Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  April 12, 2017 3:10am-4:01am EDT

3:10 am
learn the signs at autismspeaks.org. in san bernardino, california, north park elementary school remains closed as the police investigate yesterday's classroom shooting. here's john blackstone. >> reporter: cedrick anderson and karen smith appear happy in a honeymoon video posted on facebook in early february. >> oh! >> reporter: but by march, the marriage was in trouble. according to the san bernardino police chief. >> what we were told was there was an allegation of infidelity in the relationship. >> reporter: smith moved out and was living with her adult children. >> it appears he had been making efforts to contact her and to have her come back home, and she was resistant to that, and i don't know if that just reached a boiling point. >> reporter: on monday, anderson walked into smith's classroom with a hand gun and began
3:11 am
shooting, striking two students and her before shooting himself. >> the two children struck by gunfire were simply standing and seated in the exact proximity where she was on the other side. and they appear to be errant rounds. >> reporter: smith died, and hours later at the hospital so did 8-year-old jonathan martinez. in a restraining order, another woman accused anderson of threatening her with a butcher knife and trying to smother her with a pillow. smith did not tell of her problems but warned her family. >> those closest to her said that she had mentioned that his behavior was odd, and that she was concerned about his behavior and that he had made some threats toward her. he did not make a specific threat to shoot her. >> reporter: this memorial at the school to those who were killed is constantly growing, scott. the 8-year-old who died had a condition called williams
3:12 am
syndrome which makes children technically social and endearing. the 9-year-old remains hospitalized. one of the most honored and vital units in the military is battling an enemy within. for the first time, navy s.e.a.l.s. are talking to us about drug abuse in the ranks. and david martin is investigating this. >> i'm sitting in this chair because i'm not proud anymore to be in the community because of the direction it's going. >> reporter: these three navy s.e.a.l.s. agreed to talk to us on camera if we disguised their faces and protected their voices from retribution. >> people that we know about, that we hear about have tested positive for cocaine, methamphetamine, marijuana, heroin, ecstasy. that's a problem. >> reporter: how prevalent is drug abuse in the s.e.a.l. teams? >> it's growing. the drug use. it's growing. >> reporter: last december, as
3:13 am
this e-mail shows, the s.e.a.l.s. halted all training and ordered a safety stand down because of the problem. >> i feel like our culture, our foundation is eroding before our eyes. >> reporter: captain jamie sands, commander of the 900 s.e.a.l.s. based on the east coast had been on the job for just three months and had alrea already five s.e.a.l.s. had been kicked off the teams for using drugs. >> i feel betrayed. how do you do that to us? how do you decide that it's okay for you to do drugs? >> reporter: every s.e.a.l. under his command was required to attend this meeting or else watch it online. in response to our request, the navy released an edited version of the video. before sands spoke, his chief of staff rattled off what he called a staggering number of drug cases which showed that the navy special operators had a higher incidence of drug use than the rest of the fleet.
3:14 am
>> it's a population that's supposed to be elite performers, all with classification, to where they have national security information and responsibilities. that's dangerous to my teammates. >> if we need your ability i don't need in the back of my mind, can we trust this guy? is he going to 100% be at my back? >> reporter: head of the special warfare command agrees. anything above 0 is a disturbing number. why do they take drugs? you may think it'sdue to high-risk operations. but that's not what sands says. >> they see other people do it. they think their teammates won't turn them in. they think it's a cool thing to do, but they think it's okay. >> reporter: the s.e.a.l. who blows the whistle on drug use does so at his own peril. >> you stand up for what's right and you get black balled or driven out. it's a career killer.
