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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  December 13, 2018 3:12am-4:00am PST

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your faith in him. [music] greeter five days a week at walmart.
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>> how are you doing? >> good to see you. y'all have a great day. hello, hello.od teet yor: we me store in wagner, oklahoma. >> i heard you're basically the mayor of walmart. that true? >> well, i'm close to it. [ laughter ] >> reporter: how long have you worked here? >> be going on nine years. >> reporter: nine years. >> i'm only going to work 30. [ laughter ] >> reporter: kumer is a kidder, but why he's still working is no joke. when you got this job, you needed this job. >> yeah, you betcha, i did. when you lose your retirement at a big place like mcdonald douglas, you need a job. >> reporter: mcdonald douglas closed its plant in nearby tulsa. kumer, a machinist, had worked there 29 years. >> and all of a sudden, the loudspeaker come on, and it said, attention. mc donnell altadena douglas will close i60 days we stopped and looked at each other and thought, what in the world?
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to me that was just like you'd walked up and slapped me in the face. >> reporter: because all your plans -- >> all my dreams were going out the door. >> reporter: he was 56 years old with an 8th grade education and one year shy of a full pension. they have never recovered. over the years they burned through retirement savings, downsized their house and life-style, but still have a mortgage they can never payoff. the average american over 65 lives in about $4,100 a month. with his walmart checks, their social security and his partial pension, tom and ellen k, mer live in around $3100 a month. more than a thousand dollars less than the national average. is this the retirement that you imagined? >> no, no. >> reporter: tom's wife of 63 years has four heart blockages and diabetes. he calls her every break. >> i just want to check on you and remember, i'll be in a
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little after 11:00. never get her out of my mind. had her too many years. can't afford to lose her. >> reporter: tom kumer worries he'll never be able to afford retirement. >> he likes to work and needs to work. but i feel guilty, too, because he's having to work at his age. >> it hurts me that i can't do for her what i want to do. >> reporter: do you feel like the american dream came true for you? >> i was right at the door, but i never did get to go through it. >> that was mark strassmann reporting for "eye on america" tonight. so, why is this happening and what should you do? we sat down with cbsew businelyst joechfor an eende co cbsnews.com. coming up next, the latest on the search for a missing mother tonight. we hear from one of the last people she spoke to. my digestive system used to make me feel sluggish
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police in woodl colorado, have released the last-known images of a 29-year-old mother who disappeared on thanksgiving day. nikky battiste is following the nationwide search and spoke today with the missing woman's mother. >> reporter: this newly released super market surveillance video shows kelsey bereth with her 1-year-old daughter thanksgiving day. she met up with her fiance later that evening to drop off their daughter since they do not live together. it was the last time anyone saw her. cheryl bereth, her mother, was one of the last people to talk to her. >> we talked just thanksgiving morning. >> reporter: did she say what her thanksgiving plans were? >> no big thanksgiving meal at her home or anything like that. >> reporter: did she sound normal? did she sound -- >> definitely. she sounded happy. >> reporter: activity from the 29-year-old's phone is adding to the mystery. on november 25th, three days after she vanished, two text messages were sent, one to her
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employer doss aviation where she was a flight instructor, saying she would not be sng work the following week. the second was to her fiance frazee. the phone was nearly 600 miles away, outside gooding, idaho. but police have found no evidence of bereth there. her mother just wants her home. >> it just makes no sense. i guess, it just makes no sense that we can't find her. we have to keep looking. >> reporter: the police department here says this is still a missing persons case. in a statement today, kelsey's fiance says he is cooperating with police and provided dna. kelsey's mother tells us her daughter is excited to get married, but no wedding date had been set yet. jeff? >> disturbing story you can hear about. you can hear more of the new sa r interview nikki did with the mother tomorrow. thank you very much. coming up, this type of take out is not on any restaurant's menu. i can't believe it.
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the young mother whose arrest in new york became a viral video was reunited last month with her 18 month old son. charges against jasmine were dropped. officers were seen pulling the baby from her arms when she refused to leave a social services office. 25 classic movies were added to the national film registry today. >> welcome to jurassic park. >> jurassic park. cinderella. my fair lady. the shining. >> here's johnny. >> and broadcast news were among the films joining the library of congress list of most inluential movies in history. rn ae back mountain. man was arrested from a grease vent in a chinese restaurant. he was stuck there two days. police aren't sure if he was trying to rob the place.
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if so, he wouldn't have found much. the restaurant has been out of business for sometime.
