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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  September 30, 2019 3:00am-3:59am PDT

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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. the impeachment inquiry of president trump will pick up steam this week on capitol hill. several current and former state department officials are expected to testify before congress, and that will only set the stage for the so-called whistle-blower to come forward. democrats are hoping to have a final vote on impeachment by thanksgiving. president trump calls it another witch hunt. natalie brand reports from the white house. >> what's going on now is the single greatest scam in the history of american politics. >> reporter: interviews with key figures could begin as early as this week in the impeachment inquiry centered around allegations president trump pressured ukraine's leader to investigate a political rival, joe biden and his son, hunter. according to the whistle-blower
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complaint made public late last week, the president's personal attorney, rudy giuliani, was a central figure in relaying messages between kiev and the president. >> did secretary of state pompeo know you were doing these things? did he ask you to do these things? >> he did not. mr. -- mr. volker did, and then mr. sunland did. but when i talked to the secretary last week, he said he was aware of it. >> reporter: kurt volker, who resigned friday as the special envoy to ukraine, and gordon sunland, the u.s. ambassador to the eu, are among the five state department officials house democrats would like to interview. >> it was so clear they are looking for this compromising material. >> roxana sib ear ray spoke to a former adviser who says giuliani tried to set up a meeting with zelensky just before this inauguration this past april. >> do you know why he said no? >> i believe because he understood that ever since the story is top secret, and he
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didn't want to be involved in this. >> reporter: a new cbs news poll found the majority of americans approve of congress opening the impeachment inquiry. but americans are divided over whether the president deserves to be impeached over ukraine with a majority of republicans backing the president. house speaker nancy pelosi said this weekend the inquiry is worth the political risk ahead of 2020. some democratic lawmakers have said they would like to take a vote on articles of impeachment by thanksgiving, but there's no real sense of time line since the investigation is just beginning. elaine? >> natalie brand, thank you. montana's governor is declaring a winter storm emergency tonight after more thheavy, wet snow slammed the state. watches and warnings have been posted across the region. carter evans is in hard-hit great falls, montana. >> reporter: montana's early winter storm blasted the city of great falls with more than a
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foot of september snow that covered streets and made driving difficult. >> my recommendation is to stay off the road if you can. >> reporter: sergeant wade palin is with the montana highway patrol. >> the biggest challenges are overnight the roads will freeze again, so they'll become more ice-covered. >> reporter: closer to the mountains, snow measured in feet piled high outside homes, with high winds knocking down trees and at one point, thousands lost power. when is the last time you've seen a september snow like this? >> i have never seen a september snow like this. >> reporter: national weather service meteorologist don briton has lived in great falls for more than 40 years, and he says this storm is a record-breaker. >> but that one set back in 1934, that was broken. >> that was a three-day record of over 13 inches of snow. we've already had 14 inches of snow in just two days, mr. >> reporter: the snowstorm also hit parts of idaho, and in spokane, washington, this is the first time they've recorded on this date since they started keeping records back in 1881.
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forecasters expect the winter weather to continue through the night. >> hunker down. stay warm. and try to avoid traveling. >> reporter: the storm is expected to move out of the area by tomorrow morning though some schools will remain closed on monday. but all of this snow is expected to melt by the end of the week, so everyone here can get back to fall. elaine? >> carter evans, thank you. we're seeing wild weather tonight from snow in the pacific northwest to record heat in the eastern u.s. to a major hurricane in the atlantic ocean. meteorologist jeff bur deli is tracking it all. jeff? >> and even for meteorologists, this is an extreme weather pattern, and we have a lot to talk about. that's for sure. so this epic snowfall in the pacific northwest, the highest mountain so far, some places over 40 inches. we're going to see over four feet before it's all said and done. as you're going to see, we're going to probably see snow not tapering down for another 24 hours in spots. that means an additional 6 to 12 inches of snow. an extreme amplified weather
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pattern. jet stream diving to the south across the west and some are clinging on in the southeast. we're likely to see another 400 records tied or broken over the next week or so when you add up ime highs and morning an between where the battleground is set, we're going to see rounds of showers, thunderstorms, and some of that is going to be severe weather. in the east during the day on monday, severe drought is going to worsen because we're not going to see any rainfall here. temperatures will be 90 to 100 degrees. feels-like temperatures over 100 degrees. the hottest day, the apex of this heat wave, is likely to be on wednesday. a big ridge of high pressure, 60 record highs are possible wednesday alone. and to boot, in the atlantic, things are still somewhat active. we have hurricane lorenzo. it was a cat 5. it's now a cat 4, but when it was a cat 5, it's the far theft east we've ever seen a cat 5, and believe it or not, it's headed to ireland on friday, not as a tropical system but a post tropical system. >> an active week ahead, thank
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you. breaking news, four inmates are on the run tonight after officials say they from an ohio jail. authorities say the four men overpowered two female corrections officers in gallia county with a makeshift weapon and then broke down a secured door to the outside. authorities described the four as extremely dangerous. cvs pharmacy is suspending the sale of the heartburn medication zantac. the drug under investigation over possible links to cancer. it comes after the fda found traces of a probable carcinogen in some of the products. cvs is joining other major drugstore chains including walgreens and rite aid, pulling zantac from store shelves. separated at the border. ahead, the emotional reunion between a father and son. plus the sweeping new changes for uber aimed at ensuring rider safety. and three young men turning a profit and sharing it with those in need.
