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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  April 27, 2017 3:10am-4:01am EDT

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mr. trump summoned all 100 u.s. senators to the white house to hear the latest on the threat posed by north korea's nuclear program. the president has not ruled out force, and david marten is following this. >> reporter: senators were bussed to the white house for a closed-door briefing by the president's top national security advisers with a cameo appearance by the commander in chief himself. senator chris koons is a democrat from delaware. >> it was a sobering briefing and just how much thought has gone into military actions if called for and a diplomatic strategy that strikes me as a clear eye. >> reporter: in open testimony before congress, admiral harry harris, head of the pacific command, laid out the stakes involved in north korea's
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nuclear weapons program. >> with every test kim jong un moves closer to his stated goal of a preemptive nuclear strike capability against american cities. >> reporter: north korea's 30-something dictator has already threatened to strike new york, washington, colorado and hawaii. for now, it's bluster, but he is working on nuclear weapons that would make it more than just talk. >> when he threatens the united states, that's one level, but when he threatens the united states with a capability of realizing that threat, that's a different place. >> reporter: a statement by the director of the national intelligence and secretary of state and secretary of defense said their aim is to use economic sanctions and diplomatic pressure to convince north korea to dismantle its nuclear program. behind the pressure lies the threat of u.s. military firepower on display in field exercises in south korea and a port visit by a nuclear-powered submarine. in a few days, the carrier "vinson" will be operating off the coast, and there's nothing north korea can do about it.
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>> if it flies, it will die if it flies against the strikers. >> reporter: the pentagon has drawn up plans for a preemptive strike, but only if sanctions and diplomatic pressure fail. as admiral harris put it, we want to bring kim jong un to his senses, not to his knees. >> our man t the pentagon, thank you. veteran news anchor, kelly wright of the fox news channel had an emotional news conference today. he explained why he joined about a dozen current and former minority employees in a discrimination suit against the network. >> 21st century fox ought to appropriately rename itself 18th century fox. >> reporter: in the latest lawsuit, minority employees accuse fox news of racial discrimination. among one, that they mocked the way she spoke and said that
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minority employees should engage in arm wrestling contests. including against some of their white, female supervisors. anchor and reporter, kelly wright. >> this hurts. >> reporter: he came forward after his colleagues sued. >> i thought, this is so pervasive. i've seen this before, and i was silent. i cannot be silent anymore. >> reporter: the development comes after former star host bill o'reilly was fired over sexual harassment allegations. the "new york times" reported that he settled several lawsuits. but in comments to pod cast listeners earlier this week, o'reilly said, >> i'm very confident that the truth will come out, and when it does, i don't know if you're going to be surprised, but i think you're going to be shaken, as i am. >> reporter: but former fox temporary employee, perquita burgess says he sexually harassed her, calling her "hot chocolate" says. >> i want him to apologize to everyone that he has harmed with
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his words, his actions. but there's no humility. there's no "i'm sorry." maybe if i had said something maybe he would not have gotten fired. >> reporter: an attorney for judith slater said these charges are solely aimed at generating headlines and poisoning potential jury pools and judges. fox news say they deny the claims and o'reilly has called the claims against him unfounded. >> anna werner at fox news headquarters in manhattan. a new cbs poll out tonight says president trump's job approval rating is 41%, as he nears the 100-day mark. that is lower than any president at this point going back to jimmy carter. tonight dimarco morgan is at texas a&m university where he asked young republicans to grade the president's performance.
