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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  July 25, 2017 3:10am-4:01am EDT

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at girlup.org. ♪ >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." a truck driver is facing federal charges of illegally transporting immigrants in what amounted to a death trap. and could face the death penalty if convicted. ten of the undocumented immigrants died. many of the others are in the hospital. the broiling tractor-trailer was discovered earlier yesterday in san antonio, texas. mark strassmann is there. >> reporter: around 100 people were crammed inside this tractor-trailer, sweltering in 100 degree weather. they had no air conditioning, food or water. some people took turns gasping for air through a hole in the wall. during the 15-hour drive into south texas it got much hotter
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inside the truck, like an oven on wheels. san antonio police chief, william mcmahon is said an employee spotted the parked truck. >> he was approached by some one from the truck asking for water. he came back with the water. called the police. we arrived on the scene. and found eight people dead in the back of that trailer. >> reporter: in federal court this morning. federal agents said the driver, james bradley, told them he parked the truck and heard banging and shaking in the trailer. he opened the door and was run over by spanish people. 30 to 40 of them scattered. he then noticed bodies just lying on the floor like meat. but bradley himself never called 911. and admitted knowing the truck's refrigeration system did not work. police found 29 people alive, all of them, still hospitalized. one survivor said his group had help rafting across the rio grand from the zetas cartel one of mexico's most violent criminal gangs. >> the tragedy tells us the
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immigration system needs to be fixed. >> an immigration lawyer here. >> we are going to continue to see what we saw with this tragedy today. more and mr. people will continue to take their lives, put their lives at risk to come to the united states. >> we called a company in iowa that registered the truck. anthony a woman who did not give her name. told us the company sold the truck last month. then hung up the phone. >> mark strassmann, thank you, mark. court battle in kentucky over the right to protest outside the last clinic in that state that performs abortions. anna werner is in louisville. >> reporter: the protesters are organized by the group operation save america. which calls roev. wade a covenant with death and wants abortion outlawed. >> talking about the killing of an innocent human being. >> jason storms and wife sarah came with their eight children from milwaukee.
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>> little baby girls are also being murdered. in these abortion clinics. >> reporter: kentucky only has this one clinic left. down from 17 in 1978. its new republican governor wants to take that number to zero. and the protesters agreed. in may, nearly a dozen of them associated with the group were arrested for blocking the entrance to the clinic. the events in may prompted a federal judge to order a buffer zone be temporarily placed around the clinic's entrance so patients can get past the protesters. >> are you frightened of them? >> it is intimidating. >> reporter: the clinic director. protesters are more aggressive now. as in this video from 2015. >> the scare tactics have escalated. so the patients come in more upset. more scared. >> storms insist they're not violent and points out he and key leaders of operation save
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america, have never committed violent crimes. but their group calls women who have abortions, murdereders. >> i mother who has knowingly, willingly chose tine kill her own child out of pure selfish motives is guilty as a murderer in the eyes of the law. >> it is disturbing for patients. it is intimidating. it is, it is discrimination. against women. it is their choice to, to exercise this reproductive freedom that we have. and should continue to have in this country. >> protesters here this week will have to abide by the buffer zone, that's the striped tape along the pavement in front of the clinic's entrance here. anthony, in september, a judge will hear arguments on whether the clinic can stay open, under state licensing rules. >> anna werner in louisville. thanks. in california, a teenage driver was arrested after she was involved in a fatal crash while live streaming on instagram. 18-year-old was behind the wheel friday when the car swerved and
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overturned near fresno. her 14-year-old sister was killed. sanchez was arrested on suspicion of drunken driving and vehicular manslaughter. in london today the parents of charlie gard gave up their legal battle to get experimental medical treatment for their gravely ill infant. more now from jonathan vigliotti. charlie gard's parents called their son an absolute warrior at london's high court today but said time had run out for him after new medical tests showed irreversible brain damage. >> his body, heart and soul may soon be gone. but his spirit will live on for eternity. >> reporter: charlie was diagnosed with a rare genetic disease that left him blind, deaf and unable to move or breathe on his own. doctors treating him in london said charlie could not be cured. and went to court to argue he should be taken off life support. his parents fought back and asked to take the baby to the u.s. for an experimental
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treatment. but after five months of bitter legal wrangling, the u.s. doctor agreed with the london hospital. there was no hope. for charlie's father, it was difficult to accept. >> a whole lot of time has been wasted. we are now in july and our poor boy has been left to just lie in hospital for months without any treatment while lengthy court battles have been fought. >> reporter: debate over charlie's future became so heated that his doctors and hospital staff received death threats. hundreds of protesters known as charlie's army, supported sending him to the u.s. in the end, charlie's parents said they accepted they must say good-bye to their son. >> sweet dreams, baby. sleep tight, our little boy. we love you.