3:15 am
>> reporter: like the rest of the military, s.e.a.l.s. are supposed to be subjected to random urinalysis. but in practice, they aren't tested when away from home base, which is much of the time because their skills are in constant demand. three active duty s.e.a.l.s. said they had not been tested in years. sands vowed to change that. >> we're going to test on the road. we're going to test on deployment. if you do drugs, if you decide to be that selfish individual, which i don't think anybody's going to do after today, if you do that, you will be caught. >> reporter: commodore james sands called an all-hands meeting referencing drug problem in group two. sounds like he's dealing with it. >> well, i think it has gotten to a point where he's had to deal with it. i hope he's somebody we can rally behind and hold people accountable, but i'm not sure at this point. >> it's hugely important. >> reporter: as part of the safety stand down, all will have to submit to urinalysis, one who tested positive for cocaine last
3:16 am
summer tested positive again, this time for prescription drugs. he is being kicked off the team. scott, after speaking by phone with one of the s.e.a.l.s. who attended that meeting, i asked if we could talk again, which would require using a cell phone that could not be traced. he said sure, and then he added, we need help. david martin breaking the story for us right here tonight. david, thank you. coming up next, it was the bump heard round the world. now the feds are investigating.
3:17 am
♪ lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria, even on soft surfaces. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect.
3:18 am
six of you for when thyou stretch out.t i want you to stay this bright blue forever, that's why you'll stay in this drawer forever. i can't live without you, and that's why i'll never ever wash you. protect your clothes from stretching, fading and fuzz with downy fabric conditioner. fading and fuzz with downy fabric conditioner. it smooths and strengthens fibers
3:19 am
to protect clothes from the damage of the wash. so your favorite clothes stay your favorite clothes. downy fabric conditioner. today at the department of transportation says it is investigating that violent bumping of a passenger from a overbooked united airlines flight. here's kris van cleave. >> reporter: as outrage continued to spread about a united airlines passenger being forcibly removed from a flight on sunday, oscar munoz issued another apology, calling it a
3:20 am
truly horrific event. he said, i deeply apologize, no one should ever be treated this way. retreating from an earlier statement in which munoz raised questions about the passenger's behavior. >> i would say it's the worst response to a public relations crisis i've ever seen. >> reporter: he says while passengers are entitled to compensation up to $1350 for being bumped, they have few other rights. dow was one of four passengers designated to love flight 437 between chicago and louisville to make room for employees who needed to get to louisville to staff a flight. it's up to the airlines to choose who must leave in these situations. united's computer system weighs several factors, including ease of rebooking, final destination, whether the traveler is alone, with a family or unaccompanied minor, even frequent flyer status. >> airlines will be more likely
3:21 am
to bump you if you have no status in the frequent flyer program, if you've paid a super low fare or are in the economy class. >> reporter: last year they denied boarding to 3600 flyers. out of 86 million. better than the industry average. united is still facing a firestorm on social media and growing anger in china which is a growing market for united where many felt race was a factor. >> kris van cleave, thanks. up next, new guidelines for prostate cancer tests. ♪
3:22 am
you don't even want to know protection detergent alone doesn't kill bacteria but adding new lysol laundry sanitizer kills 99.9% of bacteria with 0% bleach. lysol. what it takes to protect. [car engine failing to start] [wind blows] yo- wh- ah- he- [gas pouring] [slurps loudly] [engine starting] [loud slurping continues] ♪living well come on up, grandpa don't let joint discomfort keep you down. come play with us! i'm coming. upgrade to move free ultra's triple action joint support
3:23 am
for improved mobility, and flexibility. it also provides 20% better comfort than glucosamine chondroitin, all from one tiny mighty pill.... get in there with move free ultra, and enjoy living well. ♪living well today, an influential federal panel on preventative medicine relaxed its opposition to routine screening for prostate cancer. more than 161,000 american men are diagnosed every year, and 26,000 die. dr. tara narula is here with us now. what are the new guidelines? >> so scott, medicine is a balancing act. and if you imagine scales, before they are tipped toward harm. >> now we're slightly tipped to benefit. really this is also a reflection of the changing practice of medicine where patients are in
3:24 am
the driver's seat. the recommendations say men 55-69 should have a conversation with their doctor where they discuss the harms and benefits for screening. and for men over 70 the replication -- recommendations are still not for screening. it leads to a pathway, while it can be life saving it can lead to overdiagnosis and treatment and treatments that can cause problems, so really important to discuss it. >> and why the change now? >> there's been new evidence in the last five years, new research that suggests that screening can decrease mortality, decrease death in men and decrease cancer that has spread. there's a new strategy used in the last five years like active surveillance. in the past when you had a positive test you might jump right to aggressive treatment, like surgery or radiation. now it's more of a watchful waiting approach. and that decreases harm. >> have a conversation with your doctor. >> absolutely. >> dr. tara narula. we're back in a moment.
