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tv   CBS Evening News With Scott Pelley  CBS  October 17, 2016 6:30pm-7:01pm EDT

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captioning sponsored by cbs >> pelley: wheel, dealing and e-mailing. f.b.i. documents say a state department official offered the bureau a favor if it would reduce the classification of a clinton e-mail. >> it just stinks to no end. >> pelley: also tonight, while trump warns of election fraud, experts say the real threat could be russian hackers. >> imagine on election night something comes out that causes people to think the results of the election are questionable. >> pelley: holly williams on the front lines of the biggest battle yet against isis. >> these kurdish fighters are trying to move in that direction and retake the main road to mosul, but isis has lit fires in villages there and there to try to shield themselves from air
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strikes. >> pelley: and a high school team takes a page from the kaepernick playbook. >> it's like institutionalized racism. that's what i'm taking a knee for. this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: hillary clinton's private e-mail server has come back the bite her again. today the f.b.i. released more of its notes from its now-closed criminal investigation of the former secretary of state. those notes reveal that a senior state department official tried to strike a deal with the bureau over one of her e-mails. the notes suggest that there would be something in that deal for the f.b.i. nancy cordes is covering the clinton campaign. >> reporter: the controversy surrounds one e-mail about if benghazi attacks, the the very first of clinton's e-mails to be retroactively classified as
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secret last year in direct contradiction of her early claim. >> there is no classified material. >> reporter: according to f.b.i. interview, clinton's under secretary patrick kennedy began pushing security officials to see their way clear to marking the e-mail "unclassified." one f.b.i. contact told kennedy he would look into the e-mail matter if kennedy would provide authority concerning the f.b.i.'s long-standing request to increase its personnel in iraq. the f.b.i. official then called a colleague who told agents he felt pressured to change the classified e-mail to unclassified as part of a quid pro quo. >> it just stinks to no end. >> reporter: utah republican jason chaffetz. >> when you have an f.b.i. agent himself say he was in a quid pro quo discussion with the under secretary of management at the state department, that should scare everybody. >> reporter: the f.b.i. says in the end no favors changed hands and the classification level stayed as is. state department spokesman mark
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toner. >> any real assertion that this was somehow tit for at the or quid pro coor exchange in that manner really frankly is insulting. >> reporter: f.b.i. documents also include an interview with a diplomatic security agent at the state department who said clinton frequently and blatantly disregarded security parole call. when traveling overseas for instance, clinton often refused to ride in the armored limousine with the local u.s. ambassador, opting instead to ride with long-time aide huma abedin, a practice that "frequently resulted in complaints by ambassadors, who were insulted and embarrassed by this breech of protocol." >> pelley: nancy, tell us, what has the clinton campaign had to say about all this today? >> reporter: scott, they say it's well-known that state department officials thought that clinton's e-mails were being overclassified and fought the intelligence community on that matter all last year. campaign aides say they don't
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have specific knowledge about this conversation involving under secretary kennedy, but they point out that even the f.b.i. appears to have concluded that there was no quid pro quo. >> pelley: nancy cordes, thanks very much. well, it's 22 days before the election, and our new cbs news poll gives clinton a nine-point lead. 82% of voters told us this campaign is more negative than those of the past. that's the largest number to say that in a quarter century. the latest example: trump's tweet today alleging large-scale voter fraud. major garrett is on his campaign. >> the election is rigged. it's rigged like you've never seen before. >> reporter: it is a searing indictment of american democracy, an allegation donald trump has toyed with throughout the campaign. this morning on twitter, trump wrote, "of course there is large-scale voter fraud happening on and before election day." trump has warned that democratic voters could cast multiple
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ballots and that undocumented immigrants are being processed for voting purposes. he's provided no evidence for either charge. but a study by the brennan center for justice found the average american was more likely to be struck by lightning than cast a fraudulent ballot. another study found 31 incidents of voter fraud out of 1 billion votes cast from 2000 to 2014. we put the question to ohio republican secretary of state john husted, responsible for ensuring a fair election in the battleground state. >> there's a difference between an individual random act and a systematic problem, and we do not have any systematic problems, and i'm not aware of any systematic problems in any state in the country. the idea of building a national campaign where you're suggesting that the elections process itself is rigged is an irresponsible comment. >> reporter: trump's running
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mate mike pence said this about fraud claims on "face the nation." >> we'll respect the outcome of this election, john. >> reporter: in previous close presidential election, the losing candidates have graciously conceded for the good of the country. scott, one presidential historian told us trump gives every impression of doing the opposite, and this, the historian said, could be the most disturbing aspect of his entire campaign. >> pelley: major garrett in our washington newsroom tonight. major, thank you. well, perhaps a more serious threat against the electoral system is russian hacking. jeff pegues has been looking into this. >> reporter: two years ago top russian general valery gerasimov, who has president vladimir putin's ear, called for a new kind of warfare. in a military journal, gerasimov wrote of using coverlt and propaganda tactics to turn a perfectly thriving state into a victim of foreign intervention, causing it to sink into a web of chaos. adam meyers, the head of intelligence for the cyber
