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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 18, 2018 3:00am-3:59am PDT

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life inside tent city. migrant consider captured at the border are being housed here. critics visited the facility say conditions are adequate, but the policy is wrong. >> it's crazy to think that in 201 we have to legislate to say you sthuhouldn't be taking chiln from their parents. >> also tonight. fact checking the immigration debate. president trump blames democrats for the separation of migrant children from their parents. but it is being done under the president's zero tolerance policy. >> deadly gun violence erupts at an all-night arts and music festival. >> the bullet came out here too. >> the midwest swelters in a dangerous heat wave.
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now pushing east. >> and a winning strategy every one can embrace. the hug. >> our friendship will always last longer than this silly game. ♪ ♪ welcome to the joifr. i'm elaine quijano. newly opened tent city along the texas border its now at the center of the national immigration debate. the camp is housing teenage boys, who illegally entered the united states unacompanied by an adult. they're being moved here to rooms at shelters for younger me migrant children. who have been separated from their parents under the trump administration's zero tolerance immigration policy. mireya villarreal is outside the facility near the tornillo port of entry in the county. >> we will not go away! this is not okay! >> reporter: thousand of protesters chanted, demanding the trump administration stop separating children from their parents at the border. the march was organized by
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democratic congressman. >> we were tol there were 9 # kids in the tent city. today, 200 kids. we have all got to own this. we cannot blame this on trump. ka in n cannot blame it on a political party. this is america. america has got to show up. >> reporter: the detention facility its toed to house unaccompanied minors. teen boys began arriving fry dave. jane and boyd griffith live in el paso. >> my husband said it was a long time sina prote march ck whe wwerece i iasn protesting against vietnam. >> the facilities you would see if you want to any natural disasterte.siuses. >> congressman will herd has been inside the encampment, housing 16 and a 20 kser p ro. >> congressman herd's district stretches across the texas mexico border a awe mu constituents that are outraged they should know that i'm outraged too.
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what is happening in tornillo, symptom of a larger problem. areiddedoverfl.or ntsowhe occupant ts moved enhere from o shelters. the department of homeland security numbers show over a six-week period. nearly 0 children were separated from nearly a00s m2,a adults. jacqueline alatta brought her two children to protest. >> i'm here because i grew up in a border town. i live in a border town. this just pulls at my heart strings for. me not a political issue. it is a mother issue. a neighbor issue. it's a what's right. >> reporter: despite a number of requests we are not being allowed inside. this is as close as we can get. we can't get in the perimeter of this detention facility. elaine, right now we there are 200 kids inside. but we are also told, at its capacity. this place can house up to 4,000 children. thank you.tonigh about 2,00t children who have been separated from their parents, in the past six weeks will sleep in u.s. government shelters.
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we asked tony dokoupil to look into what's driving the crisis. >> you are not forgotten. >> reporter: growing outrage anthfe o u.s.-mexican border an housed in shelters like this former wal-mart in texas. >> free the children. >> but amid the outrage. there its also confusion as president trump has repeatedly tried to blame democrats for the policy. >> i hate it. i hate the children being taken away. the democrats have to change their law. that's their law. >> not true, according to independent immigration analysts and review of past administrations. under presidents obama, and typ awaiting the decision of an immigration judge. a policy hard-liners criticized as, catch and release. the trump administration ended this approach. in april, attorney general jeff session as nounced, a zpleer row tolerance policy that refers everyone caught at the border to federal criminal prosecution.
