Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  May 3, 2019 3:12am-3:59am PDT

3:12 am
past it doesn't take one position one way or another on vaccine ss. we reached out to the church as early as yesterday but they won't call us back. >> what a story. david, thank you very much. tonight we continue our series on america's student debt crisis looking at a federal student loan forgiveness program. many borrowers, including teachers and firefighters say the program hasn't been forgiving at all with a 99% rejection rate. here's mark strassmann with part three of our "eye on america" series "life & debt." ♪ >> i love to teach, but i went back to school mostly for what my students could get out of it. touch their lives. >> reporter: you went into it with the absolute intent of giving back? >> oh, absolutely. you don't do that for the caster semenya is one of the money.
3:13 am
>> reporter: debbie baker is 56, greatest athletes south africa a mother of two, and a career has ever produced but she may choir teacher. soon be running her final race, she directs the education and it's not because she's program at a musical nonprofit in tulsa. slowing down. debra patta explains. every year, does this stack of paperwork get bigger? >> reporter: south africans are rallying behind caster semenya >> oh, yeah. with many say she's being >> reporter: this paperwork punished for being too fast and represents a 20-year struggle to not conforming to western pay off her student loans. standards of what a female she graduated from the university of tulsa in 1999. athlete should look like. for ten years, caster semenya how much did you owe? has been trying to outrun the >> it was right at about global controversy that's $35,000. threatened to cut her career >> reporter: but with deferments short. and interest, she now owes the two-time olympic champion $80,000, more than double her has repeatedly been forced to original loan amount. >> i got on there one day and it verify her gender and battle claims that her naturally athle said your loans will be forgiven if you die. well, that's nice. >> reporter: in 2007, congress passed the public service loan like semenya with test oft roen forgiveness program. public servants making ten years of qualifying payments would levels above the normal female have their loan balance wiped clean. range from running distances up you were convinced that you qualified. to a mile unless they take >> we planned our whole lives potentially harmful medication around it. >> reporter: baker never missed to reduce their testosterone. she was on track. in 2017, she applied for
3:14 am
law professor steve cornelius said this is immoral. forgiveness and was rejected. >> my payment plan was correct. so immoral, he resigned last my employment was correct. year from the iaaf. they just had issued it with the >> you are taking a healthy wrong pot of money, and nobody person and turning that person told me. into a patient. >> reporter: hormone specialist >> reporter: you had made zero payments to qualify, zero. what was that moment like when dr. grok says testosterone is you realized what you owed at that point? not the only factor affecting >> i felt very guilty because of sporting performance. >> having a higher testosterone what i had done to my family. would be similar to having a they don't deserve that. long arm span or long torso in it's just wrong. swimmers. it's wrong on so many levels. >> reporter: preposterous and regressive is how three-time >> reporter: teachers, winter olympian taylor described the decision. >> if you say caster semenya or firefighters, police officers, at last count, the department of women like her have a great education has rejected more than 75,000 applications for advantage because of their testosterone level. what about michael phelps? forgiveness. only 864 people successfully heldt allow him to applied, a rejection rate of 99%. compete? these are people who went into >> reporter: tennis legends billie jean king and martina public service in good faith and got screwed. >> exactly. >> reporter: seth frotman is the navratilova have also weighed in condemning the ruling as unfair. executive director of the student borrower protection but there are others such as center. >> through rampant mismanagement sharon davies who has been vocal in their criticism of semenya.