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>> it is unclear how long charlie gard will survive off life support. anthony, his father says, his son won't live to see his nirst birthday next month. >> john than vigliotti in london. >> coming up next, princes william and harry remember the last conversation with their mother. and later, hikers stranded by flodwaters, are rescued. ialmost everything. you know, ke 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x. bmilk and fresh cream,a. and only sustainably farmed vanilla. what is this? a vanilla bean? mmm! breyers the good vanilla. we use non-gmo sourced ingredients
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clearasil rapid action begins working fast for clearly visible results in as little as 12 hours. but can ot fix this teens skateboarding mishap? nope. so let's be clear: clearasil works fast on teen acne,
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not so much on other teen things. >> as the 20th anniversary of princess diana's death approaches her sons have given a candid interview about their mother. here is elizabeth palmer. present meets past in this homage to diana the mother through the eyes of her royal sons. >> you and i both know -- >> why? >> you were in the tummy. >> i know. >> reporter: the memories and pictures are inevitably bittersweet. >> there is not many days that go by that i don't think of her. the 20th anniversary year feels like a good time to remember, you know all the good things about her, and hopefully, provide maybe, maybe different side to the others haven't seen before.
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>> the last time william and harry spoke to their mother, she was in paris, hours before she died. they were on vacation in scotland with their father, prince charles, and anxious to hang up the phone. harry and i were in the desperate rush to say good-bye, william says, if i had known what was going to happen, i wouldn't have been so blase. harry said, how differently the conversation would have panned out if he had the slightest inkling it was to be their last. >> our mother was a total kid through and through. when everybody says to me, you know, so she was fun, give us an example. all i can hear is her laugh, in my head. and, and that's sort of -- crazy laugh of where there was just pure happiness. shown on her face. >> reporter: revisiting the past said the princes has been both daunting and healing. >> we felt, you know, incredibly loved her and i. and, i am very grateful that i love still, still feels that. ♪ >> it was that love that -- that
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even if she was on the other side of a room, that as a son, you could feel it. >> reporter: it is the very best legacy any mother could wish for. elizabeth palmer, cbs news, london. when we come back, the summer showdown man vs. flood. ♪ you don't even want to know protection detergent alone doesn't kill bacteria but adding new lysol laundry sanitizer kills 99.9% of bacteria with 0% bleach. lysol. what it takes to protect. hundreds of dollars on youmy car insurance. saved me huh. i should take a closer look at geico... (dog panting)
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rescuers picked up 17 hikers stranded by a flash flood outside tucson, arizona. the last two lifted out by helicopter today. near phoenix, firefighters worked to free a driver from surging floodwaters. they gave her a life vest and helmet, and walked her to safety. >> weekend storms caused severe flooding in moline, illinois, the rock river rose to 3 feet above flood stage and may not crest until tomorrow. in fairbank, iowa, sandbags were piled up to hold back the floodwaters. many roads were left impassible after up to 10 inches of rain fell. the world's oldest commissioned warship still afloat has returned to boston harbor. last night, a two-year restoration project on the "uss constitution" was completed. the ship was launched in 1797 and earned the nickname old ironsides in the war of 1812. still a beauty. it is not hard to reach.
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up next we'll hitch a ride to rockaway beach.
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we end tonight with the queens real estate developer you haven't heard about. he builds beautiful property along the shore using all natural materials. don dahler caught an open house. the daily commute for calvin seiver is a long one. over an hour from his manhattan home to long island's rockaway beach. >> this is your office? >> this is my office.
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>> not bad. >> with home made tools. water. imagination. and considerable skill. he turns one of the most common things in the world into structures that are anything but. >> i can't think of another art form that is more impermanent. >> even if it falls, could collapse now, you know, right behind us. and. >> you are okay with that? >> you got to be. >> reporter: the 59-year-old artist has been creating sand castles since he was a small boy. he also most chose a career in architecture, until he had a sudden realization. >> i don't really care so much about what is inside this thing. i like the outside, an object. >> you need an entrance. >> so too do the children who gather around as he works. >> i have had some wonderful encounters with people.