3:25 am
(male #1) it's a little something i've done every night since i was a kid, empty my pocket change into this old jar. it's never much, just what's left after i break a dollar. and i never thought i could get quality life insurance with my spare change. neither did i. until i saw a commercial for the colonial penn program. imagine people our age getting life insurance at such an affordable rate. it's true. if you're 50 to 85, you can get guaranteed acceptance life insurance through the colonial penn program for less than 35 cents a day, just $9.95 a month. there's no medical exam and no health questions. you know, the average cost of a funeral is over $8,300.
3:26 am
now that's a big burden to leave your loved ones. as long as you're 50 to 85, you cannot be turned down because of your health. your premium never goes up and your benefit never goes down due to age. plus, your coverage builds cash value over time. call now for free information and a free gift. all i did was make a phone call and all of my questions about the colonial penn program were answered. it couldn't have been any easier and we both got the coverage we should have had for years now. mm-hm, with change to spare. (laughing) (colonial penn jingle)
3:27 am
we end tonight with american heroes. wounded in war, fighting their way back, armed only with sticks on a battleground of ice. here's dean reynolds. >> reporter: it's been a long way back from the war for richard. ten years ago, a roadside bomb in iraq cut his lung in half, left shrapnel in his body and night terrors in his mind, not to mention what it did to his left arm. they reattached his arm, but a broken spirit was harder to fix.
3:28 am
>> i went through that depression of, who's going to want me, what am i going to be able to do? and this is one thing that gets me out of bed on saturdays. gets me motivated. >> reporter: he's talking about this. he is a defenseman on the black hawk warriors, a team comprised of military veterans with wounds and issues from their service. >> most people who lose an arm and then have it reattached don't take up hockey. >> this is true. >> reporter: we talked to him and his teammates, jacob blume, herniated discs, traumatic stress and brain injuries, along with kevin, spine injuries, nerve atrophy and more. >> it pushes you. it pushes you to be better. every time you get off there you want to be better, are. >> reporter: you getting better? >> i'm not falling down as much. >> hockey is my escape. as soon as i cross that and get
3:29 am
on to the ice it disappears. >> we're all warriors, on the ice we're going after each other. off the ice we're friends, we're brothers. >> reporter: the good part is that they're all improving on and off the ice. >> when i first joined the team, i couldn't tie my own hockey skates because of my health issues. i now tie my own hockey skates. i don't need any help. >> reporter: that's the goal, and they've got a real shot at it. dean reynolds, cbs news, mt. prospect, illinois. >> and that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
3:30 am
this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm jericka duncan. president trump and his top aides have faced criticism for inventing and repeating what they describe as alternative facts. white house press secretary sean spicer is now under fire for his use of history. nancy cordis explains. >> reporter: it isn't often that hitler is compared favorably to anyone. but it happened today when the white house press secretary was condemning syria's bashar al assad for gassing his own people. >> you had a, someone as despicable as hitler who didn't even sink to using chemical weapons. >> reporter: it was a startling comment from someone who surely
3:31 am
learned in high school that hitler sent millions to the gas chambers. spicer's clarification only led to more confusion. >> i think when you come to sarin gas, there was no, he was not using the gas on his own people the same way that assad is doing, i mean, there was clearly, i understand, thank you. thank you. i appreciate that. it was not in the, he brought it into the holocaust center. >> reporter: by holocaust centers, he apparently meant concentration camps. the executive director of anne frank center is accusing him of holocaust denial and is calling on president trump to fire him at once. in a statement he insisted, in no way was i trying to lessen the horrendous nature of the holocaust, i was trying to draw a distinction of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on population centers.
