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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  July 2, 2018 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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there are warnings and advisories as high temperatures and humidity continue to bake the midwest and northeast. also tonight, soaring heat and high winds fanning a new wildfire in northern california. white house national security advisor john bolton says he met with russian leader vladimir putin ahead of the summit with president trump and talk about the 2016 election. >> what he said was there was no meddling in 2016 by the russian state. nee whh he'llr bt trump'reme next week. democrats are taking sides and so is the top republican.
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>> there are people on that list that are -- whom i could notsu >> and the tourist boat explodes in the bahamas. one american is dead, several others injured. hi, everyone. i'm elaine quijano. the dangerous heat wave expected to peak in the northeast. forecasters say it won't go away any time soon and could last until the 4th of july. meg oliver takes a look at how some people are coping with the heat. >> reporter: sizzling temperatures beat down on thousands of determined athletes in the new york city triathlon sunday. >> the weather did get a bit hotter and humi were ae todl g conditions shut down the event early. >> for the safety of the runners. >> reporter: the mercury reached the mid 90s, but the real feel temperature hit over 100
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degrees. the oppressive heat wave stretches from the midwest with cities like detroit, cleveland and indianapolis breaking records near 100 to as far north as buffalo and burlington, baking in extreme heat and humidity. in chicago the fire department hosed down the michigan avenue draw bridge which was stuck together from the extreme heat. across the region, folks resorted to fountains and pools to find relief. while some volleyball players in new york central park didn't mind it. >> it was so hot today. i was just walking and looking like two seconds started to break a sweat already. >> reporter: forecasters say the hot sticky spell could last for more than a week, warning that the next 24 hours could be the most dangerous. the national weather service says heat kills more people each year than any other weather hazard, including tornadoes, lightning and floods. here in new york city, an excessive heat warning is in effect until monday morning.
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elaine? >> meg oliver, thank you. meteorologist kristen cornet from kmov, our st. louis affiliate, has the forecast. >> reporter: elaine, it's going to be another really hot day. on monday in the southern plains dallas expecting a high of 103. new york city the heat index is what it's going to feel like out there. it's going to be intense monday afternoon. peak index of 96 in new york city. 59 in st. louis. 104 is what it's going to feel like in memphis, tennessee. there is severe threat for monday as well. a low threat for parts of northeast into new england. higher threat for severe weather in the central plains into the upper midwest. looking ahead to the 4th of july holiday, mostly cloudy and 69 in san francisco, sunny and 108 in phoenix. sunshine to the central plains, scattered storms in the lower mississippi valley where dallas is expected.
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96, 88 in new orleans. scattered storms expected throughout the southeast and the mid-atlantic as well, and new york city where a 87 is expected on the 4th. elaine? >> kristen, thank you. heat is fueling two dozen wildfires in the northwest. a new fire erupted in northern california. in colorado there's been an arrest in a wildfire that's been burning for more nan a month. here are the details. >> reporter: fast moving flames in northern california kept fire crews busy saturday. gusty wind conditions fueled the blaze, and by sunday morning, the so-called county fire had exploded. night sky just outside sacramento was lit up as the fire tore through more than 22,000 acres, threatening dozens of structures, and forcing evacuations. it's the same in colorado where high temperatures and high winds are fueling the spring fire.
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>> pretty intense. i had about maybe five minutes to get out of there. >> reporter: so far it singed more than 41,000 acres and evacuated 2,000 homes, including ryan pitmans. >> across the street. 100 yards, 150 yards. flames were coming up and over. >> reporter: he was arrested and charged with arson. colorado's biggest fire continues to rage on a month after it first broke out. so far the four wind six fire has scorched 47 thour acres and according to fire officials, it could be another month before they're even close to containment. the 416 fire alone costs more than $26 million to fight and, elaine, it is just the beginning of fire season, a new fire forecast is warning warmer temperatures and limited rain could mean more fires that are even harder to contain. >> thanks.
