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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 5, 2018 3:00am-3:59am PST

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the final push before election day. candidates across the country are rallying support, with president trump and former president obama help iing out. also tonight, some of the u.s. troops president trump sent to the border have arrived. they're helping protect against a migrant caravan that's nearly 700 miles away. catfishing scams target the lonely, and are being called "emotional terrorism." welcome to "cbs overnight news." i'm elaine quijano.
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a new cbs battleground tracker poll has the democrats in position to take control of the house. they couldened the day with 225 seats, which is just over the 218 they need to win. in the senate, republicans currently hold the edge-- 51 seats to 49. but most of seats on the ballot this year are are already democratic so republicans have a better than even chance to maintain control there. president trump and former president obama were out on the campaign trail today doing their best to get out the party faithful. >> nobody else could dot the job we're doing. >> reporter: president trump echoed a b isn'tment from his nationwide blitz of rallies. a closing argument for the gop. >> democrats are openly encouraging millions of illegal aliens to break our laws. >> reporter: sunday he rallies in tennessee and here in georgia where he's supporting brian
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kemp. polls show the secretary of state is in a tight race with the democratic nominee stacey abrams, who could become the first african-american female governor in american history. today kemp's office announced a failed attempt to hack the voter registration system and an investigation of the democratic party for possibly cyber crimes. abrams says it's a last ditch effort. >> this is a prosecute an i part of my opponent to distract people. >> reporter: there's deep intensity surrounding many ra s races. republicans are claiming credit for a steadily improving economy, with low unemployment. while democrats have made health care a central issue, placing former president barack obama center stage. >> suddenly republicans are saying they are going to protect your preexisting conditions when they have literally been doing the opposite. >> reporter: now, the key for democratic and republican wins
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come tuesday will be voter turnout. and polls show this could be a record-setting midterm election. for example, by friday, more early votes had been cast than by all early voters in 2014 in some 27 states. elaine. >> errol, thanks. the balance of power in both the house and the senate is on the line. we have cbs news elections and surveys director anthony salvanto here. so anthony, what would it take for the democrats to take control of the house? >> they need strong turnout. and they need to continue to get the people who in the polls say they are crossing over from having voted for then-candidate trump in 2016 to voting for a democrat for the house now. those folks. our latest estimate have it that the democrats would get 225 seats if the election were held today. but there is a margin of error on that, and i don't mean just as the statistics go, i mean as the politics go. if turnout does not merge, if a
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lot of young voters do not come out, people who haven't voted in midterms before, if they stay home, the republicans hold the house. >> what about on the senate side specifically? you don't really necessarily hear the democrats talking about that, in particularly optimistic turns, how much of an uphill climb do they have there? >> it is going to be hard for the democrats. the republicans are in position to hold on to the senate, maybe even add to their majority. the reason for that is the partisanship that we have seen in this election. we've see very few people-- i mentioned crossover voters, there are very few in number. and especially in a lot of these states, where you get from indiana to missouri to montana to north dakota. i just named a string of seats across the midwest that donald trump won by wide margins. and so, when you get partisan voting like that, it is much harder for the opposing party to come in and draw a lot of different voters. >> all right, anthony salvanto. thanks so much, anthony. >> thanks. >> democrats hope to regain control of the house from the
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republicans. to do that, they need to flip 24 seats. more than half of them are in the midwest. here's dean reynolds. >> how are you doing? >> reporter: cheri bustos is something of a rare bird in politics. she is the only mid-westerner and the only democrat in the house leadership who represents a district carried by donald trump. her secret? >> first of all, you show up to places where, unfortunately, democrats have had a recent track record of not showing up. >> i love dogs. >> reporter: showing up at places like the small towns that dot her 7,000 square mile district south and west of chicago. >> and i typically just say, "i'm cheri bustos. i'll be flying back out to washington. and what do you want me to know?" >> reporter: she hears a lot about health insurance, prescription drug prices, and stalemate in washington. are the people you talk to exuberant about the stock market? >> they don't-- i never hear anybody talk about the stock market. >> reporter: are they happy about the tax cut that the republicans passed? >> they don't talk a whole lot about that either.
