Skip to main content

tv   CBS Weekend News  CBS  July 23, 2017 6:00pm-6:31pm EDT

6:00 pm
captioning sponsored by cbs >> quijano: plugging white house leaks. the president's new communications director threatens to take drastic action to stop secrets from being spilled through the cracks. >> you're going to keep leaking, i'm going to fire everybody. >> quijano: also tonight a human trafficking tragedy, at least nine people are dead. they were found inside the back of a sweltering tractor trailer. a high stakes showdown in kentucky. will it become the nation's first state without an abortion clinic? and why are people lining up to get inside this italian prison? would you believe it's the food? >> how was it to have all of theetion folks here tonight? >> libero. >> freedom? this is the "cbs weekend news."
6:01 pm
>> quijano: good evening, i'm elaine quijano reporting tonight from washington d.c. it was a busy sunday for president trump's new communications director anthony scaramucci. he made the rounds on the morning programs threatening to take drastic action to stop leaks to the press. the president's new messenger hired friday also fielded questions about mr. trump's son in law and senior advisor jared kushner. he has meetings this week with congressional intel gengs committees investigating the trump campaign's relations with russia. errol barnett is at the white house. >> if are you going to keep leaking, i'm going to fire everybody. >> is very buynary. >> reporter: president trump's new communications director anthony scaramucci hit the airwaves today promising to forcefully stop leaks and put the administration back on message. >> if the president operates off the balls of his feet, is he an aggressive guy, st the reason why he won the presidenciment and so we're going to come up with a strategy that is going to knock pem's socks off. >> he also acknowledged mr. trump has privately
6:02 pm
discussed presidential pardons. but said they won't be necessary. >> he has done absolutely nothing wrong. there's no need for him to pardon anybody. >> reporter: the president's family and associates are facing increasing scrutiny as part of multiple investigations into potential collusion with russia during the election. former campaign manager paul manafort, son donald trump, jr. plus senior advisor and son in law jared kushner have all agreed to answer questions from congress. >> there there's a great men questions for mr. kushner. >> reporter: and ranking democrat on the house intelligence committee adam schiff wonders why the president told "the new york times" it would be a violation if the special counsel looked into his finances. >> the president is clearly worried that bob mueller is going to be looking into allegations, for example, that the russians may have laundered money through the trump organization. that is really something, in my opinion, he needs to look at. >> reporter: republican senator susan kol ins. >>-- collins. >> i understand how difficult
6:03 pm
and frustrating this investigation is for the president. but he should not say anything further about the special counsel, his staff or the investigation. >> reporter: on the legislative front congress has agreed to pass a sweeping sanctions bill against russia for its role in election interference and the annexation of crimea. the bill would also require congressional approval for president trump to lift or ease sanctions. today the white house sent conflicting messages on whether the president intends to sign that bill. >> elaine? >> thanks, errol. let's bring in our chief washington correspondent and "face the nation" host john dickerson. so john, what do we know about anthony scaramucci's approach to his new role? >> well, it's to be publicly a warrior for the president and to say that really nothing needs to be changed. and then to change some things. and he clearly is just a booster for the president, that's part of what his role was in conversation. and i think then the real
6:04 pm
question will be will he amplify the president's voice already pretty amplified in this presidency or will he take those moments where the president has interrupted his own agenda and keep the president from doing so. a lot of people have tried. we'll see if the new communications director will do it. >> quijano: the president's son in law jared kushner speaks with house and senate intelligence committee this week. dn ald trump, jr. and the president's former campaign chairman paul manafort are speaking to senate investigators as well. what is at stake in those appearances. >> well, what is at stake is the big and the little, so the big is obviously any new information related to any connections with russians trying to interfere in the election f anything comes out along those line this is obviously a huge blow. the question is whether it will stay behind closed doors or whether it will leak. but in the little, what i mean is there have been-- lots of different stories on some of these thing, at least four about that meeting of someone advertised as a russian government agent with the president's son. if there is a fifth version, or there is a sixth version, then
6:05 pm
it goes to what is already a pretty damaged credibility on the part of the president and his entire campaign, always new conversation kind of drib elling out it may not be the big information but it lends to this notion of really a lack of credibility. and that hurts the entire administration not just on this investigation but on everything else they are trying to do. >> quijano: john dickerson, thanks so much. >> sure. >> quijano: officials made a horrific discovery overnight in a wal-mart parking lot in san antonio, texas. eight people dead in the back of a sweltering truck. the victims of a human trafficking traj-- tragedy. at least one other person died at the hospital. mark strassmann is at the scene. >> reporter: shortly after midnight a wal-mart employee called 911 after someone approached him in the parking lot and asked for water. fire chief charles hood said inside a semitruck parked behind the store san antonio paramedics found several dozen overheated people in crisis. >> we have eight patient that were deceased.