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when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in. you'll be inspired, you'll be encouraged. i'm looking forward to seeing you right here. you are fully loaded and completely equipped for the race that's been designed for you.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." there was chaos on the streets of hong kong today. protesters and police squared off again as the fighting shut down hong kong's main shopping district. and as ramey incenseio reports, the violence is expected to intensify with a major chinese holiday just two days away. >> reporter: fires erupted in central hong kong as tensions between police and protesters plunged the city into a state of
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disarray. videos posted to social media show a metro station engulfed in flames after molotov cocktails were thrown inside. police responded first with tear gas and then a water cannon ite itself for 17 straight weeks. right now we're in a mad crush of protesters running from the central business district. just moments ago, riot police fired several rounds of tear gas. with less than 48 hours until china's national day, protesters also vented their anger at beijing, taking down a sign celebrating the country's 70th birthday. many are resentful of china's communist party and the perception that the rights and freedoms they enjoyed under a policy of one country/two systems is slowly being eroded. tanya chen is a pro-democracy hong kong legislator. what is the dream of hongkongers these days? >> it's all regional as
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promised. it's one country, two system, high autonomy. hong kong people rule hong kong. but now it seems that we may need to lose our life in exchange for these promises. >> reporter: until that dream bears any hope of becoming reality, demonstrators say hong kong's new norma stay. ramey incenseio, cbs news, hong kong. it's estimated nearly 3,000 children have been separated from their parents on the southern border since the practice began last year. manuel bojorquez has the heartbreaking reunion of a father and son who were kept apart for 178 days. in tonight's eye on america: separated and counting. >> giovanni says he was shot five times in honduras for refusing to join a king. -- gang. he feared his son was next so in
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february they fled. here any are at the rio grande on a crowded raft eight days later to seek asylum in the u.s. the boy's mother stayed behind. but at the mccallon center, officers accused him of not being the father because his last name was not on the boy's birth certificate. they took the 3-year-old away. it wasn't until july, five months later, that the dna test he initially asked for proved he was michael's father. we met up with pasrosa as he traveled to new york, where his son was in a foster care facility nearly six months after their separation. >> translator: it is something difficult. i felt like a part of my life was taken away when they told me my son was going to be separated from me, he said. i know i'll be so happy to be with him again. but after 178 days apart, this was michael's reaction. michael appeared not to
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recognize his father. instead, he seemed afraid of him and was reaching out for the safety of the case worker. the cold, hard reality of family separation. it took about five hours for michael to calm down. pasrosa was in disbelief, embarrassed, even ashamed. we caught up with them two weeks later. >> you're good? si? it was really hard to hear him say he didn't want to come with me, he says. he feels better with me now, thank god. to this day, michael is nervous around most people. >> he doesn't like to leave the house, you think because he feels like someone is going to take him away? this doctor works with children who have endured separation. we showed her the video of the reunion. >> it's heartbreaking.