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspiredu' ncge'mng forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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we end here tonight with a man that seems to possess super human powers. mark strassmann caught up with him at a pool in north carolina. >> reporter: at the catawba college swim practice, we watched the assistant coach make subtle adjustments, lane by
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lane, swimmer by swimmer. >> you're turning here and your feet are staggering. by doing that you're going to lose a lot of power. >> reporter: here's what we learned. no one coaches collegiate swimming like tharon drake. >> i have what's called a cortical blindness. >> reporter: totally blind, but drake hears everything. >> false start lane 3. >> reporter: hands and feet hitting the water. >> you don't go until they say go. >> reporter: which swimmer needs his coaching across the six-lane pool? >> it's just wrong. i have to listen to several strokes, hitting, in correlation to your breathing. i'm creating a mass formula in my head having to solve it like that. >> reporter: drake now 25 went blind at 14. >> tharon drake is really looking good. >> reporter: as a swimmer, he won two silver medals at the 2016 paralympics in rio. he heard catawba needed a swim coach, but hiring a blind one took vision. >> i was so drawn to it. i was so captivated by it.
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>> reporter: mike sever is the head swim coach here. >> everything that i see, he hears. there may be things he hears that i don't see. >> reporter: freshman swimmer amalija fontez saw something special at her first swim practice. >> he knew every little detail about my strokes right away. >> you're like a diver. here's your box, fit in your box. well, i don't like boxes. awesome job today. >> reporter: tharon drake helping the rest of us think outside the pool. mark strassmann, cbs news, salisbury, north carolina. >> that is the overnight news for this thursday. for some of you, the nuds continues. for others, check back later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jeff glor.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the overnight news. i'm jericka duncan. disgraced lawyer and convicted felon michael cohen once said he'd take a bullet for donald trump. but the president's long-time fixer was singing a different tune in federal court as a judge sentenced cohen to three years in prison for what he called a smorgasbord of federal crimes. they include tax evasion, lying to congress, and paying hush money on the eve of the election to silence two women who claimed they had affairs with mr. trump. paula reid reports. >> mr. cohen, any comment? >> reporter: michael cohen arrived at federal court in new york this morning surrounded by his family. the president's former attorney fought back tears as he told the
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judge, today is the day i get my freedom back, and described working for president trump as mental and physical incarceration. but judge william pauley described his crimes as a very tabl smorgasbord of fraudulent conduct. he said somewhere along the way cohen lost his moral compass before sentencing him to 36 months in federal prison. as the sentence was raid, cohen shook his head in disbelief. cohen's father a holocaust survivor, said he felt dizzy. the court appearance was the culmination of two criminal cases. last month he struck a separate deal with the special counsel's office agreeing to cooperate with the investigation into russian meddling in the 2016 campaign and pleading guilty to lying to congress. cohen has provided the most direct evidence to date that ties the president to criminal activity. >> mr. president, did you direct michael cohen to commit any violation at all? >> no, no, no. >> reporter: he told
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investigators then candidate trump directed him to payoff porn star stormy daniels and karen mcdougal who alleged affair with mr. trump. prosecutors revealed today american media, the company that owns the "national enquirer," admitted to coordinating with cohen and making a $150,000 payment to mcdougal to suppress her story so as to prevent it from influencing the election. today at the white house, president trump kept his back to the camera as reporters asked about his former personal attorney. >> mr. president -- >> reporter: mr. trump's current personal attorney rudy giuliani was more than willing to sound off on the proceedings. he told cbs news, michael cohen lied in court today. he said his greatest mistake was loyalty to trump. what loyal difficult? the judge ordered cohen to start serving his sentence on march 6. >> protests continued at the michigan state househere tre vote today tie the hands of the incoming democratic governor. the gop is also working to kill
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several recently approved ballot proposals. dean reynolds is there. >> reporter: demonstrators crowded the michigan capital this afternoon. >> i think that they are trying to take away our vote. >> reporter: opposing moves by republican state house majorities to limit the authority of just elected democrats. similar power plays in wisconsin have faced the same reaction. both states have republican governors for a few more weeks, and they are being urged to sign a series of bills before incoming democrats can veto them. all designed to give legislators greater say in things like campaign finance oversight, the timing of early voting, and redistricting. michigan's retiring governor rick snyder is noncommittal. >> do you think it's the right way to operate for a lame duck session to try to put limits on incoming duly elected office holders? >> people should not expect that
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i'm just going to sign things or i'm just going to veto things. >> reporter: gretchen wittmer replaces him. >> they would not have done this if they won the race for governor. they don't want me to be successful. they don't want me to lose the chance to direct the agenda. >> reporter: wisconsin's defeated republican governor scott walker said the controversy was all hype and hysteria, but a leading gop legislator said he simply didn't want incoming democratic governor tony evers to enact policies in direct contrast to what many of us believe in. here in michigan, governor elect wittmer said this will help to energize the democratic base in elections to come. the voters, she said, understands the meaning of sour grapes. >> despite a decade of economic expansion, millions of older americans find they just can't
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retire. mark strassmann found no shortage of seniors still in the work force in their so-called golden years. >> if i had planned harder when i was younger and things had went better, i wouldn't be going to work this morning. i'd be going fishing or i'd be going hunting. i'll see you. or i would have her up going on a trip somewhere. that's on my mind a lot and i blame myself for it. we'll just go ahead and punch right in. good morning. here's your sticker. >> reporter: tom coomer is still working. >> bye-bye. >> reporter: he's 80 years old, a part-time greeter five days a week at walmart. >> how are you doing? >> good to see you. y'all have a great day. hello, hello. >> hi, good to meet you. >> reporter: we met at this store in wagner, oklahoma. i heard you're basically the mayor of walmart. is that true? >> well, i'm close to it. [ laughter ] >> reporter: how long have you worked here? >> be going on nine years.