3:15 am
at the department of education >> it's important that caster and rampant illegal practices at realize and we need to start the student loan companies, it protecting female sports. has become a broken promise for that it has to be a level millions of americans. playing field. >> reporter: semeny's response >> reporter: baker, frustrated, began recording calls with has been brief and dignified. for a decade, the iaaf has tried navient, her loan servicer. to slow me down, but this has actually made me stronger, she >> i now have to start all over, so you can understand my said. there's no doubt semenya has a frustration and disappointment and anger that's going through my mind right now. rare genetic ability, one she >> i'm just going to say, yeah, that is, unfortunately, very common. wants celebrated, not penalized. >> they lie. they talk in circles. and on that issue, the world they tell you one thing, and then you find out it's another. medical association has joined >> reporter: in a statement to the debate urging doctors around the world not to implement the cbs news, navient blamed a complex federal loan program, iaaf regulations because they which is why we consistently say they are medically advocate for policy reforms to unethical. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. simplify the system. for some of you, the news baker had to face the music. r otheeck ba ltle she restructured her loan and later for the "morning news" and started over. "cbs this morning." she has 8 1/2 more years of from the broadcast center in new from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm don dahler. payments to forgiveness. you were set up to fail. >> set up to fail, oh, absolutely. it's set up so that you're never >> reporter: america's second
3:16 am
largest teachers union has joined a lawsuit alleging that captioning funded by cbs navient misled borrowers. both navient and the department of education blame congress for creating a complex, restrictive program. >> we do have an update tonight, a great update, on someone we featured last night. it's friday, may 3rd, 2019. tell us about that. this is the "cbs morning news." cyclone fani makes landfall >> that story was about senior borrowers struggling with college debt. one of them was seraphina galante, a 76-year-old social overnig overnight, striking india's east worker in san diego. coast with winds of over 125 a viewer who saw our story has miles an hour. agreed to pay off her loan in full, almost $40,000. i mean, that's loan forgiveness it's the strongest storm to hit the country in 20 years with that the r trowe millions of people in its path. can only dream of. bucking congress. >> "making a difference," mark as democrats pursue details in strassmann, thanks very much. why some florida schools are the investigation, president trump says it's over. opting out of a plan to allow teachers to carry guns. and banning extremists. uh-oh, looks like someone's fabo
3:17 am
still nervous about buying a new house. is it that obvious? yes it is. you know, maybe you'd worry less if you got geico to help with your homeowners insurance. i didn't know geico could helps with homeowners insurance. yep, they've been doing it for years. what are you doing? big steve? thanks, man. there he is. get to know geico and see how much you could save on homeowners and renters insurance. ♪ ♪
3:18 am
new magnum ice cream. double sea salt caramel. carefully made to be broken. magnum ice cream. be magnifique. women are standing up for what they deserve in the office in the world and finally, in the bedroom our natural lubrication varies every day it's normal so it's normal to do something about it ky natural feeling the lubrication you want nothing you don't get what you want prestige creams not living up to the hype? olay regenerist shatters the competition. big hype? big price? big deal! olay regenerist hydrates skin better than creams costing over $100, $200, and even $400. for skin that looks younger than it should. fact check this ad in good housekeeping. olay regenerist. now try olay hydrating eye. hydrates better than the #1 prestige eye cream.
3:19 am
3:20 am
the governor of florida is expected to sign a law allowing teachers to bring guns into classrooms. not all schools have to allow it. and many say they won't. here's adriana diaz. >> reporter: the new bill extends florida's guardian program, passed in the wake of the parkland shooting, to now include arming teachers. the house passed the measure along party lines yesterday after impassioned speeches on both sides. some worry students of color would be at risk. >> because we're talking about black boys and girls who are getting murdered by police officers. there's bad police officers, and there are bad teachers. >> reporter: while others say the measure will save lives. >> if you put your faith in the ability of the government to protect you, that is a false hope. >> reporter: at least eight stae who aren't security officers to be armed at school. florida's measure requires psychological screening and 144 hours of instruction, including target practice, as we saw in
3:21 am
june when the guardian rogram was just getting started and limited to civilians who weren't teachers. you're a minister. why did you decide to do this? >> well, i have three small children in the school system. >> reporter: but broward county, where parkland is located, rejects expanding the program to teachers. anna fusco is a local teachers union president. teachers who don't want to carry guns won't have to. why do you still oppose it, if it's optional? >> i certa eagu to take on that job without extensive training. >> reporter: 29 of florida's 74 school districts have opted in to the guardian program. the extended measure into law. adriana diaz, cbs news, miami. "star wars." we will remember him.
3:22 am
you wouldn't accept an incomplete job from any one else. why accept it from your allergy pills? flonase sensimist relieves all your worst symptoms, ich most pills don't.rom your allergy pills? and all from a gentle mist you can barely feel. flonase sensimist.
3:23 am
you can barely feel. stop fearing your alarm clock... with zzzquil pure zzzs. a drug-free blend of botanicals with melatonin that supports your natural sleep cycle so you can seize the morning. zzzquil pure zzzs. there is some sad news tonight for "star wars" fans, just days before "may the fourth be with you." peter mayhew, who played chewbacca in the "star wars" movies, died earlier this week at his home in texas. born in britain, mayhew was 7'2". he was 74 years old. spacex admitted today a capsule being developed to carry astronauts was destroyed during an explosion. that is after the footage leaked online.