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in the bahamas, one american woman was killed and seven others were injured after a tourist boat exploded. officials say there were o ba hhamians. dimarco morris has the story. >> move the boat. >> reporter: they saw a similar tourist vessel in distress. the boat's engine reportedly sploezed causing a raging flyer and black smoke. chris took this video. >> we saw this boat sitting there and i heard this weird noise, and then there was a flame coming up. within 16 seconds. whole boat was caught on fire. >> reporter: the coast board departed from clearwater, florida, after the royal bahamas police force asked for help. the crew landed and took four people back to the air station. at least one was taken to a
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hospital inerair lifted from the scene to nassau. it appears one victim was rescued by those also boating along. they told cbs news everyone was helping as much as they could. >> we were able to take all the passengers from the other boat to our boat and rescue them. we had a doctor on board from denmark, a tourist. so she helped a lot. >> reporter: the coast guard tells cbs news it is expecting the state department or u.s. embassy to release the name of the american killed. one witness said people who jumped in the water risked their own lives to help others. >> terrifying scene. thank you. we'll be right back.
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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>> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. >> president trump is talking with white house lawyers this weekend about his upcoming supreme court nominee, laying down the groundwork before announcing his pick next monday. errol barnett is in new jersey traveling with the president. >> i think we're going to have support from democrats frankly. i think if it's the right person. >> reporter: in an interview sunday, president trump voiced confidence that his yet to be announced supreme court nominee will be confirmed soon. as he finds a replacement for retiring justice anthony kennedy who has been a swing vote on critical issues like abortion. >> i think he's going to go very quickly. i think we're going to have a lot of support. >> reporter: an announcement is planned for monday and
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republicans want to seat that judge by the fall. to succeed, the president's choice needs the backing of nearly all senate republicans. >> a candidate for this important position who would overturn roe v. wade would not be acceptable to me. >> reporter: senator susan collins, a republican who supports abortion rights, was among a group of senators meeting with president trump at the white house last week. today she said there are people on the president's short list she would not support. >> i also suggested that he broaden his search beyond the list of 25 nominees. >> these are real lives, real impacts. >> reporter: senator richard blumenthal, a democrat on the judiciary committee, is deeply troubled at the prospect of moving the nation's highest court to the right. >> it could lead to criminalizing reproductive rights as they were prior to roe v. wade. women were prosecuted and women died, and women were denied access to contra exception.
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>> errol, president trump has been vocal this weekend about democrat demands to abolish the immigration and customs enforcement agency or i.c.e. let's listen. >> all it's going to do is lead to massive, massive crime. that's going to be their platform. open borders which equals crime. i think they'll never win another election so i'm actually quite happy about -- >> errol, what's the strategy there? >> reporter: elaine, president trump senses a political weakness among democrats. yes, some of them called for i.c.e. to be abolished at saturday's rallies. but others are calling for a far more democrat states stay silent. president trump knows taking a hard line on immigration was a winning position for him during the election and he believes the same will be true for republicans come midterm. so, if he can double down on his backing of i.c.e. agents, calling them brave and courageous while painting democrats as weak on crime, he feels he will limit republican losses come the midterm elections in november.
