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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 22, 2018 3:12am-4:01am PST

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company they founded nearly two decades earlier, called square one. the pair also had a technology consulting firm and a pest control company. >> i can't confirm or deny whether he's a suspect. the only thing i can tell you is we're exploring the possibility that these two incidents are linked. >> reporter: late today the community of colts neck gathered to mourn keith caneiro and his family. and as families gather for the holidays, some families in this community have gathered here's to mourn. paul caneiro faces one count of aggravated arson for allegedly attempting to burn his own house down with gasoline while his family was inside. he faced up to 10 years in prison. that is, if he's not also
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charged with the murder of his brother and his brother's family. bianna? >> tony dokoupil in colts neck, new jersey. thank you. federal health officials tonight are trying to track down the source of that e. coli outbreak that prompted a nationwide warning not to eat romaine lettuce. at least 32 people in 11 states have gotten sick. 13 have been sent to the hospital. health officials say in a romaine in your home should be thrown out and the refrigerator cleaned. cbs news has gotten the first saudi response to president trump's decision not to further punish the kingdom for killing "washington post" journalist jamal khashoggi. the saudis are now using the president's statement to cast doubt on the cia's conclusion that the killing was ordered by saudi arabian crown prince. today mr. trump tweeted in part "oil prices getting lower. thank you to saudi arabia." holly williams with the saudi foreign minister in riyadh. >> reporter: you're confident that saudi arabia's alliance with the u.s. is safe despite
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the killing of jamal khashoggi? >> god willing, yes, because we as the government had nothing to do with it. >> reporter: the saudi arabian foreign minister, adel al-jubeir, is sticking to his government's story. the islamic kingdom now claims it sent a team of officials to turkey to bring jamal khashoggi back to saudi arabia, but a team leader decided instead to kill him with a lethal injection. >> we are in the middle of a review of our procedures and policies with regards to intelligence operations and make sure that the lines of authority are clear so that we don't have a mistake like this. >> reporter: i mean, that's a pretty extraordinary breach of authority, murdering somebody inside a saudi consulate. >> absolutely. yes. but unfortunately, these things -- mistakes like this happen with other governments. >> reporter: many, though, are still suspicious that this mistake also involved saudi arabia's crown prince, mohammed bin salman, something the saudi government vehemently denies. u.s. officials have told
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journalists the cia assessment is that the crown prince gave the order to kill jamal khashoggi. >> the cia report that you talk about, i haven't seen it, so i can't assess it. and what we've heard is the president say that the cia report is not what people say it is. >> reporter: i mean, wouldn't the best way for saudi arabia to clear the crown prince's name be to have an international investigation and to allow outside investigators to question the crown prince, to question saudi officials, and to question the men who have now been indicted? >> we have a public prosecution office that is capable of conducting investigations. the idea of an international investigation is completely unacceptable to saudi arabia. >> reporter: president trump said his decision to take no further action against saudi arabia is putting america first in a dangerous world. but many in congress are demanding a tougher response. there are rumors that the crown
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prince could be replaced because he's become a liability for the saudi government. does the crown prince still have the confidence of king salman? >> the crown prince has the confidence of every saudi citizen, including king salman. >> and holly is joining us live from riyadh. and holly, it appears the crown prince is still planning on representing the kingdom at the g20 in argentina next week. should we read that sas a sign f confidence? >> reporter: it may well be so. president trump has said he's willing to meet with the crown prince at the g20 summit, and russia says that president vladimir putin may also meet with the crown prince. so there is anger from members of congress, including from some members of the president's own party. meanwhile, though, at least some world leaders seem ready to simply move on. bianna? >> holly williams with an exclusive report for us. thank you. and coming up next, the start of
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america's $1 trillion holiday shopping spree. and later-w a building engulfed in flames, adults make a split-second choice to save a child.
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holiday shopping gets into full swing tomorrow with a number of retailers opening on thanksgiving day. the research company emarketer says holiday sales this year could for the first time top $1 trillion. here's anna werner. >> reporter: with a strong economy major retailers are hoping to get a big boost from some 164 million shoppers planning to hit stores thanksgiving weekend. jcpenney stores are struggling with more than $4 billion in debt. >> the holiday for all retail is a pretty crucial time of year because it's our biggest time of the year. >> reporter: brick and mortar stores are expected to cash in on the majority of the retail sales, earning between 5% and 5.6% from a year ago to $1.1 trillion. e-commerce sales are expected to rise as much as 22% to $134 billion, compared with about $110 billion a year ago.
