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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 4, 2019 3:00am-4:00am PST

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reporting for thum broadcast center in new york i'm david begnaud. ♪ march madness. big winter storm. means millions of people are expecting snow. also tonight investigating the president. a top ranking democrat is planning to ask for documents cles to the president. protests in california after a district attorney tells people she is not going to prosecute two police officers for the shooting death of an unarmed man. with isis on the verge of defeat in syria, charley skpeeks with an american-born woman who
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joined the terrier group and now wants to return home. also tonight. serving up for kindness. ♪ welcome to the "overnight news." good to have you with us. it started in california. now a late winter storm has made it to the northeast, some 2500 miles by the time it reaches maine. it's been tough getting around in the middle part of the country. parts of the northeast will have up to about a foot of snow. and you know what's behind that? a deep freeze. >> reporter: this massive weather system now moving east has already set off a series of single car accidents near wichita, kansas. the national weather service warns an arctic air mass could
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push temperatures dangerously low. they cause more crashes along interstate 90 as gusts of snow reduce visibility. and the state hewway patrol is reminding fok business hind the wheel to drive slow and safe after this semitruck crashed in franklin county. snowfall did lead to sledding in new york central park. but they warn sunday's over not to forecast is no child play. >> welcome to extreme weather and the new normal. >> now the national weather service has winter storm weather in maryland up to maine. could accumulate up to an inch and a half per hour. i regreet inform you there are still 16 days before spring. >> stay warm, tony. jeff, it's been a pretty
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mild winter so far. >> we've seen very little in the way of snowfall. this could be the biggest snowfall of the year from new york to boston. overnight tonight, new york, hartford, straight into boston. the problem is it's still snowing in the morning commute in boston. plan for that. how much snow are we likely to see? five or eight inches north of new york city. a big bull's eye in southeast new england. 12 inches of snow possible as we head to monday morning. the biggest story and especially tonight, brutally cold air. maybe another 20 record lows tomorrow with wind chills negative 20, negative 30 when you wake up in parts of the midwest. >> we also have breaking weather news. three people are confirmed dead from what apparently was a
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tornado in alabama near the georgia line. they issued a tornado emergencies in both states. damage is reported near smith station and dupre, alabama. in washington a key house democrat said today he's going to start new investigations into president trump. errol barnette is at the white house. >> it's very clear -- >> reporter: today jerry nadler, the house judiciary chairman is initiating investigationinize to abuse of power of president trump. >> they have to be investigated and laid out to the american people. >> reporter: chairman nadler will issue document requests to some 60 individuals and entities close to the president including trump organization cfo allen weisselberg. as well as people at white house and department of justice. >> they fight so hard on this witch hunt. >> reporter: yesterday in the
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longest speech of his presidency, he denounced the mounting probes. >> there's no collusion so now let's inspect every deal he's ever done. year going to go into his finances, his deals. these people are sick. >> reporter: last week's blistering testimony before the house oversight committee has given democrats a road map for expanding their oversight investigation into mr. trump's business practices. >> this was a guy who zero credibility. skblrks b >> reporter: congressman jim jordan has asked to investigate cohen for perjury. >> there's nothing to show any collusion between trump's campaign anda. >> reporter: what do we know about opposish emergency
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dkleration? >> he made it clear he would vote against for more border wall money, making him the fourth republican to do so. when you add that to the 47 senate democrats and independents who also said they would pass this resolution of disapproval and you now have the table set for what's expected to be the first veto of the trump administration. >> interesting. thank you, errol. there's a lot of anger in sacramento sacramento, california in a decision not to charge two police officers in the shooting death of an unarmed man. >> reporter: protesters called for justice and torched blue police flags after sacramento announced they would not charge. >> we will not charge these
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officers with any misuse of force on stephan clark. >> reporter: police spotted clark when responding to reports of a man breaking into cars. after a chase he appeared to turn towards officers and they opened fire, believing he ehad a weapon. police fired twnt shots. >> he's still down. he's not moving. >> reporter: they found clark was shot eight times, including six in the back. all he had in his hand was a cell phone. they released personal text messages between him and his feonsaw. he threatened to kill himself. information his familyici says not relevant. >> none of that matters what happens is how they came around the corner with lethal force after my son and gunned him
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down. >> r even if no one in your home smokes, secondhand smoke can be closer than you think. secondhand smoke from a neighbor's apartment can enter your home through air vents, through light fixtures and even through cracks in the walls and the floors. secondhand smoke is toxic. especially to children. protect your family. visit tobaccofreeca.com.
