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tv   BBC World News America  PBS  April 25, 2017 5:28pm-6:01pm PDT

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>> this is bbc "world news america." >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation, newman's own foundation, giving all profits from newman's own to charity and pursuing the common good, kovler foundation, pursuing solutions for america's neglected needs, and aruba tourism authority. >> planning a vacation escape that is relaxing, inviting, and exciting is a lot easier than you think. you can find it here in aruba. families, couples, and friends can all find their escape on the island with warm sunny days, cooling trade winds, and the
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crystal blue caribbean sea. nonstop flights are available from most major airports. more information for your vacation planning is available at aruba.com. >> and now, bbc "world news." this is bbc "world news america." reporting from washington, i am tim willcox. cracks in wall funding. walldent trump insists the with mexico will be built and pulls back on immediate spending demands. ivanka trump gets grounds in germany as she defends her father. likeiant minds, michelangelo and marie curie.
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tim: hello, welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. was massive and controversial as a campaign and the opposition is proving just as insurmountable. it seems donald trump is dropping demands for an immediate down payment of federal funding to build border wall with mexico. it could be their dealmaker to get the government funding bill passed by monday. donald trump says don't let the fake media tell you i changing my position on the wall, it will get built. jon: donald trump made his fortune as a builder. the president is staking a huge amount of political capital on the controversial construction project, a two
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thousand-mile-long wall separating the u.s. from mexico. no one can say it has come out of the blue. it was almost his campaign theme. : we are going to build the wall, who is going to pay for the wall? >> mexico. president trump: who is going to pay for the wall? >> mexico. president trump: who? >> mexico. have beenexicans blunt, we are not paying a peso towards it. >> if they want to do it it is their sovereign right. the thing that is clear is there is no way mexico will pay for it. jon: donald trump, initially, will have to rely on the u.s. taxpayer. that is not going to happen right now. he is still talking tough. president trump: the wall gets built, 100%.
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[crosstalk] we are already preparing, dealing plans and specifications. the government runs out of funds on friday and could face a shutdown. agree to anll emergency funding package, only if the white house removes the proposed expenditure on the wall. bill republicans have a majority in the senate, it is slammed. to get -- it is slim. to get this passed, you have to have a super majority of 60. they have 52. donald trump days to start choice -- start choice -- stark orice, a government shutdown a personal step down. inhas been a harsh lesson the differences between the ease
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of campaigning and the struggles of governing. it has left democrats savoring another victory. >> it is good news the president seems to be taking the wall off the table on the negotiations on the appropriations bill. jon: it has been high energy and high tempo. executive orders and economic confidence. on three signature policies, the travel ban, health reform, and the border wall, president trump has not succeeded in the way he promised. jon sopel, bbc news washington. president tries to get support for his wall, his daughter is trying to build bridges with women around the world. germanyrump appeared in with angela merkel and christine lagarde. she faced a tough crowd as jenny hill reports.
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jenny: taking her place among the world's most powerful women. the first daughter rubbing shoulders with the chancellor, a queen, and a banker. almost immediately, ivanka trump found herself defending a president. the delegates here weren't impressed. he has been a tremendous champion of supporting families and enabling them to survive. [groening] >> i hear the reaction from the audience. jenny: still, donald's special advisor persisted. speak on aan personal level knowing that he encouraged me and enabled me to thrive. i grew up in a house where there were no barriers to what i could accomplish. the first daughter has made powerful friends. she has accompanied her father
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to talks with the leaders of canada, japan, and germany. her first overseas trip was at the direct invitation of the german chancellor. >> do you consider your self a feminist? andy: empowering women charming one in particular. berlin needs stronger ties to the trump administration. >> it is the strategy of dialogue that is the most important. you can reach trump through his daughter. what do you are seeing may mark a profound shift in the way that germany does business with the united states. ivanka trump
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campaign has upset a delicate
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trust between the police and the latino community. lisa say they cannot solve cases without leads and information from the immigrant community. the risk is that the very policies president trump champions to make the community safer are instead making them more dangerous. it is important to get our message out. this commissioner says he will we need to make sure that people feel comfortable coming to the police department to give us information including undocumented people. and you have individuals who use charged rhetoric, it is very hard to compete with that noise. this refugee center, these new residents are learning the language of their new home and one of the few places they feel they've. it is not the fear of gangs, but the fear of deportations that now make someone uncomfortable to approach of police. theolice won't stop to ask
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police anything for fear that without papers might be arrested and deported. blaming crime on immigration was a key part of donald trump campaign. but with crime as with other of his the early days presidency show how hard it is to translate slogans into solutions. jim: you're watching bbc world news america. tonight, make an appointment with an app. how are to fulfill -- how artificial intelligence could beginning you a real health check. remaining candidates for the french president the have attended a memorial for the police man shot dead in paris. marine le pen and emmanuel position.k a sharp le pen wants france to reintroduce border control,
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emmanuel macron has urged people not to give in to fear. our correspondent reports from paris. >> they were just faces among many others, because this was not a moment for campaigning here it emmanuel macron and marine le pen were there as national figures to take part in the memorial for the police officer. officer's civil partner who spoke first. >> when the news came out that something serious had happened, and that a police officer had lost my light -- lost their life, a little voice told me it was you. president -- this map the first ceremony for officers killed by terrorists. this is a small makeshift elyseesl on the champs-
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are reminder how terrorism and purity are a central theme in this election. marine le pen with her tough stance on deportation and immigration, then attacks like this it would be much harder to carry out. the outsider in the race, marine le pen is coming out fighting accusing emmanuel macron of not having the guts to do friend the french. emmanuel macron is biding his time. ♪ defend the french. >> some minds are so exceptional they change the world. michelangelo, mozart, and i've been were all considered geniuses, but how and why can
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science provide us with some tantalizing clues tiered these issues lie at the heart of the cover story on the latest national geographic which describes what makes a genius. i spoke to the author of that article. is there some anatomical way of identifying who is a genius and who isn't? wasay back in history there attempts to do that. people want to know if there are differences in the brain, the only way to know that is to study geniuses and non-geniuses to look at the differences. that they find anything? >> they found that one part was 15% largest -- larger. is that what contributed to his genius, possibly, but it is hard to know for sure. -- into creativity.