6:06 pm
we had another 20 patients that were either in extremely critical condition or very serious condition. and they've been transported to a-- tpted to a number of hospitals. >> temperatures had climbed well above 100 degrees. no air conditioning, no water. everyone alive inside had a heart rate above 130 beats per minute. >> they were very hot to the touch. so these people were in that trailer without any type of water. so you are looking at a lot of heat stroke, a lot of dehydration. >> reporter: in a statement u.s. attorney durbin called an an alien smuggling situation gone horribly wrong all victims of ruthless human smugglers indifferent to the well-being of their human cargo. homeland security investigated at least 2,000 smuggling incidents in 2016 resulting in more than 1500 criminal convictions. the truck driver has been arrested and will face federal charges. police chief william mcmanus
6:07 pm
says cars picked up some peel inside the trailer before authorities arrived. others escaped into a forested area nearby. >> anybody who sees anything like this, people being transferred out of the back of a trailer or being transferred from some vehicle to another vehicle, then they need to call 911. >> reporter: 17 dehydrated people went to local hospitals in a life-threatening condition. elaine, police are looking for more suspects by studying wal-mart surveillance tapes. they show cars picking up people at the truck before paramedics arrived. >> quijano: mark strassmann, thanks. a high stakes showdown sunday way in kentucky. a christian fundamentalist group is trying to close the state's last abortion dlinnic-- clinic. anna werner is there. >> reporter: elaine, this spot in downtown kentucky has become the center of the abortion debate in the united states because if this clinic closes, that would mean that kentucky would be the first state in the country without an abortion
6:08 pm
provider in a nation where abortion is legal. kentucky's governor is openly antiabortion and state law requires abortion clinics to be licensed and have a relationship with a hospital for emergencies. it's a standard the clinic says it has met for years but in march, the state said there were defish sees and threatened the yank the clinic's license. with no license, it would close. the aclu sued on the clinic's behalf. a trial is scheduled on that question for september. but abortion protestors aren't waiting. this week they're beginning a campaign against the clinic, its doctors and others and plan to pick et the clink and other locations including the doctor's home. new back in may some 19 people were arrested for trying to block access preventing patients from getting too this clinic. so now a federal judge has ordered that there be a buffer zone around the entrance to the clinic, and that's where a lot of the tension might take place here. it's basically that black and yellow tape going around the entrance to the clinic.
6:09 pm
there's going to be a hearing tomorrow on how long that buffer zone will remain here, elaine? >> quijano: anna werner, thanks. severe downpours triggered flash floods in northern kentucky saturday night. the rushing water left a pile of vehicles in the town of maysville. no one was hurt. more than a dozen people had to be rescued from flooded homes and cars. >> firefighters from across boston battled an eight alarm fire early today in waltham, massachusetts. an apartment complex under construction went up in flames. officials say there were several explosions. five buildings collapsed. there were no injuries. the cause is under investigation. >> it's been an extremely busy wildfire season in the west. more than four and a half million acres have burned in the u.s. so far this year. that is up nearly 60% from last year when 2.8 million acres were destroyed by late july. more fires broke out this weekend. here's mireya villarreal.
6:10 pm
>> reporter: firefighters pulled water lines into backyards and launched an aerial assault to protect homes from fast moving flames in highland, california. >> it started. >> reporter: homeowners hosed down their property as the blaze rolled down the foothills of the san bernardino mountains. >> there he goes making that drop. >> reporter: it's at least a third fire to target this area east of los angeles in the last month. several wildfires erupted across the west on saturday. including one in washington and another in colorado. back in california we hiked along with chief ken kremensky and his firefighters on the front lines of the detwiler fire which devoured at least 76,000 acres. >> this is still an important part of fighting the fire, even though you don't see flames around. >> right, exactly, it's a real important part. big gust of wind and it ignites on the other side in the green and it can start up and continue to race on. >> reporter: evacuation orders were recently lifted in the town
6:11 pm
of mariposa allowing some people to return home. >> i mean i am at a loss for words for the firefighters, i can't express enough gratitude. >> reporter: but the detwiler fire destroyed 60 homes close to yosemite park. >> it certainly is an unpredictable season. and it's hard to say exactly what will happen. this is the start of our first big one. and we in past years have always had something near yosemite, in yosemite, around yosemite, and it's just a very unpredictable thing. >> reporter: picturesque parts of the park have been blurred by heavy smoke. a lingering reminder of how devastating these fires can be. mireya villarreal, cbs news, mariposa, california. >> quijano: an icon of the political crisis in venezuala was injured this weekend during a violent protest in caracas. willy ar-- arteaga has become famous for flaying the violin as
6:12 pm
thousands take to the street against president nicolas maduro. he was hit in the face by shrapnel yesterday. he vows to return to the protest. about 100 people have been killed in the unrest since april. protestors accuse maduro of turning the country into a dictatorship and ruining the economy. >> coming up, american boots back on the ground in one of the most dangerous parts of afghanistan.