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♪ this is the cbs overnight news. it was a big moment this morning. 260 miles above the earth. the spacex crew dragon capsule docked smoothly. if this flight continues to go well t could bring astronauts to the station as early as this summer. defends the final pocket of the area in syria, a woman is making her case to return to the u.s. she was born in new jersey but rauzed unalabama and the trump
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administration does not consider heir a citizen. she sat down in northern syria. >> reporter: being so isolated here, do you have any idea the storm of controversy that's been kicked off in the united states over this case? >> people see my case on tv and everyone asks me what are you going to do now? i know i am an american citizen and i know i have the right to come back. ib have no other citizen anywhere. >> reporter: she says she had to give up her american passport but that doesn't mean she gave up her u.s. citizenship. >> i would tell him to that i am allowed back.
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i have citizenship. >> reporter: shoo handed herself to kurdish backed forces. she ewould have been back sooner if she had enough to pay smugglers. >> $6,000. and there's no way i could get that type of money. >> reporter: yet at first s apparently embraced and contributed to isis propaganda. she refused to comment about that, aside from sawing she regrets having ever come here. >> i ruined my life. i ruined my son's future. but i wouldn't have had my son if i didn't come. that's the only regret i don't have. >> reporter: a federal court will adecide whether to allow her and her son back to the united states.
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she had no idea it was happening until we told her ourselves. as prosecutors in palm beach county, florida get ready to prosecute kraft for allegedly soliciting. >> reporter: on the same day the new england patriots won the afc championship, they allege robert are kraft visited the orchids of asia massage parlor and paid for a sex act. but kraft through his attorney has filed a written plea guiltycoun two, >> those that thing this is a victimless crime, it's missing the reality. a reality that human trafficking is stealing someone for profit.
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>> reporter: one of a hundred men charged in massage parlors located across south florida. at least a dozen men facing similar charges. >> to capture men and women disrobing, total nudity, receiving intimate massages too, go after a misdemeanor case, i think a lot of judges are going to have a problem with that. >> reporter: even if a crime was committed on tape? >> from what we're hearing over and over peopleent wi went in f massage and receive something they didn't bargain for, want, is that a crime? we don't think so. >> reporter: but they're known to use ocoersion and force to keep women against their will, often in plain sight. >> people in businesses. people not allowed to move about freely.
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they have to ask someone else's permission to come and go. sometimes they don't look like their needs are being tended to. >> coming up. caring for premature babies without all those wires. and later a restaurant owner tells people who are homeless i'll feed you for free.
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welcome back. researchers think tiny sensors are going to revolutionize. they can monitor vital signs just as well as the traditional electrodes. real ea soft to the touch, very delicate. here with more.
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[ crying] >> reporter: when olivia mcdunham arrived 15 days ahead of schedule, she needed surgery to help breathe and swallow o. her first weeks were spent wired to machines, watched closely by her mom, casey. >> and for a constant reminder that we're here and that she's maybe not yet a normal new born babe a. >> reporter: they monitor and alert doctors to any sign of infection. when you're breast feeding, is it a little bit clunkier with wires? >> we're at the mercy of the cords. >> reporter: now a collaboration between doctors and engineers at northwestern university has given birth to the sensors. they capture information like vital signs. an antenna under the crib streams data to a wiring station.