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so what i see is a child who has been traumatized. emotionally we see the whole spectrum from depression and anxiety to early signs of post-traumatic stress disorder. >> ptsd in children? >> ptsd in children, right. >> some would argue on the other side that it's the fault of the parents for bringing them into the country this way. what would you say to that? >> put yourself in the shoes of those parents who have come to me and said, we are here because family members were killed by gangs. >> reporter: pasrosa and michael are still waiting to see if they'll be granted asylum. but at least now they wait together. when you see that smile, what do you think? >> si. >> manuel bojorquez, cbs news,
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new york. a utah school is accused of refusing to accommodate a student with diabetes. ead, what oamily is now aimedt children fight f
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during childhood, affecting roughly 200,000 young people. jamie yuccas reports on the lawsuit that argues the school district is violating the boy's rights. >> reporter: this 8-year-old utah boy, we've agreed not to share his first name, spent his summer fishing for catfish. but now that the school year has started he's learning his lessons alone in his kitchen. his mom, callie watkins, says the jordan school district in salt lake county, utah, barred him from attending classes after a disagreement about his diabetes treatment plan. diagnosed before age 2, he requires up to eight insulin injections a day. in a recently filed lawsuit, the family claims the school made several potentially dangerous mistakes with his dosage in 2018. so they requested they be allowed to prepare his diluted insulin and pre-fill the syringes at home. the school district will not allow that, saying pre-filled
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syringes must be prepared by a pharmacist. >> and the doctors have said this is what he needs to use? >> right. he has doctor's orders that state he needs this with him at all times. utah law says he can carry anything, prescription or non-prescription, but yet they refuse. >> reporter: the lawsuit alleges that due to the school district's refusals to accommodate his disability and medical needs, he has been denied his right to attend school with his non-diabetic peers. nate crippis with the disability law center represents the watkinss. >> it's pretty clear schools have to make modifications to policies to enable people with disabilities to have the same access. >> reporter: the office of the utah attorney general, which is representing the jordan school district, says it is unable to comment directly on the allegations, but says approximately 130 students with type one diabetes receive direct nursing services. they also say the issues raised in this case highlight the
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difficulty in balancing the specific requests of individual students with the need to provide a safe learning environment for all students. the watkins family hopes their legal battle will help others. >> there's no reason why he should not be with his peers. >> reporter: jamie yuccas, harriman, utah. the ridesharing industry is facing increased scrutiny over passenger safety. ahead, what uber's ceo is saying ahead, what uber's ceo is saying about a scathing new report tha ♪ ahead, what uber's ceo is saying about a scathing new report tha ♪ magnum ice cream double caramel. now in ice cream tubs and bars.
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uber is making a series of sweeping changes. in a cbs exclusive, kris van cleave spoke with uber's ceo about the new features and about the new push to protect customers. >> we make sure your driver is the right driver. >> reporter: uber's ceo says his companies policies and practices have evolved over the last few years. >> when something does happen -- and it does happen. this is real life. we respond in a way that's vic tim centric, that's vic tim first. >> reporter: uber wants to take this pin verification a step further, so soon your phone will seamlessly talk to the phone of the uber you've called. it will then tell you when the right vehicle has pulled up that your ride is verified, and this is the car to get into. the new features come as the ridesharing industry faces scrutiny over passenger safety. a recent "washington post"
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report said agents in uber's special investigations unit are coached to put the company's reputation ahead of passenger safety. what do you say to these reports and to folks who have either sued you or have suffered a sexual assault that feel like the response wasn't there? >> i say that that report fundamentally was based on hearsay. we're not perfect. i wouldn't claim to be perfect. but i believe that we're significantly better than we were last year, and next year, darn it, we're going to be better. >> reporter: uber hopes this new technology could prevent the kind of deadly mistake police believe samantha josephson made when she mistook a car for her uber in march. tracy breeden is a former police officer who heads women's safety at uber. >> uber felt a responsibility to set up. even though that was not an uber driver, but to accept up and see what more we could do to create a safer environment for people who are using rideshare. >> reporter: user will start to notice alerts letting them know if you're about to be dropped off in a bike lane, so you can look out for cyclists.
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kris van cleave, cbs news, san francisco. three young brothers on a ["white rabbit" by jefferson airplane]
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♪ one pill makes you larger ♪ and one pill makes you smaller ♪ ♪ and the ones that mother gives you ♪ ♪ don't do anything at all ♪ remember what the dormouse said ♪
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welcome aboard.