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but some retailers need a strong holiday season to survive. who are the big stores for whom this season is really critical? >> i think that sears is probably high on the list. but we also have a private company, neiman marcus, very high-end retailer, has been working under a huge debt load. >> reporter: the average household is expected to spend more than $1,500 this holiday, with the majority of consumers saying they'll research their purchases online first but will do their buying in the store. >> this blended approach to the holiday season is going to really be important. that is how the big companies are going to survive. they've got to meet the consumer where the consumer wants to shop. >> reporter: well, to get those customers into their stores retailers aren't wasting any opportunities to grab their share of holiday spending. store chains like macy's here behind me are offering discounts of up to 60%, and bianna, many deals, hundreds of them, are already on online websites.
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>> and consumers are ready to spend their money. anna, thank you. coming up, what happened to an american tourist who visited a tribe that is cut off from the outside world?
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still fresh... ♪ unstopables in-wash scent booster ♪ downy unstopables know what turns me on? my better half, hors d oeuvres and bubbly. and when i really want to take it up a notch we use k-y yours & mine. tingling for me, warming for him. wow! this holiday season get what you want a dramatic scene in dallas
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this morning as flames engulfed an apartment building. residents on the third floor had only one way out. several adults jumped to safety onto mattress that's were laid out below. and a young child was dropped from the window and caught by a bystander. the child and her mother were treated for smoke inhalation. an american adventurer has reportedly been killed by members of an endangered tribe on a remote island off india. north sentinel island is home to people who refuse contact with the outside world. contact with them is illegal. local fishermen say 26-year-old john allen chau of alabama was shot to death with arrows. his body has not yet been recovered. the oldest surviving veteran of pearl harbor has died. ray chavez of san diego was a navy quartermaster when japan attacked on december 7th, 1941, launching the u.s. into world war ii. chavez, the son of mexican immigrants, visited the white house earlier this year. he died today in his sleep at the age of 106.
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and we thank him for his service. up next, an american royal brings the spirit of thanksgiving to great britain. >> dr. stanley: remember this: cannot change the laws of god. when he has visited you in some form of adversity and he brings you through that, that's like he has increased the strength of
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the foundation of your life and your faith in him. [music]
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we end tonight with one of our favorite american traditions brought to an unexpected place. jonathan vigliotti reports from
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london. >> reporter: they may not celebrate thanksgiving on this side of the pond, but today plenty of thank yous were given to this american actress turned royal turned sous chef. duchess meghan markle rolled up her sleeves and joined the women of the hubb community kitchen in london, telling them she's proud of them. she's been visiting the kitchen since january, mostly under the radar, in private. for this foreigner the kitchen is a reminder of her grandmother's home cooking. for these women it's a reminder of the homes they've lost. hubb, which means "love" in arabic, was started in the summer of 2017 after a massive fire gutted london's grenfell tower housing project, killing more than 70 people. survivors began healing through cooking, using small donations to stay open twice a week to make food for fellow victims. meghan came to pitch in. she described a sense of
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belonging, which led to an idea. a cookbook called "together." featuring the women's family recipes. the proceeds would help remodel the kitchen. >> i immediately felt connected to this community kitchen. like these women, i'm passionate about food and cooking as a way of strengthening communities. >> reporter: the book raised 26 $0,000, and today the stoves hot seven days a week. >> it's not just about cooking to fill stomachs. it's about bringing people together. >> reporter: resilient survivors and a nostalgic american, together in the spirit of thanksgiving. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news, london. >> and that is the "overnight news" for this thanksgiving thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city i'm bianna golodryga.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." happy thanksgiving and welcome to the "overnight news." i'm vladimir duthiers. millions of americans will be on the move this morning, rushing against traffic and potential family disappointment to get to the table in time for their turkey dinner. aaa predicts nearly 49 million americans will hit the roads over the holiday weekend. that's 2.5 million more than last year and the highest travel volume since 2005. nearly 4.5 million more are taking to the skies. kris van cleave is on the tarmac at reagan national to see how one of the nation's busiest airports is handling its
