Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News America  PBS  April 7, 2014 2:30pm-3:01pm PDT

2:30 pm
>> this is "bbc world news." >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, charles schwab, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions in capital to help meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news."
2:31 pm
>> this is "bbc world news america." reporting from washington. oscar pistorius takes the stand in his trial and breaks down in tears as he addresses the family of reeva steenkamp. >> i cannot imagine [indiscernible] most is being called the promising lead so far, a freighter ship has picked up signals from what could be the missing malaysian planes lack box. star of thector to silver screen, we look back at the incredible career of mickey rooney. ♪
2:32 pm
>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. givingistorius started evidence at his murder trial before he gave down in the dash broke down in tears, apologizing to the family of reeva steenkamp , saying he could not imagine the pain that he cause them. but he insists that on the night that she died he had mistaken her for an intruder. >> finally, it is his turn to talk. wayr pistorius makes his from the doc this morning and into the witness box. own toilet door, the one that he shot through, now an exhibit in the court. then we lose sight of him. only his voice is allowed to be broadcast. he turns to the public and launches into an emotional
2:33 pm
speech towards the family of the woman he killed. >> there has not been a moment that this tragedy happened i have not thought about it. every morning i think of the people i prayed for. contemplating the pain and sorrow i have caused you. i was simply trying to protect we the -- riva. her mother shows no emotion. but the story is family, quite the opposite. his sister and his aunt are here. at one point the athlete sobs and wretches. pistorius came across as a vulnerable figure today. he is reportedly on antidepressants and sleeping pills.
2:34 pm
nightmares.rrible nights where i wake up and i smell people. i wake up to being terrified. has sought to show oscar pistorius as reckless and aggressive, killing reeva steenkamp in a flash of anger. today he stressed his own fear and inexperience with crime. >> when asked if i was exposed heartbreaking, family members being assaulted. >> the focus today is on emotions and character. tomorrow he is expected to explain how and why he shot reeva steenkamp. trial.ucial day of his tomorrow oscar pistorius returns
2:35 pm
to the stand and gives his version of what happened let -- what happened that night. two underwater sounds have been detected by australian ship. consistent with signals from blackbox recorders. confirmation could still take days. jonathan has the latest. >> using it event -- a device , it has pickedr up signals once for over two hours and once for 13 minutes. usually, two distinct things were detected. >> of would be consistent with transmissions from both the recorder and the cockpit voice recorder. >> the black box contains two sets of recordings. the first, the cockpit voice
2:36 pm
recorder, registers what the crew says and any other sounds in the it. but it only stores the last two hours before the crash. reportedly fined for seven hours before changing course, the possibly crucial moments would have been overwritten. the other recorder is the flight data. this monitors the airplanes functions, including speed and direction, holding 25 hours worth of data that could be more useful. lumpur, the malaysian government that has faced such criticism in recent weeks welcomed the news. international community to unite in prayers and not give up hope. >> the search, by air and by sea, is far from over. still, no wreckage has been found and investigators are warning it could take several
2:37 pm
days to confirm if the signals detected are indeed from the black rocks. >> after weeks of scouring one of the remote corners of the world, investigators clearly feel they are onto something. detecting possible signals is one thing, but finding it and recovering it is another. in one of the world's greatest aviation mysteries, it is far from solved. more on the pings that were heard deep in the ocean, we spoke a short time ago with a forensic audio expert who joins us from new york. after four weeks of searching for this plane, how big a breakthrough could these signals be? >> this could be it. when you have a reception for over two hours -- two hours and craft iss while the going back and forth -- it is pretty positive.