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>> reporter: nine years. >> i'm only going to work 30. [ laughter ] >> reporter: coomer is a kidder, but why he's still working is no joke. when you got this job, you needed this job. >> yeah, you betcha i did. when you lose your retirement at a big place like mc donnell douglas, you need a job. >> reporter: in 1994, mc donnell douglas closed its plant in nearby tulsa. coomer, a machinist, had worked there 29 years. >> and all of a sudden the loudspeaker come on and it said, attention. mc donnell douglas will close in 60 days. and i mean, we stopped and looked at each other and thought, what in the world? to me, that was just like you had walked up and slapped me in the face. >> reporter: because all your plans -- >> all my dreams was just then going out the door. >> reporter: he was 56 years old with an 8th grade education. and one year shy of a full pension. financially, the coomers have never recovered. over the years, they burned through retirement savings,
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downsized their house and life-style, but still have a mortgage they can never payoff. the average american over 65 lives in about $4,100 a month. with his walmart checks, their social security, and his partial pension, tom and ellen coomer live at around $3100 a month. more than a thousand dollars less than the national average. is this the retirement that you imagined? >> no, no. >> reporter: tom's wife of 63 years has four heart blockages and diabetes. he calls her every break. >> i just wanted to check on you and remember i'll be in a little after 11:00. never get her out of my mind. had her too many years. i can't afford to lose her. have a good day. >> reporter: tom coomer worries he'll never be able to afford retirement. >> he likes to work and needs to work. but i feel guilty, too, because he's having to work at his age. >> it hurts me that i can't do
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for her what i want to do. >> reporter: do you feel like the american dream came through for you? >> i
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> senator bob corker of tennessee is one of the few republicans in congress to openly criticize -- in response to saudi arabia's murder of journalist jamal khashoggi. corker is the chairman of the foreign relations committee, but he's retiring from the senate this month -- before he goes, he invited john dickerson to a restaurant in chattanooga for a little lunch. >> introduction to public service, i think that was in my late 20s, i started working in this neighborhood. the good things that are happening in the country are happening -- days like this. our current president he knsher
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live in communities like this one, just wanting to be engaged. >> reporter: senator corker has tangled publicly with the president from his own party. >> the president has great difficulty with the truth. >> you supported the president, do you regret that now? >> what do you think? >> reporter: where are you right now on your feelings -- >> i like many of the policies, love the deregulation that is taking place. i love animal spirits that have been released in our country. obviously i'm republican. i love the number of judges that have been confirmed. but i think where the president hurts himself and hurts our country is his own personal conduct. it's unnecessary, you know? it's an unforced error. >> reporter: you said the president tries to divide us. >> i think with president trump, the part that's disappointing is that i know it to be purposeful. >> reporter: the distinction you seem to be making is that this president is actively being
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divisive for the purposes of his own political success. >> he might say that himself. i mean, i think that's self-evident. >> reporter: so when people say he's a little rough around the edges, he has some tweets you may not like, but he passed tax cuts. there's no real cost to his rougher side of his nature. >> i speak out because, yes, i do think there is a cost. i think there's a cost to our young people throughout the country. i think there is a cost to just the way people are relating to each other. >> reporter: do you think he'd -- you'd be able to speak out if you were running for reelection? >> to be in tennessee, critical of the president on the republican side, especially one that has captured the base in the way that he has, would be bad for your health. >> reporter: is that the pressure all your colleagues you leave behind face? >> i've been told by candidates who did run in campaigns this year that no one asked them about any issues to speak up. on our side of the aisle, no issues. they want it kno
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>> reporter: is that healthy? >> i don't think it's healthy, no. >> reporter: but senator corker does see certain advantages. >> the unorthodox nature of the trump presidency has some -- in some ways caused people to be closer on each side of the aisle, in some ways. still, vast differences in policies. >> reporter: what makes them closer? >> well, it's sort of like everybody is in the same boat, right? >> reporter: the same boat, but he says still unable to take a hard vote. >> united states senators don't want to cast a tough vote -- >> reporter: on the fiscal crisis facing the country. >> here's what happens, john. somebody will have -- i don't want to vote. if we have to vote on that, then i have to take a position on it and we're hired to vote. express yourself. >> reporter: it used to be the deficit was the conversation. it was the center piece, it was the focus, and it seems to have gone silent. and this has some real cost. >> we spend the entire year