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>> errol barnett in new jersey, thank you. there was a quick evacuation on a united flight at washington's reagan national airport. officials say flight 6122 to houston had just left the gate when someone spotted smoke coming from the rear bathroom. the crew deployed the slides and got passengers to safety. no one was injured. airport officials say after the plane was clear, they found no evidence of smoke. services will be held this week in annapolis, maryland for two of the five newspaper shooting victims. a celebration of life for 59-year-old rob hiaasen will be held monday and the memorial service for wendi winters is scheduled for saturday. in the "capital gazette" today, the editorial staff thanked the community for their outpouring of support and also promised to keep reporting the news. president trump was asked about his upcoming meeting with russian leader vladimir putin today. the summit will be held on july 16th and take place in
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helsinki finland. just one week after the president meets with nato allies. here's roxana severi. >> reporter: two days after president trump said he'll ask his russian counterpart about moscow's alleged meddling in u.s. elections, he quickly changed the subject when asked about it on fox news. >> are you going to mention the meddling when you meet with russian president vladimir putin -- >> i want to see answers as to why we didn't take the server, why the fbi didn't take the server from the dnc. >> reporter: his national security advisor john bolton said it was brought up in his face-to-face meeting with the russian leader. >> what he said was there was no meddling in 2016 by the russian state. >> very little happens without vladimir putin's okay. >> i think that's an interesting statement. i think it's worth pursuing. i'm sure the president will want to pursue it. >> reporter: on friday president trump told reporters on air force one he'll discuss several issues at his upcoming summit
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with putin including serious and the status of crimea which russia seized from ukraine in 2014. >> do you think the u.s. will recognize crimea as part of russia? >> we'll have to see. >> is endorsing international borders can be redrawn by force, is that actually a topic? >> that's not the position of the united states. >> which is why it was news worthy when he said it. >> i don't know that's what he said. >> the upcoming summit has added to concern here in europe that president trump is moving closer to russia while criticizing the european union and nato. the president is set to attend a nato summit in brussels and visit the u.k. before flying to finland to sit down with president putin. elaine? >> roxana, thank you. in mexico millions of voters head to the polls today. this election is considered the most important in years. thousands of candidates are running for office, but none more important than president. andres manuel lopez obrador is
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ahead in the polls. the former mayor of mexico city has vowed to fight government ,ou first time in decades that a leftist has run the country. and it was a very bloody campaign season. in the nine months leading up to today's election, it is estimated 145 candidates were killed. coming up, sticker shock in san francisco. the million dollar dump that got multiple offers. and later, from presidential faces to superheroes, the
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making 1 $17,000 a year is a lot of money in most cities, but in san francisco it qualifies as low-income. forget about buying a house. a recent report says the median price for a single-family home in the bay area is $935,000. in the city it's even higher. here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: realtor larry gallego showed us this 1200 square foot three bedroom two bathroom house. you'd think he couldn't giveaway. >> you have leaks in the roof. it's pretty much dilapidated. >> reporter: but this is blue collar middle class fremont where the american dream means brace yourself for sticker shock. what did this house list for? >> a million dollar. >> what did it sell for? >> a million 230.
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>> reporter: a million 230? >> yes. >> reporter: this is a million dollar dump. the buyer beat out six prices above the asking price. this is average. >> it is the norma round here. >> reporter: that norm is fueled by thousands of well-paid tech workers who have driven up the median price of a san francisco home to $1.6 million, highest in the country. and while housing prices are rising faster than incomes nationwide, nowhere is it more evident than in the bay area where home values have soared a staggering 64% over the last five years. now, this house is a fire sale, but don't expect a bargain. it went on the market for just under a million and a half dollars. and serious buyers better bring cash. >> it's like having a big sprawling unaffordable gated community where people are looking in. >> and they're looking in from far away. they have to use a telescope.
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>> reporter: she tracks homes from curb san francisco. >> reporter: you do well, your husband does well. >> we couldn't afford to live anywhere in the bay area. >> reporter: prices go up. >> we don't see an end to it. >> reporter: this flyer could speak for the entire bay area housing market. enter at your own risk. mark strassmann, cbs news, san francisco. >> still ahead, in for the land, oregon, a demonstration turns violent. my gare irtated. i don't have to worry about that, do i? actually, you do. harmful bacteria lurk just below the gum line. crest gum detoxify works below the gum line to neutralize harmful plaque bacteria
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police in portland, oregon say a demonstration turned into a riot. they used flash grenade to help break up the clash. a right wing group obtained a permit to hold a rally.
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the antifa group were against it. they seized knives, guns and chemical sprays. another day in thailand searching for 12 boys and soccer coach who have been missing more than a week. divers went into a cave but failed to make headway. they tried to get to dry area where they hope the boys are hiding. first they have to go through a murky half mile to get to a chamber. a federal judge temporarily extended pra extended program paying for their stay. it was set to expire sunday but will end on tuesday. about 1700 people have been using the vouchers since losing their homes after hurricane maria decimated the island last fall. the cbs overnight news will be right back.
