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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  November 11, 2019 3:00am-3:59am PST

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millions get set for a polar plunge. a big blast of cold intensifies. open and televised hearings begin this week as house democrats try to make their misconduct case against president trump. mormon families flee their homes after the massacre in mexico. heading to safety in america. >> not worth living in fear. caught on camera, a texas teacher faces criminal charges. what prompted this violent attack. and crowd stitching. a special community comes together to finish one chicago woman's labor of love. >> that is beautiful. >> isn't that stunning? ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news."
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>> good evening. i'm elaine quijano. winter is still over a month away, but hundreds of cold records are about to be shattered. a new blast of argument tick air is defending from the great lakes to the gulf coast. it could be the coldest day on record in minneapolis and chicago. some 250 million people could be affected. temperatures could be up to 30 degrees below normal. cbs news climate and weather contributor jeff berardelli is here with more on the big chill. jeff, this sounds serious. >> for this early in the season, it's exceptional cold, nearly unprecedented and dangerous cold. now the core of the coldest air is going to be in the upper midwest. we could break 350 records this week alone monday through thursday. this happens tomorrow. on tuesday, it moves across the great lakes all the way down to the gulf coast, and then encompasses basically the whole eastern part of the country, straight to the eastern seaboard as we head into wednesday. now the cold air is going to plunge all the way down to the gulf coast to the point where we
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could see freezing temperatures in places like houston, new orleans, panama city, all the way to charleston and wilmington along the eastern seaboards. so it's going to be cold for a lot of people. and the windchills are going to be downright dangerous. in chicago in madison on tuesday, negative 4, negative 5. dress in used to the cold so it's going to feel even colder, and then it spreads towards the east coast. it's not only going to be the cold and , it going to be snow. the heaviest snow is going to be during the day on tuesday. chicago could see as much as 5, 6 inches, chicago, cleveland to buffalo. heaviest snow in the northern parts of new york, new hampshire. we could see our first flakes of the season now. >> people need to prepare now. thank you. now to capitol hill. the next phase of the impeachment inquiry begins this week. starting wednesday, house democrats take their case against president trump to the american public in
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televised hearings. wa weijia jiang is traveling with the president in new york. >> reporter: open naergs the impeachment inquiry including hunter biden, the whistle-blower and anyone relied on by the whistle-blower in drafting the complaint. >> we're not going go back in time and revisit conspiracy theories that are implicated in the president's call. >> reporter: the chairman of the house intelligence committee, adam schiff, warned republicans in a letter he would not approve their request to hear from the whistle-blower writing in light of the president's threat, the individual's appearance before us would only place their personal safety at grave risk. president trump is demanding the whistle-blower testify as he defends himself against accusations that he used military aid and a white house meeting as bargaining chips to get ukraine to investigate political rival joe biden and his son hunter, a quid pro quo. >> the president acted
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criminally and extorted in the way a mob boss would extort somebody, a vulnerable foreign country. it's probably best not to use latin words to explain it. >> reporter: sworn testimony from several witnesses in the impeachment inquiry suggest the president may have acted inappropriately. for his part, mr. trump is using familiar terms to describe the upcoming proceeding. >> there has never been a president who has been so transparent. this is a witch hunt at the highest level, and it's so bad for our country. >> reporter: on "face the nation," republican senator john kennedy said he is waiting to see all of the evidence before drawing a conclusion. >> if it can be demonstrated that the president asked for and had the requisite state of mind, that the president asked for an investigation of a political rival, that's over the line. >> and weijia, former u.n. ambassador nikki haley unveiled explosive new details about discord in the administration to
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cbs news anchor norah o'donnell. what did she say? >> elaine, haley says during a closed door meeting, former secretary of state rex tillerson and former chief of staff john kelly asked her to joine ey werg to save the country. in a statement to cbs news, kelly says it was his job to prevent both pros and cons of policy changes to the >> all right, weijia jiang there outside of trump tower in new york. thank you. president trump will mark veterans day in new york city tomorrow. he will kick off the veterans day parade, the nation's largest along fifth avenue. it's a tradition that began 100 years ago with a huge ticker tape parade for returning troops from world war i. in mexico today, a somber caravan of fundamentalist mormons fled their homes in a rural part of the country following the brutal massacre last week of nine family members.