3:32 am
>> even in world war ii, chemical weapons were not used on battlefields. even in the korean war, they were not used on battlefields. since world war i, there's been an international convention on this. >> secretary of state rex tillerson is in moscow where the poison gas attack will be the focus of talks with officials. tillerson has no plan to meet with vladimir putin, and there are no signs he's ready to bring up the kremlin's meddling in the u.s. election. margaret brennan in moscow begins our coverage. >> they have aligned themselves with an unreliable partner in mr. al-assad. >> reporter: secretary tillerson called on russia to break its alliance with the syrian dictator. >> i think it's clear to all of us that the reign of the assad family is coming to an end. >> reporter: he said the u.s. and its allies want russia to broker a cease-fire and convince assad to step down. a reversal from just 12 days ago. >> i think the status, the longer-term status of president
3:33 am
assad will be decided by the syrian people. >> reporter: that was before last tuesday's sarin gas attack. and president trump's subsequent order of a limited missile strike on syrian airfields that the u.s. says was used to launch the chemical attack. russian president vladimir putin disputes that account and compares it to flawed u.s. intelligence that was used to justify the 2003 invasion of iraq. he claims that chemical weapons were being planted in syria to frame assad. the white house accused putin of a cover up and said russia was trying to quote, confuse and obfuscate on behalf of the syrian regime. defense sent james matis. >> it is very clues that the assad regime planned it, orchestrated it and executed it. >> reporter: syrian jets have already been spotted taking off from that same air base that the u.s. bombed five days ago.
3:34 am
russia has positioned two warships off the coast of syria america's navy s.e.a.l.s. have been on the front line in the war on terror overseas. but these highly-trained commandos have trouble in their ranks, specifically drug abuse. david martin has that story. >> i'm sitting in this chair because i'm not proud anymore to be in the community because of the direction it's going. >> reporter: these three navy s.e.a.l.s., one active duty, two retired agreed to talk to us if we disguised their identities and their voices to prevent retribution. >> people that we know of, that we hear about have been tested positive for methamphetamine, marijuana, ecstasy, cocaine, heroin. that's a problem. >> reporter: how prevalent is drug abuse in the s.e.a.l. teams? >> it's growing. the drug use, it's growing. >> reporter: last december, as this e-mail shows, the s.e.a.l.s. halted all training
3:35 am
and ordered a safety stand down because of the drug problem. >> i feel like i'm watching our culture erode in front of my eyes. >> reporter: captain jamie sands had been on the job five months and already five s.e.a.l.s. had been kicked off for using drugs. >> i feel betrayed. how do you do that to us? how do you decide that it's okay for you to do drugs? >> reporter: every s.e.a.l. under his command was required to attend this meeting or else watch it online. in response to our request, the navy released an edited version of the video. before sands spoke, his chief of staff rattled off what he called a staggering number of drug cases, which he said showed that the navy's special operators had a higher
3:36 am
than the rest of the fleet. >> it's a population that's supposed to be elite performers, all with classification, to where they have national security information and responsibilities. that's dangerous to my teammates. >> if we need your ability, i don't need to be in the back of my mind thinking that, okay, can i really trust this guy? is he 100% going to cover my back? >> reporter: this admiral agrees, telling cbs news in a statement, anything above zero represents a disturbing trend for this elite force. so why do s.e.a.l.s. take drugs? you might think it was due to the stress of high-risk operations, but that's not what sands says. >> they think it's okay because they've seen other people do it. they think their teammates won't turn them in. they think it's kind of a cool thing to do, but they think it's okay. >> reporter: the s.e.a.l. who blows the whistle on drug use, does so at his own peril. >> you stand up for what's right and you get black balled or driven out. >> it's a career killer. >> reporter: like the rest of the military, s.e.a.l.s. are supposed to be subjected to
3:37 am
random urinalysis, but in practice, they aren't tested when away from home base, which is most of the time, because their skills are in constant demand. three active duty s.e.a.l.s. told us they had not been tested in years. sands vowed to change that. >> we're going to test on the road, on deployment. if you do drugs, if you decide to be that selfish individual, which i don't think anybody's going to do after today, i believe that, then you will be caught. >> reporter: jamie sands called an all-hands meeting referencing drug problems in group two. sounds like he's dealing with it. >> well, i think it's gotten to a point where he had to deal with it. i hope he's somebody that we can rally behind and hold people accountable, but i'm not sure at this point. >> because it's hugely important. >> reporter: as part of the safety stand down, all s.e.a.l.s. were required to submit to urinalysis. one who tested positive for cocaine last summer tested positive again, this time for prescription drugs.
