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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 5, 2019 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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of apple's story was unveiled monday at the developers conference in san jose. in these hallways, cook is king. >> hey, guys. >> reporter: you're the biggest celebrity here. >> no, no. >> reporter: what he says on stage is a sort of gospel for programmers who gather from around the world. >> we are so inspired by the millions of incredible apple developers. >> reporter: this year, apple's big announcements including a farewell to itunes, software to further protect privacy and a new dark mode for the iphone screen, which cook says, will be easier on users' eyes. i want to ask you about screen time. >> yeah. >> reporter: do you know how much screen time you use every day? >> i do because i get a report every week. and i found it to be profound. so, i dialed back a bunch of mo notifications and stopped myself from being too antsy about picking up the phone. >> reporter: the ceo of apple is saying don't pick up your phone
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as much? >> we made the phone not so that you would use it all the time. we made the phone to make your life better. my simple rule is, if i'm looking at the device more than someone's eyes, i'm doing the wrong thing. >> reporter: apple's rollouts come at a critical time for the company. sales of the iphone continue to sag. and the ongoing trade war between the u.s. and china threatens its core business. how hard is apple getting hit by trump's trade war with china? >> currently, the chinese have not targeted apple. at all. >> reporter: if there's a 25% tariff on the iphone xs alone, it could add $160 to what is already a very expensive device. would that hurt sales? >> sure it would. i'm hoping that doesn't happen.
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the iphone is made everywhere. it's made everywhere. so, a tariff on the iphone would hurt all of the countries. but the one that would be hurt the most, is this one. >> reporter: president trump calls you a friend. how would you describe your relationship? >> we've had straightforward discussions, many of them. he listens to the comments, which i appreciate. sometimes he doesn't agree. my philosophy on things is you always engage. even when you know you're going to wind up on opposite sides. >> reporter: there's many other ceos and tech leaders that won't meet with president trump. but you engage with the white house regularly. >> i do. and i'm proud to. i don't believe in the i disagree with you so i don't want anything to do with you. the way you stop the
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polarization is to talk. this is sort of like step one. i don't want to be a part of the problem. i want to be part of the solution. >> that was wide ranging, interesting. and tim cook doesn't sit down for those interviews often. i hear he had a warning for you about the 2020 election? >> reporter: that's right, david. when we asked him if he's worried about fake news ahead of the presidential election, he responded that he is worried. that fake news is not under control. he says that outside forces are using it to manipulate the way we think. and without using facebook by name, he suggested that platforms like facebook amplify fake news with the news feed and that it can't be solved with artificial intelligence. >> interesting. nora, thank you very much. you can see more of the exchange about fake news and nora's interview with tim cook. we have an extended version on our website, cbs news.com.
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could it be that something about our food is wrong? there's a study that suggests that white meat, including poult poultry, may not be healthy, as well. we asked a cardiologist about this. it was a small study, about 100 people. a lot of attention, this headline is getting. what is it about? >> it's important to talk about. nutrition science is complex. it was a small and short study. it didn't look at if i eat white meat or red meat, would i encrease heart attack, stroke or death? if you eat white meat or red meat, you raise your levels of ldl or bad cholesterol by about the same more. amount. there's something in the animal protein that is raising that level. or something in plant-based
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diets that are lowering. >> i feel like cardologists have said, limit how much red meat you eat? >> red meata lot the red meat i fatty with saturated fats. a lot of it is full of sodium. this study looked at lean red meat and unprocessed red meat. in addition, what's interesting is that recent research has shown that when you eat a lot of red meat, you change your gut bacteria. you produce a chemical that can be plaque-producing. >> more plant base, less meat. coming up next, why the world health organization is investigating the deaths of an american couple vacationing in the south pacific. and the mass shooting in virginia has prompted the governor there to make an unusual move.