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security firm crowdstrike says gerasimov's doctrine is behind the recent hacks of election databases and the democratic national committee. >> imagine on election night if all of a sudden reports come out that cause people to think the results of the election are questionable. >> reporter: meyers and u.s. government officials fear that's exactly what the russians will try to do. >> all they need to do is cause us to question the results that come back from one district in one state, and that could trigger enough of a reaction that we might call for, say, a complete recount. >> reporter: helen purcell, the elections recorder for maricopa county, arizona, says an easy way to stop the hackers is to keep voting machines off line. so this is not in any way connected to the internet? >> no, no. we use paper ballots, so even on our touch-screen machine, we have tape of everything that happens on that machine so that can be verified later. >> reporter: u.s. officials
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accuse the russians of using similar tactics in other countries, including ukraine during its 2014 presidential election. scott, while the russians deny the allegation, we're told that president obama is considering retaliating with sanctions or a cyber attack. >> pelley: jeff pegues for us tonight. jeff, thank you. we want to remind you that cbs news will be bringing you live coverage analysis of the third and final clinton-trump debate. that is this wednesday evening at 9:00 eastern time. tonight the biggest battle yet against isis is under way with the help of u.s. warplanes and american special forces. the target is iraq's second largest city, mosul. kurdish forces and iraqi troops are surrounding mosul to force its liberation after two years of occupation. hundreds of thousands of civilians are in the cross fire. war correspondent holly williams
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was outside mosul today when the first shots were fired. >> reporter: over the last few days we've seen video emerging from inside mosul of what appeared to be u.s. coalition air strikes inside the city. >> pelley: holly and her crew are fine, but it was the start of an eventful day. >> reporter: just after dawn they broke through the front line. a column of tanks and armored vehicles rolling into isis territory. these men are kurdish fighters who have joined with the iraqi army and local militiamen to push isis out of mosul. a combined force thought to be more than 20,000 strong. these kurdish fighters are trying to move in that direction and retake the main road to mosul. but isis has lit fires in villages there and there to try
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to shield themselves from air strikes. it didn't work. u.s. coalition strikes pounded isis today, and the extremists lost more territory and more fighters. but the battle so far is only on the outskirts of mosul, a handful of farming vimages long emptied of civilians. now an apocalyptic landscape. isis fought back with suicide bombers. one car laden with explosive drove dangerously close to where we were standing. it was blown up by an anti-tank missile. "isis doesn't fight as well as it used to and their morale is down," the colonel told us. "that's why they're using more suicide bombers." but a desperate enemy is a dangerous one, and the battle for mosul is just beginning. the u.s. military says there are fewer than 5,000 isis fighters
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left in mosul. but they're preventing around one million civilians from leaving, using them as human shields. meanwhile, scott, the roughly 6,000 american troops here are acting in what the u.s. government insists is an advisory role. >> pelley: and the fall of mosul not expected for many weeks. holly williams reporting from iraq. holly, thank you. today russia said it will suspend bombing of the syrian city of aleppo for eight hours thursday as a humanitarian gesture. the city of two million is a ruin five years after rebels rose against the syrian president. today the european union said russia's bombardment may constitute a war crime. in aleppo today, elizabeth palmer found what each side is willing to do to keep on killing. [explosion] >> reporter: as day begins in aleppo, so does the battle. syrian soldiers and opposition
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fighters shoot at each other across the front line that runs right through the city center. soldiers offered to show us where rebels had manufactured one of their signature weapons. so this is an ordinary cooking gas canister sawed in half. it's designed so that explosive would fit in the top part, perhaps shrapnel in the bottom, and then it would be reassembled with these makeshift tin, which would help to guide it like a very primitive kind of rocket. the rockets were launched sort of through an ordinary piece of steel pipe. the syrian army has homemade arm, too, like the by now infamous and inprecise barrel bomb. as for its precision weapon, there aren't enough well-trained soldiers to use them accurately, so the battle for aleppo has largely stalled. here on the city's southern
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edge, it's taken the army three months to advance 800 yards to those white buildings, and everywhere on this improvised battlefield there is misery. "kill me," an old man tells us, "i have no food, no bread, i have nothing." not even a safe place to wait out this grinding war. the fight for control of aleppo, scott, is less a pitched battle and more a ruthless siege, which is slowly choking the life out of half of that great city. >> pelley: a siege of more than five years now. elizabeth palmer reporting for us inside syria. liz, thank you. coming up next on the "cbs evening news," a republican party office is firebombed, and later, a high school football team takes a knee. d open up on time. then i found aleve pm. the only one to combine a safe sleep aid
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>> pelley: police in north carolina are investigating the weekend firebombing of the orange county republican party headquarters. omar villafranca has the latest. >> reporter: the fireball charred interior walls, melted political signs, and burned a couch down to its springs before going out on its own. no one was in the building at the time. a business next door was spray painted with a swastika and a threat, "nazi republicans leave town or else." robin hayes is the chairman of the north carolina republican party. is this something you would expect to happen here? >> not at all, not in any way, shape, or form. totally unprecedented, uncalled for, and inexcusable. >> reporter: the incident comes during a tense period in the campaign, and republican offices across the tar heel state are taking extra security precautions. orange county is reliably blue. registered democrats outnumber republicans nearly 3-1. both presidential candidates weighed in.