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>> i give him a flat a. >> i give him an a. he followed through on a lot of his promises. >> not taking no for an answer and doing what he has done as much as he can. he's going to shove that, you know, down the opposition's throats. >> reporter: was there ever a moment in the first 100 days that made you cringe and say what did he just do? >> because i am a social media user and i think very carefully about how i put things out there, and i started to see our president putting things up at all hours of the night. that was a concern. >> i got nervous was the whole general flynn thing. that whole fiasco where it was like oh, my gosh, this is another watergate moment. we haven't even gotten into the first year of the presidency. >> reporter: general michael flynn was fired over communications with russian officials. the house oversight committee now says he may have broken the law by not disclosing payments by russian-linked businesses. what do you want to see
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president trump accomplish? >> we've seen with president obama there was a lot of trickle-down economics, things trickling down from washington, d.c. we don't want that. we don't want washington, d.c. telling us what to do. >> i feel like he's playing defense and damage control and there aren't enough people giving him the benefit of the doubt. and he's going to be president until 2020. it's going to take some people sitting down and saying, okay, we need to work with this man to advance america's best interests, because this is what we have right now. >> it's really important that our government focuses on opening up our economy and allowing students like us to get out there and find a job. >> so jobs, jobs, jobs. >> reporter: the economy was the reason they voted for mr. trump. the average student graduated from college with just over $37,000 in loan debt, that's 60% more than in 2008. >> dimarco morgan as we continue
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to listen to the voters. thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. birthday. so i mowed the lawn, put up all the decorations. i thought i got everything. almost everything! you know, 1 in 10 houses could get hit by a septic disaster, and a bill of up to $13,000. but for only $7 a month, rid-x is scientifically proven to break down waste, helping you avoid a septic disaster. rid-x. the #1 brand used by septic professionals in their own tanks. it says you apply the blue one ok, letto me. this. here? no. have a little fun together, or a lot. k-y yours and mine.
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two kids barfed in class today. it was so gross. lysol disinfectant spray kills 99.9% of bacteria, even those that cause stomach bugs. one more way you've got what it takes to protect. it sure looked like an amphibious assault today on the beaches of southern california, as marines tested the future of warfare. carter evans is at camp pendleton. >> reporter: the first wave in the war of the future could begin with armed robots.
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and drones that deliver bombs and supplies before the boots ever hit the beach. and corporal edmond kennedy is happy to let machines lead the way. >> better to have this thing be the first on the beach than you. >> absolutely, sir. i don't like being shot at, and i doesn't think any marine likes being shot at. if this can take the brunt of the assault, that's a good idea. >> reporter: it's a simulated assault that includes swarming underwater drones, surreptitiously mapping out the shore line. >> now even a primitive adversary like isis is flying uavs with explosive charges on them. >> reporter: so the pressure's on. >> the pressure's on. >> reporter: but so much faith in autonomous devices raises concerns of hacking. >> their is being designed with the cyber in mind. >> we have to be able to hack his network while presenting our own. >> reporter: the first of its kind task force is exploring new
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inventions like this speed boat that turns into a submarine and a lethal, unmanned jet ski. navy captain chris mercer. this feels like an electronics show for the navy and marines. >> yes, very much so. except in this case the judges are the marines and sailors. >> reporter: can a lance corporal come up and say i don't like this. i think you should change it. >> they already have. >> reporter: much of the equipment is operated by remote control and is almost like playing a video game. corporal kennedy agrees did you ever think you could bring those video game skills to the job? >> not in a million years. my mother told me it was a waste of time. but, look at me now, mom. >> reporter: ultimately they hope to use what they've learned about equipment like this to decide what they want to deploy on a large scale, and they plan to bring it from here at the beach to the battlefield at silicon valley speed. >> carter evans with the a look into the future.
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even with four rabbit's feet, a united airlines passenger runs out of luck. ialmost everything. you know, ke 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x. this clean was like pow! everything well? my teeth are glowing. they are so white. step 1 cleans. step 2 whitens. crest [hd]. 6x cleaning*, 6x whitening*á
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last night in st. louis with the score tied at two in the everseverso seventh, chris coghlan. dove head first. throw got there first, so he dove head first. the catcher had no idea what happened. but the replay shows coghlan safe. more trouble for united airlines. meet simon, the continental rabbit. they grow very large. this is simon's dad, a record 4'3", with their breeder. she says that simon, just ten months old was fit as a fiddle when she put him on a united flight in london. but shortly after the flight landed in chicago, simon died in a united-run pet facility. united is investigating how the rabbit went from o'hare to eternity. up next, we'll remember film maker jonathan demme. this portion is sponsored by
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oscar-winning director, jonathan demme died today in his manhattan apartment from esophageal cancer. he was 73. demme once said he was guided by enthusiasm. his lens was panoramic. from horror and drama to comedy and concert films.