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finally tonight, a family's burning passion. three young men cooked up an idea to make a little pocket money, but they didn't stop there. errol barnett shows how they're lighting the way. >> this is nice. >> thank you. >> reporter: at this farmer market, the gill brothers are selling their own homemade candle. 8-year-old austin pushes his favorite. >> to me it smells like watermelon bubble gum. >> reporter: two years ago austin with his brothers, colin, who is 13, and ryan who is 11, were looking for a way to make pocket money. had you ever thought about candles before it was time to make a business? >> no. >> no. >> not at all. >> reporter: they call their companynfren, and they've decided not to keep all the earnings for themselves.
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they know donate an average of $500 a month to area homeless shelters. why is that something you want to do? >> because as the community gives us, we want to give back. >> reporter: each brother with his own role to play. >> i pour the fragrance into the pitcher. >> interesting. this is going to smell good. on top of school and sports, they produce 10 to 15 batches of candles every day. t >> the wax is over 200 degrees. >> have any of you burned yourself? >> yes. >> yes. >> yes. >> everybody says yes. >> reporter: three young men using their own burning passion to light up the lives of others. errol barnett, cbs news, indian head, maryland. that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. the impeachment inquiry of president trump will pick up steam this week on capitol hill. several current and former state department officials are expected to testify before congress, and that will only set the stage for the so-called whistle-blower to come forward. democrats are hoping to have a final vote on impeachment by thanksgiving. president trump calls it another witch hunt. natalie brand reports from the white house. >> what's going on now is the single greatest scam in the history of american politics. >> reporter: interviews with key figures could begin as early as this week in the impeachment
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investigate son, hunter. according to the whistle-blower complaint made public late last week, the president's personal attorney, rudy giuliani, was a central figure in relaying messages between kiev and the president. >> did secretary of state pompeo know you were doing these things? did he ask you to do these things? >> he did not. mr. -- mr. , um, volker did, and then mr. sondland did. but when i talked to the secretary last week, he said he was aware of it. >> reporter: kurt volker, who resigned friday as the special envoy to ukraine, and gordon sondlan sondland, the u.s. ambassador to the eu are among the officials house democrats would like to interview. >> it's so clear they're looking on this compromising material on biden and trump. >> reporter: cbs's roxana saberi spoke to -- who said giuliani tried to set up a meeting with
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zelensky just before his i belve because h story is top and he doesn't want -- didn't want to be involved in this. >> reporter: a new cbs news poll found the majority of americans approve of congress opening the impeachment inquiry. but americans are divided over whether the president deserves to be impeached over ukraine with a majority of republicans backing the president. house speaker nancy pelosi said this weekend the inquiry is worth the political risk ahead of 2020. some democratic lawmakers have said they would like to take a vote on articles of impeachment by thanksgiving, but there's no real sense of time line since the investigation is just beginning. elaine? >> natalie brand, thank you. montana's governor is declaring a winter storm emergency tonight after more than three feet of heavy, wet snow slammed the state. watches and warnings have been posted across the region. carter evans is in hard-hit
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great falls, f ber snowt covered streets and made driving difficult. >> my recommendation is to stay off the road if you can. >> reporter: sergeant wade palin is with the montana highway patrol. >> the biggest challenges are overnight the roads will freeze again, so they'll become more ice-covered. >> reporter: closer to the mountains, snow measured in feet piled high outside homes. with high winds knocking down trees and at one point thousands lost power. when is the last time you've seen a september snow like this? >> i have never seen a september snow like this. >> reporter: national weather service meteorologist don briton has lived in great falls for more than 40 years, and he says this storm is a record-breaker. >> but that one set back in 1934, that was broken? >> that was a three-day record of over 13 inches of snow. we've already had over 14 inches of snow in just two days, so that record is pretty much obliterated. >> reporter: the snowstorm also hit parts of idaho, and in spokane, washington, this is the first time they've recorded snow on this date since they started keeping records back in 1881.