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>> i'm exuded about using engineering to improve human health. >> reporter: for more than a decade john rogers and his research team have been fine tuning this technology. >> year in your lab. frrbsz you're able to figure out all the ins and outs. >> it's important to think about full picture. we have a clear vision. we couldn't be happier with the outcome. >> reporter: the sensors are gentle on fragile neonatal skin which is 40% thinner than that 06 an adult. >> they come away with scars from the procedures anded a heesbives that attach them to the devices. >> this allows them to do something they're wire dood which is cuddle with their new borns. >> there's been study that shows 61 to skin helps decrease kudny
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issues, lung issues. it go as long way. >> i love that you brought up physical touch in the story. you and your wife's son, noah. >> three pounds, six ounces, 31 weeks. you loved all the wires and monitors because you could see he was doing okay. on the other hand i hated him because i wanted to cuddle him. so a gizmo like this could mean the world to parents like me who want to hold their kids. getting girls interested in technology as they're learning their abcors are. rs are. s are. well, here's to first dates! you look amazing. and you look amazingly comfortable. when your v-neck looks more like a u-neck...
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you know the tech industry has long been dominated by men. women hold just 1/4 of the jobs and the gap is widening. tonight on "60 minutes" going to talk to dough co founder of co. >> in fact it's gotten slightly worse. >> there's been huge efforts made to get more women in computer science and few rr going to computer science. >> many of the efforts i think
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start late if you start by the time somebody is 18 or 19 they have so many more inhibitions and other passions that they at this time develop. >> reporter: and he says college or even high school is way too late because of what's known as the middle school clip, a very well documented decline in girls interest in science, technology, engineering and math. the so-called stem subjects. >> middle school is when girls traditionally dropped oout. and for computer science, they're not exposed to it at that young age. >> it gets girls interested when they're younger, starting in counter garten. and because it's goal is to teach computer science to every kud t as the potential to change the work force. .
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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we're going to end tonight in the nation's capitol where a restaurant owner is feeding people for free. if you can't pay, it's okay. nicole killian serves up the rest of the story. >> i make everything fresh from scratch.
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>> reporter: the lunch rush hasn't even arrived at the pakistani restaurant. since opening un2013 he's welcome the homeless and anyone else who can't afortd to pay and provides them with a free meal. >> we will honor and respect you in the same way as our payinggusts. >> reporter: they come here often, comforted, knowing there's somewhere they can eat. >> i stay with my godmother. and i always tell her about this place that i go to eat. >> reporter: he learned to cook from his mother growing up unpakistan. she also taught the umportance of helping others. explei wouldlw >> reporter: what do you think she would think of the work you do? >> i think she would be happy.
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to buy an extrameal to pay it forward. when shy heard the story, she came to buy lunch and brought friends. >> such a bug heart and so much compassion. >> reporter: he's provided over 80,000 meals so far. >> that's amazing. it's not from me. i didn't do it. it was from god. >> reporter: he hopes others will be inspired to help those in need. >> we lift up other human beings who have been on the ground i think, to me, is the most beautiful thing. >> amen. you, sir, are a great example of what the it means to pay it forward. and that's the overnight news for this monday. for others, check back later in the morning. we have the morning news and of course cbs this morning. reporting from the
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broadcastsenter in new york city, i'm david beg no. ♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening. we're going to begin with major breaking news. according to our affiliate in columbus, georgia along the alabama line, there are 13 people who have been killed by parent tornados in alabama. they destroyed homes, snapped trees and left what we're being told is a trail of destruction in georgia, alabama and even in the florida pan handle. deaths are being reported in smith station, alabama, in lee county. officials say 150 first responders are on the scene. this comes amid a winter storm. it's now making its way to the
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northeast and will have gone some 2500 miles by the time the storm system reaches maine on monday. but you can see how far south it stretches. it's been tough getting aruined the country. there will be up to a foot of snow and behind that is a deep freeze. >> reporter: this massive weather system has set off a series of accidents and hamered the midwest with heavy no and high winds. they warn an arctic air mass could push temperatures dangerously low. they cause more crashes along interstate 90 as gust oz of snow reduce visibility. and they're reminding folk business hind the wheel to drive slow and drive safe after this semitruck crashed in franklin county.