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>> dr. stanley: remember this: cannot change the laws of god. when he has visited you in some form of adversity and he brings you through that, that's like he has increased the strength of the foundation of your life and your faith in him. [music]
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it's no secret former president george h.w. bush loves wearing distinctive socks. in april he wore a pair festuneed with books. he did it because she was committed to promoting literacy. where did he get them? >> reporter: john is building a sock business with his dad. >> i don't care who you are. there is a sock for you here. >> reporter: the 22-year-old with down syndrome handles all sorts of jobs. >> i drew this one.
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>> reporter: which leaves his father mark proud, not surprised. >> that's why you have such a following. >> reporter: he didn't think down syndrome would mean -- john's crazy socks was born. a $2.2 million in revenue so far, they're doing well. with 16 of 35 jobs they created, held down by differently abled workers, they are also doing good. >> they're excited to be here. they have great skills and a great spirit. >> reporter: certain socks are linked to certain charities. each pair sold generates a donation. $100,000 and counting. while youtube and social media had help spread the word, their most famous customer put them on the map. who is that letter from? >> that's from george bush. >> reporter: from george bush. the president who signed the americans with disabilities act
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into law. >> on world down syndrome day, he wore john's down syndrome socks and sent out a tweet wearing them and thanking his friend. >> reporter: that was good for business. but when the 41st president wore a pair to pay tribute to barbara busch's literacy campaigns at her funeral, that was good for the soul. >> it made me feel good. every day makes me happy. >> we've learned the more we do for others, the better off we are. >> reporter: robert crone an sees monday any warming feet. now to corner the market warming hearts along the way. jim axelrod, cbs news, huntington, new york. >> fantastic. and that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this
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>> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. >> welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. today excessive heat will bake much of the country again as millions of americans sweat through a dangerous heat wave. temperatures are soaring well into the 90s. in some places it could feel like it's over 100 degrees. meg oliver begins our coverage. >> that's it, it's your race. come on. >> reporter: sizzling temperatures beat down on thousands of determined athletes from the new york city triathlon sunday. >> the weather did get a little bit hotter and humid but we were able to muddle through it. >> reporter: the stifling conditions shutdown the event early. >> for the safety of the runners. >> reporter: the mercury reached
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the mid 90s, but the real feel temperature hit over 100 degrees. the oppressive heat wave stretches from the midwest with cities like detroit, cleveland, and indianapolis breaking records near 100, to as far north as buffalo and burlington, baking in extreme heat and humidity. in chicago, the fire department hosed down the michigan avenue draw bridge which was stuck together from the extreme heat. across the region, folks resorted to fountains and pools to find relief. while some volleyball players in new york central park didn't mind it. >> it was so hot today. i was just walking and looking like two seconds started to break a sweat already. >> reporter: forecasters say the hot sticky spell could last for more than a week. warning that the next 24 hours could be the most dangerous. the national weather service says heat kills more people each year than any other weather hazard, including tornadoes, lightning and floods.
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here in new york city, an excessive heat warning is in effect until monday morning. elaine? >> meg oliver, thank you. meteorologist kristen cornet from kmov, our st. louis affiliate, has the forecast. >> elaine, it's going to be another really hot day. on monday in the southern plains check out dallas expecting a forecast high of 103. 94 in memphis. st. louis and cincinnati looking for 89, 95 in new york city, but it's the heat index what it's going to feel like out there. it's going to be so intense monday afternoon. peak heat index of 96 in new york city. 95 in st. louis. 104 is what it's going to feel like in memphis, tennessee. now, there is the threat for some severe weather on monday as well. it's a low end threat for parts of the northeast into new england. little bit higher threat for severe weather as we get into the central plains, into the upper midwest. looking ahead to the 4th of july holiday, mostly cloudy and 69 in san francisco, sunny and 108 in phoenix. sunshine through the central plains, scattered storms in the
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lower mississippi valley where dallas is expected 96. tos expected throughout the southeast into the mid-atlantic as well. all the way into new york city where a high of 87 is expected on the 4th. elaine? >> kristen cornet, thank you. >> the heat and high winds are fueling more than two dozen wildfires in the west. a new fire erupted in northern california, and in colorado there's been an arrest in a wildfire that's been burning for more than a month. >> reporter: fast moving flames kept fire crews busy saturday. gusty wind conditions fueled the blaze and by sunday morning the so-called county fire had exploded. night sky just outside sacramento was lit up as the fire tore through more than 22,000 acres, threatening dozens of structures, and forcing evacuations. it's the same in colorado where high temperatures and high winds
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are fueling the spring fire. >> pretty intense. i had about maybe five minutes to get out of there. >> reporter: so far it singed more than 41,000 acres and evacuated 2000 homes, including ryan pitman's. >> across the street, maybe 150 yards, 200 yards, the flames were coming up and over. >> reporter: on saturday jesper jorge an son was arrested and charged with arson in connection with this fire. nearly 200 miles west, colorado's biggest fire continues to rage on a month after it first broke out. so far, the 416 fire has scorched 47,000 acres and according to fire officials, it could be another month before they are even close to containment. >> in the bahamas, one american woman was killed and seven others were injured after a tourist boat exploded. officials say there were 12 people on board, 10 americans and two bahamians. the cause is under investigation.