2:38 pm
all of the characteristics of the manufacturer seem to be observed in this particular area. furthermore, they did a u-turn that took the ship about two hours and came back and they heard some more signal. interestingly, when i asked the fellow on the ocean shield whether it was identical signal when they came back, he said it was very close, which would tend to indicate that perhaps they actually have been hearing both of them in the area. >> when you say both, what do you mean? >> one attached to the voice recorder. one attached to the data recorder. this is very promising. >> is it possible that this
2:39 pm
could be a false lead? that's something else altogether has been detected? >> i would call that possible but unlikely. it is only 37.5 kilohertz frequency that is set aside for these types of equipment. also, because it is working. there are batteries. usually these batteries only last for 30 days. if there are no other aircraft that are known to have disappeared, then this seems to be what we are looking for. however, i would really like to see a piece of baggage. see, ifdo you expect to the plane has gone down here? again, over 30 days have elapsed and there are considerable currents in that are the ocean. wreckage, the the
2:40 pm
debris, has drifted. although i would expect to see a trail of it. now? >> theens back will now crisscross and forth, taking readings of magnitude, the amplitude of the signal, then they will make a theyand go across as if are going rows and columns of the checkerboard. then they will take a look and see where it is loudest. that will be the probable location at which they will send down the submersibles to do a visual inspection of the ocean floor. >> paul ginsburg, thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >> the united states has voiced concerns about heightened tensions in the ukraine.
2:41 pm
control of government buildings, they have raised the government flag. any russian efforts at destabilization would incur costs, according to u.s. secretary of state john kerry. a drastic 850 million people registered to vote in india, not surprising, as the vote takes five entire weeks. it apparently takes place in stages. final results are expected in mid-may. the polls opened earlier today. >> they queued up from the early .ours of the morning this polling station was outside a girls school. women outnumbered men, station -- standing patiently for hours in 30 degree heat. once inside, a quick check after which there fingers are mark to make sure and before they can
2:42 pm
make the choice. it is going to start on the first day of the voting. a pretty good turnout. that is always the sign of the voters sending a strong message. not kept pace when it comes to development with the rest of india. there is a sense of frustration, even of alienation. >> this is tea growing country. the plantations starting the region are set up by the british in the mid-19th century. while the industry has prospered, the tea growers have not. these are three generations of the family. father, son, grandson, all voting in the polls. these conditions have seen little improvement over the years. the shacks that serve as their homes offer no protection.
2:43 pm
there is no electricity or proper health care. >> the british were here. i have been working here since they left. i voted in all the elections since then. >> we are not asking for much. all we want is someone who will work for us. our wages are very low. we get no share. voting for the first time, so i am really excited. here.is no future for me i want to vote for someone who will give me an opportunity to move on from here and begin a new life. >> it is decision time. five weeks from now, we will know.
2:44 pm
>> this weekend it was afghanistan's turn to go to the polls. the counting of more than 7 million ballots is underway. as the country waits for the senator isu.s. making sure the rights of african women and girls are protected, no matter who wins. turnout iney, the afghanistan was greater than expected. are you encouraged by how things went? >> i was. both by the numbers, obviously, and especially the numbers among women. we were told that one third of the 7 million were women. that is a tremendous advance. as much as the number was good initially, we have to be careful to evaluate. there were complaints that were filed, as well as determinations
2:45 pm
in which there will be a number of days counting votes. but i think that what was done in the face of extreme violence is significant. secondly, it was done without the kind of direct support that the united states and other coalition forces provided in 2009. a really good start for their first them aquatic transition. you have voiced concern that the u.s. strategy for afghanistan after the troops leave is not clear. are you getting more clarity on it? >> i think so. i think we have to be able to -- the administration and the congress has to speak clearly priorities,les, our and mitigate that. on only in discussions
2:46 pm
afghanistan, but in discussions with the american people. familiestaxpayers and who have paid a lot in terms of the men and women who have served. we have to make sure the results that we achieve, by way of the elections, by way of the afghan people developing their own self-determination, their own government, ministries, and operations to build their legitimate aspirations, that the results are commensurate with the sacrifice made. >> you have a particular interest in the rights of women. how can the gains made by women in afghanistan be safeguarded? >> one thing that we can do is to do what we can to support what just happened. wellusly, if elections go and there is a legitimacy to the
2:47 pm
result, that will obviously help women. but in addition to that we have to take determined steps to make sure that the gains that we have -- that womendy in positions of authority in government, in other words, we have to take steps to preserve those. that is why my legislation and the work we have done in a can lead toashion future good works as well. >> thank you for joining us. you are watching "bbc world news america yuriko still to come -- 20 years after the rwandan genocide, we returned to see how the company is -- the country is adjusting. prince george is on his first overseas visit.