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but as jonathan vigliotti reports, some are staying behind, looking for justice. >> some are never coming back. >> reporter: sadness and relief for members of the offshoot mormon community from sonora, mexico. >> bye! >> reporter: as a caravan left the la mora colony saturday morning, carrying about 100 people, fleeing the violence that shattered their lives. >> not worth living in fear. ♪ >> reporter: the exodus came hours after the last victim's funeral was held, this one for christina langford. she was among the three women and six children murdered in last monday's drug cartel ambush. survivors say as langford's suv came under attack, sheumped out and waved her hands to show her family wasn't a threat. >> i know that what they died for is going to help this country to have more freedom. >> reporter: the community, who's origins in this part of mexico date back more than a century watch as the violent
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drug wars picked up. but in recent months, members became increasingly concerned about reports of cartel hitmen canvassing the area. some of the victims' relatives have vowed to stay. >> we face a tragic event like this, we don't run. we seek answers. we try to solve it. >> reporter: but the violence is a problem even governments have failed to solve. those who fled saturday will join family in tucson and phoenix, and more members are expected to follow. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news. on the road to campaign 2020, democrats running for president are welcoming former new york city mayor and billionaire michael bloomberg to the crowded race, but they're warning victory cannot be bought. >> i think you have to earn votes and not buy them. >> sorry, you ain't going to buy this election. >> the "cbs overnight news" wi be right back.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> democrats have routinely attacked america's billionaires on the campaign trail this year. jp morgan ceo jamie dimon spoke to lesley stahl of "60 minutes" in his own defense. >> so elizabeth warren said in iowa the other day our democracy has been hijacked by the rich and powerful, and you jumped in and said this week about her that she was vilifying successful people and having harsh words for wall street bankers. >> what i was commenting on is that anything that vilifies people i just don't like. i think that most people are good -- not all of them. i think you should vilify nazis. but you shouldn't vilify people who have worked hard to accomplish things. my comment is american society
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is just attacking each other all the time. >> she said the system is working great for the wealthy and well connected, and jamie dimon, she brings you up, doesn't want that to change. >> i'm not going comment on anyone in particular. >> but she is commenting on you. you have become a target, whether you want to respond or it or not, you're her target and you're alexandria ocasio-cortez's target. >> i understand that a person is going to be a target in this day and age of certa piticians and stuff like that. to texas, where a teacher is free on bond tonight after her arrest for assaulting a student. her violent outburst was captured on cell phone video. the state teachers association says they are horrified by the incident. here is meg oliver. >> reporter: the video is hard to watch. a substitute teacher repeatedly punching a female high school student, throwing her to the store and stomping on her head. consuela juarez is a student at the school. >> it mays me very angry.
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it makes me feel sad for that child. and then i feel like nobody can even get in to step in to help her because they were probably very scared. >> reporter: the teacher, 32-year-old tiffany lankford was arrested on school grounds and charged with a second-degree felony of aggravated assault. the frightening incident happened last friday at lehman high school south of austin. in another video, students say this is how the incident started. the principal released this statement saying we took swift action when this incident occurred and we'll do everything necessary to protect our students. the 16-year-old student was treated and released from the emergency room. her family's attorney released this statement saying we are shocked and disgusted after seeing the abuse and excessive force used in this teacher's attempt to discipline a special needs child. the family's attorney says the teenager suffers from epilepsy. stunned parents are left to wonder why the teacher acted so aggressively and violently towards a child.