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dimarco morgan has the story. >> move the boat. >> reporter: a similar tourist vessel was in distress. the boat's engine reportedly exploded causing a raging fire and black smoke. chris took this video. >> we just saw like this boat sitting there and i heard this weird noise, and then there was a flame coming up and within 15, 30 seconds, the whole boat was caught on fire. >> reporter: the coast guard deployed its hc 130 from clearwater, florida after the royal bahamas police asked for help. that coast guard landed in exuma and one was taken to a hospital in st. petersburg. six others were air lifted to a hospital in nassau. it appears one victim was rescued by those also boating along the cays. cbs news was told everyone was
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helping as much as they could. >> we were stable to take all the passengers from this other boat to our boat and rescue them. we had a doctor on board from denmark, a tourist, so she helped a lot. >> reporter: the coast guard tells cbs news it is expecting the state department or the u.s. embassy to relace the names of the american killed. one witness said people who jumped into the water during the emergency risked their own life to help others. elaine? >> terrifying scene. de marco, thank you. president trump is talking with white house lawyers this weekend about his upcoming supreme court nominee, laying down the groundwork before announcing his pick next monday. errol barnett is in new jersey traveling with the president. >> i think we're going to have support from democrats frankly. i think if it's the right person. >> reporter: in an interview sunday, president trump voiced confidence that has yet to be announced supreme court nominee will be confirmed soon as he finds a replacement for retiring
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justice anthony kennedy. >> i think we'll have a lot of support. >> reporter: an announcement is planned a week from monday and republicans want to seat that judge by the fall. to succeed, the president's choice needs the backing of nearly all senate republicans. >> a candidate for this important position who would overturn roe v. wade would not be acceptable to me. >> reporter: senator susan collins, a republican who supports abortion rights, was among a group of senators meeting with president trump at the white house last week. today she said there are people on the president's short list she would not support. >> i also suggested that he broaden his search beyond the list of 25 nominees. >> these are real lives, real impacts. >> reporter: senator richard blumenthal, a democrat on the committee, is concerned about moving the highest court to the right. >> it could lead to criminalizing reproductive rights as they were prior to roe
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>> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. >> it's no secret that many college students struggle to payoff massive student loan debts, but for some the pursuit of a higher education includes fighting for basic needs that others take for granted. here's carter evans. >> i truly believe that i'm going to a different school than my peers are. they have houses right up the hill. they have everything they need. that's not the ucla i go to. >> reporter: while 23-year-old alejandro reyes may blend in perfectly on campus, he's keeping a secret from most of his classmates. he's homeless. his school locker is his closet. he brushes his teeth in a public rest room and at times he sleeps
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on this sofa inside a 24-hour campus library. >> my first quarter here i actually lived inside of my car. that's where i had all my clothes, everything i needed for the day. >> reporter: but after the car was totaled in an accident, a homeless shelter a few miles way from the campus was his only option. according to the u.s. department of education, there were at least 32,000 homeless college students in 2017. alejandro is hoping to attend medical school. >> i want to be an orthopedic surgeon. >> reporter: alejandro's yearly tuition at ucla is about $13,000, which is covered by financial aid, student loans and a job on campus. but after books and food, there's nothing left for rent. >> when you look at this campus, the beauty prestige of being here, it's hard to imagine't me too hom to. >> it's hard to imagine. obviously it does exist. it's just hard to grasp and put
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into a quantitative form. >> reporter: it's not just a housing problem. a survey of students at ten university of california campuses reveals 48% of under class men are food insecure and have to skip meals. to combat the problem ucula even has an on-campus food pantry where students can pickup items for free, no questions asked. >> the problem with homelessness in universities is that because we don't want to stand out, that the university has no idea that we even exist. >> reporter: and alejandro will now have to find another place to live. his shelter limits stays and his time has already run out. but he won't graduate until 2020. carter evans, los angeles. >> the cbs overnight news will be right back. , e