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try the next size up and get up to 20% better coverage - day or night because better coverage means better protection always. welcome back. u.s. authorities are looking at what caused a couple to die in
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fiji. the cdc and the world health organization are assisting in the organization. janette shandling has the latest. >> reporter: days after arriving at a sheraton in fiji, both became ill. she texted her dad. >> she told me they were sick and vomiting and they have diary ya. she told me that her hands are numb. >> reporter: when they dropped off their 2-year-old son, aidan, before the trip, both were healthy. he was never able to talk to michelle before she died at a local hospital. and david died a few days later, as doctors were reportedly ready to fly him to australia for treatment. both in their 30s. david was an air force veteran who worked at an air force volunteer for lockheed martin. there were no travel warnings at the time but fiji is monitoring
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a dangerous flu season. >> this is the worst thing you can public about their area is people died. >> reporter: the world health organization is investigating. the cdc confirms it is awaiting specimens until their own an analys analysis. janet of savings and service. whoa. travis in it made it. it's amazing. oh is that travis's app? it's pretty cool, isn't it? there's two of them. they're multiplying. no, guys, its me.
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today, virginia's governor, ralph northam, says he will call back state lawmakers to propose gun bans. it's about to get more difficult to travel to cuba. today, the trump administration banned cruise ships departing the u.s. from stopping there, in order to punish cuba for supporting the venezuelan government. commercial airline flights are not affected. walmart is offering new incentives to attract high school workers. they will have access to free s.a.t. and a.c.t. prep courses. seven hours of free college credit and debt-free degrees from universities. coming up next, two
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you know, the special relationship between the u.s. and britain was built over sergeserge centuries and forged over the battlefield of europe. as we approach the anniversary of d-day, much of that belongs to two men. >> almighty god, our sons, pride of our nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor. >> reporter: president roosevelt led the nation in prayer as the invasion of europe began. an endeavor made possible because of his extraordinary friendship with winston churchill. it's been described by some as the most consequential partnership ever. >> reporter: in new york, the private arguments of the two
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leaders are on display. many of the documents for the first time ever. >> despite the ups and downs of the war, despite disagreements between the two men, they remained on a personal level, friendly. >> reporter: churchill believed a landing in france was too great a risk. but their other ally, josef stalin, insisted on it. >> he makes the decision that he agrees with stall and churchill has to come along. >> reporter: and churchill does not look happy. >> he realized he was on the short end of this decision. >> reporter: he warned of what would come. >> 1944 will see the greatest sacrifice of life by the british and american armies. >> reporter: as the day of battle approached, he cabled roosevelt, our friendship is the greatest standby after the increasing complication of this exacting war. >> at moments of crisis, he
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would say heartfelt things to roosevelt. >> reporter: roosevelt did not live to see the final victory. reading from these notes, churchill told the house of commons, in franklin roosevelt, there died the greatest american friend we have ever known. after the war, he visited his friend's grave. >> reporte >> he stood by the grave for three minutes in silence. we don't know what he was thinking. >> reporter: and imagine what the world would be like today, had it not been for the friendship ofwo men. david martin, cbs news, hyde park, new york. we'll take you to france for extensive coverage of d-day this week. anthony mason will anchor the broadcast tomorrow and thursday. we're out of time. that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back. we have the morning news. and don't want to miss gayle and the guys on "cbs this morning."
