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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  August 19, 2019 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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wedding celebration. also tonight, president trump pushes back on alarms that the once red hot economy could be going cold. >> i don't see a recession the world is is in a recession ragt now. pro democracy protesters marched peacefully in hong kong as beijing likens their movement to terrorism. >> they are angry and committed to making their voices heard by the government. police across the country intensified their hunt for copy cats following the latest mass shooting. plus storms thunder across the plains, winds tommed train cars in kansas.
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and great adventure. meet a grandmother on a joyride of a lifetime. welcome to the "cbs overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. a horrific attack in afghanistan a suicide bomber attacked a wedding in kabul killing dozens and wounding many more. >> reporter: it's a sight that's become all too common in afghanistan. rows of fresh graves holding the victims of the latest attack. this time a suicide bomber targeted a wedding killing dozens of people and wounding o. >> i heard an explosion.
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a lot of guests were killed. >> reporter: the attack took place at this wedding hall west of the city. mostly populated by shiite muslims. isis has claimed responsibility. eyewitnesss say the bomber walked prong the children dancing before detonating. the carnage was so great some bodies couldn't be identified. their shoes are all that remain. afghanistan's president condemned the bombing saying the targeting of our people in such events indicates the i atrocity of a terrorist group determined to kill innocent peel. even the taliban con demd the attack, but isis after losing their so-called caliphate in iraq and syria look to exploit the chaos in afghanistan in order to spread their reign of terror. the i tack comes as officials try to negotiate a deal that would see u.s. troops withdru from afghanistan in exchange the taliban would ensure the country wouldn't be used as a terrorist base.
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>> thank you. president trump returned to washington today after spending ten days at his new jersey golf club. before boarding air force one, the president made a point to push back on the are risks of a recession facing the u.s. economy. paula reid has more. >> reporter: president trump tried to reassure americans after roller coaster week on wall street. >> i don't see a recession. the world is in a recession right now. >> reporter: earlier in the day the president's top economic advisers hit the sunday show circuit to calm fierce of a recession. >> i tell you what. i don't see a recession. >> reporter: larry cudlo pointed to low unemployment as signs the economy remains strong. >> we should not be afraid of opt michigan. i don't know what it is everybody wants to talk about pessimism. >> reporter: trade adviser peter navarro rejected any talk of a pending recession. >> i'm seeing looking at all the macrotea leaves is a strong
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trump economy and bullish stock market through 2020 and beyond. >> reporter: independent economists have been less optimistic after the market flashed a signal interpreted as a sign recession is on the horizon. democrats pin the blame on the trade war with china. presidential candidate pete buttigieg. >> if you think china is going to change the fundamentals of their economic model by poking them in the eye with tariffs. >> andrew yang insists the president's approach is not working. >> we theed to curb the abuses. 12k3w4rr president trump continued to defend his trade war with china insisting that the u.s. is poised for growth after the trade deals are done. but after months of negotiations between the u.s. and china, there's no trade deal in sight. >> paula, thank you. hong kong's prodemocracy movement took to the streets again today.
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1.7 million, a quarter of the territory's population, t part. >> reporter: defying a police ban in bad weather, hong kongers marched in peace fuelled by anger. overflowing victoria park, the site for people power protest, nay spilled into the streets. even with the rain, torrential at times, it's not stopping all of the protesters from rallying. they are angry and committed to making their voices heard by the government. what started out june 9th as a demand for the government to revoke a hated extra diction bill has exploded into calls for greater democratic reform. the resignation of the chief executive and a probe into police brutality. in the past week they have been accused of excessive force
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firing tear gas into a crowded subway station and a protesters could lose her eye after police shot a bean bag at her face, which they deny. protesters have been accused of chaos too crippling the world's eighth busiest airport with mass sit-ins and detaining two chinese citizens who they thought were spies. sunday's march was a chance to step back from the violence. is it better to use violence or to use peace? >> peace is the best way. >> basically, we should say it is peace. >> i would prefer peace. but this is not doing any good. >> reporter: rising violence has come with rising fear that china could deploy its military to quash these protests. cbs news hong kong.
