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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  August 16, 2019 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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coordinating these sexually explicit massages while epstein was conducting business telephone calls or authorizing company transactions, he would frequently be receiving a sexually explicit massage. attorneys for other alleged epstein victims tell cbs news they plan to file more lawsuits in the coming days and weeks. and those are expected to target not only epstein's assets, like this $77 million town house inmain manhattan, but also his co-conspirat co-conspirators. >> mola lenghi, thank you. search warrants allege that the argued the companies knowingly hired undocumented immigrants. so why haven't the companies been charged? manuel bojorquez has the answer that was given to cbs news. evi against the five poultry companies includes instances of workers wearing electronic monitoring ankle bracelets like those federal authorities place on immigrants without work
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permit, and another worker who used an assumed name who was told to quit and reapply. 680 workers were detained in last week's raids. employers can be fined up to nearly $20,000 for undocumented worker. it's unclear if that has happened, but cbs news has learned undocumented workers have started receiving fines like this one for nearly $500. cbs news contributor maria elena salinas sat down with mike hurst, the district attorney for the southern district of mississippi. >> so you knew these companies were hiring undocumented immigrants. why haven't any of them been prosecuted? >> well, in these types of executions, part of it is executing the criminal search warrants. >> so you can guarantee in the future whether it's a week or six months that the employers who hired these particular workers will be prosecuted and will be in jail. >> i can guarantee we'll investigate this case, and if we get evidence beyond a reasonable doubt, the employers and owners will be prosecuted.
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>> reporter: companies in mississippi are required to use the e-verify federal database to screen new hires. but according to the affidavits, investigators say they found dozens of incidents where that di who's dog is this?
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second nypd suicide in two days. the police commissioner has declared a mental health crisis in his department, and he spoke today with our jeff pegues. >> reporter: robert echeverria died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at home last night. the 25-year veteran officer's suicide came a little more than 24 hours after a 35-year-old officer took his own life. commissioner james o'neill is still struggling with the news. >> you know, you think okay, this is going to be the last one, and last night we got a phone call, and i just almost knocked me down. it just took the wind right out of me. what the hell ishere. >> reporter: so far this year there have been nine nypd suicides, seven since june. last year there were a total of four. >> there's people out there that love you that want to help you, but unless you come forward, unless your partner says something or friend, we're not going to know. >> reporter: what new york city is experiencing is part of a
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nationwide trend in policing. since january, there have been at least 125 officers who have died by suicide. according to one study, cops are 30% more likely to die by suicide than the general public. police departments like the nypd are expanding the safety net by offering more counseling and avenues for officers to seek help anonymously. >> we don't know why nick did what he did. >> reporter: doug's sonic, a 14-year nypd officer took his own life last year. >> i just think it was a bad last decision that he made with not thinking all the way through what all the ramifications that everyone else. >> reporter: norah, today in a profanity-laced statement, the police union was critical of how the city has responded to these suicides, and it accused the nypd of destroying the careers of officers who reach out for help.
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>> jeff pegues, our thoughts are with their families. thank you. alarming news today from government scientists that noaa. july was the hottest month ever recorded. argumentist ice shrunk to the lowest levels since records began in 1880. it hit a record high of 94 degrees in swedish territory. that's north of the arctic circle. scientists say temperatures will likely continue to rise because of man made climate change. there is still much more ahead. what some are calling a miracle landing. think sully sullenberger in a think sully sullenberger in a co ♪ we switched our detergent to one that's clean. ♪ ♪ and if you make the switch you'll see what we mean. ♪ ♪ tide purclean, because it's made with plants. ♪ ♪ tide purclean, gets stains out his pants. ♪ ♪ tide purclean, it has nothing to hide. ♪ ♪ it's made with plants and ♪ ♪ has the cleaning strength of tide. ♪
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russia is celebrating its own sully sullenberger. the pilot had just momentsfi ho crippled passenger jet today. ian lee shows us how he did it. >> reporter: a routine flight turns into a nightmare for passengers flying from moscow to crimea. a flock of seagulls fly into the plane shortly after takeoff. the engines groan as the plane descends. seconds later, "we've landed," they scream in disbelief. the airbus a321 settled in a corn field three miles from the airport. miraculously, all 320 people on board survived. the pilot of ural airlines flight 178 directed the passengers to safety. dozens of people were treated
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with mostly minor injuries. this lady described the impact saying, "i just held my small child because she isn't heavy, and i was scared that she would be shaking out of fear." investigators say the birds took out both engines, but will review the flight data recorders. the pilot, damir yusupov, is already being hailed a hero for his quick thinking. he described what happened in the cockpit, telling reporters "that we tried to make it back to the airport, but when the second engine lost power, we had no choice but to put the plane down immediate immediately." turning what could have been a catastrophe into a miracle on the corn field. ian lee, london. coming up, two of the world's biggest soccer stars share their goals for all women.
