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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 11, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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>> he is epically funny. he was on that show "strangers with candy." he's a great actor. but i think the genuine guy is going to be great. we get this from he said maybe rush since we have rush limbaugh. rush may be feeling slighted he wasn't considered. get him a onesie. >> i think everybody would be better with a onesie. that is the end of "way too early." "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ there was some big news last week that slipped through my news crack, and it concerns someone i've admired for years and yet surprisingly is not me. i'm talking about david letterman who last thursday night announced his retirement. and i am going to miss this good man. dave has been on the air my
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entire adult life. "late night" debuted my first night in college. i learned more from dave than i did going to my classes. especially the ones i did not go to because i had stayed up until 1:30 watching dave. this man has influenced every host who came after him and even a few who came before him, he's that good. and i got to tell you, i do not envy whoever they try to put in that chair. >> well, now. good morning. that was interesting. it's friday, april 11th. it's friday. does anyone feel like this has been the longest week. >> three weeks long. >> yes. >> at least three. >> sometimes a day feels like a week. on the set we have "time" magazine analyst mark halperin. >> morning. >> and editor of "the washington post" and msnbc political
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analyst eugene robinson. i love when you're on the set. this is so excited, thomas. three-time winner of the masters joe scarborough is here with us as well. yes. and that green jacket looks so good on you. >> i wish -- i don't like to talk about myself. and, you know, it was actually four times if you count the amateurs. >> sorry. >> i'm still a little upset. i won it in '85 and nobody remembers. they remember nicolas in '86. but i'm not -- you know. i'm just blessed to be here. >> the green jacket reminds us. i think it's a great sign of your success. >> he went five under par yesterday. he's on the leader board, i think. yeah. >> right. sure. >> everybody loves a comeback story. >> they do. they do. i mean, you know -- as you know, mika, minds straight out of ice castles. i won't tell you about the improbable '85 comeback.
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but there were songs playing. yeah still the putt went in. holy cow. so what's going on in news today, mika? >> well, we're starting with stephen colbert. that's what i'm supposed to say now? colbert? but i love colbert. he's always colbert to me. he's set to take over letterman's desk. thought we'd start with this. everyone was talking about when it crossed the wires yesterday. holding up their phones and saying, oh, my gosh. i'm thinking what's going on. it's who's replacing letterman. even "usa today" devoted their mass head to comedian colbert. it doesn't sound good. it's too feminine or something. colbert. no, no, no. has quite a resume for a late night comedian. it will also be a new role for colbert who for the past nine
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years has played on the "colbert report." he talked about being in and out of character. >> you said you don't want your kids to watch your show because they want them to know you, dad. >> right. i just say things i don't mean and a child is not going to know that's a character. they won't know that i don't mean it when i say i love them. and i'm going to tuck them into bed one night and they're going to say that's good, dad, that's dry. >> is it hard going in and out of character? >> no. i started in second city chicago. the rule there or saying was wear your character as lightly as a cap. you can take them on and off as you need. >> is it hard for guests to adapt to you in character? what do you like to tell them beforehand? >> i say the same thing. i said it to you when you were on. thank you for coming. i'm grateful. i know it must be like a tough
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booking sometimes because it's not like going on charlie rose, you know? you don't know necessarily what i'm going to say or what i'm going to ask because i'm an active idiot. as i say to the guests, thank you for coming have you seen the show. i do the show in character. he's an idiot. he's willfully ignorant of what you know and care about. >> an active idiot. i like it. joe? >> well, i mean, as an active idiot i'm excited. what do you think, mika? i think he's a great choice. >> i like it a lot. i like it a lot. >> i think it's a really smart choice by cbs, actually. because he can do interviews, obviously. but in his own personality as well. he's got this young demographic audience. i think it's a smart choice. >> i was going to say it should be interesting because remember
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the show "strangers with candy," he was an actor on that show. he's been a good actor. but we can see he's an authentic interview. and he has celebrities on all the time. so i think for some people it might be kind of a quick decision. like cbs, it's a week o the day that dave announces he's retiring and he's ready to go. it seems kind of fast. >> another big major change is sometimes they've gone too slow. so now the big question is just please don't set him up to fail. don't set him up to fail. just let it be until he takes over. one big question is whether colbert can lift letterman's sagging ratings. one of the critics say he's at odds with a much wider audience. this is interesting. >> you care what i think of colbert getting letterman's gig? cbs has just declared war on the heartland of america. there is a -- here's the -- no
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longer is comedy going to be a covert assault on traditional american values is, conservatives. now it's just out in the open. they're hired a partisan, so-called comedian to run a comedy show. >> so i guess some conservatives don't like it. they think he's making fun of them. i bet he can overcome that. >> he makes fun of liberals plenty. >> he makes good fun of us. we'll see. he has a right to his opinion. there's reaction all around. let's get to some other news out of washington this morning. after overseeing the troubled rollout of the affordable care act, health and human service secretary kathleen sebelius has resigned. the project has been hit by delays, canceled coverage, and massive technical glitches on healthcare.gov. she all but collapsed under the strain of heavy volume and questionable security. >> deadline after deadline
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missed. it's as if the agency is in disarray trying to meet the october 1st deadline. >> we will be open for open enrollment october 1st of 2013, and we will be enrolling americans across the country january 1st, 2014. >> you can assure us there'll be -- >> congressman, i can only tell you what i'm telling you. we are on track to meet october 1st. i can't tell you what exactly will happen at every step. but that is the determination. we are on track to meet it. >> well, you're not on track to meet it. >> we have had a few slowdowns, a few glitches. but it's sort of a great problem to have. it's based on the fact that the volume has been so high and the interest is so high. >> i'm going to try and download every movie ever made, and you've got to try to sign up for obamacare and we've got to see which happens first.