3:38 am
he is being kicked off the teams. lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria, even on soft surfaces. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. tand, our adulte children are here. so, we save by using tide. which means we use less. three generations of clothes cleaned in one wash. those are moms. anybody seen my pants? nothing cleans better. put those on dad! it's got to be tide.
3:39 am
makewith instant moisture utes from k-y ultragel. i'start at the new carfax.comar. show me minivans with no reported accidents. boom. love it. [struggles] show me the carfax. start your used car search at the all-new carfax.com.
3:40 am
major league baseball will soon have an exciting new import from japan. his name is shohei otani. he was league mvp last year after leading his team to the japanese championship. but he's also the most dominating pitcher in the league, with a 100-mile-per-hour fastball. we have his story for "60 minutes." >> reporter: shohei otani looms large in the town of sapporo. this is the sapporo dome. we sat down with otani and talked about his local favorite
3:41 am
fast food. very important question. in and out burger, captain kangaroo burger. >> captain kangaroo. >> reporter: towering and affable, otani's working on his english, but felt more comfortable using a translator during the interview. i want to talk about the majors. should we say if or should we say when? >> translator: that's a tough one. i mean, nothing is for certain, so i guess it's "if." >> reporter: despite that cautious response, otani eagerly revealed which major league players he looks forward to facing. no less than bryce harper and clayton kershaw. >> translator: i watch bryce harper, clayton kershaw. >> reporter: pitcher and a hitter. >> translator: yeah, unlike me, kershaw is a lefty.
3:42 am
>> reporter: you feel a little of yourself in both kershaw and harper? >> translator: i actually do see myself, and i actually try throwing lefties sometimes. >> reporter: how do you think you would do against kershaw? >> translator: just thinking about facing him makes me really happy and excited. i can tell he's a great pitcher through the tv screen. >> reporter: how would you go against harper? >> translator: i would go with my best fastball. i would want to see how it does against one of the best hitters. >> reporter: likely quite well. consider this performance last summer. on the very first pitch of the game, otani batting leadoff, hit a home run. he then hit eight shutout innings and struck out ten
3:43 am
batters. at 6'4", the designated hitter turned pitcher, reliably brings the crowd to its feet. when he threw the fastest pitch, breaking his own record, even opponents looked on in astonishment. last year you threw a pitch 165 kilometers per hour, more than 102 miles per hour. how much faster can you throw than 102.5? >> translator: i don't have an exact answer for that, but i'm still young. i'm still 22. i think there's more room to grow. >> reporter: as seasons go, 2016 will be hard to top. the hokkaido nippon ham fighters took the japanese series. otani was the lead mvp. about that name, the fighters are owned by nippon ham, makers of japan's best-selling sausages. and while, yes, the name
3:44 am
resists serious treatment, the fan is the most innovative in the league. the manager groomed yu darvish. now an ace for the texas rangers. can you compare this to anything you've seen? >> translator: no. never seen anything like it. never. >> reporter: what's it like having a player who's your best pitcher and also your best hitter? >> translator: he's so talented. it's really tough to use him the right way. with the right balance. >> reporter: he's not money ball, the practice of using it baseball over intuition. try overseeing a two-way player. koriama's formula, he pitches him and bats him for the rest of the week. distractions are to be kept for a minimum. the same goes for praise. shohei may be the start of the team.