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hundreds of right wing and antifascist pr testers con vermonted on the city in dualing demonstration ps more than a toss people were arrested. now to the weather. severe storms thundered across the midwest today. heavy rain in chicago washed out hundreds of flights at o'hare. in wisconsin this shelf cloud hovered over the landscape as far as the eye could see. and in kansas, winds blew more than 100 train cars off the rails. excavators were brought in to get the toppled cars upright and on the tracks. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. rodeo...
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so you can... retire better. law enforcement is on high alert for copy cat mass shooters in the wake of recent tragedies in l pa so, texas, and dayton, ohio. in the past 48 hours, two men in separate incidents were arrested on suspicion of plotting attacks. meg oliver has more on how the public can help look out for potential threats. >> reporter: police arrested 20-year-old james reardon on saturday, a self-described white nationalist after uncovering this threatening social media post. authorities say the video shows him shooting a semiautomatic
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rifle and talking about killing jews in youngstown, ohio. >> that kick ed off an intense investigation, a very rapidly evolving investigation. >> reporter: reardon took part in the deadly protests in charlottesville in 2017. he was interviewed far documentary saying he wanted to see a homeland established only for whites. police seize the semiautomatic weapons, dozens of rounds of am natiin addition and bullet proo armor. a day earlier, another takedown in daytona, beach, florida. deputies swarmed 25-year-old tristan wiggs in a grocery store parking lot. they uncovered text messages that says i would like to kill 100 people. and i want to break a world record for longest confirmed kill ever. >> are copy cat crimes becoming a competitive sport? >> yes, they are.
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>> reporter: an fbi study shows 85% of active shooters brag online about their poerm plan. >> equally disturbing is the fact that 54% of the individuals that read or were aware of the active shooter's plans said and did nothing. we need to get more involved as evidenced by this data. we can make a big impact and do it soon. >> reporter: authorities said he had a hunting rifle and 400 rounds of ammunition when arrested. >> this is how it's supposed to work. you see something, say something. law enforcement does their job, we seize weapons and he's under arrest. >> he's being held without bond in florida and in ohio reardon is being held on $250,000 bond with a court hearing scheduled for monday morning. the fbi has not said if they will pursue charges. >> thank you. iceland held a memorial today for the country's first
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gla gla sure lost to climate change. it melted ay after being frozen for 700 years. a bronze plaque unveiled today reads a let tore the future. it warns that over the next 200 years all of iceland's glaciers will meet the same fate. two kayakers in alaska were in anchorage when an ice bridge began to collapse. the chunks of ice creates a huge wave that washed over the surprised men. both say they are lucky to be alive. and a passing to note. legendary cbs sportscaster jack whitaker has died. he called some of the great moments in sports at this network for 22 years including the first super bowl and the 1974 triple crown victory by secretariat. whitaker was also a decorated world war ii veteran. he died at home in pennsylvania.
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he was 95 years old. next, why one woman is suing a major grocery store chain after her father was shot and killed while shopping. plus poison from a pond. a new warning for dog owners. and meet the grandmother and grandson on an epic joyride to visit every national park.
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after the recent mass shooting at a walmart, there's new attention on the gun policies of retailers that allow customers to be armed. one woman is challenging supermarket giant kroger after her father was murpded in one of its kentucky stores. she spoke to us. >> reporter: you received a phone call. who was on the oh end? >> my son. >> what did he say? >> his grandfather was shot. >> reporter: kelly watson lost her father to gun violence last october.