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here's anthony mayson >> reporter: when serial killer hannibal lecter faced off in "silence of the lambs", director jonathan demme lingered on the close ups. >> i ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice chianti. >> reporter: it swept all five academy awards and won demme his oscar for best director. it was his first blockbuster, but he would follow it with another. >> you were aware when you worked with melissa benedict that she had aids, is that correct? >> reporter: philadelphia starred tom hanks about the aids crisis. demme told charlie rose in 1998. >> i've always been really excited by their potential as movies and a belief that if we can make a movie that winds up exciting other people as much as the potential of it excites me, maybe it will be contagious. >> reporter: roger coreman gave
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him his first job "caged heat." in 1974. as a director, he jumped easily between genres. from drama to satire to documentaries. ♪ stop making sense, his 1984 concert film of the band "talking heads" is considered a classic. music was my first love, movies came second, jonathan demme once said. he credited the advice roger coreman gave him. never forget what is the primary organ is for the moviegoer. it's the eye. you must keep the eye interested. anthony mason, seebcbs news, ne york. that's the overnight news for this thursday.
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for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley. this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news, i'm don dahler. president trump unveiled his plan to overhaul the united states tax code, and it's getting muted praise from republican leaders on capitol hill. the white house calls it the biggest tax cut in history, but critics say the devil is in the details, and the president's plan is short on those. major garrett reports. >> reporter: president trump's plan calls for big corporate and personal tax cuts but lacked basic details. the president wants to replace the current seven brackets with three, with rates of 10%, 25% and 35%. his proposal, however, did not give income levels for those brackets. white house economic designer, gary cone. >> do you have income brackets?
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established that you're going to be proposing to congress? >> we're holding a bunch of listening groups right now. we have outlines. we have a broad brush view of where they're going to be. >> reporter: there were some details, eliminate the estate tax and alternative minimum tax. and on the business side, lower the corporate tax rate from 35% to 15%. but taxes are about specifics. cone and steve mnuchin came with precious few. >> we will be back here with very firm details. >> when we have an agreement, we will release the details. >> we will let you know the specific details at the appropriate moment. >> reporter: and they had no projections as to what the plan would do to the nation's deficit and debt. >> this will pay for itself with growth and reduce reduction of different deductions and closing loopholes. >> reporter: the nonpartisan
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committee called the promise magic beans and warned there is no golden goose at the top of the tax cut beanstalk. just mountains of debt. mnuchin was also asked if the president will release his tax returns so the country could judge what his tax plan will do for his bottom line. >> the president has no intention. the president has released plenty of information. >> reporter: mnuchin today confused the annual federal deficit, about $600 billion with the national debt held by the public. that stands at nearly $15 trillion, scott, that's a common mistake for budget amateurs but not budget secretaries, even a newly-minted one. president trump summoned all 100 senators to the white house for a closed-door briefing on north korea. tensions are running high, ahead of an expected nuclear test. david martin has that. >> reporter: senators were bussed to the white house for a closed-door briefing by the national security adviser with a
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cameo appearance by the commander in chief himself. senator coons from delaware. in open testimony before senator coons is from delaware. >> a diplomatic strategy that strikes me as a clear eye. >> reporter: in open testimony before congress, harry harris laid out the stakes involved. >> with every test, kim jong un moves closer to his goal of a nuclear-strike capability against american cities. >> reporter: north korea's 30-something dictator has already threatened to strike new york, washington, colorado and hawaii. for now, it's bluster, but he is working on long-range weapons that would make it more than just talk. >> when he threatens the united states, that's one level, but when he threatens the united states with a capability of realizing that threat, that's a different place. >> reporter: a statement by the
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director of national intelligence, secretary of state and secretary of defense said their aim is to use economic sanctions and diplomatic pressure to convince north korea to dismantle its nuclear program. behind the pressure lies the threat of u.s. military firepower. on display in field exercises in south korea and a port visit by a nuclear-powered submarine. in a few days, the carrier "vinson" will be operating off the coast, and there's nothing north korea can do about it. >> if it flies it will die if it's flying against the coalition strikers. >> reporter: the pentagon has drawn up plans for a preemptive strike but only if diplomatic pressure and sanctions fail, as harris put it, we want to bring kim jong un to his senses, not to his knees. the next generation of warfare went on display in camp pendleton, in california. u.s. marines are taking part in an advanced technology
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exercising. they're simulating naval assaults using the latest high-tech weaponry. carter evans is there. >> reporter: this is just some of the new hardware the marines are testing out. these are autonomous vehicles. they've both got machine guns mounted to them. this is a drone with a very high-tech camera. what's so special about that? it can actually see in the dark. it's an infrared camera. it reads heat signatures. that gives commanders the ability to make smart decisions before they put marines on the beach. on the sand. in the air. and in the water. the marines here at camp pendleton are training for the next generation of warfare. >> throughout my entire career, maritime supremacy was guaranteed. air supremacy was guaranteed. now even a primitive adversary like isis is flying uavs. with explosive charges on them. >> reporter: so the pressure's on. >> the pressure's on.