3:24 am
it happened during testing, and it's a major setback for the company's efforts to put astronauts in space this year. two-letter words "ew" and "ok" are among 2,800 new words just added to the collins official scrabble words dictionary. there is also "bae," meaning before anyone else, and "rello," short for relative. you can score 27 points with "hackerazzo," one who hacks a celebrity's computer. and 14 points with "sharenting," as in, posting about your kids. up next -- bearing witness to make sure no one ever forgets.
3:25 am
3:26 am
3:27 am
here in new york, an exhibit dedicated to victims of auschwitz opened next week. a recent study said 41% of americans know nothing about the nazi's largest concentration camp. the goal of this exhibit, the first of its kind in the u.s., make sure no one ever forgets. your tattoo? >> a-58-12. >> the tattoo on shirley gottesman's left arm has faded. the memories have not. when did they put this on you? >> about the first week when i got there. >> in 1944, gottesman, then 17, was pulled from her home and eventually separated from her family. only she and her brother survived. her parents and grandmother were million other jews at the nazi's largest concentration camp. >> this is my first job. >> sorting shoes? >> yes.
3:28 am
>> shirley found her mother's shoe inside crematorium number 4, where she was forced to work. >> i made a sad decision. i cannot take it with me. i left it. >> did you say goodbye? >> no. >> when you saw the shoe? >> no, i didn't say goodbye. i just said, she is dead. >> we met shirley at the museum of jewish heritage inside the exhibit called "auschwitz -- not long ago; not far away." >> every button was touched by the finger of a person who was murdered. >> it is the life work of robert jan van pelt. >> shirley is a witness. and the burden that a witness carries on her or his shoulders is immense. >> curators here have carefully handled and displayed objects never seen on american soil. more than 700, many overwhelming. a replica of a gas chamber door, the side the nazis closed, the side their victims couldn't
3:29 am
open. >> the two sides of the door speak about total power and total powerlessness. >> a sock still tucked intsht b boy who was murdered. this little boy tucked his sock in to the shoe thinking he would come back to it? >> yes. >> there are also more than 400 photographs, brutal evidence of 20th century deprivation and desperation. >> one of the reasons it is good for the world to again be confronted with this story is that when this generation passes away, an exhibition like this is one of the ways to take over their burden and to carry it on. >> do you think this could happen again? >> yeah. >> you do. >> because people forget history. >> but isn't that why a museum is here like this, so people don't forget? >> i hope so. that's what i'm trying to do as much as i can. >> by sharing your story. >> yeah.
3:30 am
♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome. i'm don dahler. the political battle between the white house and congressional democrats threatens to break out into legal warfare. attorney general william barr refused to appear before the house judiciary committee to testify about his handling or mishandling of the mueller report. he also refused a subpoena to deliver an unredacted copy of that report. barr could now face arg contempt of congress or worse. house speaker nancy pelosi said barr is guilty of lying to congress. nancy cordes has that. >> he lied to congress. and if anybody else did that, it would be considered a crime. >> reporter: the house speaker's accusation ricocheted across washington today. the justice department calling it reckless, irresponsible, and false, as the man in question
3:31 am
skipped out on a house hearing after a dispute over the format. >> attorney general barr has informed >> repter: one democrat mocked barr's absence by feasting from a bucket of kfc. >> chicken barr should have shown up today and answered questions. >> reporter: republicans argued barr was right to steer clear. >> we go back to a circus political stunt to say we want it to look like an impeachment hearing because they won't bring impeachment proceedings. >> reporter: speaker pelosi argues the nation's top law enforcement official broke the law last month when he feigned ignorance about reports that members of the special counsel's yohat fereing with that? >> no, i don't. i suspect that they probably wanted, you know, more put out. >> reporter: but it turns out he knew exactly what they wanted
3:32 am
because special counsel robert mueller had already sent barr a pointed letter complaining that barr's memo did not fully capture mueller's findings. >> i don't know what that refers to at all. >> reporter: now, democrats are threatening to hold barr in contempt of congress. >> this is very, very serious. >> reporter: a growing number of democrats, including a dozen presidential candidates, are now calling on barr to resign after just three months on the job. the president says barr is being treated unfairly and says that barr did a fantastic job when he did testify here on capitol hill yesterday. thes measles epidemic continues to spread not only in the united states but around the world. the latest outbreak is aboard a cruise ship in the caribbean. david begnaud has that story. >> nobody is getting off. for now, the passengers and crew have been told by the government of st. lucia to stay on the ship which is called "freewinds." that's the same name as a