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and that's definitely, nice. >> but if they weren't here, i would be doing this. >> art for art's sake. seibert earns his living as artists assistant. will sell a photograph of his work here and there. but money has never been his motivation. >> i want to do something, all of the time. and be creative. and if nobody ever knew about it, i would be building a sand castle. >> summer or winter. calvin is a constant presence on rockaway beach. his creations may disappear, but not the beautiful memories given to those lucky enough to see them. don dahler, cbs news, long island. and that's the "overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back a little later for the morning news, and of course, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm anthony mason. thank you for watching.
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>> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." >> welcome. i'm michelle miller. president trump's son-in-law and top adviser, jared kushner told his story as the investigation of russian interference in the presidential election picks up steam. kushner testified behind closed doors on capitol hill, and emerged to insist he did not collude with the crem len to help his father-in-law win the white house. other top aides will testify later this week. >> mr. kushner how was your meeting? >> reporter: kushner told
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investigators he did meet with influential russians four times during campaign and transition. but those meetings he said were brief part of his incoming contacts with people from approximately 15 countries. in fact, he said until recently he did not recall at all a 2016 meeting at trump tower with donald trump jr. and a russian lawyer offering dirt on hillary clinton. kushner said he arrived at the meeting a little late and quickly decided it was a waste of our time. e-mailing an assistant, can you please call me on my cell. need an excuse to get out of meeting. i did not collude with russia. nor do i know of anyone else in the campaign who did so. >> kushner disputed reports that he tried to set up a secret back channel with russia during the transition. but, said he did ask the russian ambassador if there was an existing communications channel at his embassy we could use to discuss the syrian crisis. the ambassador said that would not be possible, so nothing else occurred. kushner met that same month with
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a powerful russian banker named gorkov after being told gorkov was some one with a direct line to the russian president and could give insight how putin was viewing the new administration. >> i have not relied on russian funds for my businesses. >> mr. trump's son-in-law normally avoid the spotlight. >> mr. kushner -- will you sign my russian flag? sign my russian flag! >> confronted by a protester on capitol hill today in full view of the cameras. >> they all have connections to russia, why is that? >> kushner says he wants to be fully transparent, and he will have several more chances to prove it. he goes before the house intelligence committee tomorrow, and the senate committee that met with him today, anthony is already eager to have him back. >> the president was dogged about questions whether the attorney general should step aside. >> mr. president, should jeff sessions resign? that followed a sharply worded morning tweet in which he referred to sessions as our beleaguered a.g. the justice department insists that sessions is not preparing
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to rift with the president and reports of a conversation with the russian ambassador during the 2016 election campaign at a previously undisclosed meeting between the two. cbs news has confirmed that u.s. intelligence intercepted electronic communications in april of 2016 between the ambassador and moscow in which the ambassador reported he and sessions discussed campaign matters. the ambassador and sessions attended a trump speech at the mayflower hotel in april. sessions acknowledged in march there had been two meetings with the russian ambassador during the campaign and last month he was adamant that there wasn't a third. >> i did not have any private meetings, nor do i recall any conversations with any russian officials at the mayflower hotel. >> sessions initially said that he never met with any russians but when it became clear that he
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had he recused himself from the justice department's russia investigation. that angered the president. who has been at odds with his attorney general ever since. anthony. >> the driver of a broiling tractor-trailer, packed, he insist he's had no idea people were inside. 10 died. 29 were saved. and the manhunt is on for the human traffickers behind it all. mark strassmann reports. >> reporter: around 100 people were crammed inside this tractor-trailer, sweltering in 100 degree weather. they had no air conditioning, food or water. some people took turns gasping for air through a hole in the wall. during the 15-hour drive into south texas it got much hotter inside the truck, like an oven on wheels. san antonio police chief, william mcmahon is said an employee spotted the parked truck. >> he was approached by some one from the truck asking for water. he came back with the water.