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businesses were given a delay of a year, but that individuals were not given that option. why is that? >> in these early weeks, access to healthcare.gov has been a miserably frustrating experience for way too many americans. i am as frustrated and angry as anyone with the flawed launch of healthcare.gov. so let me say directly to these americans, you deserve better. >> joe? >> so mika, you were talking to the white house yesterday as this story was developing. what can you tell us in. >> first of all, there's a couple of different reasons for her departure. none of them completely unrelated to what we're reporting here. she feels that new blood should come in without the baggage of the rollout and all the certain things that come along with it that have negative connotations. and yet the administration has eclipsed its initial goal of 7 million people through the exchanges. and they were celebrating last night as they were seeing her off at a dinner.
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and actually she tried to call me because i was going to talk to kathleen and i fell asleep. but they were having a great time. i got a couple of e-mails. and celebrating the work that she did and what she went through to make it happen. she's proud of serving. as "the new york times" notes, sebelius was not alongside the president during the celebratory news conference. republican leaders reacted to sebelius' departure on twitter. according to ezra klein, sebelius is leaving because obamacare won. he writes in part, the law has won its survival. the obama administration can exhale. personnel changes can be made. sebelius is expected to be replaced by sylvia burwell. her omb confer mags sailed through the senate last year. so, you know, depending on what
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side of this issue you're on, maybe you take this departure differently. >> yeah. i don't know about the white house having a press conference and having her depart because she won. it certainly brings up the mission accomplished thought. this fight is going to go on for some time now. they certainly, though, numerically hit their first numbers. so it's a good time for her to leave if she's going to leave. mark halperin, what are you hearing? was this in the works for awhile or did she just leave because she's exhausted? >> my understanding is she was not pushed out. politically this is probably the best time for her to go. they're replacing her with someone if she's confirmed who is a very able manager and who will not bring to the congressional hearings and overnight as well as the politics of the midterms the same level of baggage as kathleen sebelius. if the law ends up being successfully implemented over the years, sebelius will go down
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in history books in a positive way. that's left to be written. she's an able person and great public servant. she did not execute on this and i think she'll be part of the history books on this. they're nominating a younger woman who's got a great record who's got a lot of republican support in the senate, was easily confirmed. i think they've handled the politics on this as well as they could have. >> gene robinson, let me say up front, i know kathleen and like her an awful lot. a lot of democrats say she's a very effective governor out in kansas. i don't really know her record that well there. and she does -- she's able to leave on a high note at least for her, at least as sort of a i can check this box off and get out of this building as quickly as possible. at the same time, when her legacy is reviewed, we just have to tell the truth about it, she appeared to be asleep at the switch when this thing launched
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in a white house that was not engaged and through an awful lot of thofrt to her she and her department did not seem to be ready at all, did they? >> well, look. there's no doubt about that. obviously the department and the administration was not ready when healthcare.gov launched or failed to launch and people couldn't sign up for insurance. that was a debacle and that will certainly be near the top of sort of wrap-up stories written about her tenure. but this is a great time for her to step away. they've reached their numbers. the program is working now. i guess ezra writes that its future is assured or it's here to stay. in fact, it was always here to stay, i think, much earlier when we learned it wasn't going to collapse in some sort of death spiral.
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so it was going to be here to stay. but it's looking much better now and i think it'll be a much better record now. >> you know, mika, whether this bill stays in its current form or is changed a thousand times over, which i do believe it is going to be amended so much over the next five to ten years, that it may be unrecognizable at the end. look at the changes the president himself has unilaterally made. a lot is going to depend on the elections coming up. we have interesting polls in 2014, states changes in arkansas and louisiana. some say even in alaska right now. and so that will also have an impact on her legacy, how democrats do running on obamacare. >> yep. i think that there's different ways to look at this departure. you mentioned mission accomplished. i don't think that's what they were doing at all. i think that's why she wasn't
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there, you know? she just moved quietly out. had a wonderful dinner with her friends. and did what she thought she should do. they're moving on with 7 million and counting. so i actually think each side of the story knocks the other off and calls it even at least for now politically. >> there's no question she's well liked in the white house. and the president has loyalty to her. but as the clips you showed demonstrated, she lost control of her public image. >> absolutely. totally. and joe, you mentioned those polls. democrats facing big challenging keeping control. but some are hanging tough in polls and fund raising in arkansas. mark pryor's lead over tom koth ton in arkansas. mary landrieu is likely to head for a runoff in louisiana, but she's leading her top republican
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candidate as well. and mark begich has done more than any other democrat who distance himself from the president. split polls show him and treadwell within striking distance of each other. i definitely want to send -- i want to send someone to iowa for this race. >> that's going to be a great one. this shows how much movement is in these states. i said in 2010 that we could have a repeat of what happened in 1994. almost a direct overlay where you had a new democrat elected in 1992, in 2008. they both were seen as moving too far left. so there was a rightward shift in the house of representatives. then that over-reach by the house of representatives re-elected the democratic president. everybody expected another big midterm and remember what happened in 1998, democrats
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almost actually took over the house. shocked everybody. they were expecting a huge vuktry. we republicans were. and newt gingrich lost his job because of it. you look at these numbers and in a state like arkansas where this race is tight, in alaska where the vase much tighter, in louisiana where i say mary landrieu always figures out a way to win by six and a half votes. any republicans who think they can sit back between now and election day and think that they don't have to do anything and are believing the press reports and fighting an old war, i think -- i think they may be surprised. they're going to have to stay on their toes and work hard or else these democrats look like they can maintain the majority. >> well, there's no question the story's not been written yet. but i'll say three things if you're a republican to look at in a positive way. one is the incumbents are in fighting shape but they're below 50%. second, most of the developments
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of the last couple months have been in the republicans' favor. states like iowa, michigan, new hampshire, colorado more in play than they were in expanding the field for the republican. and last thing is democrats are still looking for their message. we know what their republican message will be. is it the koch brothers? is it the ryan budget? is it individual demonization of specific candidates? they still have to figure that out. but i'll say again, you're right. this story is not written. and democrats are positioned to try to hold off and keep control of the senate. not by a lot, but by majority. >> all right. we got one more story we want to get to. and i'm going to throw it at thomas roberts. >> yes, thank you. >> that works, right? did that hurt? >> so last night hillary clinton was in las vegas as part of her speaking tour when she was interrupted by a heckler and a heckler's shoe. i might need surgery.