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>> no matter what a kid says to you, short of them pulling a weapon on you, i mean, i don't see any cause for that sort of reaction. >> the hays county independent school district fired lankford after the assault. lankford had worked in the district since august of 2019. she was released on bond. her next court is pending. we tried to contact her for comment but, elaine, we were unsuccessful. >> disturbing case. meg oliver, thank you. no to new hampshire, where a 2-year-old boy said he needed a hug from a police officer before he could be discharged from the hospital. so the staff enlisted officer tony, who came equipped with a the patient, proving sometimes a ttle caring is the best medicine. and this never gets old. ♪ sunny days, sweeping the clouds away ♪ >> today marks 50 years since "sesame street" first appeared on television with its diverse cast and colorful muppets. that very first episode was
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sponsored by the letters ws and e and the numbers 2, and 3, of course. next, battling with health ensurers to cover mental health needs. also, hitting the panic button. the new high-tech tool that can land an airplane without a pilot. quilters from across the country put the final stitches on an unfinished work of art.
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fabric refresher even works for clothes you want to wear another day. make febreze part of your clean routine for whole home freshness. ♪la la la la la. an estimated one in five americans experience mental illness each year. federal law requires insurers to provide equal coverage for mental health conditions, but as dr. jon lapook reports, that's not always the case. >> you can see, just looking at. 2013, brian friend. kadis' 15-year-old daughter took her own life. a year later his youngest daughter attempted suicide. >> the psychiatrist and therapist and family members were unanimous we needed to get her into a residential care
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service so she could deal with the loss of her sister. >> reporter: his insurer denied residential treatment. a less intensive level of care was approved. >> the hospital said what that translates to is your daughter has not failed often enough to get a longer term treatment center. >> reporter: so she has to have attempted suicide several times, each time rolling the dice because it might actually succeed. >> that's correct. >> reporter: after a second suicide attempt, she was approved for residential care. after three weeks there the klaff described an increase in suicidal ideation and clearly met criteria to continue but ju days later, the insurer, part of unitedhealth group wrote the services asked for are not medically needed. >> they were basically protecting their profitability. cket for as listening as he could, another three weeks. maram bendot represents a class
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action against yiepted health. >> i could protest all i want and you could always hold up your guidelines and say look, you just don't meet these criteria, but what if the criteria themselves are flagrantly off base? >> reporter: and you think they are? >> i don't think so. the court thought so. >> reporter: earlier this year, the federal court ruled against ubh and called the guidelines flawed, unreasonable and more restrictive than generally accepted standards of care, and that financial incentives infected the guidelines development process. united behavioral health told cbs news we want ourembers t have the mental ty need thy say guidelines to be more in line >>takesally determine me wenk n't have that withdrawal situation. >> reporter: kada has had very little contact with his daughter
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since she left that residential facility. where does that leave you? >> it leaves me with the sensation that i've really lost both daughters. >> reporter: in the case against united behavioral health, the court has yet to rule on dr. jon lapook, cbs news, new york. still ahead, the amazing new technology that let answer airplane land itself at the touch of a button. ♪ ♪
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recommend cascade platinum... ...with the soaking, scrubbing and rinsing built right in. for sparkling-clean dishes, the first time. cascade platinum. you've seen the movie. a pilot passes out and then a ground crew talks a passenger through a safe landing. in reality, that's highly unlikely. but as kris van cleave report, reality might be about to overtake fiction. >> emergency, emergency, emergency. >> reporter: that's a student pilot calling for help in australia in august as he makes his first ever landing after his flight instructor passed out. while crashes due to pilot incapacitation are relatively rare in the u.s., there have been at least 223, killing 269 in the last ten years. >> when something happens to the pilot going forward, people live. and today there is a good chance that's not going to happen if you have an incapacitated pilot. >> reporter: that's because garman has developed new
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emergency auto land technology. >> the button's right there. if something were to happen to our pilot here and i pushed it, it would get us safely on the ground at the nearest airport. >> reporter: the system will also self-activate if there is a prolonged period of no pilot activity. garman says pilots who become disoriented in weather or dangerously low on fuel could also hit the button for help. we flew with test pilot eric sargent. how confident are you for this to land any time it's activated? >> really confident. i would put my family in here in a heartbeat, be confident if they pushed the button if i wasn't around it would get them down safely. >> reporter: flying in a new piper m-600, we pushed the button. >> emergency landing activated. >> reporter: the plane picks an airport from a list of thousands worldwide where it can safely land factoring in weather, terrain and the amount of fuel on board. it radios the tower, declares an emergency and updates passengers on the approaching landing. the pilot can override the technology at any point. >> 500.