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called the police. we arrived on the scene. and found eight people dead in the back of that trailer. >> reporter: in federal court this morning. federal agents said the driver, james bradley, told them he parked the truck and heard banging and shaking in the trailer. he opened the door and was run over by spanish people. 30 to 40 of them scattered. he then noticed bodies just lying on the floor like meat. but bradley himself never called 911. and admitted knowing the truck's refrigeration system did not work. police found 29 people alive, all of them, still hospitalized. one survivor said his group had help rafting across the rio grand from the zetas cartel one of mexico's most violent criminal gangs. >> the tragedy tells us the immigration system needs to be fixed. >> an immigration lawyer here. >> we are going to continue to see what we saw with this tragedy today.
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more and mr. people will continue to take their lives, put their lives at risk to come to the united states. >> we called a company in iowa that registered the truck. anthony a woman who did not give her name. told us the company sold the truck last month. then hung up the phone. >> the parents of carly gard have given up their legal battle to have him sent to the united states for experimental treatment. the boy suffers from a rare genetic condition. after court fights there is no real chance that any treatment will help. jonathan vigliatti reports. >> charlie gard's parents called their son an absolute warrior at the high court today. but said time had run out for him after new medical tests showed, irreversible brain damage. >> his body, heart and soul may soon be gone. but his spirit will live on for eternity. >> reporter: charlie was diagnosed with a rare genetic disease that left him blind,
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deaf and unable to move or breathe on his own. doctors treating him in london said charlie could not be cured. and went to court to argue he should be taken off life support. his parents fought back and asked to take the baby to the u.s. for an experimental treatment. but after five months of bitter legal wrangling, the u.s. doctor agreed with the london hospital. there was no hope. for charlie's father, it was difficult to accept. >> a whole lot of time has been wasted. we are now in july and our poor boy has been left to just lie in hospital for months without any treatment while lengthy court battles have been fought. >> reporter: debate over charlie's future became so heated that his doctors and hospital staff received death threats. hundreds of protesters known as charlie's army, supported sending him to the u.s. in the end, charlie's parents said they accepted they must say good-bye to their son. >> sweet dreams, baby. sleep tight, our little boy.
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we love you. >> it is unclear how long charlie gard will survive off life support. not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. introducing megared advanced triple absorption... it supports your heart, joints, brain, and eyes. and is absorbed by your body three times better. so one megared has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. new megared advanced triple absorption.
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>> this is the cbs "overnight news." >> in london, the parents of a terminally ill 11-month-old boy have given up their legal battle to have him sent to the united states for experimental treatment. the latest mri show the boys' condition deteriorated. and he has no chance to recover. charlie gard was born with a rare genetic condition causing progressive muscle weakness and brain damage. british courts and the european court of human rights refused his parents' request to send him abroad saying it was just prolong his suffering and offered no real chance of a cure. now, his father said, it's too late. >> simply this is about a sweet, gorgeous, innocent little boy who was born with a rare
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disease. a real genuine chance at life and a family who loved will so very dearly. that's why we fought so hard for him. despite the way our beautiful son has been spoken about some times as if he is not worthy of a chance at life, our son is an absolute warrior. and we could not be proutder of him, and we will miss him terribly. his body, heart and soul may soon be gone. but his spirit will live on for eternity and he will make a difference to people's lives for years to come. we will make sure of that. >> children suffering from rare diseases are caught in a vice, there are so few patients researchers have a difficult time finding the funning for research. jim axelrod looked at the heartbreaking issue, several months back. >> let's do it. >> his name is sam buck, while his high wattage smile.
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>> ha-ha. >> reporter: and infectious laugh, may remind you of a favorite nephew, there is virtually no chance you have ever met a kid like him. sam who will turn 6 this tuesday, is one of just 250 people in the world who suffer from vanishing white matter disease. a brain disorder that destroys white matter, the substance that helps transmit neural impulses and leads to the loss of motor control. ♪ happy birthday to you >> reporter: there is no cure. and the disease is typically fatal by the age of 10. every birthday feels like it is another year less that you have. >> don't turn six. then you are getting closer to 10. >> exactly. so much we want to do with him and see. >> allison buck and husband nick have kept careful track in the three years since their son's diagnosis, as sam's speech has slowed down. >> what is your favorite part of being in school? >> play time. >> reporter: his ability to
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walk, slowly reroding. leaving him now unable even to stand. >> i think it is really hard for people to wrap their heads around the fact that a child is vibrant as sam could be dying. >> i'm doing it. >> you are. >> reporter: the bucks are trying to show sam as much of the world as possible in the time they have left. he has been to 30 states and 19 countries. from these mayan ruins in mexico. to meeting his hero, formula one race car driver, sebastian vittel in texas. he managed to squeeze in a meeting with the duchess of cambridge. >> we don't want to waste our time worrying about what is to come. we know what is to come.
