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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 25, 2018 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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♪ the plan to reunite families. federal officials reveal how they will bring parents back together with their children after being separated at the border. but it's unclear how long the process will take. we have the crisis covered from the border detention centers to the white house. also tonight, the search for answers after an african-american man is killed by police in minneapolis. a new wave of wildfires forces families from their homes in california. and saudi women are finally in the driver's seat as the islamic kingdom lifts its ban on women behind the wheel. >> it's an amazing feeling to
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finally be here, to be able to live this moment. it's truly a historic moment. welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. the department of homeland security says it knows the locations of all children separated from their parents under the trump administration's zero tolerance immigration policy. officials said saturday night more than 2,000 separated minors remained in government facilities. but it's not known how long the process to reunite families will take. a new cbs poll out finds 75% of democrats say reunifying separated families is aig republicans. we begin our coverage with miya villareal.r:s of protes itoechilen" near the port of entry gate sunday morning. the tent city is in a december
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lalt part of the border about 40 miles outside of el paso. >> free the children now! >> reporter: in a release by the department of health and human services the agency says they have a process to ensure that family members know the location of their children and have regular communication after separation. but federal public defenders in el paso say in a number of zero tolerance criminal cases their clients have not been told where their children are. >> so when the president says that the stories of grief are overexaggerated at the border, how do you contend with that? >> i would say mr. president, come to el paso and i will show you stories that are real stories of grief and sadness. madep the ppleheir and they're ldldis.r: sy a gaon o bot rcan and democratic politicia housing hundreds of unaccompanied teenagers. 23 of them were recently separated from their families-s and there are at least seven girls inside. >> most surprising thing you saw in there as you're walking
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through, what really kind of caught your eye? >> you know, just the fact that you look around. i mean, we're in the middle of the desert. and you've got a tent city here. i think it's in many ways a monument to the failure of the federal government. >> reporter: hhs also says separated children are able to communicate with their parent or guardian. cbs confirms those calls are limited to twice a week, ten minutes apiece. >> we need to make sure in congress that the trump administration provides a full and comprehensive list of every single child and their parent so that we can go then and audit and make sure that everybody is reunited. >> reporter: the federal government says they know where all of these separated children are, and the agencies are talking to each other. but elaine, they also say what slows down the process is confirming that someone who wants to talk to one of these children is an actual parent or legal guardian. >> mireya villarreal, thank you. it was late saturday night when the department of homeland security released its plan to
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reunite separated families and provided updated numbers. demarco morgan is here with the details. demarco. >> reporter: well, elaine, the numbers show that the department of homeland security and health and human services are working to reunite the unaccompanied children with their families. however, there are more than 2,000 minors in federal custody who are still waiting to be turned back over to their legal guardians. that number comes after customs and border protection revealed it has reunited 522 children with their parents. 16 minors are scheduled to be rejoined with their parents before the night is over with. we've also learned that immigrations and customs enforcement has dedicated the port isabel detention center as the primary family reunification center for ain their custody. in addition, the government has revealed that 17% of the minors separated from adults in health and human services facilities were part of the administration's zero tolerance initiative. elaine, it will take a lot of work to reunite the remaining
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83% who appear without a parent or barredian. >> demarco morgan, thank you. when president trump signed an executive order last week effectively ending family separations he called on the republican-controlled congress to pass a comprehensive immigration bill. when that that happen? here's errol barnett. >> i did talk to the white house yesterday. they say the president's still 100% behind us. >> reporter: with support from president trump republican congressman michael mccaul plans to put his so-called consensus immigration bill up for votes in the house soon. in addition to securing $25 billion for a border wall, it ends family separation and puts limits on legal immigration as well as providing a pathway to citizenship for dreamers. its chances of passing, though, are slim. >> our immigration laws are a laughing stock all over the world. >> reporter: before speaking in las vegas saturday, president trump said republicans are wasting their time on immigration and should wait until after midterm elections to enact reform.