3:45 am
but he's not exactly coddled. >> translator: last year when we one the championship was the first time he gave me a compliment. and he said that was great pitching. >> reporter: never complimented you before that? >> translator: not once, he always says, you've got to get better. >> reporter: anchor -- and koriyama has his reasons. >> translator: i truly believe he's a lot better than where he's at right now. >> reporter: the crowd at the sapporo dome is less stingy with its praise. you don't get a lot of quiet time here, no peanuts and crackerjacks but plenty of the local beer. a college football atmosphere pervades. the caliber of play is considered one level below the major leagues in america. top japanese players like ichiro and matsui. aspire to compete against the
3:46 am
very best in the u.s. even otani sticks out. what's it like covering this guy? >> you talk about a guy who throws 101 and a guy who hits home runs, that's a comic book character. that's not somebody you're thinking about in real life. nobody does that. who does that? >> reporter: we hoped to leave the sapporo dome with otani, get to know the mortal behind the comic book character, but he politely declined our invitation, not even a quick captain kangaroo burger. so we invited a couple of his teammates. brandon laird and louis mendoza. mendoza pitched for the rangers and the royals. sapporo's not a bad place to be a guide. over dinner at their favorite spot in town, laird told us that otani is the most talented teammate he's ever had, this
3:47 am
from a guy who played with derrick jeter and alex rodriguez. >> some pitchers can hit, but i mean he actually does it in a game. like he's in our lineup. and that's impressive. >> watching him hit the ball, i mean, like cabrera, power, you know. >> reporter: he reminds you of cabrera? >> yeah. >> reporter: you guys been out with him? >> no, he doesn't really do anything. mellow kid, goes out to the gym. >> reporter: yes, the biggest star in japanese baseball, with a salary of a reported $2 million, without a car, he lives in this team dorm. he seldom leaves the facility, not that it doesn't keep fans from waiting for him outside. >> you can see the full report on our website, cbs news.com. the overnight news will be right back.
3:48 am
daughter: uh oh. monkey swimming. irreplaceable monkey protection. detergent alone doesn't kill bacteria, but adding new lysol laundry sanitizer kills 99.9% of bacteria with 0% bleach. daughter: uh oh. lysol. what it takes to protect. it's league night!? 'saved money on motorcycle insurance with geico! goin' up the country. bowl without me. frank.' i'm going to get nachos. snack bar's closed. gah! ah, ah ah. ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪
3:49 am
♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪ geico motorcycle, great rates for great rides. rise above joint discomfort with move free ultra's triple action joint support for improved mobility and flexibility, and 20% better comfort from one tiny, mighty pill... get move free ultra, and enjoy living well. do you think i'm gonna crack under pressure or conquer the field? defy expectations any day with always infinity. made with flexfoam. absorbs 10x its weight. rewrite the rules. always. with motionsense technology... degree has redefined deodorant so that i can redefine... power... footwork... range... the more i move, the more it works. degree. it won't let you down. ♪
3:50 am
lysol max cover kills 99.9% of bacteria, even on soft surfaces. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. the vatican museum has one of the greatest collections of art in all of the world. and for the first time in its long history, the museum is being run by a woman. her name is barbara yata, and she took seth doane for a tour. >> reporter: the vatican museums are so packed with treasures it can be hard to know where to look. there's a gallery of maps,
3:51 am
rafael's transfiguration. or this, augusto. >> it really is the icon of roman times. >> reporter: she has a degree in art history and studied this famed statue of emperor augustus, now, as director, barbara yata is in charge of it. some of the greatest artwork in the world is in your care. >> yes, yes. i feel the weight of that. >> reporter: the weight of that responsibility. >> exactly. >> reporter: in its collection, the vatican holds a mind-boggling, 200,000 pieces of art. only about 10% are on display finding a place to sit and chat is no problem.