3:33 am
440-foot vessel that belongs to the church of scientology. >> today, the ship's doctor requested 100 doses of the measles vaccine. and this is currently being provided from our supplies at no cost. >> reporter: that is st. lucia's chief medical officer, dr. merlene fredericks-james, who says the quarantined passengers and crew are stable and under surveillance. dr. jon lapook is chief medical correspondent for cbs news. >> before the measles vaccine was available in 1963, about 400 to 500 people a year would die from it. 1,000 would get severe inflammation of the brain. so, this is not a joke of a viral infection. this is something that can cause severe illness. >> reporter: so far this year, 700 cases of measles have been confirmed in the u.s. the virus was declared eliminated in 2000, but it made a comeback because people are not getting vaccinated. in fullerton, california, hundreds of moviegoers at a showing of "avengers: endgame"
3:34 am
were told they may have been exposed to measles last week by a woman who was infectious. the ship has been in st. lucia since tuesday. it's free to leave according to officials, but if it stays, nobody is getting off. it can take 7 to 21 days before someone who has been exposed to measles starts to feel the symptoms. we've reached out to the church of scientologist, but they just won't call us back. david begnaud, cbs news, new york. for a dozen years now, there's been a government program designed to forgive federal student loan debt. it turns out those loans are almost never forgiven. mark strassmann has the details in tonight's "eye on america" report "life or debt." ♪ >> i love to teach, but i went back to school mostly for what my students could get out of it. touch their lives. >> reporter: you went into it with the absolute intent of giving back? >> oh, absolutely. you don't do that for the money. >> reporter: debbie baker is 56, a mother of two, and a career
3:35 am
choir teacher. program at a musical nonprofit in tulsa. every year, does this stack of paperwork get bigger? >> oh, yeah. >> reporter: this paperwork represents a 20-year struggle to pay off her student loans. she graduated from the university of tulsa in 1999. how much did you owe? >> it was right at about $35,000. >> reporter: but with deferments and interest, she now owes $80,000, more than double her original loan amount. >> i got on there one day and it said your loans will be forgiven if you die. well, that's nice. >> reporter: in 2007, congress passed the public service loan forgiveness program. public servants making ten years of qualifying payments would have their loan balance wiped clean. you were convinced that you qualified. >> we planned our whole lives around it. >> reporter: baker never missed a payment for ten years. she says navient, her loan servicer, repeatedly told her
3:36 am
she was on track. in 2017, she applied for forgiveness and was rejected. >> my payment plan was correct. my employment was correct. they just had issued it with the wrong pot of money, and nobody paymen to quify, zero. what was that moment like when you realized what you owed at that point? >> i felt very guilty because of what i had done to my family. they don't deserve that. it's just wrong. it's wrong on so many levels. >> reporter: teachers, firefighters, police officers, at last count, the department of education has rejected more than 75,000 applications for forgiveness. only 864 people successfully applied, a rejection rate of 99%. these are people who went into public service in good faith and got screwed. >> exactly. >> reporter: seth frotman is the executive director of the student borrower protection center.
3:37 am
>> through rampant mismanagement at the department of education and rampant illegal practices at the student loan companies, it has become a broken promise for millions of americans. >> reporter: baker, frustrated, began recording calls with navient, her loan servicer. >> i now have to start all over, so you can understand my frustration and disappointment and anger that's going through my mind right now. >> i'm just going to say, yeah, that is, unfortunately, very common. >> they lie. they talk in circles. they tell you one thing, and then you find out it's another. >> reporter: in a statement to cbs news, navient blamed a complex federal loan program, which is why we consistently advocate for policy reforms to simplify the system. baker had to face the music. she restructured her loan and started over. she has 8 1/2 more years of payments to forgiveness. you were set up to fail. >> set up to fail, oh, absolutely. it's set up so that you're never
3:38 am
struggling to tough me with wipes? try new mr. clean magic eraser sheets. just wet, squeeze and erase icky messes in microwaves and on stovetops for an amazing clean, get the power of mr. clean magic eraser in new disposable sheets.