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but he continues to push a hard line, today suggesting deporting those suspected of crossing the border illegally "with no judges or court cases." >> i don't want to enforce laws out of a sense of hate or animosity toward people who want to live a life like i do. >> reporter: republican senator bob corker called the administration's zero tolerance policy a mistake, casting doubt any immigration bill would succeed before november. he was also asked about the new cbs news battleground tracker poll which found 73% of republicans feel undocumented immigrants should be punished as an example of toughness while almost 80% of democrats think they should be treated well as an example of kindness. >> we've got to realize these people are wanting to live in a place like we live. we're the most fortunate people on earth to live in this country. that's why people are drawn to us. >> reporter: president trump is now hearing calls from democrats to go beyond his executive order
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in ending family separations. today senator chuck schumer is calling on the administration to appoint a czar to oversee the reunification of families for the sake of thousands of children who, in senator schumer's words, remain in limbo. elaine? >> errol barnett, thank you. at least three wildfires forced people from their homes in northern california. the fires have burned hundreds of acres in lake and tejema counties north of sacramento. red flag warnings for dangerous fire conditions were posted across the area along with high heat advisories as temperatures topped 100 degrees. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." an investigation sunder way after police shot and killed an african-american man saturday evening in minneapolis. the police say the man was firing a handgun as he walked down the street. nikki batiste has more on this. >> no justice! >> no peace! >> reporter: these anti-police chants interrupted sunday's pride parade in minneapolis. >> the whole damn system is guilty as hell! >> reporter: the outrage comes after a police officer shot and killed 31-year-old thurmond blevins saturday evening. >> thurmond! >> blevins! >> reporter: according to a facebook post by the minneapolis police department, one 911 caller reported a man firing a
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gun in the air and into the ground. another caller said he was shooting a silver 9-millimeter handgun. john elder is with the police department. >> a foot chase ensued which ended in shots being fired. the armed suspect was pronounced dead at the scene. >> reporter: locals protested peacefully at the scene right after the shooting in front of a line of officers standing silently. minneapolis mayor jacob frye addressed the community. >> regardless of what happened tonight, the historical trauma inflicted on communities of color is never far from nearly every facet of our lives. >> reporter: this shooting comes less than one week after another police officer shot and killed 17-year-old antwon rose in ttsburgh, sylvan [ gunshots ] this video shows rose running from a car suspected in a drive-by shooting 13 minutes earlier. rose was shot three times and
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later died. >> three shots to the back! >> how do you justify that? >> reporter: protesters in pittsburgh rallied for a fourth night saturday. 900 miles away from the marches in minnesota. >> strained relations between law enforcement officials and the communities they serve, especially communities of color, have exacted a toll on the very soul of our city, of our state, and of our nation. >> reporter: a new minneapolis police department policy requires officers to turn on their body cameras at least two blocks away from their call location. their spokesperson told me the two officers involved in this shooting did have their body cameras on. but elaine, that footage has not been released yet. >> nikki battiste, thank you. it's a historic day in saudi arabia, where women are finally being allowed to drive. but as holly williams reports, women in the islamic kingdom still have a long way to go on the road to equality. >> reporter: at the stroke of midnight last night the second
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it became legal for them to get behind the wheel these groundbreaking saudi women hit the gas. [ honking horn ] some of the first in this islamic kingdom to get their license. >> it's an amazing feeling to finally be here. to be able to live this moment. it's truly a historic moment. >> i can't speak. i don't have anything to say. but i'm so happy, thrilled and excited. >> reporter: it's been 28 years since a small group of brave saudi women began demanding the right to drive. protesting by illegally taking the wheel and risking arrest. but they didn't get anywhere until the arrival of saudi arabia's new reforming crown prince, muhammad bin salman. he's also allowed girls to play sports in public schools, opened cinemas for the first time in decades, encouraged more women to join the workforce, and permitted music to be performed in public. ♪ pr
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a taboo for conservative muslims. a saudi rock band wrote this in support of women drivers. with apologies to steppenwolf. ♪ get your motor running notes. >> we're at the same period at the end of the '50s back in the west where liberation happened suddenly. so people are going through the same here. we're seeing that hey, we can be the stones or the beatles of this era here. yeah, rock and roll! >> reporter: but for saudi women true legal equality is a long way off. they still need a male relative's permission to travel overseas or get married. and in this deeply conservative country some women won't be allowed to drive by their husbands and fathers regardless of the law. in recent weeks the saudi government has also arrested several women's rights campaigners, accusing them of conspiring against the
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authorities here. elaine? >> holly williams, thank you. coming up, the remarkable return of the rainbow trout, a fish that lures big money to business owners. and later, lgbt pride is on the march from coast to coast. my digestive system used to make me feel sluggish. but those days are over. now, i take metamucil every day. it naturally traps and removes the waste that weighs me down. so i feel... lighter. try metamucil and begin to feel what lighter feels like.