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that tea where the separation happens. children can't stay with parents in a federal jail. >> this administration has taken a decision to to- - apply the law in its most extreme fashion. >> doris misner, senior fellow nonpartisan think-tank based . in washington. he serve both republican and democratic administrations. >> they're deciding to prosecute everybody. that then leads to the need to separate families. >> the blame should be assigned to the trump administration's recent decisions. >> more than 11,000 -- 11,400 migrant kids are in federal custody. elaine that number surged by 2,400 children. in the past six weeks since the crackdown began. >> tony dokoupil, thank you. president trump is meeting with house republicans this week, as they prepare to vote on two separate immigration bills. errol barnett has more from the
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white house. >> reporter: this weekend rucrats esfoenr breaking utp t families at the southern border. while pressuring them to work with republicans on an immigration bill. a senior white house official is quoted as saying the new separation policy is designed to "force people to the table." >> that person should have the guts to come forward and put their name to the quote. >> adviser to the president, kelly ann conway denies that children are being used as leverage, to get democrats to negotiate. >> nobody likes the policy. >> using children is not the answer. >> republican senators, susan collins and jeff flake sent this letter to the white house, asking for details on its zero tolerance policy. >> it is inconsistent with our american val use. to separate these children from their parents. unless there is evidence of abuse or another very good >> a policy that is unacceptable, unjust,
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unamerican, and unconscionable. >> congressional democrats working on legislation to end the practice, visit itted a detention facility in new jersey. we will not rest until we shut that policy down. >> first lady, melania trump weighed in today. through a statement. saying she hates to slieeesld. e adding that while this should be a country that follows all laws, it should also be a country that governs with heart. elaine. >> errol barnett, thank you. a vehicle carrying any 1op iluded undocumented immigrants crashed today in big wells, texas, 100 miles southwest of san antonio. at least five people were killed. the county sheriff says the vehicle was being chased by border patrol agents when it crashed. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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there was chaos in trenton, new jersey, overnight. when bullets started flying. at an all night arts festival. one of the shooters is dead. more than 20 are wounded. meg oliver has the the story. people flooded out of an art festival in trenton, new jersey, after gunfire erupted just before 3:00 a.m. sunday. >> next thing you know we turn around. everybody is running down the street. all hell broke loose. >> reporter: more than 1,000 in the area sparking stampede as they ran for their lives. wawasunni nex tome. wsi heru bynn the time i realized he go hit he fell on the ground. i'm like looking, oh. that could have been me.
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>> 22 people were injured. 17 treat ford gun shot wounds. the youngest, a 13-year-old boy is in extremely critical condition. >> shots fired down here at trenton, going on all night. >> the prosecutor's office says one of the suspects. 33-year-old man is believed to have been shot and killed by officers. another suspect is in custody.e releasing very few details. trenton mayor, eric jackson. >> this isn't just a random act of violence. this is aublic health issue. >> art all night is in its 12th year, a 24-hour pop up art gallery that lets artists display their work for free. typically attracts up to 30,000 people every year. organizers say, our hearts ache and our eyes are blurry, but our inspiration will never fade, not tonight, not ever. the prosecutor's office told me there is no indication the art event itself was targeted. police are trying to determine what prompted the shooting, but
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are investigating if it was a dispute that escalated out of control. elaine. >> meg oliver. thanks. in afghanistan, tens of thousand have been killed since the taliban was driven from power in 2001. following the 9/11 attacks. temporary truce was shattered when two separate bombings in and around jalalabad left 50 people dead. here is our correspondent. >> reporter: for three days a country we'ry of war witnessed scenes it hadn't seen in years. taliban fighters embracing soldiers instead of aiming at them. and posing for selfies with sieve vilians. our hope is piece, this taliban fighter said. and the end of fighting in afghanistan. these celebrations came as the the first formal saes fire since 2001 took hold. coinciding with the end of the holy month of mara punctud by two suicide bombings. one struck the eastern city of
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jalalabad sunday. the other, had a nearby district the day before. killing 36 people. isis which was not a part of the e,pl cosesiouced rilimnsibpo news of that bombing came as an to extend the stees fire ghwith the taliban. our cease-fire surprises world he said. there is no need for fiefting anymore. >> but the taliban rejected his request. so the group's fighters are ready to resume attacks on the u.s. backed government and foreign troops. critics say it allowed thousand of armed taliban fighters to enter cities around the country. now the fear is that they could launch new attacks. elaine. thank you. here at home, much of the mr chicago, st. louis, and kansas city, are broiling and high humidity with temperatures well
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into the 90s. as the severe heat pushes east tonight. powerful storms will threaten the central u.s. through tuesday. coming up, the maker of a popular vape device responds to growing concerns teenagers are getting hooked. later the last play of the game. perhaps the only one that really mattered was the hug. ♪ over the last 24 hours, you finished preparing him for college. in 24 hours, you'll send him off thinking you've done everything for his well-being. but meningitis b progresses quickly and can be fatal, sometimes within 24 hours. while meningitis b is uncommon, about 1 in 10 infected will die. like millions of others, your teen may not be vaccinated against meningitis b. meningitis b strikes quickly. be quick to talk to your teen's doctor
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jewel vaping surging among teenagers. the electronic devicesook like pens or flash drives. they vaporize liquids that come in sweet flavors like cotton candy. and kids say they're easy to get though they're not supposed to be sold to minors. anna werner has the company's rinse to these concerns. >> jewel is a product for adult smokers. >> jewel's ashley gould says adults look those featured in the company's current marketing campaign who are the product's target market. their mature smokers who say they switched from cigarettes juul, the e cigarette that resembles a usb drive. the come of pane aimed to eliminate the smell and social stigma of cigarettes and be healthier.