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>> reporter: colonel sullivan is trying to put new high-tech tools in the hands of his marines, to unmanned robots mounted with machine guns. >> the unique thing here is having the actual scientists and engineers in the field for two weeks, evaluating a host of technologies. >> reporter: this week's exercise brings together more than 100 pieces of advanced technology and lets marines work with them in simulated amphibious assault scenarios. but putting so much faith in autonomous devices raises concerns over hacking. >> this is being designed with the cyber threat in mind. >> reporter: if there's no cyber security, it's no good. >> i think that's quickly becoming our center of gravity, defending our network. >> reporter: the technology was designed by both military and civilian innovators, but not all of it was originally intended
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for the battlefield. so just climb in? the hyper sub is a speedboat that turns into a submarine. >> wow, this is really cool. >> reporter: if it sounds like a kid's james bond fantasy, that's exactly how it started out for the inventor, reynolds marion. >> i thought it would be a good idea to have a cool speedboat that could dive when you wanted to dive. >> reporter: from youthful minds, these creations are in the hands of young warriors. you have all this top brass asking you what do you think? >> yes, sir. that's a change of pace. >> reporter: he's one of the marines participating in the exercise. and for him, a lot of the technology feels familiar. >> it's almost like being at home playing a video game. >> reporter: did you ever think you would be able to bring those video gaming skills to the job? >> not in a million years. my mother told me it was a waste of time. but look at me now, mom. >> reporter: now the marines are going to take what they learn here, narrow it down and decide what they may want to purchase for future deployment, and they promise that will happen fast. think silicon valley speed and
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there are new signs that congress will reach an agreement on a spending plan that avoids a partial government shutdown. negotiations got moving once president trump pulled back his demand for a down payment on that wall along the mexico border. mexico's foreign minister said building that barrier would be an unfriendly, hostile act that wouldn't accomplish anything. and our neighbor is considering retaliation, such as new visa requirements and a fee for crossing into mexico. some citizens who live along the border are opposed to the wall. david begnaud has their story from brownsville, texas. >> reporter: this golf course has, in the past, been a runway for people coming here illegally. from the other side, that's mexico, they would swim across the rio grande, run up the golf course and into this cane right here, hiding themselves or their
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drugs. but the golf course's owner has started to cut down the cane and with it the number of people coming illegally has dropped. now president trump's new wall may help, however, it would divide 700 americans who live right here in this community. with more than 300 acres, the river bend resort is one of the few areas left in brownsville, texas without a border fence. many of the retirees who live here want to keep it that way. >> it's not needed. border patrol's in here all the time. they launch their boat at our boat ramp and are here within 30 seconds. >> reporter: they voted for president trump. they think the money for the wall would be better spent on resources for border agents. >> they need updated technology equipment, better cameras. maybe some more drones. >> reporter: a treaty with mexico prohibits anything that could obstruct or deflect the rio grande, so when the bush administration wanted to build
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border fence, it wanted to do it right in the middle of river bend. if the trump administration follows through, it splits the resort community in half. and you have 200 people living on this side and 400 of their friends on what becomes the mexican side of the wall. that would mean 70% of the resort and 15 holes would be on no man's land between the fence and the border. jeremy bernard is another trump supporter. he's also river bend's general manager. >> we have 30,000 golfers a year. you going to give 30,000 golfers an access code? >> reporter: john garrett owns j.t. construction, a ft. worth company with 50 employees. he's submitting his border wall proposal today. >> it's going to create a lot of jobs for unemployed construction workers, veterans, individuals. >> reporter: the trump administration is seeking bids for prototypes with a
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see-through component, and made with concrete or other materials. >> we never talk about all the people who die trying to make it across to the united states illegally. so i think it will save a lot of lives also. >> reporter: the federal government controls less than a third of the border. the rest belongs to the states, native-american tribes or private clubs like river bend. they could offer you an amount and if you don't like it, they could seize it through imminent domain. you know that. >> i do. >> reporter: i get the sense that you're ready to fight. >> if that happens, we are ready to make sure we are compensated fairly. >> reporter: he says the price tag would be in the millions. and he doubts they would want to pay that. some may be sitting at home thinking sarcastically, these poor rich golfers might lose their course. they are middle class folks, retirees, many who have moved up from the north and retired here. and almost everyone we spoke to says it would be a negative effect.