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they tend to be more active. they jump more. >> reporter: but in the 1990s that fight shifted to one between rainbow trout and a parasite that invaded colorado rivers. it causes whirling disease, an aquatic plague where young fish are deformed, swim in circles, and die of starvation. what kind of numbers in decrease did you see? >> literally a tenfold decrease. >> reporter: ever since, colorado fish and wildlife manager renzo del piccolo has been working to keep the rainbow trout alive through various breeding programs. >> the rainbow trout is hugely important to this state. >> how important? is there a dollar number? >> reporter: fishing in general, it's estimated over $2 billion to the economy. >> reporter: scientists got a major break when they discovered a small isolated troupe of rainbow trout immune to the disease in this remote part of the gunnison.
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>> nice work. >> reporter: biologist eric gardunio is cruising these waters where the immune trout were discovered. capturing healthy female fish and using them to breed tens of thousands of offspring that are also immune to the illness. they use their spindly apparatus to send a weak electric current through the water that attracts and then stuns the trout. >> then it's up to our netters to be quick with their net. and get those fish out of the water as quick as possible. >> reporter: the process depends on touch and time. the touch for getting the eggs out of a female. >> usually there will be about 1,000 eggs per female. >> reporter: and the time, less than a minute to use the male trout to use the male trout to fertilize the eggs. >> the process of life is going at that point. >> reporter: the fertilized eggs are brought to a nearby hatchery, where they are cultivated and raids into healthy rainbow trout, ready to
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stock rivers all over colorado. so with a little luck and a lot of science they'll be telling fish stories here f to come. barry peterson, cbs news, in the black canyon of the gunnison river, colorado. still ahead, new zealand's prime minister introduces her baby daughter and announces her name. [thoughtful sigh] still nervous about buying a house? a little. thought i could de-stress with some zen gardening. at least we don't have to worry about homeowners insurance. just call geico. geico helps with homeowners insurance? good to know. been doing it for years. that's really good to know. i should clean this up.
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make the most of a few minutes with ky natural feeling with aloe vera the navy has identified the pilot who was killed in a plane crash on friday. lieutenant christopher kerry short of new york was flying an experimental a-29 aircraft when it went down at a bombing range in new mexico. another pilot was injured. the cause of the crash is under investigation. voters in turkey today re-elected president recep tayyip erdogan. erdogan has overseen historic change in turkey since his islamic-rooted ruling party first came to power in 2002. under turkey's new political system the president will now have expanded powers. new zealand's prime minister only the second world leader in modern history to give birth while in office is home from the
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hospital. jacinda ardern and her partner announced today that they named their daughter neve. the prime miniature appeared to sleep through her first public appearance while her parents spoke to reporters. lgbt pride parades were held today across the country. the largest was in new york city, where thousands marched through greenwich village. many stopped at the stonewall inn where in 1969 a police raid led to a riot and helped to launch the gay rights movement. a million people were expected to attend the pride celebration in san francisco. this year marks the 40th anniversary of the rainbow flag, a symbol of gay pride. walking in the footsteps of dinosaurs in jurassic scotland.
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we end tonight on the isle of sky off the northwest coast of scotland. as you might imagine, it has rugged hills, fishing villages, and medieval castles. but as jonathan vigliotti shows us, it's also a hotbed of dinosaur discovery. >> reporter: hundreds of millions of years have weathered scotland's remote isle of sky and the prehistoric secrets that are buried in its wrinkles have attracted a caravan of time travelers. >> this is spectacular. >> reporter: american paleontologist steve brusott invited us on his research team's quest. he's traveled to some of the world's most extreme landscapes. and i think scotland is one of the most exciting new frontiers for dinosaurs and there's still a lot of fossils to find here.