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>> this technology has the possibility to enable them to continue to have nicotine in the way it is and thereby with these of mit having to die from it.ro >> reporter: p and juul has tak off. it command over 60% of the e cigarette market. something else appears to be driving juul's popularity too. its appeal to kids. >> juul. >> on social media teens post photos and viz yodeos, juuling. >> the problem here is everyone was asleep at the switch. >> matt myers heads the campaign for tobacco free kids. >> by the time we woke up, we had an epidemic on our hand. >> you call this an epidemic. >> absolutely. >> a whole new jen ration of young people he says who could wind up addicted to nicotine for life. myers and other anti-tobacco groups also point to juul's early spoeshl media marketing that they say echoed prior big
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tobacco come pains with youthful images and bright colors. the come of pane insists it never deliberately targeted kids. and was call the unprepared. >> it is a combination of the company was very small. and, and the product took off, very fast. at a certain point. people say, now you are not that anymore. isn't there mr. that you could do? >> there is more we can do. there is more we need to do. >> juul is spending $30 million on youth prevention and social media platplatforms. >> when we talked to the company. they've told us, look, we had no idea this was going to take off with kids. we don't understand why it did. >> that's their job. when you market a product that is highly addictive. knowing that youth tobacco use it is your responsibility. >> our objective is toplayer. i will take the criticism. we should have known. i've will take that. we know now, we're working very
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hard. we are committed. >> well here its another area where juul gets criticisms. the pods that users plug into the dedevice, come in flavors, mango. berry. the company says adults who switch, tell them they how to like the flavors, but critics say those flavors appeal directly to teens. and that's why flavored cigarettes were banned years ago. anna werner, cbs news, new york. coming up, when self-driving cars run into unexpected roadblocks a company called phantom auto provides help even from afar. i was wondering if an electric toothbrush really cleans better than a manual. and my hygienist says it does but they're not all the same. who knew? i had no idea. so she said, look for one that's shaped like a dental tool with a round brush head.
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go pro with oral-b. oral-b's rounded brush head surrounds each tooth to gently remove more plaque, and oral-b is the first electric toothbrush brand accepted by the american dental association for its effectiveness and safety. my mouth feels so clean. i'll only use an oral-b. oral-b. brush like a pro.
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now to a new technology for self-driving cars. the computers and robotic vehicles can get confused by construction zones, bad weather, and other unexpected hazards. but a company called phantom auto has come up with a remote controlled backup system that provides the computer's human health. here is kris van cleave. >> please welcome, everybody. and i will be your phantom remote operator for your drive.
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i will be monitoring row meetly. >> reporter: our remote driver is a few miles away in silicon valley office. california one of five states alug self driving cars to be on the road without a safety driver if they have a cyst techl in place for a human to take over remotely. phantom auto doesn't build self driving cars but hoping their technology can come to the rescue of a confused autonomous vehicle. uses cell phone signals and cameras mounted to the vehicle. a remote driver can take over in a situation where the car doesn't know what to do. >> you are saying the ultimate backup for the self driving car is the human. >> yeah. say you come to a construction site and you have construction worker giving hand signals. >> flagging traffic. >> exactly. exactly. >> the vehicle may approach that construction site. and just completely be paralyzed. at that point, the vehicle itself, would ping a phantom auto remote operator. the remote operator would be
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able to drive you through construction site in the same way you could drive through the site today. >> a lot of people seeing this are going to wonder what is it like driving a car that you are nowhere near? >> go through a very strict training procedure. in order to learn how to operate something completely new. >> federal regulations are stalled in congress leaving oversight to the states. some are stricter than others. self driving uber crash that killed a pedestrian in arizona prompted states to take a second look at their regulations as the technology is not yet foolproof. think of the phantom auto service similar to something like oncar, remote help desk that would automatically link tton for the paenger.coe tback multiple vehicles. leaving the backup plan for self driving cars firmly in the hand of a human. kris van cleave, cbs news, washington. up next, the game ended with a strikeout.