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toughest week of the year. >> reporter: to make the great getaway flyers had to first navigate a crush of long lines at airports like these in denver and here in chicago. >> my dad was sending like five texts saying you've got it get to the airport early, it's really crazy. >> reporter: the day before thanksgiving found the harper family at chicago's o'hare airport prepared for the worst. >> we left 2 1/2 hours early and got here in like half an hour. >> reporter: at american airlines' reagan national airport operations center the focus was on getting all 255 d.c. flights on their way. >> our primary goal is bags and people where they want to be on time all the time. >> reporter: more than 54 million americans are expected to travel for thanksgiving, the most since 2005. more than 4 million of them are flying, which could make for a long day for customer service supervisor milo mcicle. >> i do on average about 15,000 steps a day. >> reporter: this flight aware map shows the flights across america today. but the bulk of the travel comes
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on the roads. >> we believe this started as an accident. >> reporter: a deadly car fire snarled traffic on the brooklyn bridge today shutting it down for hours. drivers tonight find themselves riding the brakes as they try to escape ahead of thanksgiving. >> take a look at this. it's the 405. >> reporter: look at last night's epic backup on the 405 in los angeles. traffic there tonight is expected to be even worse. this is the sold out flight 293. it's going to a much warmer miami. the thing about being down here on the ramp, it's all about beating the clock, getting the passengers and the bags on board so this plane can push off and depart on time. in northern california first it was fire, and now comes the rain. up to five inches of rain is expected across the burn zone in and around paradise. that will help put out the flames but complicate the search for the nearly 900 people still missing. meg oliver is there. >> reporter: crews are racing around against the clock to find human remains before they're washed away. we 25utalked with one woman who
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refused to give up hope that her loved one made it out of paradise alive. diana sowers spent the day tuesday hanged out flyers. >> i was told there's a board down here by the cafeteria that i can post this. >> reporter: she visited seven different northern california shelters hoping to find 70-year-old russell anderson. >> he was my father's best friend when i was a child. >> reporter: it's been a difficult challenge. sowers says anderson lived a her mitt's life. he had no phone. and she has just a couple photos that are decades old. >> how emotional is this for you? >> oh, goodness. i cry a lot. pray a lot. it kind of feels like i'm searching for a needle in a haystack. >> reporter: hers is a search multiplied hundreds of times over with so many still missing after the camp fire devastated an area bigger than 115,000 football fields. we surveyed the damage with cal fire operations chief josh bischoff. >> when you think about how many people were trapped, what puts it into perspective when you
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look down below? >> any area that has vegetation, the fire was moving very fast, and so getting out of its way was difficult. >> reporter: sowers knew it was against the odds to find the man she calls uncle russ. >> i hope it's a miracle i find him before i head home today. >> reporter: three hours later sowers stopped her car to share some very good news. >> what did you find exactly? >> i went to one of the evacuation centers and i found his name and his truck on a registration card. just to know that he got out safely, it means everything. >> she was so happy. now, a shelter worker didn't know where anderson had gone, but diana had to leave to get back to her kids three hours away. she is hoping he will call her now. anderson does remain on the unaccounted for list because officials tell us you have to have direct human contact before
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you are removed. president trump is letting saudi arabia off the hook. in the assassination of journalist jamal khashoggi. but some members of congress say it's not that easy, and they're promising a new round of sanctions once they return from the thanksgiving recess. how is the killing and president trump's response playing in riyadh? holly williams is there. >> you're confident that saudi arabia's alliance with the u.s. is safe despite the killing of jamal khashoggi? >> god willing, yes, because we as the government have nothing to do with it. >> reporter: the saudi arabian foreign minister adele al-jubeir is sticking to his government's story. the islamic kingdom now claims it sent a team of officials to turkey to bring jamal khashoggi back to saudi arabia but a team leader decided instead to kill him with a lethal injection. >> we are in the middle of a review of our procedures and policy with regards to intelligence operations, to make sure the lines of authority are clear so we don't have a mistake like this. >> i mean, that's a pretty
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extraordinary breach of authority. murdering somebody inside a saudi consulate. >> absolutely. yes. but unfortunately, these things -- mistakes like this happen with other governments. >> reporter: many, though, are still suspicious that this mistake also involved saudi arabia's crown prince, mohammed bin salman, something the saudi government vehemently denies. u.s. officials have told journalists the cia assessment is that the crown prince gave the order to kill jamal ca khashoggi. >> the cia report you talk about, i haven't seen it, so i can't assess it. and what we've heard is the president say the cia report is not what people say it is. >> what is the best way for saudi arabia to clear the crown prince's name be to have an international investigation and to allow outside investigators to question the crown prince, to question saudi officials and to question the men who have now been indicted? >> we have a public prosecution office that is capable of