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and they're important fossils. >> reporter: important because they come from the middle part of the jurassic period, of which little is known, a time when dinosaurs evolved from the size of house cats into the monsters brought to life by hollywood. in this real-life jurassic park brusotti is in pursuit of what could be stegosaur bones. >> over here, doogie. >> reporter: the discovery trapped in a boulder. >> you can see the texture. it has the grain of bone, that porous honeycomb type of texture. >> reporter: believe it or not, these orange mark rgz prehistoric bones preserved in sandstone. paleontology is a lot like detective work. >> detectives put people behind bars. what's your end game here? >> we put fossils in museums. so people can see them. people can enjoy them. people can get inspired by them. >> reporter: in the past 15 years brusotti has helped identify 15 new species of dinosaur. >> about 170 million years ago
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this would have been a watering hole, and today you can literally walk in the footsteps of these dinosaurs. these prints here believed to belong to the brontosaurus. brusotti's team discovered about 50 dinosaur prints in this one location. >> you have this dinosaur, this deep size plant eating dinosaur literally stepping right here. >> reporter: brusotti believes everything from long necked sorop. pods to per dakota'lls roamed this part of earth until a asteroid wiped them out. >> earth is really old. the earth changes a lot, and sometimes the species best adapted for a certain climate os it can go extinct. and if it could happen to the dinosaurs that were around for 150-some million years, could that also happen to us? >> reporter: a journey to the past may help us see into the future. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, on the isle of sky. and that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news
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continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city i'm elaine quijano. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. the department of homeland security says it knows the locations of all children separated from their parents under the trump administration's zero tolerance immigration policy. officials said saturday night more than 2,000 separated minors remained in government facilities. but it's not known how long the process to reunite families will take. a new cbs poll out finds 75% of democrats say reunifying separated families is23% of republicans. we begin our coverage with mireya villareal on the texas border. >> free the children now!
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>> reporter: hundreds of protesters in tornillo, texas chanted "free the children" near a port of entry gate sunday morning. the tent city is in a des lat part of the border about 40 miles outside of el paso. in a real estate by the department of health and human services the agency says they have a process to ensure that family members know the location of their children and have regular communication after separation. but federal public defenders in el paso say in a number of zero tolerance criminal cases their clients have not been told where their children are. so when the president said that the stories of grief are overexaggerated at the border, how do you contend with that? >> i would say mr. president, come to el paso and i will show you stories that are real stories of grief and sa not made up for the people who don't know where their 4-year-old child is. >> reporter: saturday a delegation of both republican and democratic politicians toured the site that's currently housing hundreds of unaccompanied teenagers.
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23 of them were recently separated from their families, and there are at least seven girls inside. >> the most surprising thing you saw in there as you're walking through, what really kind of caught your eye? >> you know, just the fact you that look around, we're in the middle of the desert and you've got a tent city here. i think it's in many ways a monument to the failure of the federal government. >> reporter: hhs also says separated children are able to communicate with their parent or guardian. cbs confirms those calls are limited to twice a week, ten minutes apiece. >> we need to make sure in congress that the trump administration provides a full and comprehensive list of every single child and their parents so that we can go then and audit and make sure that everybody's reunited. >> reporter: the federal government says they know where all of these separated children are and the agencies are talking to each other. but elaine, they also say what slows down the process is confirming that someone who wants to talk to one of these children is an actual parent or legal guardian.