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from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm david begn d begnaud. welcome to "the overnight news." president trump wraps up his three-day trip to britain this morning. the president and mrs. trump will travel to port spit mith t commemorate d-day. the president spent tuesday meeting with british leaders and claiming he barely saw the thousands that came out to protest his visit. ben tracy reports. >> the greatest alliance the world has ever known. >> reporter: all that red, white and blue certainly proved the point. at this news conference -- >> i've always talked openly with you, donald. >> reporter: there was another special relationship on display. >> i think you deserve a lot of
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credit. i really do. >> reporter: president trump complimented prime minister theresa may, after criticizing her handling of britain's exit from the european union. >> i seem to remember the president suggested i sue the european union. >> i would have sued. but that's okay. i would have sued and settled, maybe. you never know. >> reporter: mr. trump is pushing for a major post-brexit trade deal and seems to suggest the prime minister to get it done. >> i don't know what your timing is. stick around. let's do this deal. >> reporter: the president is clearly enjoying his visit to london. calling the queen and the royal family, fantastic. the president brought his own family, all four of his adult children, along on the trip. he's also trying to ignore the locals who aren't so happy to see him. >> it was a very, very small group of people, put in for political reasons. it was fake news. >> reporter: as the president's motorcade drove to downing street, he may have seen this, a blimp depicting him as an angry
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baby. my colleague was with the protesters. >> several thousand protesters were in the streets. far fewer than on the president's previous visit last summer but still passionate. >> i disagree with trump's views on immigration. i disagree with everything he has stood for. >> reporter: so does this philadelphia native, who commissioned this robot of trump tweeting and talking on a toilet. what would you say to those who call this distasteful to the president? >> the president is distasteful and offensive. he insults everybody. >> reporter: tonight, there was no name-calling, as the president and the first lady, hosted prince charles and the duchess of cornwall for dinner. the president will go down the coast for a d-day ceremony. the queen will be there, as well. that's where she says good-bye tohe pdes ds ireland. secretary m
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pompeo will meet with mexican officials, trying to head off the tariffs on mexican goods. it will take three years to complete the antitrust investigations into some of the biggest tech companies. nora o'donnell sat down to discuss with and other issues with apple ceo, tim cook. >> reporter: is apple too big? >> i don't think so. with size, i think scrutiny is fair. i don't think anybody reasonable is going to come to the conclusion that apple is monopoly. our share is much more modest. we don't have a dominant position in any market. >> reporter: you're saying, you're not a monopoly? >> we're not a monopoly. >> reporter: but elizabeth warren who is running for president, says apple should break up its app store and other parts of its business. >> i strongly disagree with that. some people would argue, if you're selling a good, you can't
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have a product that competes with that good. that's an argument that takes you down the path that walmart shouldn't be stocking an alternative or house brand. this is decades of u.s. law here. we'll tell our story to anybody that we need to or wants to hear it. >> reporter: the latest chapter of apple's story was unveiled monday at the developers conference in san jose. in these hallways, cook is king. >> hey, guys. >> reporter: you're the biggest celebrity here. >> no, no. >> reporter: what he says on stage is a sort of gospel for programmers who gather from around the world. >> we are so inspired by the millions of incredible apple developers. >> reporter: this year, apple's big announcements including a
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farewell to itunes, software to further protect privacy and a new dark mode for the iphone screen, which cook says, will be easier on users' eyes. i want to ask you about screen time. >> yeah. >> reporter: do you know how much screen time you use every day? >> i do because i get a report every week. and i found it to be profound. so, i dialed back a bunch of notifications and stopped myself from being too antsy about picking up the phone. >> reporter: the ceo of apple is saying don't pick up your phone as much? >> we made the phone not so that you would use it all the time. we made the phone to make your life better. my simple rule is, if i'm looking at the device more than someone's eyes, i'm doing the wrong thing. >> reporter: apple's rollouts come at a critical time for the company. sales of the iphone continue to sag. and the ongoing trade war between the u.s. and china threatens its core business. how hard is apple getting hit by
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trump's trade war with china? >> currently, the chinese have not targeted apple. at all. i don't anticipate that happening, to be honest. >> reporter: if there's a 25% tariff on the iphone xs alone, it could add $160 to what is already a very expensive device. would that hurt sales? >> sure it would. i'm hoping that doesn't happen. the iphone is made everywhere. it's made everywhere. so, a tariff on the iphone would hurt all of the countries. but the one that would be hurt the most, is this one. >> reporter: president trump calls you a friend. how would you describe your relationship? >> we've had straightforward discussions, many of them. sometimes oe aoue comments, whi
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always engage. even when you know you're going to wind up on opposite sides. >> reporter: there's many other ceos and tech leaders that won't meet with president trump. but you engage with the white house regularly. >> i do. and i'm proud to. i don't believe in the i disagree with you so i don't want anything to do with you. the way you stop the polarization is to talk. this is sort of like step one. i don't want to be a part of the problem. i want to be part of the solution. >> that was wide ranging, interesting. for those terviewsften.t down i hear he had a warning for you about the 2020 election? when we asked him if he's worried about fake news ahead of the presidential election, he responded that he is worried. that fake news is not under control. he says that outside forces are using it to manipulate the way we think. name, hested that facebook by name, hested that facebook by
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iran's supreme ruler has rejected an offer from mike pompeo to negotiate over iran's missile program. president trump has pulled the u.s. out of the deal with iran. an aircraft carrier group went to the region. >> reporter: these are the biggest shipping lanes for oil and gas. and keeping them open the one of the biggest reasons that aircraft group is here. it's seen as an escalation. the carrier was sent here as a show of force. along with b-52 bombers and u.s. troops. we landed in the sea. but outside of the strait of hormuz, a waterway for oil and
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gas and a flashpoint for iran. u.s. forces regularly patrol these waters. but this is anything but routine. this aircraft carrier was sent here specifically in response to iranian threats. rear admiral john f.g. wade, says he's personally seen the credible intelligence, suggesting an imnenminent attacn u.s. forces. what do you expect to see here? >> i don't know. we have to be expected for anything to come our way. if there's a move to close the strait of hormuz, or threaten our attack, u.s. or coalition forces, interests, there will be consequences. >> reporter: we found the warship on war footing. training surveillance flights a day.