3:39 am
3:40 am
this is the "cbs overnight news." >> this is mental health awareness month. this morning, we're taking a look at suicide. it's one of the leading causes of death in the united states, but a new technology could soon help. it's designed to diagnose the thoughts that may lead a person to contemplate suicide. nikki battiste has the story. >> we found that there was -- there were certain concepts that were altered in people who thought about suicide. and our method was able to detect those differences and analyze exactly what the differences consist of. >> reporter: that method begins with a sophisticated piece of equipment, a functional mri. >> with fmri, you see a picture of the brain's activities.
3:41 am
>> so you're saying every thought and idea in our brain has its own specific pattern? >> yes. and what's really fascinating, relatively new, is the patterns are similar across people. >> unless you have suicidal thoughts, then they're altered. >> that's what psychiatric illnesses do. they change the way you think, and this method, i think, can identify those changes. >> reporter: these images show two people thinking about the word death. this one has thought about suicide. this one has not. the colors represent brain neurones. >> when you see dark blues, that means very little firing. >> and the red is telling you -- >> you get activation related to self-thinking. when they are thinking about death. but among people who have made an attempt, you see even more of this dark red. >> reporter: 34 people took part in his latest study. 17 of them never had suicidal thoughts, but the other 17 had. and over half of those 17 had even attempted suicide in the
3:42 am
past. these second by second snapshots show clear differences in the d to think about different concepts. like care-free, praise and death. >> this is -- >> this is our thought library. >> reporter: those snapshots were analyzed by this complex computer server storing hundreds of thoughts by hundreds of people with the power to search for unique patterns. >> we can tell whether somebody is feeling anger or happiness or sadness. we can tell what number a person is thinking. we can tell what topic a person is reading a paragraph about. >> the doctor was 90% accurate in determining who had past suicidal thoughts and attempts. >> how might the doctor's research change the future of suicide? >> if we can understand the neurobiology underlying the drive to harm one's self, then we would be able to design better therapies aimed at reducing that desire. the treatments that we have now
3:43 am
don't work all that well. >> reporter: dr. joshua gordon, director of the national institute of mental health, thinks dr. jeff's work could lead to more effective treatment. >> potentially in ten years, i might go to the doctor's office, electrodes are put on my brain. they would be able to tell whether i have a mental illness, whether i'm suicidal. possibly. >> slightly optimistic, but not impossible. maybe 20 years. there are more than 90 million dogs in the u.s. about a quarter of them were purchased from breeders. now most breeders are reputable, but there's also a dark side of the industry. from puppy mills that churn out baby dogs on an industrial scale to smaller, more sophisticated scam artists who don't have any dogs at all but advertise for them online. do a search. you'll find hundreds of colorful professional websites advertising the cutest full-bred animals you've ever seen and thousands of dog lovers are being ripped off every year.
3:44 am
>> you're such a handsome boy. >> reporter: when wayne warner and pamela wanted to find a new puppy for their kids, they went looking where most people do. >> i google searched it, and it popped up a whole list. i thought i found a dog. $800. got in contact through email. got a response right away. then it moved to text. >> reporter: the chicago couple sent the money for the blue-eyed great dane through western union to a company called wallish great danes. they were given a bill of sale and told madison would be shipped by air carrier from south florida. >> i got a phone call saying it was stuck in savannah, georgia. i needed to pay an additional $1500 for this pet carrier safe thing and had to get three vaccinations to be able to travel. >> that's kind of when i was starting to -- my heart started to sink. we were all excited. we had gotten supplies. >> and you brp to get a new member of the family. >> yeah. our first baby puppy.
