioid addic thiand nely cost h life. >> ended up wrapping my work truck around the telephone pole on the way from work. that wasn't enough. >> mark is in treatment at saint christopher's inn run b ministry of the franciscan
3:52 am
fryars of atonement. he is part of a staggering number of americans swept up in the opioid epidemic. now the three harvard trained scientists believe they developed a breakthrough. nonnarcotic painkiller, 50 times more powerful than morphine but nonaddictive. >> we were told the same thing about painkillers on the market that they were nonaddictive, no risk for dependency. look where we are now. >> the onus is on all of us to make sure the scientific rigor is maintained. >> the team at blue therapeutics is part of the pharmaceutical race to find opioid alternatives. they believe the answer lies in the molecule, blue 181. it works by clinging to a different receptor in the central nervous system than opioids, eliminating the narcotic high abuse and dependence risks. >> it targets receptors in the spinal cord.
3:53 am
where, you're able to reduce the perception of pain. without targeting areas of the brain which lead to, you know, the addiction side effects. blue is preparing for its first clinical trial, but the compound hasn't been tested in humans yet. dr. robert griffin specializes in pain management. >> it takes a long time to really know all of the long term effect and really, to prove that something has no risk of addiction over time. blue 181 is backed by $2 million in funding from the nih and department of defense. which sees blue 181 promising for injured veterans especially vulnerable to addiction and overdose. >> do you see this -- your concept as, part of the solution to combatting the epidemic? absolutely.d epidemic, thever lve thoblem. us are in pai
3:54 am
>> blue therapeutics says it could be five years before the drugmakers it through clinical trials to see if they confirm its claims. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
3:55 am
3:56 am
3:57 am
we are in the homestretch of tonight's broadcast, racing toward the finish line with the story of a champion athlete who reach the pinnacle of his sport this weekend. meg oliver tells us how justify earned his place in horse racing's stable of legend. >> electrifying finish at the belmont stakes. >> justify has done it. >> justify defied the odds becoming only the 13th horse to capture the triple crown. a remarkable achievement considering he only started racing in february. >> a very good beginning for justify. >> always in the lead. the chestnut colt with the stunning stride, barreled around the track to the roar of more than 90,000 in the crowd.
3:58 am
since 1932, 23 horses have won the first two legs of the triple crown, the kentucky derby, and the preakness, but, fell short at the belmont. in 1973, racing legend. secretariat captured the crown and set a world record at the belmont leaving competitors in the dust. seattle slew and affirmed followed with sweeps in 1977 and 1978. but then, there was a 37 year drought broken by american pharaoh in 2015. racing fans didn't have to wait long. for a repeat performance. three years later, american pharaoh's trainer, bob baffort brought justify off to the track. justified turned heads at the kentucky derby, charging through the slot for the win. victory followed at the preakness. finally, a fairy tale ending at the belmont for jockey mike
3:59 am
smith. at 52, the oldest jockey to win the triple crown. >> just puts an old man out there to sit still. stays out of the way. and, and, let a good horse be a good horse. >> before winning the triple crown, justify's breeding rights were negotiated for a steep, $60 million. justified price tag now expected to skyrocket for an undefeated champion. meg oliver, cbs news, new york. that's the "overnight news" for monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm elaine quijano.
4:00 am
captioning funded by cbs it's monday, june 11th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." president and north korean leader kim jong-un are both in singapore. what's expected for the historic summit. g7 fallout. the war of words following the trade meeting with our allies. >> all this glass is falling on me, and i'm in there trying to vacuum and i'm like, what's going on. a home is blown to pieces. what led up to the deadly explosion. good morning from the studio

97 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on