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>> what was that, a bat? was that a bat? that's somebody throwing something at me? is that part of cirque du soleil? [ applause ] my goodness. i didn't know b solid waste management was so controversial. thank goodness she didn't play softball like i did. >> good for her. >> taking it in stride. i do not think it was a six inch louboutin. but she was asked what she could point to, former president bill clinton weighed in saying by the end of former george w. bush's second term essentially two
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lines of thinking had emerges. on the right was the use of hard power. on the left was a growing bias against military intervention and in favor of soft power. economic aid and incentives on human rights and democracy. former secretary of state hillary clinton in partnership with her boss president obama came up with a mix of hard and soft calling it smart power with the appropriate mix between the two driven by specific facts and circumstances. in short soft plus hard equals smart. and it could be one of clinton's most enduring doctrines and legacies of her leadership at the state department in the early years of the 21st century. >> okay. so gene robinson, agree? disagree? and what do you think of the shoe? >> our politicians are second to none in dodging shoes. right? we're better than anybody in the world in dodging shoes. i think that's a good analysis. >> remember that, gene? he's good. he's quick.
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>> he's the best at that. >> that's like keanu reeves in the matrix. >> uh-huh. that was good. let's see. are you going to roll it? that was good too. >> the hand clasp. >> she saw it coming. >> what did she say? was that a bat? >> it must have been a black high heel because it fluttered like a bat. >> i prefer to think it's a bat than somebody whipping a shoe at me. i'd rather think it's a wild animal coming at me than the shoe at my head. >> i don't want to think about a bat coming after me. >> also very clinton-esque, she made a local reference. she's talking about cirque du soleil. >> we digress. let's leave it here at this block. she was great. coming up on "morning joe," senator chris murphy joins us. and paul stanley here. up next the top stories in the politico playbook, but first
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here's britney with a check of the forecast. >> good morning. we're tracking just a few isolated thunderstorms into cincinnati. as we head into the rest of today, all of this moisture is going to move closer to the northeast. that means we'll see clouds and showers especially as we head into tonight. we'll also see your temperatures in the mid-60s. we'll stay in the 70s for philadelphia. then as we transition to the rest of your friday, we are going to see temperatures at 83 degrees in dallas. then as we head into the weekend, changes on the way. minneapolis, chicago, kansas city all going to see thunderstorms. and even the potential of hail and strong winds. and then snowfall expected in denver by sunday. stay with us. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is.
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♪ time now to take a look at the morning papers from our parade of papers. "the sacramento bee," investigating a deadly accident in california overnight that's left about nine people dead. a fedex truck crossed a median and slammed into a tour bus on a freeway in the small city of or land. it was carrying high school students on their way to a local college. seven students were killed as well as both drivers. 30 others hurt. joe? >> what an absolute nightmare. "the post gazette," speaking of horrible stories. police now believe the student who stabbed 20 people tuesday had no target and selected his
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victims at random. alex hribal remains in custody. there was no signs he was contemplating the attack. saying he was not a loner or a weirdo. president obama phoned the school's principal to express his sympathies. and some of the victims remain in critical condition. >> all right. the "wall street journal." the worst session in more than two years. the dow fell by 266 point. the biggest loss since february. and the nasdaq down by 121 points. it's been a been a rocky year. all three indexes are in the red after rising earlier in 2014. some big-name tech companies are struggling. facebook is down 5%. google and amazon fell 4% after yesterday's trading. >> and "the los angeles times." google glass is going on sale next week in the united states.
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prospective buyers will have to act fast. they'll be in limited quantities on the website. it will set you back. the possibilities with google glass is fascinating. first time i've ever been interested in using them. i don't know if you saw the sunday times article a month ago but if you're in a different country, you put the glasses on and it translates signs for you. as you're wearing the glasses, you can read the signs in whatever language. >> that's -- that's -- >> so you read the sign on the oncoming bus as you're focusing on the computer on your face. i don't know. >> i don't know about that. i can't get my arms around it. >> use them on menus in china. >> there you go. that's important. >> a group of clever chimpanzees
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are back in their cages -- >> oh, listen, mika. we just wanted to get out for a couple of hours. and it just -- >> after making a daring escape yesterday at the kansas city zoo, a zoo keeper said one broke a nearly 6 foot long tree branch and climbed out of the zoo enclosure. he persuaded six over chimps to join. officials contained zoo guests in locked areaing until the animals were locked back inside their enclosures. no one was hurt. >> so they were lured back. i wonder what lured them back? they tasted freedom. >> good news. >> for me it was a hot fudge sundae. >> okay, thomas. let's do politico. >> all right. with us now the chief white house correspondent for politico mike allen with the morning playbook. give it to us. >> happy friday! >> there we have it. thank you very much. >> and happy birthday to the great ethel kennedy.