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>> reporter: she's currently running well ahead of her republican challenger bill fawell, and other democrats have taken notice. >> she's changed the focus. we used to be all about working class people. we used to be about the people we're raised with. she has made the house focus on where we come from. >> reporter: while she campaigns for herself, bustos is busy assisting other democratic hopefuls, such as lauren underwood. she's running in a surprisingly close race against republican congressman randy hultgren. >> we're honored to be joined tonight by congressman randy hultgren. >> reporter: who won an important shoutout of his own last weekend. a first time candidate, underwood told us bustos has been a big help in how to address trump supporters. >> can i relate to them? yes, they're my next-door neighbors! mentor throughout the campaign. she encouraged us to do things like post stuff at supermarkets, talk to peopyirerrectheir fortunes in the land of trump,
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cheri bustos is showing them how it's done. you think democrats will win the house? >> i think we will. >> reporter: dean reynolds, cbs news, sycamore, illinois. another closely watched race is in texas between ted cruz and o'rork. we spoke with both candidates. >> if you look at the dynamics, we have numbers on our side. there are a lot more conservatives than liberals. what the campaign has had on their side is intensity. the liberals in texas are really, really mad that they hate president trump. that anger is dangerous. that anger is mobilizing. it means they are going to et show up no matter what. they will crawl over broken glass to show up. >> are you working that more people that show up, the better your odds of winning? >> i think the more people that show up, the better et we do. because the people who are fired up right now are are fired up to do something great for this country. >> election coverage this is not a bed.
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some u.s. troops are now on the u.s. border with mexico. their job is to help defend against the migrant caravan that's heading north. it's been one of trump's main focuses at his rallies. in the latest cbs battleground tracker poll, 74% of republicans said, "yes"-- that the caravan posed a threat to the u.s. while 77% of democrats said, "no." mireya villarreal has more from the border. >> reporter: just above me is one of the busiest ports of entry in the united states. it actually connects the city of reynosa, mexico to hidalgo, texas. now traditionally, the rio grande river here is what separates these two countries, but now there's a new added barrier. barbed wire fencing just like this has gone up in several spots along the riverbed.
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the department of defense is attempting to deploy 7,000 troops to the southern border-- a plan the president continues to boast about at rallies around the country. >> and i noticed all that beautiful barbed wire going up today. barbed wire used properly can be a beautiful sight. >> reporter: the plan to reinforce the border was born, in part, because of a migrant caravan that's nearly 700 miles away. border patrol sector, chief manny padilla, welcomes the help. >> they have shown some violence in southern mexico into guatemala, so that these are the preparations for that. >> reporter: these troops are not expected to go out and look for illegal immigrants. they are supposed to be in a supporting role, like putting up barbed wire fencing just like this. we did speak to a number of people who live along the border here, who says this feels like a midterm election distraction. elaine. >> mireya, thank you. the mayor of a utah city has been killed in afghanistan. 39-year-old brent taylor was a member of the utah national
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guard and father of seven. the state department says he was killed by a member of the afghan security forces in kabul. one other service member was wounded. this is the second insider attack in less than a month. new details about the gunman who opened fire in a florida yoga studio, killing two people. scott paul beierle was known to tallahassee police, and had a history of violence towards young women. here's manuel bojorquez. >> reporter: another sanctuary pierced by gunfire, when a man stormed into a tallahassee florida yoga studio friday night killing two women. 21-year-old maura binkley was a florida state university student. 61-year-old nancy van vessem was a professor at the school's college of medicine. police say 40-year-old scott paul beierle shot six people and pistol-whipped another man in the attack at hot yoga tallahassee. the army veteran died after he turned the gun on himself. >> several people inside fought