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hillary clinton condemned the attack, calling it "horrific and unacceptable." donald trump tweeted, "animals representing hillary clinton and dems in north carolina just firebombed our office in orange county because we are winning." income's -- north carolina's republican governor pat mccrory. >> i'm going the take this extremely seriously because i don't want any retaliation from the other side. the worst thing we can do have this expand into more violence, which is a direct assault on the democratic process. >> reporter: investigators are still looking for clues and have not made any arrests. and, scott, in a rare showing of bipartisanship, democrats helped raise more than $13,000 online to help rebuild the g.o.p. headquarters. >> pelley: omar villafranca, >> pelley: omar villafranca, thanks very much, and we're back in just a moment. eler
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>> pelley: tonight a four-star general who was once the second highest-ranking officer in the entire u.s. military pleaded guilty in a case involving a leak of top secrets. david martin has that. >> reporter: general james cartwright, now retired, but once known as president obama's favorite general, plead guilty the a crime which could send him to prison. responding to questions from a federal judge, cartwright, who served as vice chairman of the joint chief, admitted he lied to f.b.i. agents investigating leaks of classified information to two journalists, david sanger of "the new york times," and daniel klaidman, at the time a correspondent for "newsweek." sanger is the reporter who revealed the so-called stuxnet cyber attacks conducted against nissan's nuclear program. u.s. and israeli intelligence secretly hacked into the computers, which ran the centrifuges iran used to enrich uranium, causing them to spin out of control. carted cart admitted to providing information classified
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top secret to both sanger and klaidman and then lying about it to f.b.i. agents. in a statement he said, "it was wrong for me to mislead the f.b.i. his attorney said cartwright was just trying the talk the reporters out of publishing sensitive secrets they already had." the crime carries a sentence of up to five years in prison, but cartwright's attorney said the government has already agreed to recommend a sentence of six months. scott? >> pelley: david martin at the pentagon tonight. david, thank you. folks in oregon and washington state are cleaning up from a weekend storm. thousands lost power. it was a remnant of a pacific typhoon that was forecast to be much worse but weakened on the coast. up next, a high school football team protests racial injustice. >> this portion of the "cbs evening news" is sponsoredically pacific life, helping generations of families achieve long-term financial security for over 145 years.
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>> pelley: today the head of the international association of chiefs of police apologized for past mistreatment of people of color by police officers. chief terrence cunningham of wellesley, massachusetts, called on police and communities to work toward trust. police brutality is one issue san francisco 49er colin kaepernick is protesting with his refusal to stand for the national anthem. amid the controversy, some high schools are following kaepernick's playbook. here's carter evans. >> reporter: after years of losses, the garfield bulldogs are on a roll. winning every single game so far this season in part because they're playing for a lot more
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then a football title. >> for us to do this, i feel like a big change will come. >> reporter: when 49ers' quarterback colin kaepernick chose not to stand for the national anthem, running back jason nguyen was not impressed. >> my first initial thought was, oh, why is he doing this and disrespecting america, but over time, i started to learn about it. >> reporter: daily team talks soon turned into action, an now the entire bulldogs' team is taking a stand by taking a knee. jelani howard is the team's tight end. >> i just want to see justice for all people and like for people to feel like the police brutality to stop. >> institutionalized racism, that's what i'm taking a knee for. >> reporter: they have support from the seattle school district and respect from their head coach, joey thomas. these kids are the running the show. after -- absolutely. >> reporter: the team has met with the police department and
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they published a list of concerns online, including academic inequality in their own school district. garfield is in seattle's inner city. the football field doesn't have lights or bleachers. >> if you go up north, you'll have an engineering program, but when you come down here, we don't have that. >> why do you think that is? >> i think it's where you're located. >> reporter: but not everyone agrees. the team has been the target of hate messages on social media. >> most of the people who don't agree are mostly caucasian. to be honest, for them they don't experience what other friends on my football team experience. >> reporter: it's tough to talk openly about racial inequality. >> at the end of the day, teenagers just want to be heard. they want to feel like they have a voice. >> reporter: and sometimes all it takes is a silent gesture to start the conversation. carter evans, cbs news, seattle. >> pelley: and that's the "cbs evening news" for tonight. for all of us at cbs news all planned parenthood.
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i would support legislation in pennsylvania that would ban abortion and i would suggest we have penalties for doctors who perform them. would you put people in jail for performing abortions? at some point doctors performing abortions i think would be subject to that sort of penalty. dscc is responsible for the content of this advertising.
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