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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 27, 2019 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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massachusetts looks idyllic. but the last year has been a stunning immersing into the worst kind of grief for the family that lives here. >> it's choosing to wake up, it's choosing to breathe. >> reporter: a year since's yeah and dean valoras' der daughter alexandra -- ♪ happy birthday to you >> reporter: a 17-year-old with a golden resume walked to a nearby highway overpass and jumped. >> i still feel this gaping pit and it's painful. >> reporter: we first met them last summer when they shared two journals filled with dark thoughts alexandra left behind. >> i'm not good enough. i'm worthless. like these are things we've never heard. >> reporter: how could they know
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what lay ahead? >> i think it was just last week and then i walk past her bedroom, [ bleep ], she jumped off a bridge. >> reporter: they're still learning about her death, discovering a failed suicide attempt five days before by tracking her phone. >> here she is for over 24 minutes mulling around but can't do it and comes back. she's testimonies herself, do you really want to die. >> reporter: imagine their confusion in between alexandra's attempt and her death she seemed so happy. >> not too bad. >> reporter: but her robotics team earned a trip to a big competition out of state. >> friday after school she came home with her reservation number saying, mom, can we book our flight? i'm so excited. >> how how do you make sense of that? >> you don't? >> reporter: they still haven't touched her room and have a hard time crossing the bridge. >> sometimes it's like a magnetic pull and sometimes you have to take another route. >> reporter: and don't quite know what to do with the
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reminders they get. >> on google you'll get, hey, last year at this time you had these memories. i remember it. that was a fun time. but it's torture. >> reporter: they know moving into the next chapter of grieving is a matter of finding some balance. >> that's part of the whole process of grieving. to get to a place that i can look back on her and enjoy those memories. >> reporter:'s ye alysia ahead g suicide prevention walks, visiting schools to share alexandra's story. dean finds comfort in music and writing. >> there is an apple tree just as you pass the curve in grafton. you've probably never seen it. ♪ >> a couple years backs, apple and shared it on the way home. alexandra, late afternoon sun, strobe light pulsing through the trees, biting the apple, laughing.
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>> reporter: and in his poetry maybe he can find a path forward for him and his family still battling to make sense of the senseless. >> alexandra walked by that apple tree for the last time at 1:00 a.m. on march 19th, 2018. it was very cold. alexandra, you are missed. i hope for apples this year. i hope for the courage to take one. ♪ >> reporter: jim axelrod, cbs news, grafton, massachusetts. >> the number for the national suicide prevention hotline is on your screen right now. it is 1-800-273-8255. up next, one county's extreme response to a measles emergency.
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the national measles outbreak keeps growing. 333 cases have been confirmed this year in 15 states. the largest outbreak is in rockland county, new york, more than 150 cases since october. officials today declared an emergency. nic nikki battiste has more on their extreme response. >> reporter: at the stroke of midnight anyone under the age of 18 years old without a measles vaccine in rockland county, new york will be barred from most
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public places. ed day is the county executive. >> it is the largest outbreak in the nation since the measles was eradicated in 2000. >> reporter: officials are taking the extraordinary step because there have been 153 confirmed pleasele cases here since last october. 48 this year alone. health officials say the outbreak has centered around the orthodox jewish community. >> we're seeing increasing infections. we're seeing increasing exposures. we're getting more resistance from a variety of areas. >> reporter: rockland county officials say unvaccinated people who violate the emergency declaration could face a fine of up to $500 and up to six months in jail. >> is this more of a scare tactic? >> i would say it's more of an attention grabber. if worst comes to worst, if you intentionally bring unvaccinated children -- >> across the country there have been 333 cases in 15 states already this year. that's almost as many as all of
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last year. some of the rockland county community support the ban. >> i think it's a great idea. if you're not going to vaccinate your kids, stay at home. >> reporter: the ban includes public places like this mall behind me, schools and houses of worship, but all outdoor space is excluded. jeff, the ban will be in effect for 30 days or until minors are vacci vaccinated. >> what a story and one we will stay on. nikki battiste, thank you very much. still ahead here tonight, the reason why nasa put off an historic all-female space walk. you wouldn't accept an incomplete job from any one else. why accept it from your allergy pills? flonase relieves your worst symptoms including nasal congestion, which most pills don't. flonase helps block 6 key inflammatory substances.