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early saturday's snowfall did lead to sledding in central park. but warn sunday's overnight forecast is no child play. >> welcome to extreme weather and the new normal. >> reporter: the national weather service has a winter storm warning from maryland up to maine. as for snou snow, it could accumulate up to an inch and a half per hour. i are egreet inform you there are still 16 days before spring. >> stay warm. tony, thank you. jeff, it's been a pretty mild winter so far. >> for sure. because it's been so mild we've seen very little in the way of snowfall. this could by the biggest snowfall of the year. overnight tonight, hartford, straight to boston. and the problem is it's still snowing during the morning commute unboston. i think it's going to take you extra time.
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how much snow are we likely to see? it a big bull's eye in southeast new england. 12 inches of snow possible as we head to monday morning. i think the biggest story as we head through the next several days, brutally cold air. maybe another 20 record lows tomorrow with negative 20, negative fourtd when you walk up unparts of the midwest tomorrow morning. in washington a key house democrat said he's going to start new investigationinize to president trump. errol barnette is at the white house. >> it's very clear -- >> reporter: today jaury nadler, the house judiciary chairman says he's initiating investigationinize to abuse of power, krupgsz and obstruction of justice by president trump. >> all these have to be investigated and laid out to the american people. >> reporter: they will issue
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document requests to some skilkt individuals entities, including his son, donald trump jr. and trump organization cfo o, allen weisselberg as well as people at the white house and department of justice. >> reporter: yesterday while delivering the longest speech of his presidency, mr. trump blasted democrats and denounced the mounting probes. >> there's no collusion so now they morph into let's inspect every deal he's ever done. year going to go into his finances, check his deals. these people are sick. >> reporter: last week's blistering testimony from the former fixer before the house oversight committee has given dam as road map for expanding their oversight investigation into mr. trump's business practices. >> he had zero credibility. >> reporter: but the ranking republican on the committee has asked the justice department to investigate cohen for perjury.
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>> there's not one bit of evidence to show any courtedination, collusion, conspiracy whatsoever between the trump campaign and russia. >> what do we know about rand paul, the senator from kentucky saying he's going to oppose the emergency deckler aation? >> reporter: that's right. he made the clear he would vote against the executive action for bortder wall money. when you add that to fraev senate dmp independents who also said they would pass this resolution of disapproval and you have the table set for what's expected to be the first veto. >> stephan clark was shot dead in his grandmother's backyard.
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>> reporter: after sacramento's district attorney announced the decision. >> we will not charge these officers with criminal liability relating to the use of force on stephan clark. >> reporter: stephan clark's mother is outraged guy decision. >> they executed him in my mom's backyard and it is not right. >> reporter: his fiance tried to hold back tears as she spoke out. >> my boys, have to grow up without their father. >> reporter: this come kz nearly a year after clark was shot and killed. police spotted clark when responding to reports of a man breaking into cars. after a chase investigators say he appeared to turn towards officers and they opened fire, believing he hea weapon.
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police fired twnt shots. a pathologist found clark was shot eight times, including six in the back. all he had in his hand was a cell phone. they released personal text messages that implied he was involved in a domestic violence incident with her two day business nor shooting and threatened to kill himself. information his family says is not relevant. >> none of that matters. what matters is how they came with lethal force after my son and gunned him down. >> reporter: sacramento's police chief says he's done ducting his own investigation and if they fail to follow protocol, theyed could be fired. >> thank you. it was a big moment this morning. 260 les above the earth.thex cac if this goes well
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the controversial documentary, "leaving neverland", they detail sexual abuse starting when they were just 7 and 10 years eld o. the jackson estate is calling it a posthumous character assassination. that begs the question. do documentaries have an obligation to show both sides of the story? david poe went looking for that answer. ♪ >> reporter: this is nan o, ok of the north.