6:13 pm
6:14 pm
6:15 pm
>> quijano: the u.s. military is investigating an air strike that accidentally killed at least a dozen afghan police friday in helmand province. the area in southern afghanistan is now controlled by the taliban. u.s. marines recently returned there after several years to help drive them out. charlie d'agata visited the troops. >> reporter: the last time u.s. marines were here, a force of 20,000 all but drove the taliban out of their stronghold in helmand province.
6:16 pm
back then big deer general roger turner was a colonel. did you think you would be back here? >> no, i didn't. i didn't realliment i left here, as we discussed, i left here in 2012 and we knew that the mission was going to end in 2014. so i didn't think i would be back here. >> reporter: this time his mission is dramically different, in command of just 300 marines training afghans to fight for themselves. we joined them as they flew over what is once again taliban-held territory. >> because not long after the marines pulled out, the taliban swept through helmand recapturing territory, u.s. forces fought and died for. with 349 american lives lost. >> this was one of my positions. >> reporter: we can't give the location but this used to be a u.s. marine base. how hard of a fight do you think this is going to be. >> that fight will now be lead by afghan brigadier general wali
6:17 pm
mohammed ahmedzai who stressed the urgent need for increased american support to defeat the taliban. >> this war is not just ours, he said. it's a war against international terrorism. we need america's advanced technology and more forces to fight. but general turner said the marines role is simply to train, advise and assist, with priority to get afghans to do the fighting. >> i don't know that having marines moving right behind them is something we really need to do. >> reporter: recapturing and holding on to taliban-held territory is a task afghan forces must take on themselves. eventually on their own. the afghans are making progress. this week they captured a strategic town near the provincial capitol with the help of u.s. forces. the question now is whether they can hold on to it and for how long. charlie d'agata, cbs news,
6:18 pm
kabul, afghanistan. >> quijano: still ahead, prison food redefined. we'll visit a high-end restaurant inside an italian lockup. ♪ ♪ we danced in a german dance group. i wore lederhosen.man. when i first got on ancestry i was really surprised that i wasn't finding all of these germans in my tree. i decided to have my dna tested through ancestry dna. the big surprise was we're not german at all. 52% of my dna comes from scotland and ireland.
6:19 pm
so, i traded in my lederhosen for a kilt. ancestry has many paths to discovering your story. get started for free at ancestry.com. even if you're trying your best.be a daily struggle, along with diet and exercise, once-daily toujeo® may help you control your blood sugar. get into a daily groove. ♪ let's groove tonight. ♪ share the spice of life. ♪ baby, slice it right. from the makers of lantus®, ♪ we're gonna groove tonight. toujeo® provides blood sugar-lowering activity for 24 hours and beyond, proven blood sugar control all day and all night, and significant a1c reduction. toujeo® is used to control high blood sugar in adults with diabetes. it contains 3 times as much insulin in 1 milliliter as standard insulin. don't use toujeo® to treat diabetic ketoacidosis, during episodes of low blood sugar or if you're allergic to insulin. get medical help right away if you have a serious allergic reaction such as body rash or trouble breathing.
6:20 pm
don't reuse needles or share insulin pens. the most common side effect is low blood sugar, which can be life threatening. it may cause shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. check your blood sugar levels daily. injection site reactions may occur. don't change your dose of insulin without talking to your doctor. tell your doctor about all your medicines and medical conditions. check insulin label each time you inject. taking tzds with insulins, like toujeo®, may cause heart failure that can lead to death. find your rhythm and keep on grooving. ♪ let's groove tonight. ask your doctor about toujeo®. ♪ share the spice of life. >> quijano: we take you now to a unique italian restaurant in the rolling hills of tuscany,
6:21 pm
located inside a prison and meals are served by those who are serving time. seth doane checked it out. >> reporter: in a 13th sercht ree century fortress on the hill top of a tuscan town, preparations were under way for a rather unlikely dinner. armed guards kept watch above. as the apertivo was laid out in the courtyard. and as ross rosario campagna served prosecco, he is also serving a 21 year sentence for murder. >> how was it to have all of these folks here tonight. >> libero. >> freedom? >> yep, the fortezza medicea is a prison in slol ter-- volterra, italy. it's home to some of the country's most hardened criminals. and on eight nights a year it is host to a dinner where the prisoners do all the work. it is designed to raise money for charity, build skills and
6:22 pm
give inmates the chance to interact with those on the outside. in the kitchen these criminals who admit they've made bad choices in the past are more focused on the future, or at least the next few hours. the past as what thrown into the pot at about 20 minutes to 10. this is italy, after all. >> a desoun po caldo, po caldo, no. and then it is mixed way delicate parsely sauce. buono, bruino. >> life for fran she is coin for aggravated murder. >> this is where we are so this is where we must grow, he said it is like a plant, it grows where it's planted. >> come il cibo. >> the food got good reviews but the real draw was the novel tee. >> how is it to be having dinner inside a prison? >> very strange. we don't know, we come and we