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>> there's a lot of things involved with getting the suit ready leading up to a space walk. i couldn't imagine detracting from that time by having them try to get some hardware ready. >> reporter: the suit's fit is critical, protecting space walkers from extreme cold and heat. astronauts do practice in water, but the fit can differ in space. kathy sullivan in 1984 was the first american woman to walk in space. >> for a young woman, a young girl, a person of color, for anyone to be able to see someone more like them, it makes it that much easier. >> reporter: only 12 of nasa's 38 active astronauts are female. tonight a slight stumble on what they all hope will eventually be a giant step forward for women. janet shamlian, cbs news, san francisco. up next here, how to fix a broken school. principal cook found a unique recipe.
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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finally tonight, it takes more than lessons and homework to fix a school. first you have to clean it. we met a hero who did just that. >> oh, my sweet lord. >> reporter: ackbar cook calls it the big room. the place where he stores hundreds of bottles of donated laundry detergent, fabric softener and dryer sheets inside west side high in newark, new jersey. >> we've been getting a lot of community service help from around the state. >> reporter: the big room was a solution to a big problem. >> my kids weren't coming to school. >> good morning. what's up, baby? good morning. >> reporter: some of cook's kids, he calls them all his babies, weren't showing up because they were wearing dirty clothes and getting bullied. >> i think we really put the
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microscope on basic needs of kids. like everyone wants the high test scores. everyone wants them to perform well. but if the kids don't feel confidence in just coming to school and being that person we know they can be, then what are we doing? >> before you raise the s.a.t. scores, how about giving somebody some clean clothes? >> there you go. fight for that baby the way you want them to fight on that test. >> the famous washers and dryers. >> reporter: today, west side has five commercial-grade washers and dryers. deshawn and brianna use them all the time. >> when we first got it, i ain't gonna lie, i was scared to bring my clothes over, but when i went to cook i asked him, can i use the laundromat. he's like, you're good. we're nothing but family in here. you can bring it any time you want. >> reporter: principal cook, who grew up in newark, also started a program called lights on. he opens the school from 6:00 to 11:00 p.m. on fridays during the school year and three nights a
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week during the summer. 11:00 p.m., you're supposed to be home eating dinner, doing homework, sleeping. >> that's not the case. my babies are taking care of their younger siblings. their parents are working hard and have to take all these odd jobs or the parents are not there at all. >> the kids u the gym, dance and are fed warm meals. it is a long way from what west side was just a few years ago. >> people were fighting every day, getting kicked out. >> people getting killed. >> so one principal turns all that around? >> yes. cook made a big impact on west side. >> good morning, mr. cook. >> good morning. how are you doing? >> reporter: it might seem hard to believe thatone person could clean up a school and a whole neighborhood, but in newark the proof is in the principal. >> this is selfless work that we do. no one goes into education thinking they're going to get rich. >> you're not getting a medal at the end of the day. >> no, sir. but i have a gold medal around my heart from the love that the kids can give back to me and just the families and the
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communities that are taking it one step further, so i can't -- you give me goose bumps, jeff. this is the "cbs overnight news." hi, everyone, and welcome to the "overnight theresnews." outrage in chicago after prosecutors dropped all charges against actor jussie smollett. he was accused of faking a racial attack, telling police he was beaten and berated, doused with a liquid and had a noose slung around his neck, while investigators described it as a publicity stunt to get a raise. smollett faced years in prison but now he's off the cook. adriana diaz has the details right after the stunning decision by prosecutors, jussie smollett claimed vindication. >> i've been truthful and consistent on every single level since day one. >> reporter: charges were dropped in exchange for