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back, and tried to not only save themselves but other people. >> the gentleman who came in apparently tried to fight off the attacker. and he had quite a few wounds on his face. >> reporter: beierle was known to tallahassee police. in 2016, after he allegedly slapped and grabbed a woman at a pool, he was charged with battery. two years earlier, he was charged with trespassing at florida state university. in 2012, another battery charge for grabbing a woman in a campus dining hall. >> i see dreadlocks as the black man's mullet. the pants below the butt. you realize that's a gay thing? you don't have to be a degenerate. you don't have to be disgusting. >> reporter: the former high school teacher posted condescending and racist youtube videos. youtube took the channel down on saturday afternoon. there has been an outpouring of support for victims, two who remain in the hospital. deputies in volusia county have been searching the gunman's home and reviewing his electronic devices and social media
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profiles. >> manny, thank you. in iran, a new round of tough sanctions begin tomorrow. the trump administration put them in place after the president withdrew from the iran nuclear deal in may. on "face the nation," secretary of state mike pompeo defended the sanctions. >> the whole world understands that these sanctions are real. that they are important, that they drive the iranian people's opportunity to make the changes in iran that they so desperately want. and stop iran from having the wealth and money that they need to continue to foment terror around the world. >> elizabeth palmer has been in tehran all week, as iranians prepare for this new round of sanctions. >> reporter: charter buses i- prt. this group's signs may have been on message. the boys themselves, not so much.
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there were plenty of hostile banners, but the atmosphere was far from threatening. even for an american tv crew. in spite of a couple of flag-burnings, and, of course, the ritual chants of "death to america." what is your message to mr. trump? >> okay. mr. trump, mr. donald trump, what you are doing to us is nothing. we don't care. >> reporter: that bravado was echoed on stage by the head of iran's revolutionary guards, mohammad ali jafari. he warned that the u.s. was in decline, and the america threatened iran's powerful military at its peril. behind this show of defiance, iran's leaders are realistic. they may fantasize about getting rid of the administration by force, but they know full-well this is a waiting game. everyone is resigned: from
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politicians and the people in the crowd, to the millions of iranians who are just trying to get on with their lives. everyone's preparing to hunker down and survive under sanction, until president trump either leaves the white house, or an unexpected political shift somehow allows iran in from the cold. we saved hundreds on our car insurance when we switched to geico. this is how it made me feel. it was like that feeling when you're mowing the lawn on a sunny day... ...and without even trying, you end up with one last strip that's exactly the width of your mower. when you're done, it looks so good you post a picture iaets 127 likes. geico. fifteen minutes could save you
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>> catfishing is a scam that targets people looking for love online. victims in the u.s. and canada say they lost nearly a billion dollars over the last three years. meg oliver tracked down victims on both sides of the scam. >> reporter: 65-year-old roxanne reed fell for someone on facebook who called themselves scott humpal. although they never met, she sent the scammer more than $50,000 for medical bills. when she ran out of cash, she allegedly plotted to kill her 88-year-old mother for insurance money. have you ever been in a relationship with roxanne reed? >> no. >> reporter: the real scott humpal lives ove12 away in corpus christi, texas.
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seven years ago, humpal's wife died in a plane crash, soon after he started receiving suspicious messages on facebook. >> it just seemed odd, because i didn't know them. so i sent a message back and say, "do i know you?" and then they would say, "yes." >> reporter: humpal discovered scammers had created multiple profiles under his name. identity theft expert adam levin says humpal checked off all the boxes for a catfisher: a handsome well-to-do widower. how would you describe these catfishing fraudsters? >> they're emotional terrorists. >> reporter: emotional terrorists? >> they don't care who they destroy, how they destroy them, whatever. all they want is they want money. >> reporter: for catfishing victims like retired nursing assistant beverly franzke, red flags are often missed. why did you go on match.com? >> maybe to find somebody to talk to. >> reporter: she fell for a man claiming to be a serviceman stationed in afghanistan. beverly sent the stranger more than $30,000 for his sick child's medical bills. why did you send him money? this is a person you had never met in person. >> i don't know, i'm a caregiver. i've always taken care of people. >> reporter: are you embarrassed that this happened?