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>> still 500 feet to go in altitude. >> reporter: and the plane is completely flying itself? >> the plane is completely flying itself, hands-off. >> reporter: with the runway in sight and sargent's hands off the controls, we're going. in. >> that brings us to the center of the runway. >> reporter: for what turned out to be a smooth hands-free landing. >> pretty much gives us a human pilot. >> reporter: kris van cleave, cbs news, overland park, kansas. next, quilters across the country stitching together a true work of art.
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we end tonight with the story of an i state sale find that became a labor of love. a chicago woman found a beautiful but unfinished quilt that cried out for its final stitches, and nearly 100 people answered the call. here is adriana diaz. >> that is beautiful! >> isn't it stunning? >> reporter: when artist shannon downey came across this work, she knew it was done by a master embroiderer. downey learned it was done by rita smith, who had recently passed at age 99. >> she was really precise and a pretty exceptional stitcher. >> reporter: then she opened a box she thought held supplies. >> i realized no, this is massive quilting project that somebody had started and not finished. and my friends were like so sorry. i was like i know. because now i have to buy it and finish it. >> reporter: why not just look at it, appreciate it, leave it there, move on. >> no.
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there is no way their soul is resting knowing that there is a work in progress that they left behind uncompleted. >> reporter: downey calculated at shive 's outlines on nearly 100 patches would take her years. >> i have an amazing instagram community, and i thought i can definitely find like four or five people that will help me. so i just posted the story and the images of what i had bought. will somebody help me? anyone? and within 24 hours, i had over a thousand people who were offering to help me. >> i just got chills. >> i know. i've been living with goose bumps for two weeks. >> reporter: one of them was jessie banward. >> you go up and down. you don't want it to go directly in the hole that you pulled up into. >> reporter: who was tasked with kansas. >> my great aunt passed away and left a lot of unfinished projects, and i immediately was like i would love to help. >> reporter: do you feel pressure to not mess up? >> i did definitely beginning, and then it went away.
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as soon as the community of women started connecting. >> reporter: that community spans the country, sharing daily progress online. they've become friends. joanne is sewing her home state of virginia. >> everyone is outlining the state basically in the same way. but the rest is up to you. >> reporter: it almost sounds like a painting. this this is a piece of art. >> it absolutely. it absolutely is. >> reporter: the finished patches arrive daily. >> someone you don't know, someone from utah. >> yep. >> reporter: who wanted to be part of this. >> yes. it's overwhelming. people are awesome. >> reporter: downey and her tight knit group of helpers plan to have the project sewn up by next year. adriana diaz, cbs news, chicago. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. after weeks of depositions behind closed doors in the basement of the capitol, the next phase of the impeachment inquiry of president trump will be on display for all to see. televised hearings get under way wednesday, and they're destined to be must-see tv. democrats will make their case to remove mr. trump from office, and republicans are preparing an all-out defense. weijia jiang is traveling with the president in new york. >> reporter: democrats are burning back on what they want to call in open hearings in the impeachment inquiry, including hunter biden, theclear and
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anyone relied on by the whistle-blower in drafting the complaint. >> we're not going go back in time and revisit conspiracy theories that are implicated in the president's call. >> reporter: the chairman of the house intelligence committee, adam schiff, warned republicans in a letter he would not approve their request to hear from the whistle-blower writing in light of the president's threats, the individual's appearance before us would only place their personal safety at grave risk. president trump is demanding the whistle-blower testify as he defends himself against accusations that he used military aid and a white house meeting as bargaining chips to get ukraine to investigate political rival joe biden and his son hunter, a quid pro quo. >> the president acted criminally and extorted in the way a mob boss would extort somebody, a vulnerable foreign country. it's probably best not to use latin words to explain it. >> reporter: sworn testimony from several witnesses in the impeachment inquiry suggest the president may have acted inappropriately. for his part, mr. trump is using familiar terms to describe the upcoming proceeding. >> there has never been a president who has been so transparent. this is a witch hunt at the
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highest level, and it's so bad for our country. >> reporter: on "face the nation," republican senator john kennedy said he is waiting to see all of the evidence before drawing a conclusion. >> if it can be demonstrated that the president asked for and had the requisite state of mind, that the president asked for an investigation of a political rival, that's over the line. >> and weijia, former u.n. ambassador nikki haley unveiled some explosive new details about discord in the administration to cbs evening news anchor norah o'donnell. what did she say? >> elaine, haley says during a closed door meeting, former secretary of state rex tillerson and former chief of staff john kelly asked her to join her their resistance of the president because they were, quote, trying to save the country. in a statement to cbs news, kelly says it was his job to prevent both pros and cons of policy changes to the president so he could make informed decisions.