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86 today. >> wow. good for her. >> that is lovely. let's start off with knowing that scott brown is now officially running for u.s. senate in new hampshire. but after a stint in the capitol representing the state of massachusetts, he's having trouble shaking off a bit of the criticism that he has been more of a political opportunist. >> it's got almost 3,000 miles on the odometer and looking good with the license plates that say live free or die. as gail and i have traveled around portsmouth, and seen all the places that are important in my life. where my grandparents used to bring me when i was born. when my mom was young she was a waitress at hampton beach and my dad was an airman at the air force base. when they carried me home, it wasn't too far from here. >> reminding everybody of his
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roots there in new hampshire. also airing a new campaign ad that looks a little similar to the spot had he ran back in 2010. >> scott brown has almost 300,000 miles on this truck. over the last few weeks it's taken him all across new hampshire listening, learning. and what he's heard is pretty simple. people that want an america that leads the world again. >> i put a lot of miles on it during the campaign. people tell me they're concerned about the path our country is on. spending is out of control. government keeps getting bigger and bigger -- >> all right. so it is familiar there. he's talked about this truck far long time. i thought it was interesting in his speech he talked about his young daughters who are now both getting married. the wife said you have to adapt to the change. you'll always have your truck. >> that's true. >> but is this really an uphill battle for him to unseat the
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democrat? >> it is. i asked around and people in new hampshire say there's no question he's still the underdog. but this is going to be a close and real race. he's going to spend a lot. he's going to force democrats to spend a lot. but your setup pointed to his problem. he's officially lived in new hampshire for all of four mon s months. that's partly why he went through the trip tick he did of the sugar house and all the other places he's been in new hampshire. but to them he's a come-here. and there's a lot of ex-massachusetts residents themselves, but he has to make this sale. and he's using the truck because the truck worked. >> i like the truck. >> it was effective before. and at the very end of that new ad, they have someone with a clear new hampshire accent saying go get 'em, scott. >> do you think he can overcome the carpet bagger look? he has established and it's true
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he was born and raised in new hampshire. got his start there obviously traveling to massachusetts. but he does have the local boy connection. >> absolutely. and he's vacationed there. he's been part of the state and as the country becomes more transient, the carpet bagger thing becomes less -- much less of an issue. ask former senator clinton about that. and republicans in senate races have the wind at their back. there's no question about that. he's one of the people that will benefit from that. and he's one of the people that will benefit from the new supreme court ruling. a lot of people will write more checks in these races. >> joe, what do you think? >> i agree with mike allen. all you have to do is talk about hillary clinton who had no contacts with new york state when she decided to run for senator of new york. people look at a senator differently than they look at a governor. there's no way hillary would have been elected as governor of new york state, i don't think,
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just as scott brown would have trouble running for governor of new hampshire. but especially around the border and in a good chunk of new hampshire, the boston globe and the boston local stations have a big impact on the media markets out there. and there is such a connection between new hampshire and boston. and northern part of massachusetts that this is certainly -- i would think, mike, much, much smaller jump than hillary clinton for the white house and deciding to run in new york state. >> absolutely. he speaks their language. you've been seeing media coverage of him forever. he can say he knows the senate. he has a great story to tell. but it's a bluish state and that's why he's the underdog. >> all right. politico's mike allen, happy friday. thank you very much. >> and happy weekend.
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thank you. coming up, the yankees michael pineda dominates the red sox at the stadium, but the talk is all about what's on his hand. >> the goo. >> what? >> there's goo. >> oh, no. is that against the law? >> no goo. >> i think it was a cut and oozing. >> "morning joe" sports is next. ♪ out an ira ♪ ♪ and i got the tools ♪ to do it my way ♪ i got a lock on equities ♪ that's why i'm type e ♪ ♪ that's why i'm tyyyyype eeeee, ♪
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♪ i can do it all from my mobile phone ♪ ♪ that's why i'm tyyyyype eeeee, ♪ ♪ if i need some help i'm not alone ♪ ♪ we're all tyyyyype eeeee, ♪ ♪ we've got a place that we call home ♪ ♪ we're all type e ♪
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oh, i can barely move a muscle. i don't have any muscles left. [ sighs ] [ chuckles ] you should really clean your ceiling fan. are you kidding me? you're gonna just throw away the last hour? no, it's only 15 calories. [ male announcer ] with reddi wip, fruit never sounded more delicious. at least i can die happy. [ male announcer ] and hard work won't have to go to waste. mmm. with 15 calories per serving and real cream, the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy. with 15 calories per serving and real cream, to truck guys, the truck is everything. and when you put them in charge of making an unbeatable truck... ... good things happen.
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this is the ram 1500. the 2014 motor trend truck of the year and first ever back-to-back champion. guts. glory. ram.