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>> i'm not embarrassed, no. because nobody should be embarrassed for trying to help somebody. >> reporter: and scott humpal still receives messages each day from people around the world who have fallen prey to scams. as for roxanne reed, the district attorney is determining how to proceed in a case where the accused is both a suspect and a victim. elaine. >> so important for people to be aware of these scams. meg oliver, thank you. up next, neck-and-neck for 26 miles. the winners of the new york city marathon.
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know what turns me on? my better half, hors d oeuvres and bubbly. and when i really want to take it up a notch we use k-y yours & mine. tingling for me, warming for him. wow! this holiday season get what you want dove gives you so you can wear anything.ms from athletic tops to zebra dresses, and everything in between. enjoy 48 hour protection and softer, smoother underarms. with dove antiperspirants. a california music teacher was arrested and charged with child abuse, after a violent fistfight with a student at maywood academy high school-- just outside of los angeles. the teacher, identified as 64-year-old marston riley, appeared on cell phone video end pummel the boy to the ground. witnesses say the fight started after riley asked the student t
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uniform. the student allegedly responded with a tirade of racial slurs. >> it was just back and forth, back and forth, and that is when the teacher decided to throw a punch, and that's when everything happened. >> the 14-year-old student was taken to a hospital and treated. a gofundme page was started by the teacher's supporters to raise money for his legal fees. they say he's been attacked physically or verbally in the past. riley posted bail yesterday. a dramatic finish at the new york city marathon. lelisa desisa of ethiopia, and fellow countryman shura kitata ran practically step-for-step the last mile. but desisa crossed the finish line first, winning by less than two seconds. and for the women, mary keitany of kenya won for the fourth time, she missed setting a course record by 17 seconds. still ahead, the injured jockey
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a thrilling end to the breeder's cup in louisville, kentucky. accelerate took the lead down the final stretch to win the $6 million classic. jockeys risk their lives every time they ride. jamie yuccas caught up with an injured athlete determined to get back in the saddle. >> here it is! >> reporter: it was the first time in nearly four decades: a horse captured racing's biggest prize. >> american pharoah was won the triple crown! >> reporter: for jockey vicar espinoza, the race track has been his life's passion.
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mostly out of the limelight, working powerful thoroughbreds. and it was here at the iconic del mar race track, that a routine july run went horribly wrong. >> there was no warning, nothing. i was on the horse working, and then next thing i know, just disappear out of my legs. >> reporter: that horse, bobby abu dhabi, suddenly collapsed, throwing espinoza to the ground. this t.m.z. video shows him lying motionless, his neck broken. >> i try to move as hard as i can. my legs-- but nothing. >> reporter: among those who raced to his bedside was friend and fellow hall of fame jockey gary stevens. >> we sat for a couple of hours. and he was scared. >> reporter: the vertebrae fracture nearly paralyzed him, but within two weeks, espinoza regained movement, working through enormous pain. he's not only back on his feet, but dreams of being back in the
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do you think you'll race again? >> i hope so. >> reporter: stevens understands. he fractured his neck during this horrifying spill in 2003. >> i know he's hoping, and we all hope that he can ride again, but i hope he doesn't. >> reporter: you hope he doesn't ride again? >> yeah. >> reporter: was it more exciting to you to win the triple crown, or to feel your legs? >> wow, that's a tough question. it was fun winning the triple crown, but having my legs back, there's nothing like it. that was the best thing ever happen to me. >> reporter: and for what happens next, espinoza says don't bet against him. jamie yuccas, cbs news, del mar, cafornia. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. americans go the polls tomorrow. a new battleground tracker poll finds that the democrats have a chance to take control of the house. they could end the day with 225 seats, which is just over the 218 they need to win. in the senate, another story. republicans currently hold the edge 51 seats to 49. but most of the seat this is year are already democratic. so republicans have a better than even chance to maintain control there. president trump and former president obama have been out on the campaign trail doing their best to get out the party faithful. >> we are doing a great job at the border. nobody else could do the job