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>> mireya villareal, thank you. it was late saturday night when the department of homeland security released its plan to reunite separated families and provided updated numbers. demarco morgan is here with the details. demarco. >> reporter: well, elaine, the numbers show the department of homeland security and health and human services are working to reunite the unaccompanied children with their families. however, there are more than 2,000 minors in federal custody who are still waiting to be turned back over to their legal guardians. the number comes after customs and border protection revealed it has reunited 522 children with their parents. 16 minors are scheduled to be rejoined with their parents before the night is over with. now, we've also learned that immigration and customs enforce thement has dedicated the port isabel detention center as the primary family reunification center for adults in their custody. and in addition, the government has revealed that 17% of the minors separated from adults in health and human services
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facilities were part of the administration's zero tolerance initiative. elaine, it will take a lot of work to reunite the remaining 83% who still appear without a parent or guardian. >> demarco morgan, thank you. when president trump signed an executive order last week effectively ending family separations, he called on the republican-controlled congress to pass a comprehensive immigration bill. when might that happen? here's errol barnett. >> i did talk to the white house yesterday. they say the president's still 100% behind us. >> reporter: with support from president trump republican congressman michael mccaul plans to put his so-called consensus immigration bill up for vote in the house soon. in addition to securing $25 billion for a border wall, it ends family separation and puts limits on legal immigration as well as providing a pathway to citizenship for dreamers. its chances of passing, though, are slim. >> our immigration laws are a woughingstock all over the rteef sin i las vegas saturday, president
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trump said republicans are wasting their time on immigration and should wait until after midterm elections to enact reform. but he continues to push a hard line. today suggesting deporting those suspect of crossing the border illegally "with no judges or court cases." >> i don't want to enforce laws out of a sense of hate or animosity toward people who want to live a life like i do. >> reporter: republican senator bob corker called the administration's zero tolerance policy a mistake, casting doubt any immigration bill w w w succeed before november.he was cbs news battleground tracker poll which found 73% of republicans feel undocumented immigrants should be punished as an example of toughness. while almost 80% of democrats think they should be treated well as an example of kindness. >> we've got to realize these people are wanting to live in a place like we live. we're the most fortunate people
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on earth to live in this country. that's why people are drawn to us. >> reporter: president trump is now hearing calls from democrats to go beyond his executive o inilseonrder ll tinionator chuck poach s i czar umto oveerrsee t reunification of families for the sake of thousands of children who in senator schumer's words remain in limbo. elaine? >> errol barnett, thank you. for a lot of people one image has come to symbolize the plight of immigrant children separated from their parents after entering the u.s. illegally. but in this case the picture does not tell the whole story. david begnaud goes behind the shot. >> we were patrolling the border. >> reporter: border patrol agent carlos ruiz was the first tone counter sandra sanchez and her 2-year-old daughter after they crissed the rio grande river into texas. >> we asked her to set the kid down in front of her. not away from her. she was right in front of
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so we could properly searchr. t mother. so the kid immediately started crying as she set her down. i personally went up to the mother and asked her are you doing okay? is the kid okay? and she said yes. she's tired and thirsty. it's 11:00 at nig. >> when i took this picture, i knew it would be important. i had no way of knowing that it would touch people quite on the level that it has. >> reporter: that's getty photographer john moore, who joined ruiz for a nearly nine-hour ride-along on the border. he was just feet from sanchez and the little girl. >> i asked her how long she'd been traveling. and she gave me this very weary look and she said she'd been on the road with her daughter for a mop. >> reporter: this picture moore took now graces "time" magazine, next to an t image of pheresident c trump.feo according to ruiz, mother and daughter were never separated. "time" corrected their article today, clarifying that they remained together. >> they're using it to symboli a policy, and that was not the case on this picture. it took less than two minutes. as soon as the search was finished, she immediately picked the girl up and the girl
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." president trump continues to bend federal regulations to support the oil and coal industries. so it may come as a surprise that the two fastest growing careers in the nation right now are solar panel and wind turbine technicians. perhaps more surprising is the state leading the way. oil-rich texas. steve inskeep of national public radio reports. >> how many miles of wind turbines are we walking through here? >> from the furthest point out on the project to the furthest point out back there is right about 13 miles. >> reporter: dave watkins oversees this wind farm. it's on route 66, exactly
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halfway between l.a. and chicago. bikers taking road trips on this historic highway rumble past one new wind farm after another. >> i heard someone in town say once that this particular area doesn't have a lot of oil, doesn't have a lot of water, but the one thing it does have is wind. >> reporter: which means a job for wesley house. >> look at this. best office in the world. >> reporter: he used to work on oil rigs. >> this is more stable. >> beautiful. >> reporter: with oil it's either hit or miss. >> reporter: a few years ago it was impractical to generate power in this remote spot. then texas spent $7 billion on power lines connecting windy north and west texas with cities south and east. it happened under energy secretary rick perry, who was governor then. >> we can deliver power to san antonio, dallas, houston, you name it.