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conducting investigations. the idea of an international investigation is completely unacceptable to saudi arabia. >> reporter: president trump said his decision to take no further action against saudi arabia is putting america first in a dangerous world. but many in congress are demanding a tougher response. >> there are rumors that the crown prince could be replaced because he's become a liability for the saudi government. does the crown prince still have the confidence of king salman? >> the crown prince has the confidence of every saudi citizen, including king salman. >> president trump has said he's willing to meet with the crown prince at the g20 summit, and russia says that president vladimir putin may also meet with the crown prince. so there is anger from members of congress, including from some members of the president's own party. meanwhile, though, at least some world leaders seem ready to simply move on. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." cardinal daniel dinardo of houston has been one of the most outspoken critics of the way the catholic church has handled the priest sex abuse scandal. last week he gathered 300 bishops in baltimore to address the ongoing crisis. but a cbs news investigation found cardinal dinardo has some issues of his own. nikki battiste has been trying to get him to talk to us for three months and finally tracked him down in baltimore. >> reporter: this summer a priest cardinal dinardo had promoted was arrested for allegedly molesting two children in the late 1990s. cardinal dinardo vowed by
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january to release a list of all the priests in houston who have been in the church's judgment credibly accused of sexually abusing a child. but we spoke with victims who say dinardo still has their abusers in active ministry. >> i shrank. i was like i'm not here. i left my bobody. >> reporter: john labonte, who is speaking out for the first time says cardinal dinnardo has allowed this priest john keller to continue at one of the largest diocese in houston. labonte says keller molested him when he was 16 years old. >> at your lowest point what were you feeling? >> i didn't want to be around. i was just consumed by pain. >> reporter: labonte broad his allegations to the archdiocese. in 2002 he says he told them that father keller plied him with alcohol and fondled him in his bed on an overnight trip. >> well, you know, right here where it says, you know, "acted very inappropriate." >> reporter: a letter from the archdiocese says that father keller acknowledged holding
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labonte in a manner inappropriate for a priest but "denies any sexual intent." ultimately, the church "could not conclude that what happened constituted sexual abuse." the church promised to put father keller into therapy, and cardinal dinardo has kept him in active ministry. >> peace be with you. >> reporter: at prince of peace church where our cbs news cameras captured cardinal dinnardo visiting recently. >> just last week we saw cardinal dinardo in father john keller's church. what does that tell you? >> if he knows, then he's a liar and it makes me angry. >> reporter: we pored over court records and turned up graphic allegations against a second active previous in houston. in a sworn affidavit a victim accused father terence brinkman of wearing his priest collar as he "sodomized me" as a 12-year-old in the 1970s. attorneys for cardinal din-somardo's archdiocese argued that the statute of limitations
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had passed and the case was thrown out of court. today father brinkman is a priest at st. john the evangelist. in a statement father brinkman denied any involvement saying "i cannot tell you that these events did not take place. but i was not the person who did them to him." and the archdiocese says the victim "provided a physical description that does not match father brinkman." >> all i wanted for them to say was yes, he did it. and i believe you. >> reporter: elodia flores along with her siblings monica and raymond were all molested by another priest in houston, father lawrence peguero, who died in 2000. after they sued the archdiocese, they met personally with cardinal dinardo. >> we were invited to meet with him, but our attorney felt this would be maybe closure, an opportunity to receive an apology. >> how would you describe his demeanor, raymond? >> he didn't care. >> reporter: cardinal dinardo in a statement told us that he
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apologized during the meeting. >> did any of you get an apology from cardinal dinardo? >> no. >> no. >> no. >> nikki battiste from cbs news. how are you? >> i'm doing fine. but i'm going to a meeting. >> reporter: we spent three months asking for a formal interview with cardinal dinardo. he never made himself available, so we caught up with him in the hallway during the conference of the u.s. bishops in baltimore last week. >> are you aware that you have two priests with credible sexual abuse allegations currently in active ministry in your diocese? >> it depends what names you're talking about. >> father john keller and reverend terence -- >> that's not a credible one. and kerterry was never -- was nr credible. >> are those two names going to be on your list of credibly accused priests that you'll release in january? >> we're working on the list. >> does the name john labonte sound familiar? >> yes. i would prefer to do this at another time. >> we've been requesting. we'd love to sit down. >> at another time, yeah.