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in the hollywood ripper trial, a jury in los angeles convicted michael gargiulo today of murdering two women and attempting to kill another. in 2001, actor ashton kutcher went to the home of one of the victims to pick her up for a date, but she didn't answer the door. well, her body was found the next day. she had been stabbed 47 times. gargiulo was charged in 2011 after "48 hours" mystery aired a report on the case. the u.s. women's soccer team is ready to take its battle for equal pay to court. mediation talks to settle the team's lawsuit against the u.s. soccer federation broke down after just one session. co-captain meganinnd teammate christen spoke on "cbs
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this morning." >> it's very frustrating for us on the team, you know, for women everywhere i'm sure to be feeling like they aren't getting paid what they should be. >> we're trying to do this on behalf of women everywhere, to be treated respectfully and paid lawfully. >> in their lawsuit, the women say they earn about 40% of what players on the men's team makes. we end tonight with an extraordinary young police officer. he's determined to improve relations between cops and kids, and the best way to do that he believes is one-on-one. here is jim axelrod. >> reporter: though he's never fired his gun on duty, syracuse police officer brandon hanks still takes great pride in how he shoots. >> there it is! this kind of shooting. a standout basketball player in high school and college, officer hanks grew up like a lot of kids he knew, fearful of the police. >> the only time i ever really saw them in my neighborhood is when somebody was either going to jail or getting arrested or
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something like that. >> reporter: when he became a cop, he wanted to change that perception, posting this challenge on facebook to the kids he sees on patrol. one-on-one, first basket wins. if that's hank's, the challenger does 20 push-ups. but if hanks loses, he buys the winner a new pair of sneakers. >> it gives me the hunger to not lose is thinking about that receipt for that $150 sneaker bill. >> reporter: he is undefeated in 20 challenges. he does get the ball first, but he's playing in full uniform. >> i got my bulletproof vest on which is another also 10, 15 poun.indfplg tlt. >> reporter: so far the challenge is working perfectly, i mean, all cops are not bad cops. >> reporter: and just imagine how they'll feel if hanks ever has to buy them sneakers. jim axelrod, cbs news, new york. >> story is a reminder there are so many people doing great work
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in their communities. send us your stories. i'm norah o'donnell. good night. ♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news," everyone. i'm errol barnett. police and city leaders in philadelphia are joining growing calls for tougher gun control. this comes after six officers were shot by man with an assault rifle. police say the suspect opened fire wednesday when officers came into his home with a warrant. he then barricaded himself inside and kept firing at others from a window. two officers and three hostages were trapped upstairs as police tried to talk the gunman into surrendering. jericka duncan has the latest.
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>> i mean you think about what could have happened, right? to have six police officers in such close quarters be fired upon with an individual with a rifle, an assault rifle. >> reporter: philadelphia police commissioner richard ross says he was front and center, watching the drama unfold in a s.w.a.t. vehicle for much of the nearly eight-hour shootout turned standoff. >> we know somebody is firing a high-powered rifle out the window, potentially putting civilians at risk. >> reporter: around 4:30 yesterday afternoon, police arrived to this north philadelphia neighborhood to serve a search warrant for drugs. in a matter of seconds, 36-year-old maurice hill allegedly began firing shots and wounding six officers. moments later, a possibly wounded officer rolled out of the doorway. when you look at those injuries, someone grazed in the head, someone shot in the hand, someone shot in the leg, what are the chances? >> i'll just sum it up this way. god is good. he just is.