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60% of women wear the wrong size pad and can experience leaks. you don't have to with always my fit try the next size up and get up to 20% better coverage day or night. because better coverage means better protection always california's redwood forests are one of america's most beloved natural wonders. now an effort to help save the towering trees involves cutting some of them down. lee cowan shows us why in a story for sunday morning. >> reporter: deep in one of california's few remaining old growth forests sat an oddity. popular with tourists since the 1880s, a giant sequoia, so giant a tunnel was carved in its trunk. last year that tree toppled over in a storm. it was estimated to be around a thousand years old.
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it and other trees like it in the redwood family are a testament to how much we are fascinated by these ancient evergreens. but it's also a reminder of just how much we've abused them. >> looked like the red woods were a limitless resource that we could never posy ofhem down. we needed those for houses and lumber camps and mine shaft tunnel sure up poles, everything. seems like a limitless resource. >> reporter: alex is a ranger at the very first state park in california. big basin red woods state park. about 65 miles south of san francisco. it's been a park since 1902, ever since a photographer named andrew p. hill led the first of its kind conservation charge to protect giants like this one. what's now called the father of the forest tree. >> it was probably only going to be another six months to a year before all of these old growth trees that we're standing in right now would have been gone.
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>> reporter: this was that close? >> that close. >> reporter: those trees were saved. other old growth groves were not so lucky. in a 1965 cbs news documentary, our own charles kurault reported on the last remaining forest either into lumber or to clear them out of the way to make room for a highway. >> 100 years ago, the great original redwood forest covered 2 million acres along the california coast. but more than two-thirds of the virgin redwood trees are gone. >> reporter: their loss was lamented even then. >> the more you can preserve is better. i don't think the world needs a. pretty soon you're going to end up with roads with no place to go on them.
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>> reporter: the final tally, 95st of california's original redwood forest was logged, wiped clean, leaving only giant stumps as reminders of what had stood here for so long. and it's not as if the threat is entirely over. even today, only about a quarter of the coast redwood habitat is protected from commercial logging and development. that said, those that remain stand as cathedrals of nature. some have been here long before columbus landed in the americas, and touwered some 30 stories tall. yes, that's a grown person being dwarfed by that massive trunk. >> what's it l wheu see someone who has never been in a redwood forest? >> that is the best. >> reporter: what do they say? >> usually something along the lines of oh, my god! >> reporter: sam is president and ceo of the nonprofit save
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the red woods league. they started buying up foreof the land hundreds of years ago. most is younger forests that aren't maturing as big and fast as some conservationists would like to see. and these, what do you think, 50, 60 years old? >> they're babies. >> reporter: these are just babies? >> these are just babies. we're working with redwood forests that have been clear-cut multiple times and are growing back with such a density of stems that they're crowding each other out and it becomes a thicket of spindly trees that don't get enough sunlight, that don't get enough water. >> reporter: there's too much competition? >> there is too much competition. >> reporter: so there is a shuttle shift underway. from forest conservation to forest restoration, which includes one idea that may have you scratching your heads. logging. over the next five years, save the redwoods league will be working to thin over 10,000 acres of smaller trees in order to give the remaining redwoods
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more space, more nutrients and more light in order to grow faster. >> just like in the garden where you prune to accelerate the growth of the dominant plants, you need to thin. >> reporter: but figuring out which of these precious trees stay and which ones go is no easy decision. >> we treat all the trees like they're the same but they're really not. >> reporter: save the redwoods league amy along with u.c. california davis professor david neil are trying to unlock the genetic secrets of some of the oldest living things on the planet. >> as old as they are, as iconic as they are, we don't really know that much about them, right? >> they're the strong silent type and so we have to use science to help decode what's going on with these trees. >> reporter: last year in two labs, one at u.c. davis, the other at johns hopkins university in baltimore, they began the complex task of mapping the redwood genome to