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community service and forfeiting $10,000 bail. >> i would not be my mother's son if i was capable of one drop of what i had been accused of. >> reporter: the about-face was a slap in the face for police chief eddie johnson. >> it's mr. smollett who committed this hoax, period. if he wanted to clear his name, the way to do that was in a court of law so that everybody could sehe evidence. >> reporter: mayor rahm emanuel was even harsher. >> this is without a doubt a whitewash of justice and sends a clear message that if you're in a position of influence and power, you'll get treated one way, other people will be treated another way. there is no accountability then in the system. >> reporter: the dropped charges come just over two weeks after prosecutors laid out 16 felony counts against him, punishable by up to three years in prison, for allegedly lying to police when he told them he was attacked by two white men who hurled racist and homophobic slurs, but it was these two
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brothers whoed admitted under oath that smollett told them to do it. >> what do you say to people who believe these getting preferential treatment? >> he's not. >> reporter: lead prosecutor joseph mcgats dropped the charges calling it common practice for nonviolent first time offender. >> our priority is violent crimes and the drivers of violence. jussie smollett is neither one of those. >> does dropping the charges vindicate him? >> no. >> does it exonerate him? >> no. >> do you believe that he is innocent? >> i do not believe he's innocent. >> so you believe he's guilty? >> yes. >> reporter: but that's not how the actor played it in front of the cameras, leaving court without having to admit he did anything wrong. even though smollett forfeited $10,000 in bond money, chicago police tell us they spent over $150,000 on his case and a source tells us that the mayor is considering suing smollett to try to recoup some of that money. one of president trump's high-profile an tag difficults
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celebrity attorney michael avenatti is free on $300,000 bond. avenatti is accused of orchestrating a $25 million shakedown aimed at nike. avenatti tells our jericka duncan he was just trying to be an aggressive lawyer. >> did you try to extort nike for millions of dollars? >> no and any suggestion is absolutely absurd. >> you said you were working on behalf of your client, but you were also telling nike, according to this complaint, you either hire me or i'm going to say something. >> there are legal experts that say i was well within the line as an aggressive attorney. there are many that say that. and the fact of the matter is this was not extortion. >> what was it? >> people make threats all the time in connection with trying to settle a case. parkland, florida is still reeling over the recent suicides of two students who survived last year's high school massacre. their friends and family say they were suffering from ptsd and survivor's guilt, but when it comes to suicide, sometimes there is just no explanation. jim axelrod checks back in with
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the parents of a young woman who had the world at his fingertips but still took her own life. >> reporter: this red colonial near worcester, massachusetts looks idyllic. >> it's been a year. i miss her every day. >> reporter: but the last year has been a stunning immersing into the worst kind of grief for the family that lives here. >> it's choosing to wake up, it's choosing to breathe. >> reporter: a year since alysia and dean valoras' older child alexandra, a 17-year-old with a golden resume. >> if you consider me for the national honors society. >> reporter: walked to a nearby highway overpass and jumped. >> reporter: >> i still feel thaz gaping pit and it's painful. >> reporter: we first met them last summer when they shared two journals with dark thoughts alexandra left behind. >> i'm not good enough. i'm worthless. these are things that we never heard. >> reporter: how could they know what lay ahead? >> i think it was just last week
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and then i walked past her bedroom, it's like, [ bleep ], she just jumped off a bridge. >> reporter: they're still learning about her death, discovering a failed suicide attempt five days before by tracking her phone. >> here she is for over 24 minutes mulling around but can't do it and comes back. so she's tempting herself, do you really want to die. >> reporter: and imagine their confusion in between alexandra's attempt and her death she seemed happy. her robotics team earned a trip to a competition out of state. >> friday after school she came home with her reservation number saying, mom, can we book our flight? i'm so excited. we're going. >> so how do you make sense of that? >> you don't. >> sometimes it's like a magnetic pull and some days you've got to take a different route. >> reporter: and don't quite know what to do with the reminders they can't avoid. >> on google you'll get like, hey, last year at this time you have these memories and this
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timeline and i always want to see the picture. yeah, i remember that, that was a fun time, but it's torture. >> reporter: they know moving into the next chapter of grieving is a matter of finding some balance. >> that's part of the whole process of grieving, to get to a place that i can look back on her and enjoy those memories. >> reporter: alysia is headlining suicide prevention walks, visiting schools to share alexandra's story. ♪ dean finds comfort in music and writing. >> there is an apple tree just as you pass through the curve in grafton. you've probably never seen it. ♪ a couple years back, alexandra and i stole a big red apple and shared it on the way home. stro pulngou theite rnoon sun, lang. >> reporter: and in his poetry, maybe he can't find a path forward for him and his family