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the storm is expected to move out of the area by tomorrow morning though some schools will remain closed on monday. but all of this snow is expected to melt by the end of the week, so everyone here can get back to fall. we're seeing wild weather tonight from snow in the pacific northwest to record heat in the eastern u.s. to a major hurricane in the atlantic ocean. meteorologist jeff ber deli is tracking it all. jeff? >> even for meteorologists this is an extreme weather pattern. this epic snowfall in the pacific snoeft, the highest mountain snowfall, some places over 40 inches. we're going to see over four feet before it's all said and done. as you can see, we're going to probably see snow not tapi tape down for another 12 hours in spots. an extreme amplified weather pattern. jet stream diving to the south across the west and some are clinging on in the southeast. we're likely to see another 400 records tied or broken over the
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next week or so when you add up daytime highs and morning lows. and in between where the battleground is set, we're going to see rounds of showers, thunderstorms and some of that is going to be severe weather. in the east during the day on monday, severe drought is going to worsen because we're not going to see any rainfall here. temperatures will be 90 to 100 degrees. feels-like temperatures over 100 degrees. the hottest day, the apex of this heat wave, is likely to be on wednesday. big ridge of high pressure. 60 record highs are possible wednesday alone. and to boot, in the atlantic, things are still somewhat active. we have hurricane lorenzo. it was a cat 5. it's now a cat 4. but when it was a cat 5, it's the farthest east we've ever seen a cat 5. believe it or not, it's headed to ireland on friday, not as a tropical system, but a post tropical system. >> an active week ahead. jeff, thank you. >> you're welcome. breaking news, four inmates are on the run tonight after officials say they escaped from an ohio jail. authorities say the four men
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overpowered two female corrections officers in gallia county with a makeshift weapon and then broke down a secured door to the outside. authorities describe the four as extremely dangerous. there was chaos on theong k fighting shut down hong kong's main shopping district. and as ramy inocencio reports, the violence is expected to intensify with a major chinese holiday just two days away. >> reporter: fires erupted in central hong kong as tensions between police and protesters plunged the city into a state of disarray. videos posted to social media show a metro station engulfed in flames after molotov cocktails were thrown inside. police responded first with tear gas and then a water cannon in a routine that's now repeated itself for 17 straight weeks. right now we're in a mad crush
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of protesters running from the central business district. just moments ago, lriot police fired several rounds of tear gas. with less than 48 hours until china's national day, protesters also vented their anger at beijing, taking down a sign celebrating the country's 70th birthday. many are resentful of china's communist party and the perception that the rights and freedoms they enjoyed under a policy of one country/two systems is slowly being eroded. tanya chen is a pro-democracy hong kong legislator. >> what is the dream of hongkongers these days? >> it's all regionally. it's promised. it's one country/two system, high autonomy, hong kong people rule hong kong. but now it seems that we may need to lose our life in exchange for these promises. >> reporter: until that dream bears any hope of becoming reality, demonstrators say hong
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reality, demonstrators say hong kong's new normal is here to just between us, you know what's better than mopping? anything! at the end of a long day, it's the last thing i want to do. well i switched to swiffer wet jet and its awesome. it's an all-in-one so it's ready to go when i am. the cleaning solution actually binside. wn dirt and grid thd p so, it prevents streaks and haze better than my old mop. plus, it's safe to use on all my floors, even wood. glad i got that off my chest and the day off my floor. try wet jet with a moneyback guarantee we'd love some help with laundry. spray and scrub anything with a stain. wash the really dirty clothes sepate ppgra no unleash a foolproof clean in one step. aww, you did the laundry!
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. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome back to the overnight news. i'm elaine quijano. the drug enforcement administration has posted a $10 million reward for information leading to the capture of a reputed drug cartel kingpin known as el mencho. they claim he's responsible for one-third of the illegal drugs entering this country and 90% of the drugs flooding the streets of chicago. adriana diaz is in chicago with the story. >> reporter: we're standing along i-290 in chicago. this is also known locally as the heroin highway. that's because this is the road many drug users take to come into the city and buy drugs. last year alone in chicago, nearly 800 people died from drug overdoses, and the dea took us inside neighborhoods where many
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drug deals go down. sirens are part of the sound track in pockets of chicago's west side. the dea's brian mcknight took us there to see the drug trade up close. >> here she comes right now. >> reporter: that's where we saw an ambulance responding to a suspected overdose. we were in unmarked cars, but the locals knew better. >> it's not happening. we're shutting down business for the day. >> reporter: we did spot a sale nearby where several people entered an alley to buy drugs. >> there's literally a line. now everyone is coming back out. >> the guy is putting -- on his right hand. he's putting it in his pocket. >> reporter: what percentage of drugs in chicago do you think come from mexico? >> a significant amount. probably, you know, 90%? >> 90%? >> yeah. >> reporter: the arrest of notorious mic drug ldouzman has has fd his way iso the void.