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working on this appropriations process, which deals with 35%, let's say, of what we spend as a nation. and we don't spend a single day on the rest of it, which is what is going to be our undoing, right? not a day is spent on it. that's what you call majoring in the minors. it's just not on the american people's mind, and it's sad, we're harming the next generation. the greatest privilege -- >> reporter: a crisis senator corker now won't be in the senate to help confront. as he returns home here to chattanooga. do you know exactly what you're going to do now? >> i do not. >> reporter: is the political active office stage of your life over? >> i will not rule anything out at this time. >> reporter: would you rule something in? >> i know every person thinks every senator wakes up in the morning and thinks they're looking at the next president. i don't do that, i don't. i do, though, think about it sometimes. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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zzzquil pure zzzs. rap star cardi b is nominated for five grammys, including song of the year and album of the year. the singer brought maurice dubois back to her neighborhood for her life and her career. >> reporter: even if you haven't heard her music, chances are you've heard her name. cardi b is a pop culture phenomenon. >> i'm the hottest in the streets. know you probably heard of me. >> reporter: last summer, yellow catapulted her from virtually unknown to the top of the billboard charts.
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>> i hit at 85, and i felt i already did enough. when people were telling me there's a possibility of going number one, i was like, oh, my gosh. by going number one, this is going to be crazy. >> reporter: and then it did. >> and then it did. i was like i was on top of the world. >> reporter: the 26-year-old rapper is still on top with hit after hit. including "i like it." ♪ ♪ >> reporter: and girls like you, a collaboration. she became the first female rapper to have three billboard number one singles. >> cardi b. >> reporter: and on friday she was nominated -- >> cardi b. >> reporter: for five grammy awards. >> i love you. >> hi. >> reporter: but it's her personality that people cannot seem to get enough of.
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>> i feel like people feel like i'm very reachable. when i talk, i make a lot of mistakes, like i might say words and the words are not even in the dictionary. but people still like it because you can tell that i'm saying it from the heart. >> reporter: the bronx new york native has been speaking from her heart as far back as she can remember. >> i grew up in this neighborhood. this is high bridge right here. >> reporter: her nickname was bacardi. she later shortened it to cardi b. growing up, her bad girl behavior including joining a gang took a toll on her family. >> when i was like 17, practically almost turning 18 and everything, i got kicked out of my house. i was like a very rebellious teenager. >> reporter: how is the food in this place? >> i like it. >> reporter: to make ends meet, she found work at this grocery store. >> i need some of this. >> reporter: but she said she got fired for being chronically . manager suggested, bra
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yourself, she tryout at a nearby strip club. >> i went the next day and i got hired at the spot. and like literally in five hours, i made my whole check or a little bit more. >> reporter: using the alias camila, cardi spent a lot of her time at this strip club in manhattan. >> i could do this. >> reporter: which one? >> 0. >> reporter: what did you have in there? >> just my stripper shoes. >> reporter: she acknowledges stripping isn't a conventional calling. >> a lot of women here, they taught me to be more powerful, like -- >> reporter: but it did work for her. >> i did gain a passion and love to performing. it made me feel pretty. >> reporter: did it make you feel powerful? >> yes. i'm glad for this chapter of my life. a lot of peopleay wan to make fun of me. you used to be a stripper. i don't ever regret .n't ev reg? >> because i learned a lot. i feel like it matured me. my biggest ambitions was money. because that's what these women
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put in my head. nothing is important but the money. >> reporter: she used that money, she says $200,000, to finance her music dreams. she put out mix tapes. >> nobody like a a cardi b party. you know i got that party popping. >> reporter: and appeared on the reality show love and hip-hop. she gained recognition. >> thank you so much for reposting my videos. >> reporter: but it was her social media savvy that put her on the map. >> i went from live 5,000 followers to like millions of followers. >> reporter: 36 million and counting on instagram. time magazine named her one of its 100 most influential people. but along with the fame comes criticism and internet trolls. >> when i was like a nothing, everybody was rooting and now that i'm finally here, people have a problem for it. like i work so hard, why do ople feel like i don't deserve it? >> reporter: do you ever try to say, snap out of it, just forget about it, just ignore it? i do