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still battling to make sense of the senseless. >> alexandra walked by that apple tree for the last time at 1:00 a.m. on march 19th, 2018. it was very cold. alexandra, you are missed. i hope for apples this year. i hope for the courage to take one. ♪ >> reporter: jim axelrod, cbs news, grafton, massachusetts.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." the food and drug administration wrapped up two days of hearings on the possible cancer risks associated with some breast implants. medical advisers insist it's too soon to ban a type of implant associated with a rare type of cancer. the fda found 457 capes of cancer in women with breast augmentation. most were linked to the same type of implant. anna werner reports. >> reporter: sandra rush is a grandmother who had breast impl for more than two decades with no issues until april of 2017. >> my left breast began to swell, and it -- there was a hardness in it.
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>> reporter: what her doctor at first thought was a common infection turned out to be cancer. >> i was in shock, really. i couldn't -- i couldn't believe it. >> reporter: it's called breast implant associated large cell lymphoma, a rare cancer the fda says can develop following breast implants. most women who get that cancer like rush have what are called textured breast implants. these shaped implants have a rougher surface that is designed the limit the movement of the implant but may initiate the cancer. surgeon elizabeth potter is rush's doctor. >> because of this surface being rough? >> that's right. >> reporter: reports to the fda show a 457 cancer cases at least 310 occurred with textured implants. most women are cured after doctors take the implants out. but in sandra rush's case, aften
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she developed an odd pain in her w. so doctors did another test. >> it showed that it had metastasized all through my body. >> i can't imagine what that feeling is like. >> i was in complete utter shock. i was in complete utter shock. >> reporter: she wasn't the only one. >> when i got the pathology report, i was astonished. i actually thought it was incredibility. >> really? >> i read it and reread it. >> reporter: the cancer had moved beyond the area of the implant into her tissues and bones. >> this is not something you'd expected to see? >> i'd never heard of that and did not expect it, was not taught that that could happen. >> reporter: not only was rush's cancer not easily curable, it could kill her. potter says it took five rounds of chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant to put her into remission. >> we have seen something new in breast implant associated
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cancer, and i just want us to pay attention to that. >> it was just an awful experience. really bad. >> reporter: the country's three largest breast implant manufacturers told us textured implants have been extensively tested with safety and comply with fda monitoring and that patient safety is their top priority. mentor says the cancer risk is rare with its implants but that's not good enough for dr. potter. she won't use them anymore. >> i won't use them. actually in my practice i often say this doesn't pass the sister test. >> doesn't pass the sister test, ie, if you wouldn't give it to your sister, you're not going to give it to your patients. >> that is correct. >> reporter: dr. potter now specializes in using a woman's own belly fat to reconstruct a new breast instead of using implants. if a patient wants a nontextured implant she'll provide it, but says -- >> the power should be in a woman's hands. let's give her the information
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and let her choose. this implant carries greater risk. would you like it in your body? it's that simple. >> you're in remission. >> that's incredible. >> reporter: last month rush got a clean bill of health from herher oncologist but regrets the day nearly a quarter century ago when she decided she needed breast implants. >> i think women kind of get conditioned in their mind that they want to
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the legal marijuana industry is growing by leaps and bounds. one estimate says the u.s. cannibis business will have a total value of $13 billion by the end of this year and three years it will top $22 billion. entrepreneurs are coming up with different ways to sell the stuff and you can smoke it, you can eat it and candies or cupcakes and now you can drink it. barry petersen spoke to the man who figured all that out. >> reporter: when it's the clydesdales, it's about budweiser. >> whatever you know. climb on. >> reporter: when it's the rockies, it's about coors. famous beers available at a grocery store, mini mart or nearby bar. now comes ceria, the beer almost no one has heard of, for sale