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while shopping for school supplies with her then 12-year-old son, he was shot and killed inside this kroger grocery store in louisville, kentucky. >> to have been taken from us in the way that he was taken because of someone else's hate is unbelievable. >> reporter: police arrested gregory allen bush, he was indicted if i bia federal grand jury for hate crimes. watson along with her mother charlotte recently filed a lawsuit against kroger. it describes two dozen gun-related incidents resulting in eight deaths inside and outside of kroger stores nationwide. >> you don't need a gun to buy groer ris. >> reporter: ron johnson is the family's attorney. >> you can't carry a gun into your school or the courthouse. why? because they know it's dangerous if people bring guns to those places. what we're simply say iing is grocery stores need to do the same thing. >> reporter: kroger does not have a policy prohibiting
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customers from bringing firearms into their stores. the company released a statement on its website stating their long standing policy on the issue is to follow state and local gun laws. and asking customers to be respectful of others while shopping. watson says she hopes her lawsuit will help make places safer. >> we have to do something to try to prevent these things from happening again to others. >> reporter: cbs news, new york. up next, why some fresh water lakes and ponds are (flight attendants) ♪ when you have nausea,
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(vo) get powerful relief with new pepto bismol liquicaps. dog owners are being warned about a deadly algae that's taken lives in a handful of states. here's anna warner. >> reporter: abbi, iz sit and harpo meant the world to their owners. >> we did everything together. >> reporter: but after taking their dogs to play at a north carolina pond, the joy shattered in just minutes. >> denise brought the two little dogs upstair tors get their bath next and she started yelling for me that something was wrong with abbi. >> reporter: the dogs started to have seizures. they rushed them to the vote vet. less than five hours later, all three dogs were dead. >> they crossed that bridge
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together. >> reporter: the animals were poisoned by something lurking in the water. a microscopic bacteria called blue-green algae. it mostly infests waters when the water is warm and releases toxins that can cause liver damage and organ failure among other deadly conditions. in recent weeks, several dogs have been poisoned across the south. this australian shepard died less than an hour after ingesting toxic algae outside austin. and in georgia this border collie suffered the same heartbreaking fate. >> you know when something is not right. i just didn't think it was this not right. >> reporter: dogs and children are said to be the most likely to ingest the toxins while swimming. the three dogs' owners set up a fundraiser to buy sign to put them up in front of contaminated water. anna warner, cbs news, new york.
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california's monterey pest nins la this weekend. >> monterey turned car week is like the super bowl. cars parked on the street all over the place. >> reporter: all over the place include iing the auction block. $400 million worth of prime hardware could change hands at six different auction houses. that includes this 1994 mcclarn f-1 considered the first super car. earlier this week, the 1965 ashton martin made famous in the the early james bond films went in another auction for $6.4 million. >> the 18961 ferrari 250 gt california. >> reporter: a 1962 ferrari 250 gt california spider priced at $10.5 million. while gooding and company is offering the 1958 model e
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estimated to go for $11 million. cbs news, new york. straight ahead,
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sglnchsz until four years ago, a grandmother had never seen a mountain or an ocean. so her grandson planned a road trip. >> on the road again. >> reporter: in virginia's shenandoah national park this week, brad and his grandmother admire the spectacular view of the valley far below. it's one of 29 national parks the two have visited over the pastr yeom theedwood forest of california to the gulf stream waters of florida. >> better not get too close. you'll be alligator lunch. >> reporter: the goal is to visit all 61 national parks. the extraordinary journey began
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after joy, then 85, told brad she regretted that she'd never seen an ocean or a mountain. >> i never climbed one, but he fix ed that. >> you climbed a mountain? you don't have a burning desire to climb another mountain? >> no, i think that will be sufficient. >> reporter: but they didn't stop there. two years later they set out on a 28-day camping trip. >> we're staying in a tent every night. >> we had a routine down. the moment we pulled in, she was assemble lg the tent stakes. >> reporter: he's always known his grandmother had an adventurously spirit but she continuously surprises him. >> to see your grandmother roll down one of the sand dunes. >> whoa, okay. >> i thought it would be fun. just because i'm old doesn't mean i can't do anything. >> reporter: he cated an instagram account to share photos. their journey went viral, worldwide and grandma joy's name fwot lost in translation.