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known simply as el mencho.is ca cartel jalisco, is responsible for roughly a third of the drugs entering this country by land and by sea. >> he's the number one prorlt for dea and federal law enforcement in the united states. >> reporter: matthew donahue is the dea's top agent in mexico and has helped uncover dozens of el mencho's drug labs in the jungle. el mencho used to live in california, where he was arrested at 19 and deported back to mexico. that's where his drug empire grew by force. he once shot down a mexican army helicopter and was suspected in this public hanging this summer. is he the most brutal cartel leader that you've come across? >> he's definitely one of them. his group definitely does some of the murderous and revengeful things that we've seen against innocent human beings. >> reporter: back in chicago, the mexican drugs seized are so toxic, they can't be handled without protective gear. at the dea's lab, packs of
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cocaine are stamped with traffickers' brands. agents are now seizing potent mixes of heroin and fentanyl. it's a daily occurrence that needs to be stopped says acting dea administrator utam dylan. >> their drug trafficking begets violence on the streets, poverty, anguish throughout the entire country. >> can you stay with me? open your eyes? >> reporter: the aftermath is unmistakable. this chicago man survived this overdose, but last year more than 67,000 americans did not. while most drugs come from mexico, the dea says that many cartels are getting their ingredients for opioids from china. meanwhile, el mencho is so powerful, the agency in part because he has entire police departments in mexico on his payroll, and that makes it even harder to capture him. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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so why are so many towns and cities banning them from the streets? david pogue has the story. >> reporter: in the spring of 2018, the citizens of several american cities awoke to find something new. thousands of electric scooterse town, unannounced. they were put there by a new breed of well-funded companies with one syllable names like byrd, lime, scoot, jump, and spin. they want to introduce a cheap, fast, clean way to get around cities like this one -- santa monica, california. okay. suppose i'm here, and i want to go somewhere else in the city. so i open the app, and right here i see these little dots representing all the scooters that are charged and ready for me to just pick up. there are 50 of them within two blocks of where i'm standing.
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so this is the closest one. i walk over there, and here's my scooter. in this case, it's in a cluster. sometimes it's one by itself. very simple. this throttle is for go. this brake is for stop. there's the emergency brake for your foot back here. to get going, i point my camera at this and scan the barcode, and that beep means i am ready to go. i push off with one foot and then use my hand on the throttle, and good-bye. ♪ now, when you get where you're going, this is the crazy part. there's no dock. there's no rack. you just put the kickstand down, tell the app you're done, and then you leave it there. you just leave it for the next person to find. you put somebody on a scooter for the first time, and there's not a person that doesn't come off smiling.
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i love that. joe krause is the president of lime. >>hat are ts have provided 65 m have? polluti pollution. conkwegs. we drive around in these boxed aquariums on wheels. scooters put you out in the world. they reduce congestion by taking cars off the road and their efficient in terms of carbon emissions. >> reporter: but wait, it gets better. somebody's got to recharge all those scooters every night. >> step right up. >> reporter: so the scooter companies employ an army of freelancers like william they're in washington, d.c. >> i've been able to make anywhere from $100 to $300 a night. >> reporter: you're responsible for getting them back out on the street the next morning? >> that is one big part of it. i'm about to load up at least maybe a dozen in my prius. >> you're going to fit 12 of these things in that hatch back? >> i can fit almost two dozen of these. i call it a clown car for
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scooters quite honestly. >> reporter: an app tells him where to put the scooters back on the streets. >> so the app told you that this is a drop. >> yeah. then i'll be able to release the scooters. >> release the scooters! >> reporter: the scooter companies insist on considerate, attractive placement. >> it looks like you've taken some pains to set them up neatly with the angles and -- >> yeah, you know, you don't want the scooters to be an eyesore. you don't want them to be in the way of sidewalks, we're not blocking fire hydrants. >> what are the benefits of having this kind of job as opposed to a 9:00 to 5:00 desk job. >> there's so much independence that i've gained from this. i've never been skinnier, and my wallet's never been fatter. it's -- it's been remarkable. >> reporter: wow, what an amazing development these scooters. >> hey, guys. >> reporter: good for us. good for our cities. good for the world. so why have so many cities