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>> is there anything you'd say to the survivors and victims? >> what would you say to father keller today? >> come clean. you step up. >> what would you say to cardinal dinardo? >> don't leave any stones unturned. put effort into it. fix the problem. >> cbs news has spoken with more than 20 people with knowledge of allegations made against priests in the archdiocese of galveston-houston. not one has been contacted by church authorities or investigators. in a statement to cbs news cardinal dinardo said that the church has made important strides in addressing this evil. but he went on saying "we can and will do better." on a lighter note, marijuana envy is growing in new england after massachusetts became the first state east of the mississippi to allow the legal sale of pot. lawmakers in vermont and maine are working on their own regulations to allow people to buy cannabis from licensed
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vendors. it's already legal to use marijuana in both states. meanwhile, the two legal pot shops in massachusetts are doing big business. tony dokoupil's at the one in leicester. >> welcome to cultivate, where more than 1,000 people came through here yesterday for day one marijuana purchases. the most popular item, a strain called chocolate o.g. now, if you're thinking that looks a lot stronger than the stuff i remember, you're probably right. and sales are booming. >> three, two, one! [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: the first two licensed pot shops in massachusetts opened on tuesday with high excitement. >> legal! >> reporter: and long lines. thousands waited as much as five hours. >> i'm 64 years old, and i used to have to run from the cops when i bought pot in the past. so i figured i wanted to do it legally. for the first time. >> ten strains available. >> reporter: inside cultivate customers were presented with a
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daily menu selection with varieties including tropicana cookies and purple punch. but it's not cheap. one ounce of raw bud at cultivate costs $420. >> got a couple good things. way too many edibles. >> i am going home and i am going to be enjoying them with my grandmother. >> it's like your coffee in the morning. >> it's like your coffee in the morning and not like your wine at night? >> you know, it can be both. >> reporter: sam barber is cultivate's president and co-owner. >> there's a lot of wrong information going on out there about this product. and again, it is about doing it, like anything, in a safe, balanced way that's healthy. >> people think this has actually gone through some kind of safety and efficacy that we even know what it is. it hasn't. >> reporter: kevin zabet is a former white house drug policy adviser and president of smart approaches to marijuana. >> you're relying on a state that is being heavily influenced by the marijuana industry themselves to basically tell you that your product is safe. colorado has seen hundreds of thousands of individual products
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recalled because of additives and other kinds of back-tieria and molds that are in these marijuana products. so it's really buyer beware. >> next. >> reporter: but that's not scaring away consumers. the number of americans reporting daily or almost daily marijuana use jumped from a little over 3 million in 2002 to just over 8 million in 2017. >> this isn't about the individual user. this is about a green light to an industry that is taking all of their plays from big tobacco, that lied to the american people for almost a century. why would we get fooled again? >> and speaking of sales, here in massachusetts by one estimate smailz could reach a billion and a half dollars. of course no telling if and when federal legalization could come through. but americans already consume about three times as much lilly. she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. but once a week i let her play sheriff so i can wash it. i use tide to get out those week old stains and downy to get it fresh and soft. you are free to go.
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so do you think you have a good taste for food? well, lee cowan paid a visit to perhaps the most famous food designer in all the land. >> all right, bird. >> nice bird. >> reporter: although the bird might disagree, few thanksgiving turkeys have been so lucky. in the hands of sarah massoni, any food from fig to fowl is destined for gastronomic greatness. >> just shove it up in there as much as you can and as far back as you can. >> reporter: she's an alchemist of taste. just look at her butter.