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>> reporter: two other officers and three civilians ended up inside the home on the second floor. police and s.w.a.t. teams were able to help them escape around 10:00 p.m. commissioner ross says he even spoke to the suspect several times, trying to convince him to surrender. >> he texted at one point that i'm going to call you back. he didn't. but we kept calling, we kept calling. >> reporter: just after midnight, hill walked out with his hands up. do you worry about the amount of access civilians have to guns like the ones you were up against yesterday? >> i always do. and i know that in my heart, we can do better in this country. we can do better with regard to regulation. >> reporter: based on the suspect's extensive criminal background, we asked the district attorney here if the criminal justice system failed in this instance. he said it's fair to say it did not stop a terrible incident. the nypd is mourning the
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loss of another officer who took his own life. police say heas a veteran. his death on wednesday is now the ninth nypd suicide so far this year. police commissioner james o'neill says the department is facing a mental health crisis right now. here is jeff pegues. >> reporter: robert echeverria died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at home last night. the 25-year veteran officer's suicide came a little more than 24 hours after a 35-year-old officer took his own life. commissioner james o'neill is still struggling with the news. >> you know, you think okay, this is going to be the last one, and last night we got a phone call, and i just almost knocked me down. it just took the wind right out of me. what the hell is going on here. >> reporter: so far this year there have been nine nypd suicides, seven since june. last year there were a total of four. >> there's people out there that lolove you that want to help yo
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but unless you come forward, oue something or friend, we're not going to know. >> reporter: what new york city is experiencing is part of a nationwide trend in policing. since january, there have been at least 125 officers who have died by suicide. according to one study, cops are 30% more likely to die by suicide than the general public. police departments like the nypd are expanding the safety net by offering more counseling and avenues for officers to seek help anonymously. >> we don't know why nick did what he did. >> reporter: doug's son nick, a 14-year nypd officer, took his own life last year. >> i just think it was a bad last decision that he made with not thinking all the way through what all the ramifications that everyone else. we're hearing more firsthand accounts from women who say they
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were sexual abused by jeffrey epstein when they were minors. meanwhile, epstein's estate and his alleged associates are facing new lawsuits despite his apparent suicide. mola lenghi has the latest on this. his roughly $77 million new york city town house. epstein may be gone, but the demand for justice is intensifying. >> a good i'm sorry would just would have been good enough, you know. like because i didn't deserve that. i didn't deserve to, like, just not be a teenaged girl anymore. >> reporter: michelle licata said she did not want jeffrey epstein to die. she wanted him behind bars for allegedly sexual abusing her when she was around 16 years old. >> i just wanted him to sit there like i had to sit there after it happened. >> reporter: licata says a
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friend recruited her to give the financier a massage at his florida home when she was in high school. and hoping to earn some extra money for christmas presents, she agreed. now 31, licata is calling for epstein's alleged accomplices to be held accountable. she is not alone. on wednesday, epstein accuser jennifer araoz filed a federal suit against epstein's estate and epstein's girlfriend ghislaine maxwell and a secretary and maid on epstein's staff. kimberly lerner is one of araoz's attorneys. is there anyone else who should be held accountable? >> there were various secretaries, there were house keepers and there was the recruiter. we haven't been able to identify any of those people by name as of yet. >> reporter: the lawsuit claims araoz was recruited when she was 14. she alleges the abuse began about a month after meeting epstein when he showed her the massage room in his palatial new york city town house and told her it's my favorite room. according to the suit, their
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events routinely became routine. a maid would put towels and lotions out, tell araoz to get changed in the bathroom and leave her about $300 for each visit. about a year after the abuse started, she claims epstein forcibly raped her and she never returned. how much are you seeking from epstein's estate? >> i don't even know what his entire estate is worth, but we're seeking significant damages. >> reporter: but licata says going through the courts won't make up for the abuse she suffered. >> a civil lawsuit then would not give me back what i lost. >> reporter: licata told us, at least for her, there is no way to get peace now that jeffrey epstein is dead. we should note that both licata and araoz say they never actually met ghislaine maxwell, and the three other women are listed as jane does in the lawsuit because their identities at this point are still unknown that is something attorneys tell us they hope to learn through what's called the discovery process of the civil case. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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♪ this is the "cbs overnight news." >> a mother over in california is suing her son's charter school after a sickening act of bullying was caught on video. the mother says the incident left her child with severe brain damage and school officials did nothing to stop it. here is nikki battiste. >> this is a terrible story that every parent dreads, their child bullied at school. now one california mother is taking legal action to bring about change. she spoke with our los angeles affiliate kcbs and didn't want to show her face or name to protect her son's identity. she says she wants accountability. >> that child that i dropped off at 7:30 that morning, he's not
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the same anymore. >> reporter: this mother says school officials at animo westside charter school in los angeles didn't do enough to protect her son from a school bully. >> that hurts because that's all i have. it could have been prevented. only if someone cared. >> reporter: it was january of 2018. school surveillance cameras show a small boy getting off the bus when he is approached by a much larger boy who punches him and allegedly puts him in a chokehold. at one point, a staff member walks by, but doesn't intervene. according to the lawsuit, the boy allegedly lost consciousness twice. he is eventually helped inside, where staff members realize what's going on, bringing him to the main office and laying him down on the floor while they call his mother. when she finally arrives, she says no one had called 911. >> my son is literally laying there still in the middle of the office floor completely black
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and blue. >> reporter: ben micelles is the attorney representing the mother and her son. >> the school district has seen the video. the fact that they can watch that video and not so much offer an apology is really, really, really disgusting. >> reporter: according to the complaint, the boy suffered permanent brain and spine damage as well as post traumatic sleep disorder. in a statement, the organization green dot, which runs the charter school writes we take seriously the safety of all of our students and quickly address bullying of any kind on our campuses. we promptly and thoroughly investigate any complaint and take appropriate corrective action. the boy's mother says she wants an apology and can't believe the bully was never expelled. >> i think across the board, there should be discipline, and i think that that can include termination.