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but, the hug amounted to a game winning home run.
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we end with the some times good rule of sportsmanship. winning is not the only thing. of a simple hug can mean everything. here is jim axelrod. >> reporter: the most talked about strikeout in the country has nothing to do with winning and losing.
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minnesota high school pitcher, ty cain provided a master class in how you play the game. >> i never thought a story like this would blow up the way it did. >> reporter: last week, ty's team advanced to the state tournament, when he struck out jack cochan looking on a 2-2 fastball that nicked outside corner. >> i really felt for him. felt it was right to go over and say something. >> reporter: that's right. watch ty. while his teammates from mountains view high, erupted in celebration. ty waved off his own catcher. to attend to more pressing business. hugging the kid he struck out. >> i didn't thing. i ran over there. instinct. >> january and ty have been pals and teammates on the same travel team. they stayed close after heading off off to high schools. i said you had a great season, great plater. don't allow the outcome. i told him i loved him.
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he is my brother. our friendship will last longer than the silly game. >> reporter: the hug has become a social media sensation. which just may something about our first these days for examples of how to treat each other with class grace, and empathy. in 20 years i will not remember the game. i will remember him coming up to me after that. kind of being there nor me when i need someone. >> the hall of fame manager, leo derocher once said nice guys finish last. clearly he never met ty cain, an impressive winner on the field who saved his best stuff until after the game was over. what true sportsmanship looks like. that's the "overnight news" for this monday.
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welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. a newly opened tent city along the texas border is now at the center of the national immigration debate. the camp is housing teenage boys who illegally entered the united states unaccompanied by an adult. they're being moved here to make rooms at shelters for younger migrant children who have been separated from their parents under the trump administration's zero tolerance immigration policy. mireya villarreal is outside of the facility near the tornillo port of entry in elso
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>> we will not go away! hiis iokt paraaytino c ld!>>n rfrr:omep their parents at the border. the march was organized by democratic congressman. >> we were told there were 9 # kids in the tent city. today, 200 kids. we have all got to own this. we cannot blame this on trump. cannot blame it on a political party. this is america. america has got to show up. >> reporter: the detention facility its toed to house unaccompanied minors. teen boys began arriving fry dave. jane and boyd griffith live in el paso. >> my husband said it was a long time since i was in a protest march back when we were protesting against vietnam. >> the facilities you would see if you want to any natural disaster site. tents like the u.n. uses. >> congressman will herd has been inside the encampment, housing 16 and 17-year-old boys. >> there are 20 kids per tent. there is two adults in the room. >> congressman herd's district stretches across the texas mexico border a awe mu constituents that are outraged they should know that i'm outraged too. what is happening in tornillo, >> reporter: for now the tents
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are considered overflow. occupants moved here from other shelters. the department of homeland security numbers show over a six-week period. nearly 2,000 children were separated from nearly as many adults. jacqueline alatta brought her two children to protest. >> i'm here because i grew up in a border town. i live in a border town. this just pulls at my heart strings for. me not a political issue. it is a mother issue. a neighbor issue. it's a what's right. >> reporter: despite a number of requests we are not being allowed inside. this is as close as we can get. we can't get in the perimeter of this detention facility. elaine, right now we there are 200 kids inside. but we are also told, at its capacity. this place can house up to 4,000 children. thank you. tonight, about 2,000migrant children who have been separated from their parents, in the past government shelters. we asked tony dokoupil to look into what's driving the crisis. >> you are not forgotten.