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♪ to sports now. we're going to start with the yankees in the bronx hosting the red sox. we've got yankees star michael pineda looking great. just allowing one run. but there's a caveat to this. there are questions this morning about whether he had a little bit of help. the boston herald headline reads "the bronx goo" referring to a brown substance that was clearly visible on the pitcher's right hand. are you looking at this. take a closer look at the hand. it could be stick 'em to help
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him get a better grip on the ball. but the red sox didn't mention it to the umps leading an analyst to say certainly the sox are aware by now. if they don't complain, it tells you this is standard operating procedure for pitchers. the substance, however, that disappeared from his hand by the fifth inning. the yankees get the win in the series opener 4-1 in the final. joe, what do you think about that? can we show that picture again so people can get a longer look at it, the goo. >> yeah. you know, it certainly is illegal. i'm surprised the sox didn't complain about it. that's just -- but it doesn't surprise me. the yankees have to do what the yankees have to do to beat the red sox. so if they have to chief, so be it. i will say you look at the stands in yankees stadium when the yankees are playing the red sox first series, this should be packed. and it's just a shame that ticket prices are just so extraordinarily high there that,
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you know, middle class baseball fans have a hard time affording a ticket there. even for a huge series like this. >> yeah. it does, it squeezes a lot of people out that would like to be there. so in honor of your green jacket, we want to go to augusta for everybody. >> oh, good. boy that takes me back. >> bill haas. this long birdie on 14 helped him finish with a four under. unseats the battling champion. aside from a hiccup on 12 where he drops it in the water. there's only one stroke off the lead at three under. and perhaps the shot of the day. phil mickelson, keeps on going and then bending, and rolling. >> holy cow. >> it's in the hole. >> just like the putt joe made in '85. >> almost identical. >> i'm glad you remember that, gene. the winds were blowing out of the south/southeast if i remember correctly. so you just -- it's
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unbelievable. listen, i don't want this to be about me. let's talk about the kids who are playing well now. >> yeah. move on. >> it is a very exciting first round. let's post everybody where phil is though. it's a rough first round for him. he's eight strokes off the lead at plus four. round two gets underway in about two hours. which is great. all right. so you know what else is great? >> this is exciting. >> this is really exciting. >> less than two weeks we're taking the show on the road to chicago. >> i've never been there. >> "way too early" and "morning joe" live from wrigley celebrating 100 years at the historic park. i requested, mika, you and i get to share a room. as much as you love fenway? >> do i get my pink onesie yet? >> we are going to debut it there. >> all right. that's an awkward request. >> this is a deep tease. it's happening on wednesday, april 23rd starting at 5:30 a.m. eastern. it's going to be good.
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>> yeah. it is. going to be really good. >> coming up next, we're going to look at the what people earn issue. editor in chief maggie murphy is here to spill the beans on everybody's money. don't go away. "morning joe" is back after this. ♪ ♪
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♪ with us now editor in chief maggie murphy who's here -- is someone screaming in my ear? who's here with the magazine's signature -- i love this. it's the iconic parade magazine. what people earn. it's the one you read cover to cover. it's fascinating. >> and what a great week because of all the work we've been doing because of jobs and equal pay. >> and let the ask you this. you said something to me that's
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stunning. i'm glad to hear this. people volunteer this to you. >> people volunteer. the way this works is we put on ad in parade. very effectively and hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people say we want to be in this issue. it brings out the entrepreneurs in people. a lot of civil servants do this i think which shows the pride of our, you know, first responders, teachers, nurses, et cetera. >> what about the people who make an ungodly amount of money? do they volunteer? >> and the celebrities. we do a little investigative reporting. sandra bullock, what a great year she had. she was in two top movies. $63 million. supposed to net another $70 million after for "gravity" because she was such -- >> 70? >> yeah. she gives a lot of money to fabulous choices. >> look at these three women
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topping the leader boards and matthew mcconaughey in fourth. but you've got miley cyrus on the top. beyonce at number three. she's not doing badly at all. but i like to see this. this is good. women are making its happen. >> what's interesting about beyonce -- >> i'm not happy about miley making it happen that way. sorry. >> beyonce made $6,507 an hour at one point. and miley made $48 million when she was on "hannah montana." she's only gotten richer. >> what does she make now because there's a thing over it? >> $76 million. >> 30 of that is from sticking her tongue out? >> this is question, like, i hope she's a little wiser with her money than she is with her tongue. >> yeah. >> she was pretty wise with her antics this year in terms of her income. right? >> we were talking at the women of the world summit the way women get attention for sexual assault and miley's name came
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up, of course. and it's just -- it's really hard and offputting to try to figure out what a women's value is when a tongue and spanking and all those things at the mtv music awards can bring in that kind of dough. >> i will say that i agree with you in terms of shock tactics, but one of the reasons that she is such a high grossing performer is touring. and she is out there -- she is out there working. >> and twerking as well. >> and the question is you've seen it -- you know, the reality is in another few years where will she be? the other best thing on this list, however, is the real people. you know, we really just love the people. patrick garner is a guy who plays a thomas edison impersonator. he makes $75,000.
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annemarie mccoy is a teacher making $80,000 which is a great salary. she says you know you've not done the job well unless you're dog tired at the end of the day. who doesn't want that teacher? and gloria ross is an obituary writer. she started she wrote an obituary for her father-in-law and then her father. and then other family members started saying would you write one for me. she was in marketing and communication. she worked at the united way. and well, there's a job here. what's really amazing in people always invite her to the funeral after she writes the obituary. >> the other great thing you have is not just what people are making but those who are looking for work and things to market themselves, correct? >> exactly. one of the things we really wanted to tackle was sort of that non-seeking work class of what's going on. i've heard from thousands of people saying i send resumes out, i don't hear. we tried to understand working with linkedin what gets people
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hired through that sort of social way to networking. and using linkedin, how to sort of manage your profile socially which a lot of people who are older workers from the office didn't really know how to do. and the other thing is toyota gave us some advice about volunteering. so say you've been out of work for awhile. you haven't found a job. if you're volunteering at your church. if you're a mother who's organized a bake sale, structure that, view that as work done and a lot of employers will respond to that and say you've got organizational skills, management skills, bookkeeping skills. >> i love it. so fascinating. thank you so much. >> thank you. >> always great to have you on the show. the latest issue of "parade" what people earn. maggie murphy, thank you. still ahead, colbert nation will have a year to say good-bye to its fearless leader on comedy
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central, but how does stephen stand up to the two late night jimmys? we'll talk about that. also who's going to replace him? might it be samantha b.? it should be a woman. "morning joe" will be right back. (little girl) no! saw her first day of school. (little girl) bye bye! made a best friend forever. the back seat of my subaru is where she grew up. what? (announcer) the 2015 subaru forester (girl) what? (announcer) built to be there for your family. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. a dayou owe me this causetial for i clean your tushy.pirit.