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uncover nature's blueprint that is every tree as it is to us. >> you have to have a parts list to understand whether anything is the same or different. the parts for redwood did not exist. >> reporter: it's a daunting task. >> we won't be able to do it overnight. it will take a few years. but it's achievable. >> reporter: we as humans have 3 billion pairs of dna. pretty complicated. but the coast redwood has some 30 billion base pairs. >> i thought we were the most complex organisms on earth. >> you should rethink that. >> reporter: i see probably two or three that look pretty good. >> reporter: it all starts with the redwood's cones and the seeds embedded in them high up in the yeeone hma y all the wp there and hand so you're climbing 2 or 300 feet in the air? >> not me. i would like to. >> reporter: it's from the seeds where the dna is extracted, one
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scalpel cut at a time. millions of little pieces of dna, the chemical building blocks of life are all sequenced and fed into a powerful computer. >> basically you take a puzzle and throw it on the floor, now you have to put it back together. >> reporter: the $2.6 million project has been funded by mostly private donations. when it's done, scientists will have mapped enough of the genome in the trees to help identify the kinds that are the most resilient and likely to live a nice long life. >> within 100 years, we absolutely can set these forests on a healthy trajectory where they have many of the characteristics we're looking for. >> reporter: call it a nurturing nudge from science, all to save what john steinbeck once called, ambassadors from another time. >> when so much of the conversation today is about what we've lost, the damning of the world's waterways, the receding glaciers, we have in the redwood
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forest a sense of hope, and we can truly leave the world better than we found it.
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it's no secret former president george h.w. bush likes to wear distinctive works. he wore the socks with books because his wife was committed to literacy. where did he get them? >>sith his dad. >> i don't care who you are. there's a stock for you here. >> reporter: the 22-year-old with down syndrome handles all sorts of jobs. is this a new design? >> a new design. >> reporter: you drew this? >> i drew this one. >> reporter: which leaves his
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father mark proud, but not surprised. >> it's why you have such a following. >> reporter: he knew down syndrome didn't mean limits others might assume it would. >> he came to me and said, dad, i want to go into business with you. >> reporter: so 18 months ago john's crazy socks was born. at $2.2 million in revenue so far, they're doing well. with 16 of 35 jobs they created, held down by differently abled workers, they are also doing good. >> they're excited to be here. they have great skills and a great spirit. >> reporter: certain socks are linked to certain charities. each pair sold generates a donation. $100,000 and counting. while youtube and social media had help spread the word, their most famous customer put them on the map. who is that letter from? >> that's from george bush. >> reporter: from george bush? the president who signed the americans with disabilities act
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into law. >> on world down syndrome day, he wore john's down syndrome superhero socks and sent out a tweet thanking him. >> reporter: that was good for business. but when the 41st president wore socks at barbara bush's funeral, that was good for the soul. >> it makes me feel good. it makes every day makes me happy. >> we have learned the more we do for others, the better off we are. >> reporter: robert sees money in warmi feet. >> jingle bells. >> reporter: now to corner the market on warming hearts along the way. jim axelrod, cbs news, huntington, new york. >> fantastic. and that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning from the broadcast center nyork.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, july 2nd, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." dangerously hot temperatures hit the midwest and the east coast, and it looks like the sweltering heat may be sticking around for the fourth of july. there are signs north kor may be expanding plant while the white house security says there's a plan to deknew caloryize the country. and lebron james is going to hollywood. he's leaving the cast and signing a four-year $154 million contract with the lakers.

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