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what are your pilots looking out for? >> we're looking that we're at a posture. we're staying as disciplined as we can. >> if that carrier group moves into the straits near iran, the risk of a. a dark chapter is being dredged up from an alabama river. it is the last slave ship that handed off human cargo. >> reporter: ben rains took us where a piece of history met the light of day. >> here, now, we have the story. the ship tells the story. this is the object that stole their lines from them.
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>> reporter: he used the historical documents, including the captain's journal. he pulled up a ship. >> there's no more sinister slave store. >> reporter: in 18importing slaves was a crime. he returned to africa with 110 slaves. once unloaded, he ordered the captain to burn the vessel, to cover up the crime. ben and cleon are from the community. >> these are strong people. strong-willed people. that's what came to america. >> reporter: many direct descendants still live in africatown. they gathered to hear the details of the discovery.
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>> yes. >> i'm emotional because of the fact that this ship has been found. it can't be denied now. >> reporter: you feel it was being denied? >> sure it was being denied. covered up and everything else. now, it's real. >> it's not my story. but it's a story in a nethat ne be told. >> reporter: they want the ship brought up and displayed in africatown, so this can be part of american history. in case you missed it, james holzhau holzhauer's record-breaking run on "jeopardy!" came to an end. he won 32 games and $2.4 million. he finally lost to a university of chicago li librarian, emma boettcher. david beg fold naud has more.
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>> reporter: he stuck to a winning strategy. he would seek out the daily doubles and bet everything he had. he also managed to give the correct responses 97% of the time. >> james? >> who is fernando valenzuela. >> reporter: he earned nearly $2.5 million. in last night's episode, the professional gambler's luck ran out. >> what did you wager? $20,000. what a payday. 4 $46,801. >> reporter: emma boettcher ended his streak. but holzhauer said he never expected to get this far anyway. >> thought i could win six episodes. not 32 and not this level of
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money. >> reporter: early on, he set the record for the most money won in one episode. he walked away with 16 highest totals, earning an average of $77,000 per game. on 12 shows, he went the entire game without missing a single question. in fact, he belt the full pot so often, he became known for his signature gesture. >> all of the chips, please. >> reporter: so confident in his gesture, he would add a personal message. he said there were two keys to husba his success. >> holding the buzzer and the wrist, trying to keep everything study. >> reporter: the other was mental. >> there's a big advantage to getting a big stack of chips early on. you can make plays that no one else can. accumulating the dollars quickly
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was a big part of the plane. >> what is deep state? >> reporter: he went into final jeopardy in second place. against a contestant who took big risk for big rewards. >> if i had to go out, i would want to go out against a top player. an honor to go on top. >> i was thinking, okay. it was surreal. >> reporter: he was less than $60,000 shy of ken jennings' record for the highest number of wins in a season. he won 2 $1/2 million over 71 games. >> you have a $1 lead over ken jennings right now. and his final response was -- he winds up in second place, with $8,799.