3:52 am
what a place to do an interview. yata, a 20-year veteran of the vatican was surprised when pope francis announced she would be the museum's director. this mother of three was also surprised when people reacted to >> i make a joke of that, because everybody keeps asking me, how do you feel about that, how do you feel to be the woman. i feel a person. >> reporter: it is a male-dominated institution. >> i worked in the vatican for 20 years. after eight years, i became head of a department. >> reporter: she shrugs off any special attention. she's got work to do. >> the last two months of 2017, we had 70,000 people more than last year. >> reporter: the museum attracts more than 6 million visitors a year. we're going against the flow here. but it's a balance, trying to
3:53 am
attract more visitors while not diluting the experience. on the day we visited, she estimated crowd size. 19,000 people, 20,000 people today. is that typical? is that a lot? >> is a lot for this time of the year. >> reporter: yata plans to hire more guards so they can be open for longer hours. while the sistine chapel part of the museum is often full, we found plenty of space around other masterpieces, including "the nile." yata is working to get guides to encourage visitors to stop at lesser-known spots. there's also the issue of keeping so much art on display and in good shape. it takes a team of more than 150 people to work on constant maintenance and restoration. >> if you do make annual and daily preservation and conservation, you really do not need much restoration. >> reporter: what struck us is there's so much, it fills not just public spaces but private
3:54 am
passageways. even just in a small side room by the elevator, there's spectacular art. >> exactly. >> reporter: yes, near this back elevator, a bella robbia, famous for work with glazed terra-cotta, and in the director's office is her desk. >> it's a very nice desk. it has this coat of arms. so it was part of this collection, yes. >> reporter: a picture of her boss sits over her shoulder. it's a reminder that this is part of a greater mission. she believes art can act as a spiritual ambassador. >> of course i am catholic and i do believe that art takes you to faith. >> reporter: next up, the vatican museums will have some of its collection on display in china. yata says that is an effort to
3:55 am
build spiritual bridges in a place where ther
3:56 am
3:57 am
a lot of disabled americans rely on service animals to help them get through the day. well, these dogs are allowed to accompany their owners where other pets are banned, but some people are taking advantage of the system. don dahler has the story. >> reporter: a snowboarding accident in 2007 put christina slaven in a wheelchair, but it didn't take her off the mountain. >> i knew that it was not necessarily a life-altering injury. it was just a change. >> reporter: when she's not giving ski lessons to people with disabilities, you'll find her accompanied by her faithful lab and service dog, earl. >> earl does a lot of retrieving for me. when i lose my phone. he's actually very good at finding it. >> reporter: i could use him. like these puppies smothering our camera, earl was trained at
3:58 am
needs, a service dog industry leader for more than 40 years. jerry deroach is needs ceo. how many tasks do these dogs need to learn? >> we train them in about 50 different tasks, we train to open doors, to turn on lights, to retrieve objects. >> reporter: that's the major difference between trained service dogs and the mini imposters gaining access to the places that accommodate the disabled. you may have seen the cute chihuahua or occasional pig, posing as something more than the well-intentioned pet that they are. do you think fake service dogs can hurt the perception of real service dogs? >> i know that fake service dogs can hurt the public perception of trained service dogs. >> reporter: yes, training is difficult, but getting fake credentials to pretend your pet is qualified couldn't be easier.
3:59 am
within 24 hours of logging onto one website, we obtained a phony certificate and i.d. for my border collie, abbey. three days later, her uniform arrived, and without my having to show any proof of a disability. so what would you say to someone who is either doing this or thinking about doing this? >> i would say that i understand people's desire to have their dog with them. and they don't think it's a big deal, just as people park in handicap spots and they think it's not a big deal. >> reporter: a newly proposed law in massachusetts would make misrepresenting a service animal illegal. if passed, massachusetts would join 12 other states where it's already law, the toughest of which is in california, where a maximum penalty is $1,000 fine and six months in jail. can you imagine what your life would be like without him? >> i don't want to imagine what my life would be like without him. he makes my life worth living every single day. >> reporter: for cbs this morning, don dahler, princeton, massachusetts.
4:00 am
that's the overnight news captioning funded by cbs it's wednesday, april 12th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." the u.s. issues a warning to syria as the secretary of state makes a push to get russia to change sides. >> they have aligned themselves with an unreliable partner in bay bashir al assad. >> the comparison of hitler and sean spicer

127 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on