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>> all right, weijia jiang there outside of trump tower in new york. thank you. president trump will mark veterans day in new york city tomorrow. he will kick off the veterans day parade, the nation's largest along fifth avenue. it's a tradition that began 100 years ago with a huge ticker tape parade for returning troops from world war i. in london today, members of the british royal family led the nation in honoring its war dead on this remembrance sunday. prince charles laid the first wreath at the cenotaph on behalf of the queen, who watched from a nearby balcony. the solemn ceremony honors those soldiers killed in all british and commonwealth conflicts. there was a rare imperial pparade in japan today. ♪ thousands lined the streets of tokyo celebrating new emperor naruhito and his wife emmasako.
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they ascended to the chrysanthemum item there last month. in mexico today, a somber caravan of fundamentalist mormons fled their homes in a rural part of the country, following the brutal massacre last week of nine family members. but as jonathan vigliotti reports, some are staying behind, looking for justice. >> some are never coming back. >> reporter: sadness and relief for members of the offshoot mormon community from sonora, mexico. >> bye! >> reporter: as a caravan left the la mora colony saturday morning, carrying about 100 people, fleeing the violence that shattered their lives. >> not worth living in fear. ♪ >> reporter: the exodus came hours after the last victim's funeral was held, this one for christina langford. she was among the three women and six children murdered in last monday's drug cartel ambush. survivors say as langford's suv came under attack, she jumped
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out and waved her hands to show her family wasn't a threat. >> i know that what they died for is going to help this country to have more freedom. >> reporter: the community, who's origins in this part of mexico date back more than a century watch as the violent drug wars picked up. but in recent months, members became increasingly concerned about reports of cartel hitmen canvassing the area. some of the victims' relatives have vowed to stay. >> we face a tragic event like this, we don't run. we seek answers. we try to solve it. >> reporter: but the violence is a problem even governments have failed to solve. those who fled saturday will join family in tucson and phoenix, and more members are expected to follow. jonathan vigliotti, cbs news. on the road to campaign 2020, democrats running for president are welcoming former new york city mayor and billionaire michael bloomberg to
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>> i think you have to earn votes and not buy them. >> sorry, you winter is still over a month away, but hubs of cold records are about to be shattered. a new blast of arctic air is descending across the country from the great lakes to the gulf coast. it could be the coldest veterans day on record in minneapolis and chicago. some 250 million people could be affected. temperatures could be up to 30 degrees below normal. cbs news climate and weather contributor jeff berardelli is here with more on the big chill. jeff, this sounds serious. >> for this early in the season, it's exceptional cold, nearly unprecedented and dangerous cold. now the core of the coldest air is going to be in the upper midwest. we could break 350 records this week alone monday through thursday. this happens tomorrow. on tuesday, it moves across the great lakes all the way down to
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the gulf coast, and then encompasses basically the whole eastern part of the country, straight to the eastern seaboard as we head into wednesday. now the cold air is going to plunge all the way down to the gulf coast to the point where we could see freezing temperatures in places like houston, new orleans, panama city, all the way to charleston and wilmington along the eastern seaboards. so it's going to be cold for a lot of people. and the windchills are going to be downright dangerous. in chicago in madison on tuesday, negative 4, negative 5. dress in layers. remember, your body is not quite used to the cold so it's going to feel even colder, and then it spreads towards the east coast. it's not only going to be the cold and wind, it's going to be snow. the heaviest snow is going to be during the day on tuesday. chicago could see as much as 5, 6 inches, chicago, cleveland to buffalo. heaviest snow in the northern parts of new york, new hampshire. for here in new york city and boston, we could see our first flakes of the season on tuesday. >> people need to prepare now. >> people need to prepare now. thank you.