3:45 am
there's no dog. there is no dog. >> reporter: and there is no wahlish great danes. their advertised address is actually a thrift shop. according to the federal trade commission, wayne and pamela are victims of an international scam that affects as many as 37,000 people a year. paying an average $100 to $1,000 for dogs they'll never see. the better business bureau also says at least 80% of websites advertising pets for sale, the vast majority believed to be puppies, are frauds. and mostly based in west africa. >> one of the red flags also was the guy asking for more money for the cage was a virginia number. and he didn't speak very good english. >> reporter: consumer watchdog groups like petscams.com post fake puppy sites every week but new ones keep coming. sam aussies is one of them. the site, which is still online sell adorable australian shep herds like 99%
3:46 am
potty trained bandit. luna. or lola. for $750. >> this is elsa, and this is anna. >> and a discounted dog should be a warning to consumers says breeder jordan mills. >> what's involved in breeding these dogs? >> what's not involved? the training. the getting them ready for their new homes. the vet visit to have the vet look them over. the vaccines. >> reporter: mills, who has bred french bulldogs for a decade, sells them for an average of $3200 through her website which scammers duplicated two years ago to defraud potential buyers. >> they took my website and they mirrored it completely. but there was no one behind it. people are putting trust in you, a good deal of money, and then sitting there waiting for something that doesn't exist. >> what kind of advice would you give to someone who wanted a puppy but was afraid they were going to a fraud lent website. >> go to their home. if you can't visit the person, another great resource is to
3:47 am
facetime them. you want to talk to this breeder. ask them how they got into breeding. get a real history from them. >> reporter: you can also look locally, which is where pamela and wayne finally found their beautiful great dane atticus. >> he's the love of our life. he loves us as much as we love him. >> i think he's going home with me. >> lesson here is, if you're going to buy a dog online, use a credit card. the better idea is to meet the breeder, see the dog and take it home from there. of course, you can avoid all of this by going to the nearest shelter. you're likely to find a lovely and loveable new member
3:48 am
3:49 am
3:50 am
there's a new exhibit at the brooklyn museum in new york dedicated to the art of frida kahlo. her greatest creation may be herself. faith salie explains. >> reporter: you may know the face -- >> hi. i'm frida. >> reporter: but there's so much more to frida kahlo than meets the eye. >> i think frida kahlo is definitely one of those one-name artists. frida. people say that, and you know who you're talking about. >> reporter: who exactly frida kahlo was is now being explored at the brooklyn museum in an exhibit that blurs the line
3:51 am
between artist and art. lisa small is the co-curator. >> very crowded every day. >> reporter: the exhibit includes over 300 pieces with self-portraits, photographs, and personal items that suggest how carefully kahlo crafted her image. like her trademark unibrow. >> is that her eyebrow pencil? >> indeed. that's her eyebrow pencil next to her emory board. everybody loves to fixate on the unibrow and she had an eyebrow pencil. she was paying attention to them in some way. may have even been making them more pronounced or bolder. >> reporter: kahlo was born in mexico city in 1907. she developed an eye for art as a child aided by her father, a well-known photographer. >> she was his assistant but more importantly, learned how to pose for photos. that intense gaze coming out of all these pictures her father took of her is the same gaze you see later coming out of her own
3:52 am
self-portraits. >> reporter: at 18, she taught herself to paint. as she recovered from a horrific bus accident that shattered her pelvis and spine. >> she's laying in bed, sometimes painting paintings above her on a specialeesle. but i don't think many people think of her as a disabled artist. >> yeah. exactly. and i think she lived her life as a disabled person. and it became part of her identity and her creative process. >> reporter: so much so that an entire room in the exhibit displays how she lived her life in pain. featuring the braces and plaster corset she had to wear. >> she painted them while she was wearing them. the hammer is right over where her heart would be and she painted a curled up fetus over her womb which leads to the complicated and fascinating questions about kahlo and never having children. >> reporter: kahlo also survived childhood polio, which left one leg shorter than the other.
3:53 am
when she lost that leg to gangrene, she turned her prosthetic into a work of art. >> on the boot on the prosthetic leg, she sewed these little bells, which is so fascinating because here is the leg that is no longer there, and every time that leg moves, you're going to hear it. you're going to know about it. >> reporter: to kahlo, no subject was off limits, including her tumultuous marriage to diego rivera, the 20th century muralist. she paints the couple at their best. >> she is suggesting a sort of maternal, nurturing aspect toward rivera in this particular painting. >> reporter: and at their worst. after she caught rivera having an affair with her sister, no less, she created this piece. ♪ it's a moment dramatized by salma hayek "frida."
3:54 am
>> rivera loved her long hair. and so her cutting it off -- >> power move. >> something of a power move. and the fact that she's holding the scissors with which she cut all of those hairs off right at crotch level is also, i think, could be interpreted in a slightly symbolic way. >> reporter: kahlo spent four years in the u.s., following rivera as he painted his massive murals. at the time, mrs. rivera's artistic talent was mostly ignored. frida kahlo died in 1954 at 47. it would take decades for the art world to truly recognize her work. and we remember frida kahlo today, says lisa small, because she invites us to see ourselves. >> putting herself out there. playing around with her identity and how she presents herself to
3:55 am
3:56 am
3:57 am
3:58 am
3:59 am
4:00 am

56 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on