2:48 pm
the duchess and duke of cambridge landed in wales down under. it will include a visit to christchurch, which was devastated in 2011. arrival that was keenly awaited. the aircraft door opens, and there with his parents were george -- was george. getting a final reassuring touch from his mother before emerging from his -- for his first high-profile appearance outside the united kingdom. the first time that he has been seen properly since his christening last october. a blustery first encounter with new zealand. it started with visits to new zealand and australia. cope with the flight? like any eight-month old, he simply looked composed and disinterested at the end of it.
2:49 pm
talk, thee baby air toe of this bouncy the throne invited discussions , if new zealand still wanted to maintain ties to the british crown. it is hard to read new zealand's attitude. are they greeting them as future kings? enthusiasm for the product of curiosity than loyalty? one former deputy prime minister of new zealand said over the weekend that it was inevitable that the country would eventually become a republic. get the future impact of the crown should not be underestimated. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman
2:50 pm
>> across rwanda, commemorations were held to mark the 20th anniversary of the genocide there. the country had been left in total ruling by it. george al a guy, there is a time, has returned for the -- for this for port. for some in the crowd, the memory alone was too much. joined by international dignitaries, including the secretary-general, who at knowledge the organization's failure to stop the genocide. one of the most infamous massacres took place here, in the south of the country. up to 50,000 people were killed in miranda, where they saw refuge.
2:51 pm
off theenocidal mob cut water, they moved in for the kill. .ictim clothing tells the story women, children, the elderly. no one was spared. you reconcile the victim and the perpetrator? every city, every town, every village in rwanda has challenges . in a remarkable act of generosity, he has been allowed into the light. one of the few who survived. she lost her husband and two sons that night. >> we were pleading for mercy and were killed. were sayingchildren
2:52 pm
-- forgive us, we don't want to anymore. >> what kind of mad attacks innocent people? >> when they attacked, there was no humanity in them. they were like wild animals. if you have ever seen a mad dog, that was it. >> after the genocide, emmanuel image of killing nine people. he served seven years in jail. like how can you sit next to the man who may have been the killer your house and some? >> i never thought i could be close to a person who killed another. i forgave him because he told the truth and ask to be pardoned.
2:53 pm
>> over half the population of rwanda was born after the genocide. among them are the 20,000 children conceived of women who were raped. rest of his generation, he now wants to look forward. keepe only reason we commemorating the genocide is to make sure. >> today rwandans are remembering their past, doing so by highlighting the extraordinary achievement of the past two decades. uniting around a shared vision of their future. wrote one that, moving
2:54 pm
forward. this amazing career spanned more than a case, mickey rooney, taking to the stage when he was a toddler. this sunday he died at the age of 93. star of stage and screen. >> the veteran already of 100 20 films. he had been a child star. >> starring in a succession of musicals. >> liz taylor was another child
2:55 pm
star. >> he grew up too quickly and his private life was an -- was a mess. he went broke twice. the self-styled rubber ball of showbiz, he often made comebacks in films for children. >> just to be a grown-up kid, memorizing lines. it is a walk in the park. >> he lived a long life and made over 300 films. >> the incredible life of mickey rooney bringing today's program to a close.
2:56 pm
see you back here tomorrow. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, union bank, and charles schwab. >> there is a saying around here. you stand behind what you say. around here, you don't make excuses. you make commitments. and when you can't live up to them, you own up and make it right. some people think the kind of accountability that thrives on so many streets in this country has gone missing in the places where it is needed most. but i know you will still find it when you know where to look. >> for nearly 150 years, we have believed that the commercial bank owes its clients strength, stability, security.
2:57 pm
so we believe in keeping lending standards high, capital ratios high, credit ratings high. companies expected then, companies expect it now. doing right -- it is just good business. union bank. >> "bbc world news america" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
2:58 pm
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> putin! putin! putin! >> woodruff: in ukraine, pro- russian protesters seized control of government buildings in the east. demanding a vote to follow crimea's lead and secede. good evening. i'm judy woodruff, gwen ifill is away. also ahead, the results in afghanistan's presidential election won't be in for weeks. but calm and order prevailed despite taliban threats of violence, with higher than expected turnout at the polls. plus, wild moose are dying at alarming rates in parts of the u.s. and canada, we explore what's driving the decline.

52 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on