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>> some countries have now misconstrued her first name and have been calling her grandmother pleasure, which is uncomfortable. >> how do you feel about that? >> i think it's funny. >> i think it's mortifying. >> live it up. next is devil's tower. >> is and mount rushmore. >> it was beautiful to see that. >> life has not always been so beautiful for joy. she was widowed 25 years ago and had to work a low-wage job until she was nearly 80. two of her three sons died in middle age. >> someone asked me why do you smile all the time. would you rather me be an ol grump? >> they have received messages from it people all over the world inspired by their journey. >> i'm not going to waste another day and i'm going to make sure i do this with my grandmother sometime. >> there's a lot of love here. >> yep. i wouldn't trade him for nothing.
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>> me neither, grand thank you.love y. >> i love you too, brad. >> reporter: love, the fuel that powers this epic journey. cbs news, shenandoah national park. welcome to the "cbs overnight news". i'm elaine quijano. the islamic state is claiming responsibility for a hork attack in afghanistan. a suicide bomber attacked a wedding in kabul. ian lee reports. >> reporter: it's a sight that's become all too common in afghanistan. rows of fresh graves holding the victims of the country's latest attack. a suicide bomber killed dozens of people and wounding scores more.
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>> i heard an education ploegs a explosion. a lot of guests were killed. >> reporter: the attack took place at this wedding hall west of the city. mostly populated by shiite muslims. isis has claimed responsibility. eyewitnesss say the bomber walked among the children dancing before detonating. the carnage was so great some bodies couldn't be identified. their shoes are all that remain. afghanistan's president condemned the bombing saying the targeting of our people in such events indicates the atrocity of a terrorist group determined to kill innocent people. even the taliban condemned the attack, but isis after losing their so-called caliphate in iraq and syria look to exploit the chaos in afghanistan in order to spread their reign of terror. the attack comes as officials try to negotiate a deal that would see u.s. troops withdraw from afghanistan in exchange the taliban would ensure the country
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wouldn't be used as a terrorist base. >> ian, thank you. president trump returns to washington today after spending ten days at his new jersey golf club. after months of tough trade talk, the president finds himself on the defensive about the risks of a recession. pau ra reid is traveling with the president. >> reporter: president trump's advisers tried to calm fears of a recession after a tumultuous week on wall street. >> larry kudlo pointed to low unemployment as signs the economy remains strong. if. >> speaking to face the nation, peter navarro rejected any talk of a pending recession. >> what i'm seeing looking at all the macro tea leaves is a
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strong trump economy and bullish stock market through 2020 and beyond. >> reporter: independent economists have been less optimistic after the market flashed a signal interpreted as a sign recession is on the horizon. democrats pin the blame on the trade war with china. presidential candidate pete buttigieg. >> if you think china is going to change the fundamentals of their economic model by poking them in the eye with tariffs. >> presidential candidate andrew yang insists the president's approach is not working. >> we need to curb the abuses. 12k3w4rr president trump continued to defend his trade war with china insisting that the u.s. is poised for growth after the trade deals are done. but after months of negotiations between the u.s. and china, the two countries appear no closer to a deal. >> paula, thank you. hong kong's prodemocracy movement took to the streets again today.
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an estimated 1.7 million, a quarter of the territory's population, took part. >> reporter: defying a police ban in bad weather, hong kongers marched in peace fuelled by anger. overflowing victoria park, the city's historic site for people power protest, nay spilled into the streets. even with the rain, torrential at times, it's not stopping all of the protesters from rallying. they are angry and committed to making their voices heard by the government. what started out june 9th as a demand for the government to revoke a hated extradition bill has exploded into calls for greater democratic reform. the resignation of the chief executive and a probe into police brutality.