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome back to the "overnight news" on this veterans day. i'm elaine quijano. the tom hanks movie "forrest gump" is being rereleased on blu-ray to mark the film's 25th anniversary. in part, it tells the story of brothers in arms from the vietnam war and how life unfolds for them when they returned home. for two of the actor, their roles did not end when the cameras stopped rolling. here is mark strassmann. >> morning, sir. >> get your hands down. do not salute me. there are goddamn snipers all around this area. >> reporter: "forrest gump" is an odyssey of innocence, not a war movie. >> run, forrest, run! >> reporter: but much of the film's emotional impact resonates from private gump
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played by tom hanks and his commander in vietnam. >> i'm lieutenant dahntay lore. >> reporter: gary sinise plays lieutenant dan, who tries to protect his young recruits. >> it's pretty basic here. stick with me, you learn from the guys that have been in country for a while, you'll be all right. >> reporter: but gump soon learns a battlefield is a box of terrors. his heroics save most of his platoon, including lieutenant dan, who loses both legs. >> i was supposed to die in the field with honor. that was my destiny, and you cheated me out of it. >> reporter: lieutenant dan forever changes gump's life and our perception of wounded vets. >> he goes into a deep despair and a darkness, a survivor's guilt, you know. why did they survive and their buddies did not. and lieutenant dan carries that with him.i ry much wanted to pl part because of the vietnam veterans in my family, and i wanted to pay tribute to that in
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some way. >> reporter: people come up to you in the street and call you lieutenant dan today? >> yeah, yeah. i've had that happen many times. >> reporter: sinise never served in the military, but he proudly showed us photos of family members who have. now he's doing his part, helping injured vets, first responders, and their families through the gary sinise foundation. since "forrest gump" premiered in 1994, battlefields in iraq and afghanistan have created too many real-life lieutenant dans. >> some of them have just like lieutenant dan just tried to disappear. they had very serious post traumatic stress. could not come back, could not function in society in any way. and so they've withdrawn. >> reporter: vets like michael connor humphries. >> i struggled. i didn't accomplish anything for a long time. >> reporter: humphries, now 34,
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struggled with ptsd. in 2005, he served for 18 months in anbar province, iraq. he is just like countless other combat vets, except for one thing. >> i considered being in the military ever since having been in "forrest gump". >> reporter: that's right. >> i'm forrest, forrest gump. >> reporter: when he was 8, michael humphries played young forrest gump. as a kid in mississippi, humphries had never acted before, but won an open casting call. >> i knew nothing about it. i didn't even know who tom hanks was. for the longest time i thought the only reason i was selected for the film was for the accent because the accent i had as a kid was a big part of that character. >> we got more money than davy crockett. >> reporter: the challenge to make gump's accent sound realistic. >> you've got a cast a kid and i follow where that kid goes. >> reporter: listen to these
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early gump audition tapes. hanks rehearses in his own voice. >> oh, well you're my most special friend. >> and you're mine too. >> reporter: but he kept studying humphries. >> stupid is as stupid does. >> see? >> i would engage him in conversations with a tape recorder and just get this weird kind of cadence. >> my mama says stupid is as stupid does. >> and i was saying, so michael, what does your father do? miked said ma -- ma -- ma dad makes grease. >> reporter: what stuck with humphries about the movie were the combat scenes shot in south carolina. so after high school and the attacks on 9/11, he enlisted. >> i felt like there was a duty to go do it because it's part of being a citizen of the country. that's what you got to do. >> reporter: gump wasn't on your uniform. >> no. >> reporter: how quickly did it take people to figure it out?