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trying to get creativity with creative,trying to be putting musicians into a brain scanner -- tim: how do you do that? musicians, have them do improvisation. when they are getting creative, their brains damp down the side that controls us and lets that imagination and creativity surge. those sides are often feuding. with them improvising and creating, that side comes to the fore and they can be creative. tim: there is hard work, too. it is not just flashes of genius. >> it is not a magical thing that comes out of nowhere.
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-- e is practice, hard-core tim: so there is hope for all of us? [laughter] >> there's hope for all of us. they seem to be out of nowhere, but they aren't. tim: what about differences from men and women? i'm trying to think of female geniuses, but not many come to mind. overlooked. to be they're not able to work their way up often, because family demand gets them off track. 's sister,e, mozart anna maria, was a talented musician. when she was 18, her days of showing her music was over. she was of marriageable age. often, the opportunity isn't there. tim: iq has to be 140 plus even to be considered -- iqthere are numbers, but
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isn't everything. research shows you have to have some intelligence to get ahead, but iq isn't everything. you need a lot of persistence, motivation, grit, and sometimes pure luck. tim: from human genius to artificial intelligence. imagine an app that gives you a better diagnosis than your doctor. developers are using what is known as machine learning to offer immediate health care device without the inconvenience of going into surgery. our correspondent has been for a consultation. >> welcome to babylon. how can i help? reporter: this consultation is happening inside a technology company with an ambitious mission. babylon is building a computer program that should be able to diagnose your problem as well as your gp. in this case, the computer has
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been given the same information as the doctor and reaches the same conclusion. >> it is likely you might be suffering from gallstones or colic. >> my tummy hurts. >> i'm sorry you are feeling unwell. reporter: eventually this could be a smart phone app you could talk to. >> we will have a doctor that will fit in your pocket who you can talk to that will diagnose you. it will also try to predict your future. combiningthe project medicine with the latest trends in computer science. is using something called machine learning where a computer is given vast amounts of data and teaches itself a task. the same technique is being used here to recognize what i am saying. we are seeing machine learning in other places. >> machine learning is about getting data to a computer.
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then the computer learns to do specific tasks. there is a whole range of areas where we have more access to data appeared it could be in the medical field, education, solving societal challenges. reporter: it gives you personalized recommendations on shopping sites, helps a computer go, and complex game of the software behind driver-less cars. there is a concern about these machines removing the human touch from our lives and costing jobs. >> it will work nicely alongside gp's. i love seeing patients, listening to their complaints, and coming up to solutions to their problems. can learncomputers faster and more than we can, but
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they will never have much of a bedside manner. bbc news. tim: absolutely. that is it from me in washington. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation, newman's own foundation, giving all profits from newman's own to charity and pursuing the common good, kovler foundation, pursuing solutions for america's neglected needs, and aruba tourism authority. >> planning a vacation escape that is relaxing, inviting, and exciting is a lot easier than you think. you can find it here in aruba. families, couples, and friends can all find their escape on the
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island with warm sunny days, cooling trade winds, and the crystal blue caribbean sea. nonstop flights are available from most major airports. more information for your vacation planning is available at aruba.com. >> bbc world news was presented by kcet los angeles.
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>> woodruff: good evening. i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, budget battles. president trump calms congressional nerves over a potential government shutdown, by dropping insistence on money now for a mexico border wall. then: >> democrats need a strong, progressive agenda. >> woodruff: i sit down senator bernie sanders to discuss the trump agenda and what democrats need to do to start winning again. and, dreamers worry about a potential nightmare. young, undocumented immigrants prepare for the worst as the trump administration adopts a hard-line approach. >> losing my job, losing the ability to teach my kids, being separated from my family. losing everything that i know;

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