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mixed with rosemary, sage and garlic. and that's only after her turkey has taken a 36-hour dip in her citrusy brine. finally, to add one more savory note, she weaves a blanket of bacon on top. >> all of the bacon fat is going to go down through the turkey and give it a whole different layer of flavor. >> reporter: massoni wasn't just getting a head start on thanksgiving. >> now we wait. >> reporter: she was demonstrating her job, as a food designer. here at oregon state university's graeming food innovation center. >> we have spice rubs. lots of beautiful hot sauces. >> reporter: hundreds have paid big dollars to get sarah's culinary counsel. >> there's actually a floral note to this product. >> reporter: making sure their new food products are both safe and sumptuous. >> p.h. 6.14. >> reporter: a food science
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background gives her the technical knowledge to do what she does. but she has a physical attribute too. >> i knew that there was something different about my tongue, but i mean most people don't spend a lot of time looking at their tongue. >> reporter: her tastebuds, she says, are actually bigger and better than most, giving her what some call a million-dollar palate. >> i like to joke and say i have a billion-dollar palate. >> a billion-dollar palate. >> yes. because i've helped so many people become million-dollar companies. >> so what's your first ingredient that you're working with? >> reporter: jay perry is a chef who was hoping to get some advice on his new line of salad dressings. and he got a mouthful from massoni. >> there's something in this that's not right. >> bitter. no, you've got too much mustard. >> she's done this for so long she can detect every little nuance of flavor. >> reporter: at portland's salt & straw ice cream you can get all manner of flavors, including one that tastes like sweet
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potato casserole. >> we have also have like cranberry sauce. >> reporter: head ice cream maker tyler math worked with massoni for months and he says few people can turn such complicated flavors into a reality. >> we spent the first six months of our company right there beside her. if we had technical issues like the caramel melting into the cream, we could game plan on like here's different techniques. and i think that's an amazing talent. >> reporter: it's that kind of praise from her clients that sometimes brings massoni to tears. why is it so emotional? >> well, i don't want to be on tv crying. because when i put my heart into a food product -- oh, my. and it's successful. it brings great joy. >> reporter: her emotional connection with food is as sweet as her ingredients. >> moment of truth. >> there is our turkey. >> reporter: with her turkey fresh out of the smoker, there
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in all its browned bacony goodness, there was nothing left for sarah massoni to do but her job. >> you ready? >> cheers. >> when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for
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the race that's been designed for you.
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we wrap up this thanksgiving broadcast with a note from our own john dickerson of "cbs this morning." he's giving thanks to the dozens of people who wake up in the middle of the night to put his show on the air. here's john. >> there are many ways to prepare for thanksgiving. brine the turkey. chop the wood for the fire. do the research for the political fights you'll have around the table. i prepare for thanksgiving by making a list of the things i'm grateful for. it's based on an essay from years ago by roger rosenblatt. it contains items big and small. the new yorkers who texted us
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when they found our lost dog. stumptown coffee roasters. at the top of my inventory this year are the people you never get to see at "cbs this morning" but whose work you see every time you watch the show. if there's a piece you liked or a question that helped you learn something or simply if the show has become a part of your morning, it's these colleagues you have to thank. they interrupt their plans to chase stories and bring you the people at the heart of them. they create entire villages in random spots to bring you live reports. they capture just the right shot and make sure the sound and lighting sings. they solve puzzles under hairy deadlines. they stay up all night as stories break while you sleep. they track information so we get it just right. and their graphics help make the complex understandabl. >> let's rock and let's recognize. >> they churn page after page of scripts tweaking words until sometimes just seconds before we say them.
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they make our hair and makeup and clothes look just so in order for us to be at our best for the crew that manages the cameras, cables and chaos during the live broadcast. ♪ taking care of business >> those of us in front of the camera work hard to do work that is worthy of that collective dedication. so while you gather around your table, all those you're grateful for, we are grateful for all those gathered around our table each week. and one final note of gratitude, to all of you out there watching. thank you. and happy thanksgiving. >> and i would like to thank the six people in the control room who put this show on the air and the one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine people here and one outside, dave, who does audio. i'm not kidding. that is the "overnight news" for this thanksgiving thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and of course "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city i'm vladimir duthiers. did i get the count right?
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i got you, dave. i got a shout out. it's thursday, november 22, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." it's an unseasonably cold thanksgiving day for tens of millions of americans in the east. but how will the weather affect new york's famous thanksgiving day parade? spectators are bundling up. >> we're prepared. we have our ski boots, hats, gloves and everything. firefighters are making progress against california's wildfires but rain is expected to bring new trouble.

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