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ignore it. and it's just like it drives you insane. >> reporter: the other part of fame she says that drives her crazy is the constant need to defend herself. this fall her feud with another top female rapper nicki minaj, resulted in a confrontation at a new york fashion week party. is it embarrassing to be involved in that kind of stuff? >> it's unnecessary, but am i embarrass ed about anything that i do? no. >> reporter: is it good for business or bad for business? >> i think it's bad for buysness. you know, a lot of people like to say, all publicity is good publicity. ntn craft.it even c t ur craft.. >> reporter: and the drama continues. >> things just haven't been working out between us for a long time. >> reporter: and true cardi fashion, she took to instagram last week to announce her split from her husband, the rapper
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offset. the couple have a daughter together. but fame does come with an up side. when we paid a surprise visit to her old high school, she was welcomed as royalty. and thanked her favorite teacher. >> i know that she's strict, but every single day until this day in my life, miss hill is always in my head. >> reporter: it's been an extraordinary year for the woman who keeps beating the odds. >> what's happening, new york! >> reporter: but cardi b said hungry for more.rmined and ♪ ♪ >> people just feel like, ha ha, it's almost over for you. it's just like, i get up every single time. even before this fame stuff, i always get up, all the time. >> reporter: people can relate too that. >> uh-huh, and i show people
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that -- i show it over and over and over again.
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one community in southern california has come up with a new way to get young children back into the library. let them read away their library book fines. jamie yuccas shows us how it works. >> mildred and sam lived in a tiny house underneath the daffodil roots. >> 15 little t, what begins with t? >> reporter: at the east l.a. library, even the youngest patrons have to pay their dues, but not the way you think. how high have your fines been before? >> $5. >> reporter: $45? >> yeah. >> reporter: card holders 21 and under can literally read away what they owe in late fees. at a rate of $5 per hour. it's a new chapter for los angeles county, a program called the great read away.
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>> we're not really concentrated on what they're reading so long as they're reading. >> reporter: l.a. county library director sky patrick says the idea came about after the library noticed an unsettling trend. that fines are not fined. many kids who racked up debt on overdue books or movies would stop coming to the library all together. $10, absolutely. for some people that's a huge barrier. >> reporter: those are the kids that you want in the library reading. >> that's exactly it. so this program is really to invite them back into the library to make libraries accessible to them and their families. >> reporter: we found 8-year-old jayleen robe lz working off her fee while catching up on the judy moody series. when you didn't have to pay money for your fines and you could read away your fine, what did you think? >> i was surprised. >> reporter: why were you surprised? >> i thought that the library or somebody had a fine they had to
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pay. >> about 5 to 600 kids come through our doors on a daily basis. >> reporter: children's librarian says she sees kids reading away fees daily. did you ever see an astronomical fine, oh, my gosh, the kids aren't going to be able to read this away? >> i've seen as low as a couple cents to as high as a couple hundred dollars. i've seen kids read that away because they have the commitment to do so. >> reporter: since the program launched last year, l.a. county says it's more than 80 libraries have logged more than 50,000 reading sessions, and reinstated more than 13,000 previously blocked accounts. do you think the library has given you guys a love of books? >> yes. >> reporter: and that's going to be with you forever? >> yes. >> reporter: a price well paid for these page turners. jamie yuccas, los angeles. >> well, that's the overnight news for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a
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little later for the morning news and, of course, "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york the president's former lawyer learns his prison it's thursday, december 13, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news". dirty deeds, the president's former lawyer is sentenced for crimes linked to president trump. and michael cohen is not done cooperating with investigators. deadly crash. the death toll climbs after a high-speed train wreck in turkey. and found alive, three people trapped in a west people trapped in a west virginia mine are out safe. captioning funded by cbs

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