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tonight as thousand of children are split from their parents at the u.s.-mexican border and housed in shelters like this former wal-mart in texas. >> free the children. >> but amid the outrage. there its also confusion as president trump has repeatedly tried to blame democrats for the policy. >> i hate it. i hate the children being taken away. the democrats have to change their law. that's their law. >> not true, according to independent immigration analysts and review of past administrations. under presidents obama, and bush, federal authorities typically released families awaiting the decision of an immigration judge. a policy hard-liners criticized as, catch and release. the trump administration ended this approach. in april, attorney general jeff sessions announce aid zero tolerance policy that refers everyone caught at the border to federal criminal prosecution. that tea where the separation happens.hiadminition has ten
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a decision to -- to apply the law in its most extreme fashion. >> doris misner, senior fellow at migration policy ns to the. a nonpartisan think-tank based in washington. he serve both republican and democratic administrations. >> they're deciding to prosecute everybody. that then leads to the need to separate families. >> the blame should be assigned to the trump administration's recent decisions. >> more than 11,000 -- 11,400 migrant kids are in federal custody. elaine that number surged by 2,400 children. in the past six weeks since the crackdown began. >> tony dokoupil, thank you. president trump is meeting with house republicans this week, as they prepare to vote on two separate immigration bills. errol barnett has more from the white house. >> reporter: this weekend president trump again, blamed democrats for breaking up
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families at the southern border. while pressuring them to work with republicans on an immigration bill. a senior white house official is quoted as saying the new separation policy is designed to "force people to the table." >> that person should have the guts to come forward and put their name to the quote. >> adviser to the president, kelly ann conway denies that children are being used as leverage, to get democrats to negotiate. >> nobody likes the policy. >> using children is not the answer. >> republican senators, susan collins and jeff flake sent this letter to the white house, asking for details on its zero tolerance policy. >> it is inconsistent with our to separate these children from their parents. unless there is evidence of abuse or another very good ason. >> it is a policy that is unacceptable, unjust, unamerican, and unconscionable. >> congressional democrats working on legislation to end the practice, visit itted a detention facility in new jersey.
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we will not rest until we shut that policy down. >> first lady, melania trump weighed in today. through a statement. saying she hates to see children separated from their families. adding that while this should be a country that follows all laws, it should also be a country that governs with heart. elaine. >> errol barnett, thank you. more now with the interview with republican senator susan collins, a critic of the president's zero tolerance immigration policy. senior administration official told me, the white house is on the side of the angels, with the separation policy because they say they are helping to stop child smuggling. what do you make of that defense? obviously if a child is being abused in any way including trafficking that is justification for separating the parent from the child and arresting the parent and protecting tchild. but that is not what is going h
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on. what the administration has decided to do is to separate children from their parents to try to send a message that if you cross the border with children your children are going to be ripped away from you. that's traumatizing to the children who are innocent victims and it is contrary to -- our values and in this country. that's not to say that we we should.ct to try to curb and, i support the president's proposals. for border security. we do need to strengthen our security at the border. we need to work with those countries and central america. from which these families are coming to end the ganglence that is -- encouraging themio v to leave. and in some cases, we need to repatriotate the whole family back to the host country.
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three months after he passed away, legendary physicist stephen hawking was laid to rest. he will spend eternity between a pair of history making scientists, isaac newton, and charles darwin. pretty good company. >> reporter: for a scientists to call themselves an atheist, the memorial service at westminster abbey must have seemed ironic. >> in this holy place where god has been worshipped for over 1,000 years. >> tributes paid by british astronomer martin rece were a stephen hawking helped people look beyond earthly matters to the mysteries of the universe. >> nobody else since einstein
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has done more to deepen our understanding of space, time and gravity. >> hawking was born in oxford, england in 1942. as a 21-year-old, ph.d. student he was diagnosed with lou geh g gehrig's disease. debilitating condition he was told that would take his life in a year or two. he beat the daunting diagnosis by more than half a century. confined to a wheelchair and using a computer synthesized voice. hawking inspired the world with his ability to soar beyond his disability. in 2007, he came close to flying in space himself. from nasa's kennedy space center, he took a zero gravity flight and moved freely for the first time, in 40 years. >> i could have gone -- ace, he i come. >> we now commit his mortal remains to the ground. earth to earth. ashes to ashes. >> friday, hawkings' ashes were buried between the remains of
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two other giants of science, isaac newton and charles darwin. as the he was laid to rest, t hehiss voice from a satellite dh in spain to the nearest known black hole more than 3,000 light years away. >> we are here together and we need to live together with tolerance and respect. >> we are all time travelers into the future, he said. let's work together to make the future a place we want to visit. last summer a navy destroyer, uss john mccain was involved in a deadly collision with a merchant ship off singapore. the wreck claimed the lives of ten u.s. sailors. their namelies are now joining together, to take legal action against the owners of the cargo ship. kris van cleave has the the story. >> it has ripped me from stem to stern. >> when kevin was laid to rest last fall, it was just the nnin
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be and anger for his father tom. >> this horribletragedy, that, last at uss mccain . lost steering in the singapore strait. one of the world's busiest shiching lanshich i shipping lanes. it veered into the path of the tanker ship. and killed ten sailors, including kevin. >> oil, chemicals, fuel oil all in the water. just holding his breath would have started burning. it would have been torture. >> a navy report placed blame on some of the mccain's crew saying they weren't aware of surroundings and failed to properly steer the ship. an investigation by singapore's ministry of transport pointed out mistakes by the ship. calling the ship's actions to avoid collision insufficient. investigators found the bridge where the ship is control, was accident.h it also revealed that it was on autopilot and did not slow down until moments before impact.