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economically. the florida manatee has made a big come back. manatees were recently taken off the endangered species list. now they're listed as threatened. that's got some manatee lovers up in arms. they say it will roll back some protections the animals need from their biggest threat, human boaters. marc straussman has the story. in the lowry park zoo in tampa. >> reporter: this tank is part of the manatee hospital here. the two manatees in it both needed critical care after they were hit by boats. the vets here heal them, but first they often have to just try to keep them alive. the larger debate here is whether manatees should still be classified and protected as an endangered species. florida manatees are gentle giants. 10-12 feet long, averaging 1300 pounds e grazing slowly on plants in shallow waters along the state's coast. >> what i'm looking for now is
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any movement in the water. >> reporter: mike dunn helped us find a handful of them. it took him ten minutes, because they swim right behind his house in crystal river, florida, where his charter boat takes out tourists. >> i really do care about them. they're a great, gentle creature. they remind me of the volkswagen in the early '60s. it was really ugly, but everybody fell in love with them. manatees are the same thing. >> reporter: propellers gash, gouge and maim hundreds of them. bigger boats cut them in half. ray ball is the senior vet at lowry's zoo. this zoo treats wounded manatees and last year set a record. >> we admitted 37 manatees. the majority of those were due to boat strike. sometimes the injuries are quite catastrophic. >> reporter: in 1967, florida manatees were listed by the federal government as an endangered species. at that time, roughly 600 were
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alive. since then, their population as spiked to about 6600. enough progress that last month they were reclassified as threatened. >> the animals were out here being killed, kind of one after another. >> reporter: pat rose should be celebrating the reclassification, right? he's not. this aquatic biologist is also executive director of the non-profit "save the manatee" club. why is the reclassification likely to hurt rather than help? >> it can hurt if it's not scientifically and legally justified. so then you start to pull back protections, which they say they are not going to do. but we know there are user groups that want the laws reduced, and they want to be able to run their boats faster. >> reporter: as a practical matter, what difference does it make? >> the amount of money that goes in to protecting endangered species is more than what goes into protected species.
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>> reporter: as the manatee herd here as grown over the last four decades, florida's human population has also boomed. mike dunn's on the water nearly every day, protecting manatees from his other neighbors, the ones in boats. will you shout at another boater if he's not doing it right? >> i have no problem shouting at somebody. they're always in the wrong spot. >> reporter: going too fast. >> going too fast. if you hit a manatee, please call it in. we might be able to find him and save him. >> reporter: many manatees are hit repeatedly by boats. experts estimate that 80% of manatees will be hit at least once. something else to consider. these manatees both are doing well. experts here have high hopes they can be riri leasereleased wild. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x.
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no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. president trump's top advisers will meet later today at the white house to discuss his plan to pull the united states out of the paris accord on climate change. the president has questioned whether global temperatures are actually rising and has denied that human activities have played a role. scientists use a lot of high-tech gear to measure how the earth is warming. john blackstone took a trip high into the colorado rockies to visit a hermit who's spent decades measuring snowfall the old-fashioned way. >> all right, give this a try. >> all right. ♪
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>> reporter: how far is it from here? >> about three miles. >> reporter: this is spectacular scenery. >> that mountain right in front of us. >> reporter: old mining town? >> old mining town, old silver mining town. >> reporter: a springtime visit to billy barr's place is no simple journey. to avoid a three-mile cross country ski from the nearest paved road you need a permit, and then you hit a ride like ours. courtesy of dave ox. >> borderline wilderness here. >> reporter: but it's all worth it when you discover this remote cabin deep in the woods. >> a snow cave here. >> reporter: is home to one of the world's most valuable and unexpected troves of data.
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hey, billy! john blackstone, cbs news. >> good to meet you. >> reporter: what a spectacular spot you have here. >> i came out late may '72. it was such a mental relief to have peace and quiet in my life. >> reporter: and it was a shack. >> oh, it was a shack. i mean, it was 8 by 10 feet. the wind would literally blow snow through the cracks. >> reporter: you came for solitude but you started to get a little bored. >> a little bit, but a lot of it was making my own activity. >> reporter: so you'd go out and measure the snow. >> twice a day. i would first get a ruler and stick it in the snow and measure how much new snow there was. >> reporter: it wasn't just the snow depth and when it melted. using a hand-operated system he built himself. >> what it does is converts the weight of this can and the snow in it into the equivalent of water. >> reporter: he also calculated how much groundwater that snow would produce when it melted. you've been doing that same thing since 1974. >> twice a day. twice a day.