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in the past week they have been accused of excessive force firing tear gas into a crowded subway station and a protesters could lose her eye after police shot athy. protesters have been accused of chaos too crippling the world's eighth busiest airport with mass sit-ins and detaining two chinese citizens who they thought were spies. sunday's march was a chance to step back from the violence. is it better to use violence or to use peace? >> peace is the best way. >> basically, we should say it is peace. >> i would prefer peace. but this is not doing any good. >> reporter: rising violence has come with rising fear that china could deploy its military to quash these protests. cbs news, hong kong. the mayor of portland,
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oregon is praising law enforcement for keeping the peace this weekend. hundreds of right-ring and antifascist protesters converged on the city in dualing demonstrations. but they were largely kept apart. more than a dozen people were arrested. now to the weather. severe storms thundered across the midwest today. heavy rain in chicago washed out hundreds of flights at o'hare. in wisconsin this shelf cloud hovered over the landscape as far as the eye could see. and in kansas, winds blew more than 100 train cars off the rails. excavators were brought in to get the toppled cars upright and on the tracks. iceland held a memorial for the country's first glacier lost to climate change. fpz it melted away after being frozen for 700 years. a bronze plaque unveiled today
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reads a letter to the future. it warns that over the next 200 years all of iceland's glaciers will meet the same fate. there's a close call for two kayakers in alaska. they were exploring the spencer glacier when an ice bridge began to collapse. the chunks of ice creates a huge wave that washed over the surprised men. both say they are lucky to be alive. and a passing to note. legendary cbs sportscaster jack whitaker has died. he called some of the great moments in sports at this network for 22 years including the first super bowl and the 1974 triple crown victory by secretariat. whitaker was also a decorated world war ii veteran. he died at home in pennsylvania. he was 95 years old.
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welcome back to the "cbs overnight news." it turns out president trump's desire to buy greenland isn't a joke. the white house economic adviser confirmed the president will make a more concrete offer when he visits denmark next month. greenland is a part of denmark and the government says the giant island is not for sale. seth doane paid a vitt. sdplr greenland's strategic location and natural resources are undoubtedly appealing. but denmark says this territory is not for sale. >> trump is maybe a little
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crazy. >> you thought the president was crazy? >> i think so. >> this would not be the first time the u.s. has tried to buy this place. the state department made an inquiry in 1867 and then after world war ii president truman offered $100 million to buy greenland. but both awe tempts faattempts failed. but in 1917 they sold the west indies to the united states. they are known as the u.s. virgin islands. >> 900 miles from the north pole. >> reporter: the united states has had an air base in northern greenland since 1943. we took a helicopter out to a remeet clor remote location to meet the scientists. >> what would would you make of that suggestion? >> i think you should talk to denmark. >> reporter: president trump is traveling to denmark in
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september and a white house official with knowledge of the trip says the white house expects the issue of greenland to come up and staffers are preparing for it. folks here will most certainly be watching too. seth doane, cbs news, greenland. during the wars in iraq and afghanistan, u.s. troops often got rid of unwanted materials in so-called burn pits. it turns out a lot of the troops breathing the smoke from those pits got sick. >> reporter: dan struggles with what most of us don't even think about, taking a breath. >> one full breath in. blast. all the way. >> reporter: an air force veteran, he's part of a lung study at national jewish hospital in denver. but he's also part of something much larger. he was one of thousands of men and women who served in iraq and afghanistan and maybe sick or dying because this was the air they had to breathe. smoke from massive burn pits next to their bases. >> what did it smell like?