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>> where the people are. >> yep. >> reporter: including the city that uses almost entirely renewable power. it is 501ilm mro f turbines are, down to georgetown, texas where the power is going top we've been driving all afternoon through the permian basin in the center of texas, and all along the way we've been passing oil pump jacks from an older economy and wind turbines from a new economy. when we arrived in georgetown, people told us coal plants kept the lights on for we have all this history but also we're one of the leading cities when it comes to innovation in the country. >> reporter: t mayor daleosshenepclubudliedcan market was changing. >> were you always a republican? >> always a republican. >> you grew up in a republican family? >> i did. >> who's your favorite president? >> president reagan. >> reporter: unlike many
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republicans ross accepts climate science. he supports clean power so much he bought an electric motorcycle. but ross says he approved wind and solar because it's affordable. >> this was first and foremost a business decision. and if you win the business argument then you're going to win the environmental argument. >> have the facts been changing? 10 years ago or 20 years ago wind and solar would have been more expensive, right? >> that's true. but now the facts are changing. it's a totally different landscape out there. four coal plants have closed. this is the economics of the matter. you buy wind and solar for, say, $18 a megawatt. you buy coal for 25? you have that choice? which one are you going to buy? >> so you're thinking about the art of the deal. >> the art of the deal. i might be able to teachp sothio renewable energy. all he has to do is invite me great can have ad discussion. >> very clean coal. eporter: the president has hailed a few new coal jobs. >> miners go back to work.
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>> reporter: but has not erased coal's disadvantage against natural gas and renewables. >> my overall impression is that president trump has been able to do less damage than i feared that he would. >> reporter: formere ic >> hi. >> mr. vice president. >> how are you, mr. mayor? >> reporter: featured georgetown's mayor in one his climate documentaries. >> market forces are moving the entire energy marketplace toward renewable energy. i'm hoping they'll follow the leafed dale ross rather than donald trump. >> reporter: renewable energy has continued growing since the election. even in texas, the conservative home of trump's energy secretary. so even though rick perry is the energy secretary for president trump, who's all about coal. >> right. >> reporter: i was in some way a visionary on wind. >> and he was. and without his leadership we wouldn't be having renewable energy here. now, he's shying away from that, and i need to be his pr guy.
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rock star david bowie passed away two years ago, just days after releasing what would be the final album of his illustrious career. now bowie fans can relive his life and musical legacy at a new exhibit in new york city. serena altschul took a tour. ♪ >> reporter: music pioneer. fashion icon. gender-bending rebel. ♪ rebel rebel david bowie was all of those things. and what he was is the subject of a record-breaking exhibit now at the brooklyn museum entitled "david bowie is." >> i think more than anybody he's been a great visualizer of
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music. ♪ >> reporter: an artist of sound and vision, explains curator matthew jacobowski. >> you know, there's canned insky who painted music. georgia but wer in o'e.keef new era wh we have rock and roll music. and david bowie was also able to tell you how rock and roll music should look. >> reporter: o'born david jones in 1947, he adopted the stage name bowie to avoid being confused with that other david jones. even as a teenager he was a musical chameleon. nds.d from the start he viewed rock and roll as a profession and an art. >> he really felt like the other members of these early bands, these teenagers weren't taking it seriously enough. >> right. >> and he was already in there thinking about what the publicity photo was, what the songs sounded like, what they
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looked like. so he was art directing all of his early bands right from the start. >> reporter: always looking for inspiration, he found it in a big way when he saw this. the very first color photograph of earth taken from space. he was so moved he wrote the song that would rocket him to fame.>> d nd a iidsavte blue and there's nothing i can do." >> and it was the anthem for that moment. forever. ♪ planet earth is blue and there's nothing i can do ♪ >> reporter: from "space oddity's" "major tom" --o next alter ego, martian glam rocker ziggy stardust, the exhibition features around 400 items, showing how bowie designed, dazzled, and then when he was done with them discarded
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identities that audiences adored. >> he kind of rewrote the book of rock and roll and said you don't have to be one character your whole career. you know, you don't have to be johnny cash. you don't have to be stevie nicks. >> but he was always -- had this energy, like bird-like energy. >> reporter: tony visconti was a young record producer who had moved to london in the '60s to find the next big thing. >> as soon as i saw him and listened to him speak, i said this guy is the next beatles. >> you did? >> it's not in the form of four people. it's one person. ♪ cha-cha-cha-changes >> reporter: working together on 14 albums, visconti remembers bowie reinventing himself time after time. from a pearly haired folk rocker. >> he walked in with the perm one day. i thought it was hilarious. >> reporter: something much
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different. ♪ >> so inside every white british boy was a soul singer like trying to burst out. you know. and david decided to go to philadelphia and make an r&b album. >> reporter: 1975's "young americans" was a smash hit. and gave bowie his first number one song in the u.s. ♪ fame "fame." co-written by john lennon. ♪ fame >> we met john lennon one night at david's apartment in new york. he came in. and we had a great night. and a few days later he was in the studio. >> oh, my god. so what was that like? >> it was kind of an x-rated night. i can't tell you everything. ♪ i ♪ >> reporter: at the height of his popularity bowie dropped out of sight and changed his sound yet again. this time moving to west berlin with friend and punk icon iggy pop.