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>> reporter: twice a day in this place. when that wasn't enough to keep billy busy he started tracking wildlife. so when you saw birds and animals -- >> i write it down, absolutely. precipitation, birds, mammals. >> reporter: and recorded it all by hand in a series of now-tattered notebooks. >> .09 inches of water. >> reporter: you've got to be a little obsessive, though. >> oh, yeah. >> those notebooks are historic now. >> reporter: in the early '90s, a scientist from the nearby laboratory needed data for his research on wildflowers. he had heard about billy's notebooks but was shocked when he saw how comprehensive think were. >> i said billy that is relevant to how the animals are responding to the changing climate. >> reporter: when you started taking your measurements, did you have any idea they would have any kind of long-term significance? >> not at all. this was mid '70s, early, mid '70s.
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if you would have asked about climate change, i would have said yeah, it got warm, i took my sweateder off. it meant nothing to my. >> reporter: but it means a lot to the scientific community. which has published his numbers in dozens of scientific papers. >> one of these days i'll read them. i wasn't out to prove anything. i was just recording the numbers. this winter we had 21 record highs. last winter, 17, the winter before 36. >> reporter: billy is concerned by what his numbers show. temperatures are rising and snow is melting earlier each year. >> it's worrisome, obviously. it's not a good trend. where we lose water storage, will drought increase? will floods and famine increase? >> reporter: but billy leaves the answers to big questions like those to others. he's content to do his part, head out into the wilderness where there's an infinite amount of data, waiting to be collected. ♪
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john blackstone, gothic, colorado. ng pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-cbs caption t! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 67890 cbs caption test !!! maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 maint. testing pc-17 f1 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 12345 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 678 it's ryan's cell phone. gibbs: isolate calls from psy-ops, government-issued lines. there's five or six different numbers here.
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cross-reference with incoming calls to banks
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foreign ministers from the eight nations who make up the so-called arctic council will meet next month in alaska, and at the top of the agenda, climate change. a new study shows the arctic is warming faster than any other region on earth, and it's disrupting weather patterns across the globe. president trump is threatening to withdraw from the paris agreement on climate change. and climatologists just say that will make things worse. barry petersen reports from the north slope of alaska. >> reporter: with temperatures soaring this last winter to 50 degrees above normal, the area around the north pole is melting and the arctic sea ice is shrinking at a rate never seen before. >> we're talking about something that's going to happen in the next decade.
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>> reporter: jeremy mathis is director of arctic research for noaa. >> the arctic is warming twice as fast as other parts of the planet. >> reporter: we met mathis at the farthest-northern city in alaska in the united states. where noaa has a post monitoring the sea ice. the ice is thinning. it used to be nine feet thick in some areas. now it's mother -- more like three. why do i care about what's happening out there? >> we care about the arctic, because it has connections to the entire northern hemisphere, to people down in the lower 48 states. >> reporter: the warming arctic is causing the jet stream to wobble across america, helping spawn massive weather events. and, as america's weather becomes more destructive, early warnings become more critical. but scientists may lose their vital tools like climate
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monitoring satellites, targeted by the trump administration. nick mulvaney is the administration's budget director. >> as to climate change, we're not spending money on that anymore. we consider that to be a waste of your money. >> reporter: john walsh is chief scientist at the international research center in fairbanks. >> we're ignoring threats to the well-being of future generations. >> reporter: in alaska, warmer temperatures are melting the permafrost. villages are literally disappearing, and scientists say alaska today is fair warning of the climate change future for the rest of america. barry peterson, alaska. and that's overnight news for this thursday. for some of you the news continues, for others, check back a little later for the morning news and of course cbs this morning.
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captioning funded by cbs it's thursday, april 27th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." reneging on nafta. in a late night surprise president trump walks back on another campaign promise keeping something he called -- >> it's a disaster. >> long awaited, short on specifics. a look at the trump administration's single page tax reform and the mixed reviews it's getting from both sides of the aisle. plus united issues another policy and other policy ces

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