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banned them? >> they're not allowed in our cities. >> reporter: john mirrish is the mayor of beverly hills, california. >> well, they arrived overnight, dumped on people's lawns and all around the city, and none of the scooter companies had talked to anyone at the city. and they just kind of appeared. and for a lot of our residents, it waslitter. there are other cities that are also upset that these companies just came and dumped their product, and we'd all collectively be left to deal with the impacts of what they were doing. >> reporter: ah, yes, the impacts. people can leave the scooters anywhere, and sometimes that's in the middle of the sidewalk or on people's lawns. that carelessness infuriates other citizens to the point that scooter vandalism has been an ongoing problem. and then there's the other kind of impact. >> people have suffered really
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terrible injuries, head injuries, broken bones, surgeries, injuries which are going to affect them for a lifetime. >> reporter: katherine lair is a los angeles personal injury lawyer. >> the calls that i get from riders who are injured, they are injured when the scooter malfunctions. >> oh, really? do you get the impression that they malfunction much? >> very much. all the time. the scooters die mid-ride. the brakes lock up. the handle bar post collapses. the handlebars detach. they were never intended to be, like, rental cars. commercial fleet usage, you know, use, after use after use after day. that's why they have a life span of only 30 to 45 days. >> do you think helmets would help? >> yes. i think helmets are so, so important. in california, we did have a helmet requirement. >> reporter: and then came bird, another scooter-sharing company. >> bird came in and sponsored a bill which was sign the into law which removed the helmet requirement as of january 1st of
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this year. >> so you think this problem is fixable? >> i mean it has to start with not only the helmets, but also inspecting these scooters on a daily basis. >> reporter: the great scooter backlash and reports of at least eight rider deaths seemed to have humbled the scooter companies. according to lime co-founder toby sun, the days of dumping scooters in cities are over. >> i think working with the city is very important. we're in markets for the long run. i think building that trust and collaboration, collaborative approach will get us a lot longer serving the cities and users. >> there are problems with accidents and parking and vandals and cities who don't get it. what percent confidentrethisnd h >> my confidence level is 120%.
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i'm fully confident that this is going to be revolutionary. >> reporter: that will happen only if cities agree to accommodate the scooters. for example, by designating places to ride them and park them. lime's joe krause thinks it will happen. >> it's happened before. by 1917, nine years after the introduction of the model t, the last horse-drawn trolley was taken out of new york. in nine years, we took a city that was based around human and horses and we transformed it into an urban landscape centered around cars. these periods of change can happen rapidly when there's big problem, in our case, congestion, pollution. an incredibly efficient magic carpet that you can drive around for about three bucks a ride.
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fans of the grateful dead are mourning the passing of songwriter robert hunter. he penned some of the band's most famous tunes and is part of the songwriters hall of fame. hunter never performed with the dead onstage and is the only non-performer ever inducted into the rock & roll hall of fame with a band. he was 78 years old when he passed last week. jeff glor looks back on the long, strange trip of robert hunter. ♪ >> reporter: for 30 years, the grateful dead were known for their free-flowing, psychedelic live shows. ♪ the hrt of the ca liedscopic jams were the poetic t rob oer hunter, who died this week at the age of 78, was responsible
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for some of the dead's most profound songs. ♪ ♪ hunter's trip as a psychedelic songwriter can be traced back to his days at stanford, where he was paid to take lsd as part of the cia's covert mk-ultra program. hunter says the experience helped the words of his songs jump from his subconscious to the page. ♪ from the dead's seminal 1970 album "american beauty" hunter calabasas raced with bassist phil lush on the song "box of rain." ♪ a song written for loesch's terminally ill father.
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>> the phrasing was all there. i think i went through it two or three times writing as fast as i could. >> the lyrics that he produced were so apt, so perfect. it was very moving. ♪ >> reporter: hunter was presented with a lifetime achievement award by the americana music association in 2013 and was inducted into the songwriters hall of fame two years later. while he was a multi-talented musician in his own right, hunter never appeared eonst sag non-performer to be inducted with a band into the rock & roll hall of fame. ♪ ♪ if your cup be empty ♪ if your cup is full, let it be again ♪ >> that's the overnight news or this monday. from the cbs broadcast center in
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new york city, i'm elaine quijano. it's monday, september 30th, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news." pressing on. a new cbs news poll shows growing support for the impeachment inquiry into president trump. lawmakers say they have a plan for the investigation. >> we have a pretty good roadmap thanks to the courage of this whistleblower. >> there as the whistleblower is expected to testify soon. chaos in hong kong. pro-democracy demonstrators hit the streets ahead of china's national day.

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