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>> he and iggy asked me to give them haircuts. and then they would put a scarf and a cloth cap on and they could walk anywhere in berlin unnoticed. >> unnoticed. so how liberating to be able to just be completely free. >> and that's something he hadn't had for many years. ♪ let's dance ♪ put on your red shoes and dance the blues ♪ >> reporter: but he didn't stay hidden for long. with a string of top ten hits in the early '80s, bowie was a bona fide mega star. in heavy rotation on mtv. he began popping up on the silver screen as well, in movie roles that ranged from the biblical to the fantastical. ♪ i move aside for no one >> he is the world's best rock star who is also an actor. and he always told me that if he wasn't going to be a rock star he was going to be in musical
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theater. >> reporter: visconti also worked on bowie's 25th album, titled "black star." it would be his last released on the artist's 69th birthday in 2016. two days later david bowie was dead of liver cancer. >> "black star" was not meant to be the last album. he had another one in his head, told me about it. >> he did? >> yeah. i knew about it. >> it makes me sad. >> yeah, it made me sad too. ♪ fame >> reporter: last month the brooklyn museum held a costume party where revelers dressed u as their favorite pbowie. ♪ there's a star man it was a fitting tribute to a man who changed so often, yet always stayed true to himself. ♪ there's a star man waiting in the sky ♪
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mcdonald's new fresh beef quarter pounder is so good, garry's speechless. so here is gabrielle union. you know i can't resist all that 100% fresh beef juiciness. you're all i think about. ....the burger, garry.
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the new fresh beef quarter pounder burgers. one of the most famous animals in the world passed away last week. coco the gorilla. she was 46 years old. coco was the first known primate to master the art of sign language. anthony mason has her story. >> baby. >> reporter: with a sign language vocabulary of more than 1,000 words and the ability to understand thousands more. >> coco love. logowl gorilla, was a scientific marvel and source of wonder for decades. ♪ happy birthday to you
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coco, who died this week at the age of 46, captured the world's attention not just because of her ability to communicate but for her display of human-like emotions and empathy. >> they're crying. they are crying in the movie. >> reporter: coco was born in captivity in 1971 at the san francisco zoo and began learning sign language at the age of 1 from dr. penny patterson as part of a stanford research project. she became a sensation back in 1978 as the subject of a national geographic cover story. the cover, a picture coco took of herself in a mirror. coco would again grace the magazine's cover in 1985. this time it showed the gentle giant cradling her pet kitten, ball-ball. >> coco found a name for her new
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kitten. >> reporter: when the beloved dy nelife upset. >> coco.car. >> reporter: and seemed to understand the concept of death. over her lifetime coco also learned how to paint, play wind instruments -- ♪ and loved watching movies. being a celebrity also meant coco got to bond with other notable names. stars such as mr. rogers. >> can you teach me how to do that? >> reporter: betty white. >> oh, thank you, darling. i appreciate that very much. >> reporter: and even the late robin williams. the two hit it off instantly. and famously formed a close friendship. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this mornin"
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, june 25 it's monday, june 25th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning ews." on the border, protests outside annt iigra tt entyci detained as president trump takes a hard line against illegal immigration. in northern california, a wildfire that destroyed a dozen buildings threatens hundreds more. and protesters in minneapolis demand justice for a black man shot and killed by police.

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