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almost nowhere except marijuana shops in colorado. because this is beer with the alcohol taken out and potin created by keith villa and his wife jodi. >> we're excited, number one, that our dream is coming true, but number two, to offer people a true alternative to alcohol. >> reporter: it starts when villa mixes beer in a building behind his house with his special recipe. >> i used a mixture of blood orange peel and valencia orange peel to get a nice fruity taste and smell. >> reporter: but he's no ordinary backyard brewer. he got a phd in brewing science by studying in belgium and while at moleson-coors, he invented blue moon that made craft beer mainstream. so when he makes a beer prediction, best pay attention. >> weones thing thatart the cannibis craze and turn it into a legitimate industry that no longer has that stigma>> rorter
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denver facility with bags of marijuana. >> so if i walked into a pot shop like this. >> very similar. >> reporter: the pot is crushed to dust then liquified upped the watchful eye of eric, ceo of the production company can core. from the liquid they extract the thc, that's what creates a high. finally in the vats, the thc is infused into the nonalcohol beer. >> would you close your eyes and imagine, who is buying that? who is your audience? >> the first place i look is right here. it's a perfect product for myself. this gives you an alternative to drinking alcohol. >> reporter: but the complicated chemistry may be the easiest part. much harder is marketing it. under colorado law, it can only be sold at a pot shop and only consumed in private like inside a home. but even so, says stephanie wilson, editor and chief of
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"sensi" magazine, it's a product colorado may like a lot. >> are people really going to buy it? >> i see it working like gangbusters in colorado, "a," because we have such a strong craft beer market. a lot of people who are connoisseurs of beer. i believe there is definitely a market for it and it's new and it's novel. >> reporter: ten states and the district of columbia have legalized recreational marijuana with varying restrictions and that has encouraged other companies to get into the cannibis beer market. the first was two roots in california, but since pot is still illegal under federal law, the products cannot be shipped across state lines. not so in canada where pot is now legal across the nation. brewers like molson coors are investing big time to make pot beer there and expecting sales in the billions of dollars. >> what we want is the effect of the cannibis. >> reporter: keith villa sees a day when cannibis beer will be the best way to get high.
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>> it's different to say i'm having a marijuana cigarette as opposed to having a beer with the guys. >> well, yeah, any kind of smoking is really not socially acceptable, and having a beer with cannibis is socially acceptable. you can even toast people with our beers because in the cannibis world, there are gummies and chocolates, but let's face it, when people are getting married, you can't toast the bride and the groom with a gummy bear. >> reporter: there may even be wine and whisky with marijuana instead of alcohol, which could make cannibis the new way to say cheers. barry petersen, denver. and travellers have been complaining for years that seats are getting smaller and leg room tighter. well, some airlines are flying in the opposite direction. alaska airlines, which recently purchased virgin atlantic, is one carrier undergoing a major makeover. kris van cleave took us to the sky. >> reporter: alaska flight 9565 is making a leg loop around california's bay area, but it's
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left about the destination today and more about the ride. we're with dozens of frequent flyers like jodi genise who alaska is hoping to impress pr with its fresh new cabin. alaska's investing tens of millions to address a huge challenge, melling virgin america's trendy vibe with the more traditional alaska in a way that makes loyalists happy. here is the airline president. >> virgin was a bit of a flying dance club and alaska was not. >> we just needed to evolve. evolve to something that is a little bit more stylish, a little bit more modern. so we needed to have something that really resonated with passengers. >> reporter: the virgin fleet is getting this new look outside, but to go from the old interior to this on an airbus a-321 neotakes 45 people 18 days. two years of work went into picking the right welcoming cabin colors. the mood lighting virgin is known for gets a new blue hue