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>> about three weeks. humphries rhymes with gumpfries. >> reporter: but in iraq humphries learned real combat was nothing like the movies. 1/10 of his brigade was killed. that's 100 soldiers. he now lives in washington state. he teaches and he'd like to start acting again. "forrest gump" will always run inside him, but where playing that part led him, he says is what really matters. >> i'm very proud of having been in the military. i actually put that ahead of having been in "forrest gump" as far as a significant thing i've done with my life. >> reporter: as part of his outreach to wounded vets, gary sinise formed the lieutenant dan band in 2003. he's played almost 500 concerts for troops around the world. >> how are you? it's good to be back! >> reporter: and he is proud that lieutenant dan lives on as a role model of sorts for
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injured vets. >> he is wealthy at the end of the movie. he is a successful business guy. he is married again. its story that we want for every single combat veteran coming home from war. we want them to come home and be okay. . >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. i'm alex trebek, here to tell you about the colonial penn program. if you're age 50 to 85, and looking to buy life insurance on a fixed budget, remember the three p's. what are the three p's? the three p's of life insurance on a fixed budget are price, price, and price. a price you can afford, a price that can't increase, and a price that fits your budget. i'm 54. alex, what's my price? you can get coverage for $9.95 a month. i'm 65 and take medications. what's my price? also $9.95 a month. i just turned 80. what's my price? $9.95 a month for you too.
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until i found out what itst it actually was.ed me. dust mite matter! eeeeeww! dead skin cells! gross! so now, i grab my swiffer sweeper and heavy-duty dusters. duster extends to three feet to get all that gross stuff gotcha! and for that nasty dust on my floors, my sweeper's on it. the textured cloths grab and hold dirt and hair no matter where dust bunnies hide.ebbi phew. glad i stopped cleaning and started swiffering. america's veterans come in all shapes and sizes from all
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races and religions and all financial backgrounds. a new art exhibit in south carolina tells the story of 50 vets from all 50 states, and each one of those paintings has a story behind it. here is martha teichner. >> reporter: in her portrait, calla withorn is wearing hand made regalia. >> because of my military service, the flags represent the military and the patriotism. >> reporter: artist mary white knew she wanted a native american to represent south dakota when she set out to paint 50 veterans from 50 states. >> this is ed from north carolina. he says mary, i had 17 great years in the military and one really bad day.ic >> this is winston scott who served in the navy for over 25 years as a captain, and later at nasa did three spacewalks. hirohoow deceased
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bomb and was turned away. >> reporter: because? >> because he is japanese-american. but then a year later he was allowed to enlist. >> reporter: different war, different backgrounds. the veterans pictured are as diverse as the nation they served. mary white's intention when she began the project she called "we the people." >> i thought what if i painted all of america? i do believe our veterans are our greatest patriots. and anyone willing to lay down their life for our country, that's what truly makes a person most american. >> reporter: she traveled the country at her own expense. the paintings took her seven years to complete. they were unveiled two weeks ago in charleston, south carolina, where white lives. >> it is so beautiful. >> reporter: believe it or not,o >> iatlo generally, we don't use white paint. so wherever you see the white, the white is part of the beads,
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that's not paint. that's the paper in which i paint around. >> how are you? >> reporter: the veterans and their families were offered free trips to charleston for the opening festivities. more than half attended. like graduating seniors passing around their year books, they signed the exhibition catalogs they were given. >> it looks just like him. see, we got every single wrinkle. >> reporter: the paintings all have back stories. ♪ rosalind lionhart and david leonard street musicians in new orleans joined the air force to get away from home to find themselves. they found each other. >> look at you! >> reporter: single mother joanie gabriel worked construction in the army. she joined to support her kids and deployed twice to afghanistan.