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i guess a couple guys decided to go out in the woods for a little target practice and they chose a tree as their target. well, just watch what happened next. [ gunshots ]
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>> yeah. mother nature was like, what's up! >> i could see that coming. i knew that was going to happen. coming up at the top of the hour, senator chris murphy and david gregory. more "morning joe" when we come back. don't go anywhere. ♪ [ banker ] sydney needed some financial guidance so she could take her dream to the next level. so we talked about her options. her valuable assets were staying. and selling her car wouldn't fly. we helped sydney manage her debt and prioritize her goals, so she could really turn up the volume on her dreams today...and tomorrow. so let's see what we can do about that... remodel. motorcycle. [ female announcer ] some questions take more than a bank. they take a banker.
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♪ working on nice moves you have three kids and you said you don't want them to watch your show because you want them to know you, dad. >> right, right. i just say things i don't mean. and a child just is not going to know that's a character. and they're going to think i don't mean it when i say i'm proud of them or when i say i love them. and i'm going to tuck them into bed one night and say i love you, honey. and they're going to say that's good, dad. that's dry. >> is it hard to go in and out of character? >> no. i started in second city chicago. the rule there was wear your character as lightly as a cap. you can take them on and off as you need. >> is it hard for guests to adapt to you in character? what do you tell them beforehand? >> i say the same thing. i said it to you when you were on. thank you so much for coming -- because i'm grateful. i know it must be like a tough
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booking sometimes because it's not like going on charlie rose. you don't know, necessarily, what i'm going to say or what i'm going to ask because i'm an active idiot. and as i say to the guests, thank you for coming have you seen the show. i do the show in character. he's an idiot. he's willfully ignorant of what you care about. >> welcome back to "morning joe." with us on set, we have assistant editor and columnist for "the financial time" gillian tett. good to have you here. and moderator of "meet the press." what are we doing? going to a sox game? >> no. got a conversation for the program sunday about the boston bombing anniversary. >> a looking forward to that. thank you. let's go, by the way, stephen colbert. have you had any more thoughts about this big change coming to
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late night tv? we were going to roll sound bites but i think we just chat at this point? right? >> i think so, yeah. david gregory, this is actually -- it came as a surprise to some people yesterday when it broke across the wires, but i guess it shouldn't have. colbert does very good numbers on comedy central. he's a very popular guy. and he's going to fit in comfortably. as far as being a broadcaster like david letterman he's an absolute pro. and cbs is actually very lucky to be able to just slide him in the slot. what do you think about the choice? >> i think it's a great choice. i'm a huge colbert fan. he's incredibly smart like jon stewart and jimmy fallon. this is a golden age of broadcast come by when you think about it in the greatness of letterman and leno and even carson, the influence they've had on this younger generation is all to our benefit.
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because stewart and certainly colbert and fallon are just taking it to a new level. i think stephen is very much in that mold. i'm very interested to see him out of character. of course he's also so funny out of character as well. so i think he's just going to do a great job. you know, that writing -- and i think this is a big factor, too, with fallon. these guys so enjoy what they're doing and that comes across. and i just think that's a great lesson for all of us who work on this medium. >> all right. gillian, quick, quick, quick. >> i would say who would have guessed in 2014 we'd be looking at a revival of old fashioned television? >> exactly. >> people on their iphones are watching this stuff and he's got a broad base. >> i think the choices are interesting. let's get to news out of washington. the headline this morning after overseeing the troubled rollout of the affordable care act, health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius has resigned. president obama's signature project has been hit by delays,
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canceled coverage and massive technical glitches on healthcare.gov. they eclipsed their goal of 7 million people in exchanges. as "the new york times" notes, sebelius was not alongside the president during the celebratory news conference. she is expected to be replaced by sylvia burwell. her omb confirmation sailed through the senate last year. 96-0. so i was talking with the white house last night, and actually i was supposed to talk to kathleen but my sleep meds kicked in. they were celebrating her work. they have a positive message about what she's done. but joe, she got battered in the process of the rollout. it was rough. >> it was rough, and she wasn't prepared. the department wasn't prepared. the administration wasn't prepared for all the glitches that hit in the fall. but if she was going to leave, somebody said it last hour.