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designed to calm flyers' sar cad cadin rhythm. >> the only people who lost some space were first class. >> went from a 55 to a 40, but we put more seats. >> that's usually not how that works. >> we want to make sure people flying in the main cabin feel good about their experience. >> reporter: the new seats were designed by bmw design works and feature hand cut memory foam. >> when people hear bmw, they think about a car. we're on a plane. >> the seat is obviously taking cues from the automotive seat in its performance, in the cushioning, sort of the lumbar support. >> reporter: but it was this custom clip on the seat back for a tablet or phone in economy that got people talking and in premium economy, an added surprise. >> i know it doesn't sound like a big deal, redesigning a tray table, but look, there is a cup holder so your drink isn't going
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anywhere. you can put your tablet or phone up here to watch something. it's ergonomically better for you. there is still room for your laptop and there are two charges. i can charge my phone, charge my laptop, work and watch. >> this is a make or break move for alaska. >> reporter: this airline analyst says people are motivated by their cabin experience. 15% of flier satisfaction comes just from the seat. >> if alaska doesn't do this right, people aren't going to choose the airline. they'll fly with other airlines that have cheaper fares, more flights or both. >> reporter: including adding it to 50-seat regional jets. and competitor jetblue is in the midst of upstating with new seats, aimed at giving people more room at knee level. for michael thomas, alaska's cup holder sold him. >> this new cup colder is going to hold my whisky secure. it's going to be great. >> you can put the laptop in
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your lap. >> exactly. no spilling. >> reporter: a s ll >> dr. stanley: remember this: cannot change the laws of god. when he has visited you in some form of adversity and he brings you through that, that's like he has increased the strength of the foundation of your life and your faith in him.
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[music]
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if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, well, it's probably a duck. steve hartman paid a visit to his favorite duck and its loving mother. >> reporter: a lot of kids go to the park to see ducks, but 8-year-old kylie brown of free port, maine takes her duck to see the park. as we first reported a few years ago, snowflake goes into the pond and then returns when called. because snowflake truly believes that kylie is his mother. and the duck is not alone in this delusion. >> i'm his mom. >> but you're not really his mom. >> yep, i'm his mom. >> how did you first find out? >> that he was a duck? >> no, that --
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>> reporter: kylie is unbearably cute. and since i never did recover to ask that question again, let me just tell you that kylie first noticed snowflake's attachment the day the browns brought him home. >> look, look look, he follows her. >> reporter: for whatever reason the duck imprinted on kylie and just had to be by her side no matter what the hour. when snowflake refused to stay in the backyard, kylie's parents, ashley and mike, say they had no choice but to give him a deep? to make him a house duck. >> he goes everywhere that ducks are allowed and almost everywhere they're not allowed. i don't know if you've ever had a 2-year-old or 4-year-old that wouldn't leave home without its blanky. >> anxiety. >> she would not leave home without her duck. and at that point nothing is negotiable. >> reporter: snowflake goes to the beach in summer and sledding in winter. he's been to soccer practice, gone on sleep overs, he even went trick or treater as olaf,
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the snowman from "frozen." and over time because they both sincerely believe they belong together, snowflake and kylie have formed a bond like most of us will never know. >> it's special that i know that that's the type of person that she's going to be. >> reporter: since we first told this story in 2016, kylie has gotten even more motherly. she taught snowflake how to read, or at least not eat the words. >> beak away. >> reporter: she also taught him the value of community service, signing him up to be a therapy duck. and, of course, she knows just what to do whenever her little one needs help falling asleep. kylie really is going to make a great mom some day. mostly because she always has been. >> you know, some day you're going to grow up and go to college. >> what? >> reporter: steve hartman, on the road in freeport, maine. >> it's so secret that steve
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hartman has some very friends. captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, march 27th, 2019. captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, march 27th, 2019, this is the "cbs morning news". charges against actor jussie smollett are dropped in the case of his alleged attack. he may be off the hook, but he's not in the clear. the possible trouble he still faces. i am nervous, i'm concerned, i'm scared. >> attorney michael avenatti opens up in his first interview since the arrest and the serious charges he's facing. u.s. announces we are going back to the moon. when we can expect to see new boot in

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