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a famous silent movie about the inuit people from quibeck. in truth film mocker staged a few scenes. still it's considered the world's first documentary. >> this is the way it was. >> reporter: for the next 80 years documentaries were never as popular as fictional move as. >> you can see cooking is practically applied chemistry. >> reporter: they earned the reputation of being spinach. >> you were supposed to watch them, they inform you but you didn't necessarily want to watch them as entertainment of themselves. >> reporter: but he says lately that's changed. his ki his company, impact partners it has done n documentaries
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including "let's be my neighbor" about mr. rogers. and "icarus." >> we're in a golden age. there's never been as great sto story telling in the nonfiction story. >> reporter: in the last few years documentaries are earning more, costing more and being shown more unmain mainstream theaters. >> netflix played an extraordinary role. that algurhythm will take you to documentaries, even if you're not documentary person, the algurhythm say you might like this. there are people who watched "icarus" because they were interested in conspiracy films or thrillers that it took them there. but there's also hbo, showtime,
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hulu, amazon, cnn has done an extraordinary job. i think there are a lot of places one can now go to watch these films. >> when i started in the business 25 years ago, we were knocking on the door of the entertainment industry sayingholo, psaying hello, watch us. >> reporter: he's produced dongumentries, including "conversations with a killer, the ted bundy clip" on what else, netflix. >> scripted and unscripted film makers for the past decade have been borrowing information from each other. and therefore the documentary has become more creative.
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>> reporter: i asked him to identify his own contributions to documentaries, especially in his first one from 1992, "brother's keeper." >> since you're asking me to toot my own horn, the provocative sequences, the music score, all of these thing that were unheard of in a documentary. the thing that has inspired other film makers is we want to be conscious of dramatic structure. there's an end, middle end, an tagnist, protagnist. and that's whew we chose a murder trial. >> reporter: he runs america's largest documentary festival, doc nyc. they are especially appealing because thaw can change the world.
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>> there's been films that have got people out of prison or "thin blue line." "supersize me" changed the conversation around fast food. and changed the conversation around climate change. so all of the world you can see document eras having an effect. >> and -- >> reporter: some of the most popular documentaries give vouss to victims of abuse. as in documentaries about harvey weinstein, roger ailes, and musician r. kelly. >> tradition that he will people being accused have always held the power. and the fact some of these victims are now speaking up, it's time to hear their story.
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one of those stories apoors in hbo's new film that alleges michael jackson molested them as boys. they spoke with gale king. >> as michael started doing the sexual acts, he started talking about we love each other and this is how we love each other and this is how we show each other our love. >> reporter: not surprising michael jackson's family gives this a thumbs down. they're suing hbo for a half million dollars and they're suing because they're not in it. isn't it supposed to be balanced? you never even talk toads us. do they have a point?
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>> i think everybody has a point. but aren't necessarily under any kind of obligation to present anything other than a particular point of view. it's story telling from a particular perspective with a particular goal. >> a lot of people think a documentary is truth. but i think there's a difference between truth and objec tiv ta. s there editing, sound, lougting. er all the things we have right here in this report are going to be in a documentary film as well. >> are you implying that news stories are edited to? >> i'm sorry to break this to you, david. >> we're going to edit that right out. >> hard for me to grasp why he wants it. >> reporter: as they have become more popular and effective, they
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budgets and earnings have gone up. here's how much money the top five scripted have earned compa compared with the top five documentaries. is it stale borrow money from your parents kind of thing? >> yes. it's still something you should discourage your kids getting into unless they absolutely feel the calling, then good luck for them. >> you do it because you believe unit, you're devoted to it and you want to tell good stories at you want to tell good stories at a high l you still stressed about buying our first house, sweetie? yeah, i thought doing some hibachi grilling would help take my mind off it all. maybe you could relieve some stress by calling geico for help with our homeowners insurance. geico helps with homeowners insurance? they sure do.