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that we're doing. >> reporter: speaking before his flight to the south, president trump echoed a sentiment from his nationwide blitz of rallies. president trump has made immigration his closing argument for the g.o.p. >> sunday he rallies in tennessee and here in georgia where he is supporting the republican nominee for governor brian kemp. polls show the secretary of state is in a tight race for the democratic nominee stacey abrams, who could become the first african-american female governmeor in american history. today kemp's office announced a failed attempt to hack georgia's voter registration system and an investigation of the state's democratic party for possibly cyber crimes. democrats deny the charge, and abrams says it's a last-ditch effort. >> this is a desperate attempt on the part of my opponent to distract people. >> reporter: there is deep intensity surrounding many midterm races, which are effectively seen as a referendum on president trump. republicans are claiming credit for a steadily improving
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economy, with low unemployment. while democrats have made health care a central issue, placing former president barack obama center stage. >> when i was president, republicans voted more than a dozen times to get rid of protections for pre-existing conditions. democrats are going to protect your care, period. >> reporter: now, the key for democratic and republican wins come tuesday will be voter turnout. record-setting midterm election. for example, by friday, more early votes had been cast than all early voters in 2014 in some 27 states. elaine. >> errol, thanks. the balance of power in both the house and the senate is on the line. we have cbs news elections and surveys director anthony salvanto here. for the democrats to take control of the house? >> they need strong turnout. and they need to continue to get the people, who in the polls say they are crossing over from
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having voted for then-candidate trump in 2016 to voting for a democrat for the house now. frankly, there are not many of those folks. our latest estimates have it such that the democrats would get 225 seatif the election were held today. but there is a margin of error on that, and i don't mean just as the statistics go, i mean as the politics go. if turnout does not merge, if a lot of young voters do not come out, people who haven't voted in midterms before, if they stay home, the republicans hold the house. >> what about on the senate side specifically? you don't really necessarily hear the democrats talking about --paul optimistic turns-- how much of an uphill climb do they have there? >> it is going to be hard for the democrats. the republicans are in position to hold on to the senate, maybe even add to their majority. the reason for that is the partisanship that we have seen in this election. we see very few people-- i mentioned crossover voters, there are very few in number.
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and especially in a lot of these states, where you get from indiana to missouri to montana to north dakota. i just named a string of seats across the midwest that donald trump won by wide margins. and so, when you get partisan voting like that, it's much harder for the opposing party to come in and draw a lot of different voters. >> all right, anthony salvanto. thanks so much, anthony. >> thanks. >> democrats hope to regain control of the house from the republicans. to do that, they need to flip 24 seats. more than half of them are in the midwest. he'sreren dseaolyn. >> how are you doing? >> reporter: cheri bustos is something of a rare bird in politics. she is the only mid-westerner and the only democrat in the house leadership who represents a district carried by donald trump. her secret? >> first of all, you show up to places where, unfortunately, democrats have had a recent track record of not showing up. >> i love dogs. >> reporter: showing up at places like the small towns that dot her 7,000 square mile district south and west of
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chicago. >> and i typically just say, "i'm cheri bustos. i'll be flying back out to washington. and what do you want me to know?" >> reporter: she hears a lot about health insurance, prescription drug prices, and stalemate in washington. are the people you talk to exuberant about the stock market? >> they don't-- i never hear anybody talk about the stock market. >> reporter: are they happy about the tax cut that the republicans passed? >> they don't talk a whole lot about that either. >> reporter: she's currently running well ahead of her republican challenger, bill fawell. and other democrats have taken notice. >> she's changed the focus. we used to be all about working class people. we used to be about the people we're raised with. she has made the house focus on where we come from. >> reporter: while she campaigns for herself, bustos is busy assisting other democratic hopefuls, such as lauren underwood. she's running in a surprisingly close race against republican congressman randy hultgren. >> we're honored to be joined tonighen. >> reporter: who won an
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important shoutout of his own underwood told us bustos has been a big help in how to address trump supporters. >> can i relate to them? yes, they're my next-door neighbors! >> reporter: cheri has been a mentor throughout the campaign. she encouraged us to do things like post-up at supermarkets, talk to people about what is going on in their lives. >> reporter: while listening to voters may not seem like such a novel concept, for democrats trying to resurrect their fortunes in the land of trump, cheri bustos is showing them how it's done. you think democrats will win the house? >> i think we will. >> reporter: dean reynolds, cbs news, sycamore, illinois. >> some u.s. troops are now on the u.s. border with mexico. their job is to help defend against the migrant caravan that's heading north. it's been one of president trump's main focuses at his rallies. rlicans said, "yes"-- that the caravan while 77% of democrats said, "no." mireya villarreal has more from