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upstate new york. >> it brings me back to the time when i was 20 years old and falling in love with this beautiful woman here. ♪ >> reporter: they were not alone that first time. far from it. half a million others were camping out with them on max z yasgur's farm on that weekend in 1969. >> what is that? >> that's hashish. >> it's hashish? >> wow, what is that? >> reporter: at woodstock, three days of peace and music as the poster promised. what no one counted on was torrential rain rainstorms that turned the site into a muddy mess with food, water, and bathrooms all hard to come by. >> i like to say i think the whole scene is out of sight. really, this is really a groovy
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seen. >> see how close bobbi and i are standing? that's how close the people were standing. >> reporter: all those people. what was the vibe like here? >> we were all in it together. >> reporter: they were all in it together. this woodstock generation. a year after the assassinations of martin luther king jr. and bobby kennedy, with the war in vietnam raging, woodstock was a counterbalance. >> once i got here and felt the vibrations that these people were giving off, to see the sun come up to jefferson airplane was something, really something. >> we hadn't planned on going. the tickets were $18 for three days. minimum wage was $1.60. >> reporter: the festival succeeded despite the promoter's ragtag efforts. >> so many people came up it became impossible to control them, and the festival was declared free and open to every. >> reporter: richie havens opened the show friday afternoon. ♪ freedom, freedom >> reporter: jimi hendrix closed it early monday morning with the
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national anthem. ♪ in between -- sha na na, janice joplin, blood sweat and tears -- ♪ what goes up, must come down -- the grateful dead, and the who, among others. ♪ people try to put us down ♪ talking about my generation ♪ >> reporter: woodstock put joe cocker on the map. with his own take on the beatles "with a little help from my friends." ♪ john fogerty's credence clearwater revival was one of
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the hottest bands going when they played woodstock. >> we're going in by helicopter. we thought it was really fun. >> we apologize for the noise of the choppedy choppedy. as the chopper came over the rise, fogerty realized this wasn't just a concert, this was history. >> the awesomeness of it, the hugeness of it, it was scary. i just have never seen a gathering of people that big before. >> reporter: construction of the concert stage continued until the last minute. time problems created chaos in planning and organization among the producers of the affair. booked as headliners and assigned the prime spot of 9:00 saturday night, credence didn't take the stage until 2:30 sunday morning. >> the lighting only carried out about two, three rows of people. the rest was just black. >> reporter: so you were playing to pitch-black? >> yes. instead of the usual that kind of thing, there was kind of no
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reaction. quickly i looked down, and i see a couple of rows of people. they were naked. and they were asleep. and way out there, like a quarter mile, i can't tell you, it's black, but i see a lighter flicker, and i hear a guy's voice, and he says, "don't worry about it, john, we're with you." so i played in front of a half a million people, i played the whole rest of my show for that guy. ♪ don't come around tonight, there's a bad moon on the rise ♪ >> reporter: we're standing approximately where the stage was in 1969. >> reporter: wade lawrence is the curator of the museum at bethel woods. it feels like sacred ground. >> it is. carlos santana came here 40 years after woodstock. he stood right where we're standing and looked up the field, tears in his eyes and said this is ground zero for peace and love. ♪
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>> reporter: a number of security officers, while aghast at what they saw, praised the celebrants for their good manners. "excuse me, i'm sorry, and thank you" were terms of common usage between cops and kids. sure, there are plenty of stories about the bedlam that marked those three days, but half a century later, lawrence says that's not the enduring meaning of woodstock. >> it became a rallying cry for young people who were disappointed with the way their government was treating them, disappointed with the progress of civil rights and an unpopular war in vietnam, and woodstock to them was a gathering of the tribes. it gave them optimism. it gave them that idea that we could change the world. >> and so it's all over except for the massive cleanup job that remains. the woodstock music and art fair having quietly folds its tent and steals away.