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we want to be able to enjoy whatever time we have with him. >> reporter: it is not a pretty thought. but a real one for parents of kids suffering from rare diseases. >> hey, what's your name? >> eliza. >> eliza. >> 95% of all rare diseases have no treatment options at all. with so few people suffering from them, there is no incentive for research and development of a cure. >> i want to get it just perfect. because this, it really means a lot. >> that is a fact not lost on lucas colossa, an artist and curator of beyond the diagnosis. a collection of intimate port ritz of children with rare diseases. like were trained, one of the first kids lucas painted for the traveling exhibit. he was the first patient ever diagnosed with something called ngly 1 deficiency.
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were trained has hundreds of seizures every day. >> when i painted the portrait. took the wheelchair out. i just made him look hike he was having a good day. and it's not just a picture, a real person. that, i am dealing with. >> the objective is to humanize the diseases through port ritz of kids like theodora who has a fatal heart condition. megan, who suffers from a rare chromosomal disorder that slows the blood flow to heart and lungs. and hannah, who suffers from a rare form of epilepsy leading to progressive loss of motor skills. >> maybe somebody will look at this and be inspired to maybe, find a cure for it. that would be awesome. >> beyond the diagnosis hopes to eventually put a face to all 7,000 of these rare diseases. >> it is ambitious. we will do it. >> the idea was hatched by patricia welt on of the rare disease united foundation. whose two daughters suffer from rare diseases. >> you can't look at the portraits and not be moved. you can't. >> so far, they're up to 60 portrait buys artists from around the world. each hoping to do with paint, what can't be fully done by words. >> you don't just see, gochey
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disease, you don't see it, you see ashland. don't see the syndrome, you see miriam. >> exactly. that was the point. >> accepted i'm in a wheelchair where i will be. >> 17-year-old, and his brother are the faces of a muscle wasting disease often fatal by theage of 20. >> most kids my age with my disability are on death's row near the end of their life. but the brothers have more hope than most kids suffering from a rare disease. an experimental drug, seems to be helping. it is not a cure, but it does seem to slow down the progression of the disease. austin and max are two of rough re100 children enrolled in clinical trials. >> i do believe this is holding the kids from the edge of the cliff. >> jennifer mcnary is austin and
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max's mother. she has seen austin able to maintain certain functions while on the drug, and regain others. like raising his arm above his head. >> yes! >> max, one of the first to get it, is still walking more than four years later. >> but in this world of rare disease, hope is an elusive commodity. the path to drug approval is not an easy one. in part because the sample size is so small. i'm uncomfortable with the evidence to date. >> an fda panel, recommended against approving the drug until the company provided more data, that the drug actually works. if that decision becomes final it could threaten access to the drug for the leclaire's. >> it is almost worse to be shown something that treat your children and then to be told it could be taken away. that in is to just come to terms with having children that are ill. >> it creates conversations
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and -- >> which brings us back to lucas and the moving way he hopes to keep attention focused on rare diseases. and pressure on researchers and regulators, who may be able to provide hope. >> there is, frying to do the child justice. the family justice. >> when we first met him at his gallery in warwick, rhode island, lucas was putting the finishing touches on the portrait of sam buck. >> precise delicate work, using a syringe to form images, dotd by dot. >> i get pretty involved with it. and it becomes, becomes very difficult to actually paint. because, i start to fully understand what this kid is going through and what the family is going through. and then it is no longer a portrait to me. it is, it's really a merge experience. >> but even lucas didn't know how personal until he brought the portrait to sam's family for a look. >> just incredible. >> how amazing is senate who is that? >> me.
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>> now. his vanishing white mat hears a face. >> his personality shows through in the painting. >> it does. you captured his joy. >> a sweet, darling face to put on this hideously cruel and destructive disease. >> every cause needs a face. >> yep. >> that's a beautiful face. >> yeah. it is a beautiful face. because your carpet there's resolve carpet care. it lifts more dirt and pet hair versus vacuuming alone. resolve carpet care with five times benefits so, your new prescription does have oh, like what?ects.