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welcome back. a who's who of musical giants will take the stage for. they're all performing for free. but it's not free to get en. >> reporter: love rocks has raised more than $5 million to help feed severely ill patients at home. the concert was a brain child of a real estate broker and a prominent fashion designer. >> yeah, this is our new spring collection. >> reporter: detroit-born
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designer has long used iconic muse u musicians in his ad campaigns. >> i there's rebelliousness of music. >> reporter: so when a supporter of god 's love we deliver came to him, barbados was un. >> i've done it before but not at this level. >> reporter: they launched love rocks at the beacon theater. was it hard getting national artists to give a concert for a local charity? >> yeah. i mean there was nothing about this project that was ease a. >> reporter: but the artists responded. in the first two years, joel walsh of the eagles, keith richards of the stones and mava staples all performed. >> it's my desire to appear on
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eshos like this. something to help someone. >> we're here together to celebrate god's love we deliver. >> reporter:ilities rar not for profit charity that delivers meals to those living with severe illness in new york city. logistically this is a massive job. >> it is. >> reporter: karen pearl is the ceo of god's love. >> out of here every day, 7200 meals. >> reporter: all prepared and packaged in their kitchens over looking sixth avenue. how many chefs does it talk to make this kitchen run? >> we have just under 20. >> reporter: the paid staff around 100 include nutritionists. but it's an arm a of some 14,000 volunteer whose put the meals together and get them out to
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people in need. >> come on through. that's all right. >> but we're also delivering respect and dignity and lots of love. >> thank you so much. >> you're welcome. >> reporter: to people luke david due port, who is blind. >> they mean a huge amount to me. >> reporter: like many of their clients, he has more than one illness. has cancer and recently suffered a stroke. >> i think they're unbelievable. this is done with love. >> reporter: it's a 20 million a year operation and love rocks is one of its biggest contributors. >> it feels great when you hand that check over. >> reporter: how big of a check? >> a little over 2 million. >> reporter: this year will feature robert plant, cheryl crowe the irish singer.
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got a feel good story for you now. doesn't take a genie in a bottle to grant three wishes. steve hartman. >> reporter: at nursing home in northwest, arkansas we found a gem named ruby. she likes to go to work with her mom. amanda is a nurse who travels to several nursing homes in the area. and it was on one of those visits that ruby started going to residents with her note pad. >> if you could have any three things, what would they be? >> she came up with the idea of these questions? >> yes. >> reporter: with the intention of what? >> i dont think she had an intention really.
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>> reporter: were you surprise snd. >> i was. i thought people would say money, houses. >> reporter: but instead here's what she got, electric raiser, new shoes. for some reason a lot of people asked for vienna sausage. >> that's all they wanted. and i decided i needed to do something. >> reporter: so she started a charity called three wishes for ruby's residents. now while her mom is kacaring f patients, ruby goes room to room, jots down wishes and sets aught to grant those wishes. >> thank you, sweet heart. >> reporter: she has a gofundme to cover costs. but no one is asking for a sports car. her expenses are minimal, especially compaired to the rewards. on this day she came back with a
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s and other grocery items. >> you have this huge chocolate pie you can eat all by yourself. watermelon and oranges. >> reporter: no one has this kind of reaction over fresh fruit alone. >> thank you so much. i can't believe you. >> reporter: whether she knows it or not, ruby is satisfying some much more basic needs here, to be remembered, to be cherished, especially by a child. that is what seniors are truly hungry for and that is what ruby brings every time she sets foot in a nursing home. who needs a lamborghini when you have home delivery of the happy you can handle. on road near harrison, arkansas.
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captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs it's monday, march 4th, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news." deadly tornado, about two dozen people in southeast alabama are killed after a violent storm system spins off twisters. wow! the avalanche. >> plus, snow is wreaking havoc from the rockies to

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