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she is leaving at a time that's probably the best case scenario for her. say we reached the goal, put a check there, now i'm running out of the building whether it's burning or not. history will tell us. but she's getting out of there at an opportune time after a really, really rough start. >> i think it's interesting. if you look at it when there's a big narrative when the media is calling for someone's head which was the case for sebelius. i think it was an interesting choice for the president to step back and say, okay, i've got a big problem here. am i going to make it better or worse by firing her now in the middle of this? he chose not to do that, to hang back a bit. she had to be part of the solution in terms of getting to the fix on the website and some of the other issues. now he can take a step back. he can exceed some of the initial expectations. and now she can pull back. she has to be accountable as the administration does for something that happened on her
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watch that was so poorly executed. and there's a lot of big questions about obamacare moving forward. but the other piece of it is, i think back to president obama and don rumsfeld. and how many republicans were angry that he didn't let rumsfeld go before the midterms in '06. here maybe the president is giving democrats room to say you know what? not only have they exceeded some expectations on the rollout, but he did take action to have accountability about it. >> it's funny when you watch what happened and kathleen put herself out there. she was literally on live television trying to make it work. and glitches that happened literally in realtime. and she handled it with grace and elegance. you know, the president obviously believed in her, because a lot of people were calling for her resignation or saying why aren't they doing anything. but yet she leaves with their goal surpassed. >> absolutely. i moo enwimean, it's an ironic
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story. but sylvia coming in is somebody who's respected by the president. she's got good management experience. what you need right now is management and implementation skills. if there's one thing we learned from the health care fiasco is the government needs more geeks on board. needs to get more people on board who actually understands how technology works and internet works. it's shameful that here we are today in 2014 with so few people sitting inside the white house who actually understand websites. >> all right. let's get to other news. a lot going on. democrats facing a big challenge in keeping control of the senate. but some of the candidates thought to be most vulnerable are hanging tough in polls and in fund raising. in arkansas democrat mark pryor's lead over tom cotton has been growing and he now holds a three-point edge. mary landrieu is headed for a runoff in louisiana, but she's leading her top republican challenger as well. and mark begich of alaska has done perhaps more than any other democrat to distance himself
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from the president. split polls show him and treadwell within striking distance. we now have senator murphy from connecticut. good to see you this morning. >> good to see you. hartford, connecticut, home of the uconn huskies. >> exactly. men and women. congratulations. should we just start right there? >> thank you. i feel very personally responsible for these wins. so i appreciate the thanks. >> where did i just see you recently? i'm trying to remember. the red sox. >> yeah. the red sox. this has been a big year for us in connecticut. >> exactly. looking towards the midterms are all democrats trying to distance themselves from the president? we were just talking about kathleen sebelius stepping down. healthcare.gov has met its number, but politically has it hurt democrats? >> the republicans hinge their entire strategy for the fall on the health care bill and the
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fact is that the numbers have greatly exceeded expectations. "the washington post" poll from about a week and a half ago shows for the first time more people like the health care bill than don't like it. so the electoral strategy sort of crumbles if the health care bill is not a detriment to democrats out there. and it's not going to be. so in 2010 when democrats lost the house of representatives and took some hits in the senate, by this time there were a a bunch of democratic incumbent senators down by five or ten points. the fact that mark pryor, mark belle itch are hanging in there and the health care bill is getting more popular, i think it suggests we're going to be okay in the fall. >> joe, jump in. >> i want to go to gene robinson who will have a question for you next, senator. gene, touch on that quickly. you look at obamacare numbers, recent "washington post" abc poll shows the approval rating
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down to 37%. but you go to the reddest of red states and the series of polls out this week showing in arkansas tom cotton shouldn't be measuring for the drapes yet in the senate office. louisiana, mary landrieu. i always say she's the toughest democrat for republicans to beat and even in alaska mark begich doing much better, republicans planning to go into the majority in the senate might not -- might want to check their strategy mid-april. and recalibrate it. >> yeah. i think they might. i mean, joe, as you know having run races, it's not easy to knock off an incumbent. number one. there are just structural r reasons why that's not an easy thing to do. democrats seem to have a bit of a breeze at their back. i don't know if we could call it a wind yet, but it looks much better for the party now than it did before. but just to ask senator murphy,
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is there an overall democratic message for this midterm election? is it -- we hear a lot about the koch brothers. we hear a lot about the ryan budget. but is there a single message that democrats are going to try to get across to hold the senate and to, who knows, make gains in the house? >> well, there absolutely is. this is all about giving a fair shot to the middle class. that economic dynamic. which is the reason why president obama won re-election two years ago. it's still present today. republicans aren't offering anything different. they've unrolled the ryan budget again which dramatically cuts funding for everything from medicare to education and what you're going to see from democrats is a focus on the minimum wage pay equity, trying to help families afford college. if we can talk to that constituency that re-elected president obama, we're going to do fine. and again republicans really are relying on people going to the
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polls to vote on health care. and as they see the success of this act, both in terms of enrollment but also in terms of the amount of money it's saving the federal government, i don't think that's going to be the defining issue of the fall. >> david, it's quite a week for the voices of bipartisanship. jeb bush out speaking about those themes this week. you had all the former presidents and the current president down in texas talking about civil rights and about a lot of themes of unity. of course here in boston commemorating an event that did bring the country together. how does all that mood music of the week fit in with a white house which seems determined to fight fiercely? >> well, i think it's as the senator says which is to try to take the issue to a larger choice between republicans and democrats. when i think the reality is in this midterm, this is very much a referendum on the president and the democratic party around a big entitlement, around health care. and, you know, the senator's
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views of testing whether or not health care is getting more popular will be tested in november because a lot of these republicans are going to say this is something that you should evaluate president obama on. and i think my question for the senator is isn't it striking to you -- i wonder how you'd feel if a republican president were unilaterally making the kind of choices this one is in regard of implementation of health care based on aspects of it the administration thinks are not ready to go yet. that picking and choosing on the application and implementation of the law. do you find that troublesome? >> listen, i think it's an interesting point here, but i think you have to look at this health care law differently in the sense we are reordering 1/6 of the american economy. you don't do that without some bumps along the road. i'm certainly forgiving of the president making some decisions to try to implement the law in a way that makes sense. so ultimately i think you got to