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the border. >> reporter: just above me is one of the busiest ports of entry in the united states. it actually connects the city of reynosa, mexico to hidalgo, texas. now traditionally, the rio grande river right here is what separates these two countries, but now there's a new added barrier. barred wire fencing just like this has gone up in several spots along the riverbed. the department of defense is expected to deploy 7,000 troops to the southern border-- a plan the president continues to boast about at rallies around the country. >> and i noticed all that beautiful barbed wire going up today. it was a-- barbed wire used properly can be a beautiful sight. >> reporter: the plan to reinforce the border was born, in part, because of a migrant caravan that's nearly 700 miles away.
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tomorrow is election day. cbs news will bring you continuing coverage throughout the day beginning with "cbs this morning" and wrapping up late in the evening with the special election night coverage. cbs news direction of elections and surveys has a look at what's ahead. >> important elections are mentioned right up front in article 1 where we the people select who goes to congress. compared to a presidential race, these tuesdays don't always get the same turnout. last time only over a third of people showed up, but this year
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2018 looks very different. turnout is expected to be high. millions have cast their ballots early. lle tells they will. and tuesday night right here at the cbs news decision desk, we'll watch those millions of votes pour in across the country. 35 senate races, 435 house seats, majority control of congress is indeed up for grabs. democrats think they have a shot to win the house. polls suggest they might. republicans think they can hold on to their majority in the senate. polls agree. but none of that, as we pollsters stress, is certain until tuesday. this you can be sure of. the most sbrens interesting decision is how people think, not just how they vote. right now more americans say the economy is good heading into a midterm than have said so in 20 years. that ought to help the party in power, the republicans. but in a surprising split, far fewer people are happy ab the direction of the country and that the democrats are hoping
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helps them. these elections are for state and local offices, but people by 2 to 1 told us they are thinking about national politics. and that in turn may have a lot to do with the president. he's not on the ballot, but he's on voters' minds. three quarters in key states have told us so and that will mark historical level of influence with just as many trying to support him as oppose him. then there's the voters move. we might see that big turnout with voters on both sides telling us they will feel disapointed if the other side wins. and maybe that leads to the biggest thing to watch of all. whether the next congress, whoever win its, can help to change those feelings once all the votes are counted. wisconsin was a battleground state in the 2016 election helping deliver the presidency to donald trump. it's a battleground again this year as well with close races for governor and senator. ed o'keefe spent some time in wisconsin and tell ls us what he
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found in this "eye on america." >> we're going to be letting in staff and volunteers. >> are you excited? >>. >> that's why i'm here today. don't wait. vote early. >> bringing out this huge crowd. more people than i have seen at rally before. >> the deputy political director for wisconsin's republican party, scott walker is until the race of his career faciing ever. >> tomorrow is a new day. go out and talk to voters and get them to the polls. >> this is our field office. it's the main entryway. we have val making phone calls. >> you have all the groups calling. and you have all the fundraising calls. so a lot of people have gotten
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rid of their phones. >> reporter: that's why they have to go looking for voters in person. >> what's the sales pitch? >> jobs are coming back, wages are come iing back, the state i running a surplus. >> reporter: but it can be hard to find someone at home during the week. >> no luck there. >> knocking on door after door and getting no response is normal. >> hey, ma'am, my name is josh. >> reporter: he's got one. he found somebody at home. >> we're excited that you kept ongoing with us. are you tuned in, what issues matter to you, how republican policies helpedout out and that's the reason you should go vote. >> reporter: democrats remember what happened two years ago. hillary clinton was supposed to win here, but she ended up losing by nearly 23,000 >> we must get out and vote. that's the only way that we're going to turn this thing around.