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there is a massive archaeological dig under way in a location beneath the streets of los angeles. carter evans reports. underneath one of the busiest parts of the city. one of the largest subway projects in the country is under construction. it was here workers digging the new line literally made a mammoth discovery. >> so this is the area where the first find was made. >> about right here. about 20 feet above our head. >> this scientist oversees the team which works alongside construction crews searching for fossils. their discoveries began with bones of colombian mammoth whose roamed here in herds during the ice age. first came the three foot section of tusk at least 11 f years old. then this nearly complete skull emerged. a rare find. a dream come true. the bucket list you want to find in your career.
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one of the firest we found here. >> over the next few weeks the tunnel will close in on an ancient area, known as labrea tar pits. ledger expects fossil finds will increase dramatically in the area. just a couple of inches of tar. become a sticky death trap for the massive mammals that roomed here tens of thousand of years ago. >> people think los angeles, hollywood, bev year hills. what do you think of? >> think of what is underneath all of that. under everyone's feet is a rich history. everybody misses. open up people's eyes and imagination and bring the past to life. >> prehistoric black ooze seeps from the ground around the museum which contains the world's largest collection of ice age fossils. >> here at the museum. things come to life.
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they speak to the curiosity we're all born with. >> you are going to be digging through the stuff that is bubbling up through the ground around here. >> sticky, dirty. and love every second of it. >> this is behind the scenes. this is where the magic happens and where the researchers come. >> all most every bone found at the tar pits is kept here. catalog ford further research. they help ledger identify one of her newest finds. >> so we can confirm that it is a ankle bone. >> back in the tunnel more clues about the ancient past keep turning up. a leg bone from an extinct camel and tooth from a mastadon. >> they were found over behind where we are standing. >> seems like a teasure trove under here. >> it is. we have mammoths, mastadons. it has been really fun. >> according to ledger the best is yet to come. in the next few weeks she hopes to add more predators like the saber tooth cat, to her finds. >> if you are keeping scoring we have found two mammoths, mastadon, camel, bison, horse,
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turt till. >> just getting started. >> just getting started. carter evans. los angeles.
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we end the half-hour with steve hartman on the road to recovery. >> you may remember, a couple years ago, i confessed. to a weed addiction. although i only did it at my place in upstate new york after the kids were in bed. the fact was. i could not stop pulling the things. mug wart, canada thistle and levee goldenrod were my favorites. i realized extent of my diction after my cameraman interviewed my wife andrea about it. >> he goes out the 7:00 and weeds until dark. some times out there past dark. >> reporter: and her point is? >> it's not weeding a garden. it's weeding five acres. >> reporter: 4 1/2 technically. see, a few years earlier, i had this idea. to turn this weedy hillside into a beautiful prairie full of wild flowers and grasses.
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i contacted this man who would eventually become my dealer. >> we started with prairie plants. >> reporter: he owns the prairie nursery in westfield, wisconsin. he got me hooked on weeds through gateway plants. purple coneflower, compass plant, and smooth aster. >> trying to get you hooked. yes my product is highly addictive. it's called love of nature. >> reporter: here's the problem. before you see those flowers in the magazine, you often need to spend a great deal of time weeding a new prairie meadow. and neil made no mention of how addicting that can be. >> i would come out here every night and dread it. then, a switch flipped. and i started coming out here, and loving it. >> weeding, can induce a meditative state. that is therapy for all of us in this crazy world we live in. when you can tune everything out and focus on swun single-minded purpose. >> also, just as a practical matter, after investing hundreds of hours out here. of what else can you do? just give up on the whole project? >> it would -- andrea?
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>> i could live without it. >> you want your husband back don't you? >> i know. i don't know if i could live with how defeated my husband would feel if we gave it up. >> reporter: after this story first aired in 2015, i thought a lot about her hesitation. i realized you can take a hobby too seriously. which is why i am now a recovering weedaholic. oh, i will still clip occasional spotted nap weed. i don't obsess like i used to. choosing instead to focus more on these three blossoms. growing like weeds, in the only garden we tend, the that truly matters. steve hartman, at home, in catskill, new york.
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this is the cbs morning news. senator john mccain returns to washington for a key vote in the health care battle as president trump puts the pressure on republican lawmakers. >> any senator who votes against is telling america that you are fine with the obamacare nightmare. >> mr. trump's son-in-law says he has nothing to hide. today kushner will make his second appearance on capitol hill to testify about his

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