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>> that really touched me, because coming from where i was. >> reporter: she ended up homeless when she got out until a job using the skills she learned turned her life around. stories of the benefits of service side by side with others of its costs. >> when i first came back before my symptoms appeared, like most veterans, at a time you feel invincible. you had this experience. you served your nation. >> reporter: casey midel is a firefighter and paramedic in bend, oregon, and was a green beret in afghanistan. >> but my ptsd symptoms, they caught up to me, and they made it extremely challenging to remain in public service. >> reporter: but you have. >> i've struggled to do it, driving a fire engine, the loud noises, working on fourth of july is very triggering because of the fireworks.
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>> reporter: midel's lifeline is his service dog banner, named for a close friend who served with him and died in action. your mental and physical health were your gift to your country. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: was it worth it? >> i have -- i'm proud to have served my country. i just need to be taken care of. >> they're trying to privatize some of the veterans hospitals. so i go to demonstrations for that. >> reporter: for 40 years john mcdonough has been a new york city cabbie. he joined the army when he got out of high school in 1974 and hated it. now he fights for veterans against war. >> the disdain i have is for the politician who sends them to some of these needless wars we're involved, never-ending wars. >> reporter: 50 picture, 50 takes on what it means to be a veteran that mary white hopes is
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a truthful portrait of america. >> there was anything that they all had in common, it would be this overall sense of wanting to do something not for themselves but for others, this cause greater than self. >> reporter: which is why captain richard kalana became a teacher when he retired from the navy after 22 years. the highlight of his career? commanding the uss austin. >> discuss and tell me a few reasons why we wear the uniform. >> reporter: he wore his uniform with pride. >> captain. >> reporter: just as he does now reviewing his navy rotc students to set an example. >> second general order. >> reporter: about character. >> should leaders be humble? >> reporter: about patriotism. >> when you wear that uniform, you're carrying the country on your back. >> reporter: about service.
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it was 30 years ago this weekend that the berlin wall came tumblingdo, piece by piece. the symbol of the cold war an c than three decades with communism on the east and freedom on the west. roxana saberi has the story. >> reporter: these flowers and the fragments of the berlin wallmark 30 years since the symbol of the flit explicit between communism and democracy began to crumble. built by soviet allied east germany in 1961, the wall began as barbed wire, going up overnight. people in east berlin woke up to learn they were trapped. over the years, thousands tried to bridge the 27-mile wall. for dozens of them, the attempt across the so-called death strip
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guarded by soldiers and filled with mines was deadly. john f. kennedy visited the wall in 1963. >> and the world of freedom, the proudest post is ich bin ein berliner. >> reporter: in 1997, ronald reagan followed with a message for soviet leader mikhail gorbachev. >> mr. gorbachev, tear down this wall. >> reporter: two years later, the people did. crowds on the eastern side of the wall demand they be let through. >> they were streaming across the wall within hours of the announcement. >> reporter: overwhelmed border guards had no choice but to step back. >> now their job is stamping passports as fast as they can to keep the flow to the west moving, and many of them seem to relish their new role. >> that's good. >> reporter: the fall of the berlin wall pointed to the end of the cold war and the promise of a more unified democratic world. but three decades later, that
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expectation has faded with the rise of nationalism and cracks appearing in the european union and nato. in berlin, yesterday, secretary of state mike pompeo called on nato nations to spend more on their defense. he also criticized russia and china. >> today authoritarianism is just a stone's throw away. it's rising. and if we're honest, it never really went away completely. >> reporter: and today german chancellor angela merkel urged europe to defend freedom and democracy, warning they should never be taken faken for grante. roxana saberi, london. >> and that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. firefighters are driving their fire truck for today.
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it's monday, november 11th, 2019. this is the "cbs morning news."

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