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>> they beoth were at fault. >> her son timothy died on the mccain. >> we need answer from both sides. >> they learned the owner, is petitioning in federal court to be cleared of all liability. or to have its liability limited. >> the when i first saw it, i was dumbfounded. i didn't know what i was looking at. >> the owner krielts a law that predates the civil war. called the ship owner's limitation of liability act, of 1851. under the law, the poe ten sthal damages will be capped at 16.7 million. that's the value, after the collision. >> is was like yoear -ki like -- are you . this tg ragedydd.in and you are going to come after us. and say well this is what -- because of -- because of, ruling from 1851. this is all that you can do. >> it is mind-boggling. >> he represents nine of the mccain victim's families.
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>> why should the ship have any hand in liability here when, even the navy says -- this was an accident created by mistakes made on the mccain. >> the navy -- is -- is doing things to make sure this doesn't happen again. but whenever you have an accountability on bh side. >> the victimvictims' families planning to challenge the petition. so is the navy. they will need to prove the actions weren't just a sailing error but management was at fault. >> everybody is surprised. >> martin davies, director of tulane university, maritime law center. he says the law was originally passed to simulate the risky business of sea trade. this kind of litigation is absolutely typical after -- a may your incident such as this. for the past, at least, 150 years. the whole economic structure, of the shipping business, has been prem ilgsedilgsed -- premised o
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it has been used after accidents like the titanic and sinking of the alfaro. >> do you feel look you getting victimized again by an are cane law. >> someone driving to use whatever -- law they can find, on the books, whether just or not. to try to eliminate or, or limit, their liability. >> the company that owns the alnic declined our request for comment but is suing the navy for damages to its ship. we asked the lawyer for the mccain families if they intend to sue the navy. he told us that many of them are .ocomfortable with the idea of f in>> tghe cbs "overnight news" l be right back.
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theseare heading back home.y oil thanks to dawn, rescue workers only trust dawn, because it's tough on grease yet gentle. i am home, i am home, i am home here is a question, what did you get your dad for father's day. if you ask the kids. a lot of dads could use a wardrobe makeover. mo rocca has a look.yomay no tn ♪valenciaga as your father's fashion house, your father probably has no idea
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what a fashion how is. at the spanish luxury brand's recent annual show, the dad look dominated. no skinny jeans here. instead the run way was awash in washed out denim. oversized jackets. and hawaiian prints. with a couple of kids to complete the ensell bum. ♪ >> dad style is what we have called it. >> max berlinger wrote about the yoxy unsixy trend for "the ne." trk >> few bod. it is taking what a red-blooded american dad represents and dopgt it making it popular and cool. ♪ sunset hip toip to be square ♪ >> dad core as vogue dubbed it wasn't always cool. former president barack obama said he was unfairly maligned for his jeans.
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but one of the looks actual founders wasn't a dad when he sported dad wear in his 1990s sitcom. >> going to see her again? >> true day night. >> jerry seinfeld was a good dad. kind of the high waisted light denim. chunky, white sneaker. >> by the way, elaine does not ne tonow aut anything. >> hey, hey, hey, hey. >> uh-huh. >> i dig. >> what are dad's gravitating toward now? >> so it is definitely still about, the chino having a comeback. >> erika russo fashion director for bloomingdale's. >> can't talk about dad without thele hawtyaiian shirt. having such a come back. love this. so if you think about, you know year's past, dad, hawaiian shirt, chino shorts. something like, ah, actually now something like, yes. looks so good. so now. so, so happening. >> with dad wear, things we wished never happened, are suddenly happening. >> the fanny pack.