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>> reporter: and the festival's anniversary has always provided a marker for that generation's legacy. "sunday morning" first took note on the tenth anniversary with singer david crosby. >> it was the only time i know in history that that many people got together in one place where there were not murders, rapes, robbery, taking place. there weren't any. it was a peculiarly peaceful scene. this is talking statistics, not hey, groovy, man. it was for real. >> it's true that every person that ever came up to me and said they were really there, the planet would have tilted. >> reporter: crosby's graham nash was 27 at woodstock. and along with steven stills and neil young, they were all a little nervous. >> this is the second time we've ever played in front of people, man. we're scared [ bleep ]. >> reporter: "sweet judy blue eyes", that's tricky to do live, isn't it? ♪
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♪ gentle soul >> reporter: did you nail it? >> yep, pretty good. i was proud of it. ♪ a little loose. we're only sitting in front of half a million people. i thought we did very well. ♪ >> reporter: now 77, nash says the woodstock generation did very well too. ♪ you who are on the road must have a code that you can live by ♪ ♪ and so become yourself because the path is just a goodbye ♪ >> reporter: when you look back now, the woodstock generation,
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how did they do over the next 50 years? >> i still believe what we believed then as hippies. i'm still hippie. let's get real here. the basic ideas of that love is better than hatred, that peace is much better than war, that we have to take care of our fellow human beings because this is all we have, those tenets that were established then are still relevant to me today. ♪ don't you ever ask them why, if they told you, you would cry, so just look at them and sigh, and know they love you ♪ >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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two childhood friends in minnesota are giving old flowers a second life, and that's given a lot of seniors a new reason to smile. here is adriana diaz. >> hey, i brought you some flowers. >> oh, thank you. those are beautiful. >> reporter: bloomington, minnesota is in full bloom. that's where you might call karen waldridge and laura hogan full-time flower girls. >> hi, maxine. >> reporter: an idea sprouted from friends last year. take unsold flowers destined for the dumpster, repurpose and visit them to those who can use an extra visit. seniors. the flowers inspire a special feeling that inspires both song -- ♪ oh say can you see
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>> reporter: and dance. >> i can tell. you're good. >> we started working on our kitchen island, and we were really proud of delivering a dozen or two dozen flowers. >> reporter: then what happened? >> what happened, laura? >> we bloomed. we bloomed is what we say. >> reporter: now they rearrange nearly a thousand bouquets a month, with 150 volunteers working five days a week. >> maybe just the hydrangea. >> reporter: this is bluebirds and blooms, named after the pair's childhood youth group, the bluebirds. the flowers brighten 30 communities. >> it kind of opens a conversation and opens a door. >> reporter: mostly homes for seniors with memory loss, like the wealshire. >> this is for you. >> beautiful! >> i'm not used to this. >> reporter: valley larson has dementia. some memories may have faded, but her daughter children shores was in the same bluebird troop
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and veli taught them all music. what did you think when they gave you the flowers today? >> i just was in shock.whuld ty? >> reporter: i think they just wanted you to have something night. >> believe me, i took them. and they're not getting them back! >> when they deliver flowers to her, she'll call. she'll describe them to me, and give me a flower report every day. >> reporter: the flowers are also a reminder that someone cares. even if the memory of who has gone. adriana diaz, bloomington, minnesota. ♪ >> everybody! ♪ you make me happy when skies are gray ♪ >> andhat is the "overnight news" f news" for this friday. for some of you, the continues, and for others, check back with us a bill later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm errol barnett.
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it's friday, august 16th, 2019. this is the cbs morning news. miracle survivors. a small plane skids off the runway an bursts into flames. on board racing legend dale earnhardt jr. and his family. what we're learning now about the crash. a rash of suicides. police officers taking their own lives. what one major city is now doing to curb the troubling trend. and mercury rising. july was the hottest month on earth. why scientists say temperatures will continue to go up. good morning from the studio 57

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