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>> when you burn plastic. you get that smell depending on how strong the winds are. the smoke could be pretty strong. so you constantly either saw the smoke or smelt it pretty much every day, all day. >> all day all night. you're breathing this stuff in. >> reporter: into the burn pits went things like bat ritz, chemical, heavy metals, arsenic. a report by an inspector general put it bluntly. it's indefensible that u.s. military personnel already at risk of serious injury and death when fighting the enemy, were put at further risk from the potentially harm fful emissions from the use of open-air burn pits. even worse it did detailed millions on incinerators to dispose of waste but many sat idle next to the burn pits. an air force expert issued a warning about the burn pit there is and added, it is amazing that
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this burn pit has been able to operate without restrictions over the past few years. >> i think at the end of the day, the data looked good in terms of your lung function. it hasn't gotten better, but it hasn't gotten worse. >> reporter: dr. cecil rose is is a pull monthnologist, who was principle investigator of the five-year lung study funded by the department of defense. >> our study is designed to understand the spectrum of lung diseases that can occur following these hazardous exposures and then -- >> that's called breathing. >> shea she has already seen some results. >> we have described a spectrum of diseases that are related to deployment. they weren't there before. they are clearly there after. people have returned from these extreme environments. >> reporter: it's not as simple as a plume of toxic smoke.
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>> those hazards include desert dust, very intense sand storms, a huge amount of diesel exhaust and diesel particulate, paints that may cause lung disease in just the course of their regular job duties. >> reporter: dan is not alone. the veterans administration set up a voluntary burn pit registry, more than 180,000 have signed up. but of the claims connected to burn pits, only about 2500 have been accepted. and a victim's lawsuit against contractors who oversaw some of the pits was rejected by the supreme court. one of the denied va play clinton campai claims was saying her cancer was caused by burn pit exposure. >> is there severe enough consequences as the family of jennifer keper in who died. >> reporter: her congressman from california got her family
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survivor benefits, but he didn't stop this. a harvard trained emergency room doctor, he has launched a legislative blitz to get sick veterans benefits now and not wait for more years and studies. >> there's enough to act on it. when people are exposed to an illness and they come in dying on the gurney, you don't have to wait for that pristine science to determine that this patient is sick and dying. you need to act on it and take care of the patient. that should be our common sense approach when you put veterans in the center of theva saees a american history. the use of agent orange in the vietnam war. it's a powerful herbicide used to kill jungle foilage. veterans exposed and got sick years after fought the va for
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benefits. a battle that took decades to win. >> be accountable, be responsible, do what's right for our veterans. give them the care that they need and if they don't, then they should be held accountable. >> i don't know if they will be. i don't know how long people will live. how long will they survive. >> that's my concern. we cannot let burn pit exposure veterans be the vietnam veterans exposed to agent orange of our generations. we can't do that. >> in april the central command reported nine burn pits, but says 13 burn pits at the moment are burning nonhazardous waste. they also say that could change at any time if battlefield conditions change. a department of defense spokeswoman added, we are concerned that toxins from burn pit emissions may pose health risks and we are assessing potential long-term impacts. a skeptical ruiz worries people
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are still at risk. >> it's still going on. and when you think that the military is willing to expose men and women, our young sons and daughters and brothers and sisters, to burn pits simply because they say it's inconvenient and not cost effective for them, it's sha shameful. it's shameful. >> reporter: so in the years ahead, there may be more like dan. no longer a father who can go on a hike with his kids. >> i used to be very active. dirt bike riding, mountain bike riding, hiking with the family, very active with my kids. now i don't do any of that. >> don't or can't? >> can't. >> reporter: barry peterson, denver.
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three years after the people of great britain voted to leave the european union, the country is no closer to striking a deal on how to do it. now some pro-brexit politicians are feeling the heat. sglrp. >> reporter: it may to the look for a hot band of revolutionary activity, but this london pub was exactly where an audacious
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gorilla campaign was born when four dads decided to hold politicians to account for the brexit chaos. >> nobody was going back to the politicians and saying, hang on. you promised this and said this. we hold all the cards. you said wif the european union over a barrel. >> reporter: brexit has already sunk two prime ministers, thrown favorable trade deals into uncertainty and left a nation by theerly divided. and yet three years after the uk voted to leave the eu, it's still no closer to an agreed exit plan despite the looming october departure date. as james, ben and will drown their brexit sorrows, a simple plan was hatched. why not throw politicians' own words back at them. >> the day after we vote to leave, we hold all the cards. >> reporter: it was to em blazen the quotes on huge billboards. the only problem was they had no idea how to do it.