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>> reporter: the two tweeted on monday. congrats, that was a experience. "the cbs
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did you ever have a lock you couldn't get open? how about a safe?
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david has the story of finding the right combination. >> reporter: in the movies, safe cracking looks like this. inl -- it's a little calmer. he is one of new york city's most accomplished safe crackers. it's taken him 15 years to get this good. it is true that you don't know what's inside this safe? >> i don't. all right. >> reporter: that's unbelievable. do the honors. >> all right. there's a second door. but it's unlocked. >> it's another safe. >> reporter: the truth is, almost all of the safes he's
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hired to open turn out to be empty. goose egg. sorry, movie screen writers. in the united states, how many people are at your level? >> probably in the hundreds. >> reporter: out of 100 safes that people hire you to open, how many stump you? >> zero. i'm too well prepared. >> reporter: master safe cracker, roy waters, living in rural pennsylvania, in a house that is practically a museum of safes and locks that he has cracked. you can open almost any safe, why don't you go to the dark side and be the guy that gets rich. >> not my style. i enjoy the people. >> reporter: it's exciting to watch safe croackers using
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manipulation. >> the second way is by drilling a hole into the lock in the safe, using a medical-grade boroscope, and dialing it while you're watching it. >> did you eat your wheaties? >> yes, sir. >> reporter: that's how roy walters is going to help brett cunningham, who found this in a scrap yard. >> i can give you a list of people that's tried to open it up themselves. >> reporter: oh, really? >> yeah. time for the experts. >> reporter: i decided to drill it right here. you would probably like to have people not asking you questions? >> there you go.
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i unlocked the lock. >> empty bank bags. >> reporter: this kept roy busy for a few minutes. but the cheap safes from stores, not so much. >> with security, you get what you pay for. the less money you spend on a safe, the less security you get. >> reporter: rt the art of safe-cracking has been on the decline for 50 years. but for faster safe crackers that remain, the job has its jobs. >> for you, the drama is more about opening the safe and not what's in it. >> forget what's in it. >> reporter: is being a safe-cracker as cool as it should
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so, is it always "i" before "e," except after "c"? steve hartman posed that question to the grammar lady. >> reporter: imagine you're walking. out of nowhere, a woman on the street prepositions you. >> over the preposition. under the preposition. >> reporter: what would you think? >> people must be impressed. >> reporter: who is this lady? >> do you see grammar questions? >> reporter: who sets up a table just to talk about grammar? >> i love grammar so much. >> reporter: you couldn't think of anything more interesting? >> it's the anchor. right now, we're using words. this wouldn't be happening. we would be looking at each other. >> reporter: y,ingple in business communications. but her passion is linguistics.
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she has a huge library of grammar and style books, from arabic, to zulu. last year, she began setting up her gram moomar table in new yo city. it worked so well, she is taking the table to the collective that is america. we caught up with her at new hope, pennsylvania. telling when to use who and whom. and counseling people on their comma addictions. >> i have had more of an urge to leave them out sometimes. >> reporter: she answered something about i wondered about. doesn't the period have to go inside the quotation mark? or can it go outside? how about the story steve did on the grammar lady was interesting. i have used it here.
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>> it always goes inside. >> reporter: ellen says her favorite part is settling grammar disputes between husbands and wives. >> i resolved that. >> reporter: she says it's enlightening. >> main my experience, a couple comes up. and usually the woman is right. >> reporter: i'm grammarless right now. she hung me out like a dangling modifier. a lot of people appreciate her mission. this guy had to know, do you capitalize after a colon? >> if it's only a piece of a sentence, no caps. >> reporter: that made her day. one more convert in the army of grammar offenders. >> people love to be lectured on grammar. >> eporter: next lesson, harvey,
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it's wednesday, june 5th, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news". d-day commemoration. president trump joins world leaders in the uk this morning to pay the fierce battle during world war ii. >> a helicopter rescue goes wrong. and the powerball jackpot winner has come forward to claim his more than $344 million prize. how he's keeping some of that money in the family.

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