6:23 pm
come back. >> joking aside, by the end of dinner curiosity had given way to a connection. ♪. >> and for a moment inside this prison, the walls seemed to disappear. seth doane, cbs news, volterra, hit lee. >> quijano: up next, a whale of a comeback. humpbacks are now a common sight in the waters off new york city whrang keeping me from the people, places, and things i love. the people i love have always been there for me. and now, i'm there for them, too. talk to your doctor, and call 844-214-2424 to learn more. but prevagen helps your brain with an ingredient
6:24 pm
originally discovered... in jellyfish. in clinical trials, prevagen has been shown to improve short-term memory. prevagen. the name to remember. essential for him, but maybe not for people with rheumatoid arthritis. because there are options. like an "unjection™". xeljanz xr. a once daily pill for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz xr can reduce pain, swelling and joint damage,
6:25 pm
even without methotrexate. xeljanz xr can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections, lymphoma and other cancers have happened. don't start xeljanz xr if you have an infection. tears in the stomach or intestines, low blood cell counts and higher liver tests and cholesterol levels have happened. your doctor should perform blood tests before you start and while taking xeljanz xr, and monitor certain liver tests. tell your doctor if you were in a region where fungal infections are common and if you have had tb, hepatitis b or c, or are prone to infections. needles. fine for some. but for you, one pill a day may provide symptom relief. ask your doctor about xeljanz xr. an "unjection™". p3 it's meat, cheese and nuts. i keep my protein interesting. oh yea, me too. i have cheese and uh these herbs. p3 snacks. the more interesting way to get your protein.
6:26 pm
>> quijano: we end tonight in the waters off new york city where 4u6r7back whales have made a remarkable comeback. jeff glor has the story. >> in rockaway queens steering with manhattan's high-- sky line to the side the american princess set sail on a whale watching expedition. >> friends of mine said do you know there is a whale watch out of razor point and my question to her was, are you high. catherine granton say naturalist who studies whale. >> what i am looking for is the next blow. >> and she is seeing more humpbacks swimming through new york harbor. >> what do you think about new york city, we think empire state building, statue of liberty, we don't think hawmpback whales.
6:27 pm
>> and we should. >> new york city say water city. john kronin isee renowned environmentalist and professor at nyu. >> a hawmpback whale does not know it is swimming through a city. that is what makes this such an amazing tinnings with a whale sight be maybe look like ak kro-- acro bettic display, but this is lunge feeding, ak taking fish called menhaden. paul sieswerda the president of the nonprofit gotham whale say menhaden are thriving because the water is cleaner. >> one of the things that brings everything together is this food chain. >> reporter: quite a change from the '70s and 08see when kronin knows the waters were a wasteland. >> as the first hudson river keeper, cronin patrolled this waterway for po lawsuiters. >> now 33 some odd years later, it is how much better. >> we are seeing some biological rejuvenation. >> rejuvenation spawned by decades of cleanup which began with the passing of the clean water act in 1972. >> we shouldn't be cutting back the epa. which provides the funding and
6:28 pm
the technical expertise to clean up the nation's waterways. >> reporter: still the cleaner water has lured back the fish that whales feast on. >> this whale is very distinctive because it has a patch on the left side of its cheek. >> reporter: sieswerda says patchy also has a distinct injured dor sal fin. it was probably knocked off by a boat in this busy shipping area. >> as human activity and whales come taght,-- together there are some concerns. >> reporter: there are still obstacles to navigate but given that humpbacks were on the endangered species list just a year ago, the recent sightings are a sign. >> let's hope this is an indication not just of water quality of new york, but that we're making that progress nationally. >> reporter: jeff glor, cbs news, new york. >> quijano: quite the sight that is the cbs weekend news for this sunday. later on cbs, "60 minuteses." i'm elaine quijano in washington i'm elaine quijano in washington d.c., for all of us
6:29 pm
>> i'm natasha brown. shot at home. how a young boy from chester ended up with a serious gun shot wound inside his own house. plus. >> an elderly couple is killed in an early morning plays. i'm in elkins park and how family and friends are remembering the victims. >> a flash flood watch. showers and storms moving in our night. how much rain you could see in
6:30 pm
>> tonight at of:0. shot at home. a young boy from chester takes a bullet from a stranger without ever leaving his house. and here's a look at storm scan 3. a flash flood watch in effect as another strong around o

61 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on