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>> reporter: so if they wanted to beat governor walker and reelect tammie baldwin, democrats need to convince tens of thousands of more voters to show up. >> i'm here to ask you to vote for what might be the most important election of our lifetimes. >> reporter: he recruits volunteers and tracks down votes for democrats. >> what's the pitch? >> we have agraze maizing progressive candidates that we need to elect here in wisconsin. regardless of who they are. >> i'm calling with the democratic party of wisconsin. >> people are coming in to phone bank. but the thing is tammie baldwin. >> reporter: in some parts of milwaukee, the outreach is in spanish. tens of thousands of latino voters sat out is the 2016 elections. democrats desperately need them. >> theredoes a visit from a dem make a difference? >> uh-huh. >> why? >> because it's more personal. you get more insight.
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>> reporter: with billions of dollars spent and millions of campaign calls made across the country, it's really just one person face to face that both sides agree will win here's a simple true-or-false quiz for you. if you're between age 50 and 85, it's important for you to know the truth, so please listen closely. i'm alex trebek, and all of the answers are false. so what is true? you can get coverage, regardless of your health, with the #1 st popular whole life insurance plan available through the colonial penn program. whether you're in the best of health or you have high blood pressure or other health problems, you can get coverage, with no health questions and no medical exam.
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scientists have steered clear of the political fray, but this year more than 450 candidates have so-called stem backgrounds. that means science, technology, engineering and math. this may be the year of the scientist. >> i believe that if we're going to take a real approach at fixing our health care system and transforming our health care system, we need to have a nurse at the table. >> reporter: lauren underwood, j a nurse from chicago -- >> i think what you have now is a perceived threat to this basic concept of science, facts. >> reporter: and joseph, an aerospace engineer from texas are just two of the hundreds of scientists throwing their lab
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coats into the political ring for the first time. >> is it hard to make the jump from those more analytic fields to politics? >> i b don't think so, and here's why. the whole reason why i got into aerospace engineering as a cadet was because i was inspired as a kid. there was nothing more american than the moon landings. in terms of public service, it's just a natural extension. so the scientific method allows you to make a hypothesis and where we can can leverage ideas, test ideas, see what works and that's what i intend to do. >> reporter: he served in the army for 20 years, ran his own company and decided this year was the year to run for congress. in may he won his primary in texas's 21st dringt. >> there's a theory that scientists are kind of wonky, they are lab rats, they are not people. you don't seem to fit that molding with. >> no, i'm a blue jean, beer drinking kind of engineer.