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a lot of people consider it fashion third rail. >> fanny pack, fanny must. having such a moment. for all day wear. wear it across body like this. looks fabulous. >> ah. >> little slung. you look cooler. >> so these. are the must haves. dad sneakers. characterized by the thick sole. exaggerated look. love it when it is distressed. the more the better. feels more like a heritage shoe. >> was. you can wear these on the runway and raking leaves. >> absolutely. >> how much retail? >> $1,000. >> reporter: retailers may love the trend. what do the actual experts think? >> these are air dads. >> air dads. >> lance summerfeld co-founder of city dads group which connects thousand of fathers around t cherynt. th feelaw comfortable wearing. the dads we see, chaperoning field trips, ones at doctor's
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appointments, helping their kids with home work. >> dad wear is anesthetic. dictated most of all by comfort. >> this is a more mon chromatic look than i am used to with you. >> really the only thing i had that was clen today. >> got it. >> for gavin boyle, the dad look comes naturally. he is a father of two. and a senior producer at cbs sunday morning. so, for all of our sakes, this better go well. >> this is the weekend look. and you could use this for -- anything, from, from -- >> well, from anything to mowing the lawn to home depot. things i do during the weekend. >> comfortable? >> it's comfortable. >> talk about downtown. your pants. >> what about them? they're jeans. >> and erika russo turns out. >> erika, gavin. >> gavin, nice to meet you. >> likes them. >> assess his look. >> yeah, gavin, you know, he is rocking actually the look that we are talking about right now. kind of working with an eversized shirt here. a light denim wash. >> what do you think of his
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footwear? >> he actually has the this more of the aggressive sole sneaker on. definitely, feels like it is, lived in. >> would you slowly turn around. >> erika, my pleasure. >> still, erika thinks gavin is due for a fashion reboot. >> if you have ever watched tv before. you know what is about to happen. >> nice. >> you like it? >> look at you. all right. >> look at that. >> gan, how do you feel? >> feel very comfortable. i've feel like, i feel like, easy, breezy. on an episode of the love boat. great. >> to finish off the look. >> it just feels. feels fresh. and carry essentials here. hand-free. ease. once again. comfortable. >> my two sons are going to love this on television. >> this father's day, it's worth remembering. $800, faragamo fanny pack maze come and go. but dads are perennial. [ applause ] >> now can i say one thing to y'all. you're fired.
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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hopefully you got to spend time with your dad on father's day. or at least got to chat on the phone. mark strassmann has the story of one father and son fair whose time together was 3 # years in the making. >> the shrimps. >> what brought malcolm stewart and his father to the fish market wasn't the catch of the day. >> where are your crawfish. >> but the catch of a lifetime. >> this sunday, they'll spend their first father's di togetheren almost four decades.
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>> when you were a kid what was father's day like? >> i didn't have a father. it was just a blank day. in my mind, i am thinking he was going to die in jail. >> his father, malcolm alexander was convicted of rape in 1980. the sentence was life, no chance of parole. louisiana inmate number 93124 was innocent. dna evidence finally proved it. and in january, he walked out to his family and freedom. he was now 58. >> actually. hug him. as a freeman. like a dream come true. words can't explain how i felt all the ee motion i was feeling at that time. >> his father had spent almost 38 years behind bars. >> it was a whole life, to live without him. because you are living without love. see, there is no love in the institution. >> there is in this home, outside new orleans. malcolm stewart was 2. when his father went to prison. >> you go to your friends'
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house. they have their dad. it's like, wow, wish i had that. >> uh-huh. >> this father's day he will. after a lifetime of prison visits and phone calls, to a dad who never deserved to spend one minute behind bars. >> what's it like just to be able to sit side by side. after 38 years. >> no rush. >> no rush. >> where we go, we here. we are where we wanted to go. >> you don't seem builter at all. ? >> there is no time to even think about, nothing negative. being mad. none of that. my dazed here. it's father's day. very happy, you know what i mean? it's -- it's lech i said a new beginning. >> this family has one word in their father's day card. gratitude. mark strassmann, cbs news, new orleans. that's the "overnight news" for monday. for some of you the news continues.heck back with us ews c and the morningrs n her ot cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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captioning funded by cbs it'smonday, june 18th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." >> we will not go away. this is not okay. >> the fight over the separation of immigrant families in intensifies as thousands of children are held in hu.s. huma shelters. plus the highway border chase in texas ends in tragedy. and a deadly earthquake strikes in japan, breaking water pipes. good morning from the ud

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