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>> the first moment we came out and did it it was a disaster. we didn't have the right tools or the right thickness. >> reporter: billboards with their now infamous tag line. it turns out, there's a lot to be said for laughing at those in power. >> i by laughing at them pet we remove a little power. so we quite enjoy calling them don keys. >> reporter: nobody was laughing when the billboards turned into a nationwide phenomenon. as 1 million people marched in london demanding a second referendum on brexit led by donkeys found themselves hiring helicopters with the help of crowd funding to capture a banner that would be held aloft by the marchers. >> can we get a drone. new york city you can't fly drones during the protest. then could we get a helicopter. it was another 5,000 pounds and we had a helicopter in the air.
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it was singularly the most stressful thing we have done. pulling out a huge banner like that over a crowd comes with a lot of responsibility. but actually for me, it gave us one of the greatest rushes. >> reporter: the banner became a defining moment of the day. now funded by online donations and no more stealing ad space, they have upped their game with projections in brussels as well as poking fun at international visitors. >> it's empowering because i think one of the things is that people are feeling powerless. >> something these quotes and promises that were made before the referendum became a fundamental part of the debate. i would like to think that's because we sat here frustrated, printed out a poster and slapped it on a billboard side. >> reporter: as for the future -- >> i think all of us generally are optimists. and i don't feel in my heart of hearts we are going to leave the europe b union at the end of
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october. >> reporter: while staying in the eu might be unlikely at this stage, it wouldn't be the craziest thing to happen in british
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we end with a tale of the power of love. steve hartman found it on the road to the adirondacks. >> reporter: deep in new york's adirondack mountain, friends and family gathered to help pay tribute to her remarkable husband. >> your marriage to paul was one for the history books. >> what did you love about him? >> his sense of humor. he got me laughing. he was the one for me. >> that's him? >> that's me and my pride. >> reporter: chris and paul met in 1988 and after dating five years, they became one of the first couples in the world with synome to get married.
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>> i proposed to thim hymn. >> you proposed to him? >> yes. would youme? he looked up with me with his big beautiful smile and shook his head yes. >> but chris's sister say it is took more than yes to get them to i do. there were marriage classes, counselling sessions and a loot of pushback from able-minded people. >> there really was quite a bit of resistance. there was a feeling it was like children getting married versus two very capable adults. >> reporter: today people with down syndrome who want to get married still face resistance. there's still question whether some couples love as deeply as the rest of us. and in fact, we saw evidence that maybe they don't. that maybe their love is deeper. >> thanks to you and paul, everyone here has seen what true love looks like. >> reporter: at the end of the
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ceremony, chris read a portion of her husband's ashes near the lake where he loved to fish. >> yes, you love him so much. >> reporter: the rest will be mixed with hers one day and b r buried together. >> i love you. >> you were the best wife any husband could ever have. >> reporter: it was an intensely intimate moment. shared with you today for a reason. >> what i hope is that other families will entertain this. other people will recognize the importance of this kind of intimate love. >> people like us need to have a chance. >> a chance at what? >> a chance to find the man of their dreams like i did. >> are you going to be able to be happy again? >> i don't know. i just lost the man they love. but i'm going to try. >> reporter: even if she doesn't succeed, chris says it's still far better to have loved and
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lost than to be told you can never love at all. steve hartman, on the road in new york's adirondacks mountains. . it's monday, august 19, 2019. this is the cbs "morning news." powerful storms slammed parts of midwest and northeast. and the new weather threat for millions of people today. money matters. president trump pushes back on the threat of of a looming recession. what he's now saying about the future of america's economy. an out of control wild fire forces thousands to evac krautd. one of the world's most famed tourist destinations. ♪

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