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>> are there more like you? >> of course, there are. that's the best part about stereotypes. if you lead i'm an aerospace engineer here to solve the probleoing to solve anybody's problems. if you say, i n gotms, ittoo, h this or i, too, understand that. then start to have it come out, that's my favoriteersa w sneou y douurarnyof p aout. you kind of rocket scientist? >> you're like, yeah, i am actually. >> reporter: underwood at 26 years old hopes to be the first african-american woman to represent illinois's 14th distr gone republican the last several election cycles. you are someone that comes from a non-traditional political background. do you feel like this is an uphill battle?. tfeel like this whanot moment is calling for. we have witnessed something that i feel like has never happened before. we see our policymakers trying
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to dismiss facts. they are ignoring facts and not consulting experts, but the end of the day, truth penetrates. >> we need people with diverse backgrounds at the decision making table. >> reporter: two former epa chiefs say that although the majority of scientists are running as democrats, the need for scientists at the table isn't red or blue. >> personally, are they left or right? yeah, everyone has their own political opinion, but when they are doing their science advisory board, that's peer review ed. they care about their reputations. they are not going to jeopardize them by fiddling with the science. >> reporter: whitman served under president george w. bush and mccarthy, a democrat, served under president obama. they both believe scientists' voices are needed, particularly now. >> what do you make of the fact that 400 scientists are running for office in the 2018 elections? >> i think, you know, there's
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clearly they see the same thing that we do. which is it's not ience der tack, but it' tth scientisttshe themselves. we need people in leadership positions in the public sector who can help make sure there's evidence and fact-based decisions being made. >> not everyone agrees. >> do you still think that climate change is a hoax? >> look, i think something is happening. something is changing. it will change back again. >> reporter: in a recent interview, president trump repeated his skepticism about climate change and questioned the motives of scientists in general. >> scientists also have a political agenda. >> the war on science didn't start with the trump , butt h gone from what felt like a war on science to an all out war on facts. and that has acted as a presid 314 action, a non-profit political action committee helping stem candidates learn
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the political ropes. this year they received interest from over 7500 scientists. >> whether it's cyber security or nuclear weapons, protecting the integrity of our elections or something like climate change, why wouldn't we want scientists at the table helping to decide policy as deciders and not just advisers. >> reporter: but there's risk in this approach. >> 75% of the country has a positive view of scientists being trustworthy. are you concerned that number diminishnc's the introduction of politics? >> i wouldn't be worried about it because scientists are coming into the political realm. we need more people taking it up from all walks of life. >> scientists are not interested in become. ing political leaders so that they can politicize the
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america.
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land of blue jeans. muscle cars. bald eagles. and burgers. and while muscle cars lost their sc.mu i can. and bald eagles got, well, balder.. . and while muscle cars lost their sc.mu i can. oh no, is it obvious? ...no way are we giving up on burgers. that's why i created the all-american ribeye burger, made with 100% ribeye beef, fresh spring mix, and provolone cheese on a potato bun. that's a good looking burger. ribeye burgers are back, america. try them today. a growing number of young
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americans are find iing theiwa out of the city and out into the wide open spaces. dean reynolds met a couple who insists there's no looking back. >> reporter: john and halle have come a long way from their lives in new york city. >> the hustle and bustle of new
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york city and the crowds and the noise and all that. >> it's very different. >> reporter: they draw their excitement from the land they work in western wisconsin. the livestock, the grain and the beauty of this place, elements that fuel a youthful trend on the farm these days. the agriculture department has found that for only the second time in the last century, the number of farmers under 35 years of age is increasing. they live and work on 700-acre spread in a deal to one day take over the farm. >> a real good friend of mine told me, he says, farming is a higher colony. >> do you agree? >> yeah. >> they answered an ad he placed on craigslist looking for an enterprising couple who would protect the land and the way of life. their harvest is marketed as
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meadowlark organ iics, feeding a demand for locally grown foods. >> you're wokking with the stuff that came out of the ground. >> yeah, for sure. that's the dream. >> reporter: it's a risk to leave jobs and salaries in a big city for the blisters and capricious, even calamitous weather that farmers endure. >> it's not for everybody, but for us, it's a beautiful life. i don't think either of us have any regrets about it. >>no. >> reporter: how can you keep them down on the farm after they have seen times square? this is how. dean reynolds, cbs news, ridgeway, wisconsin. >> that's the "cbs overnight news" for this monday. for ohs check back for the "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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che it's monday, november 5th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." countdown to the midterms, contl ofongrs ist ste as president trump and former president barack obama fight for their party's candidates. on the eve of the election. also, he served his city and died for his country. the remains of a utah mayor will return today from afghanistan. good morning from the studio 57 newsroom at cbs news headquarters here in new york, good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green.

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