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give the president a little bit of grace period and a bit of latitude because this thing is so big the only way to do it was to make it big to interlock coverage and protections for people when dealing with their insurance companies. and largely i think he's done it at the right pace. he's implemented at the right pace. and i think the reason the polls are turning around is people are seeing that. >> chris murphy, thanks. great to see you. >> thank bs. . >> we're having a seminar may 16th in connecticut. join us. >> thank you. >> former governor jeb bush isn't shying away from the issue of immigration. it's a topic that attracted plenty of attention following his comments that people who come to the u.s. illegally often do so as an act of love for their family. here's what the florida republican said during an event yesterday. >> this last week i made some statements about immigration reform. generated more news than i anticipated. you know, i've been saying this
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for the last three or four years, said the exact same thing that i've said regularly. the simple fact is there's no conflict between enforcing our laws, believing in the rule of law and having some sensitivity to the immigrant experience which is a part of who we are as a country. it makes no sense for a val k k valedictorian who's lived here for years that we say no, no, you're not worthy of being successful in our country. if our country is to be successful, everybody in our country should be successful as well. and so comprehensive immigration reform is part of the answer. >> all right. joe, take it to the panel. what do you think? >> well, david gregory, what i've been saying about what wouldn't work for jeb bush is i'm sure jeb is holding his breath to see what i think will
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work for jeb bush. but in my esteemed opinion as someone who was a big fan of his as governor. what doesn't work is a hand wringing. going, well, gee, i just lo immigrants more than other republicans. and gee, my -- sort of that approach. jeb has been wringing his hands playing hamlet for some time about his party. yesterday, though, seemed to be jeb bush on his toes and sort of leaning into his critics and taking an approach that i think might work in a republican primary. certainly a different tone. he's pushing back. >> i totally agree with you, joe. you saw from that clip that was a different -- there was more fire there. you often make the point if you're going the direction, go 90 miles an hour. if you want to own immigration the way his brother did as
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president until 9/11 and on the come pain trail, then go out there and open iwn it. i've been speaking to corporate leaders who are republicans who aligned with jeb on immigration, education, spent a lot of time on it. he's got to do that. he's got to get over this reticence about the primary process. nobody can begrudge him that, but that's part of it. you've got to get over it. if you want it, go in there hard. he's going to face a tough primary. maybe he's getting some of these issues out of the way, but i think now he's got to recognize that he is being looked at. there's a lot of smart money in the party as you well anyway that's seeking him out. he's got to demonstrate this ask who i am and i'm ready to do it. >> yao gene robinson and then gillian tett. >> what he's doing on immigration is a useful thing
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for the republican party. because if he doesn't do this, there is no real discussion of immigration reform in the republican party. i think it's in the interest of the party to have that discussion. which ever way they go to at least let voters see that the party understands this is an issue. you know, self-deportation as a message takings the party to whig land. >> the other thing is let us not forget christine wright. having trouble in recent years by in the christian religion, it is not acceptable to shun people who need refuge. and so by playing it this way, he's potentially tapping into a whole new ground of support that hasn't been discussed much in recent years. >> before we go to break, gillian can you comment on the markets? 266-point drop driven by tech? >> yeah. in my view this is a badly needed correction. it's gone far too far in terms
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of the over-hyping of the stocks. if we have a correction now, there's more of a chance of a sustainable market going forward. >> thank you very much. and david we will see you this sunday, "meet the press." look forward to seeing boston strong. thank you very much. >> thanks. up next, stephen colbert will shed the act that made him famous when he takes over the late show next year. but does cbs' new hire really shake up late night? and then a new book pays tribute to the life of billy graham. we'll have that and much more when "morning joe" returns. ♪ ♪
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i want to say congratulations to our pal stephen colbert who will be taking over for david letterman next year. we're very happy for that guy. he's very funny. he's a good friend. now, a lot of people in the media are already talking about how there's going to be a new late night war. i just want to say that there's not going to be any war. it'll be a dance-off. ♪ >> all right. let the late night dance wars begin. that'd be good. they all dance. so stephen colbert will take over david letterman's desk when the talk show host retires next year. let's bring in the editor from "the new york times" peter lotman. great to have you on the show. what do you think? >> letterman announces his
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retirement. the first person they said was the lead person to replace him was stephen colbert. and he was right. it came together just a week after the announcement of the retirement. >> that's really quick. >> yeah. >> how does letterman feel about that? >> colbert said one of the issues of taking over for letterman was that he supported it. les moon had his eye on him far long time. that's why it came together so fast. >> i think decisiveness is also really helpful. when you have these long periods of time with who is it, it sets that person up brutally. and secondly it just shows they know what they've got. they know what they've got and they got it. >> yes. we've had this series of announcements. letterman retiring, i think they wanted to act quickly. there were a few leaked candidates out there and they snapped colbert up. >> if you know the answers, say.
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if you don't, speculate wildly. is he going into the ed sullivan theater? given it's clear he's not going to play the role of stephen colbert, what is the format? traditional or innovative? >> bill carter says yes he's going to stay in new york. >> but in the ed sullivan theater? >> yes. they own it so otherwise they'd lose money. they're going to repurpose it for colbert. he attracts a younger audience. he also brings strangely some musical talent. yesterday we were watching great video of him performing at carnegie hall. which i think will surprise a lot of people. >> it's such, such big shoes to fill. i mean, it's got to be daunting. >> it is. letterman's the longest running late night host. everyone thinks he's the greatist. but colbert has a lot of support from his fellow comedians. you've seen fallon there. jimmy kimmel issued a statement.
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>> so who will replace the colbert report? >> they've got a thought of amy schumer, key and peelle. they've got a lot of choices. >> do you think that stephen colbert will ever bring back colbert even as a gag or bit in the show? >> quite possibly. he's shedding the persona. rush limbaugh went after him yesterday saying this is a war on the heartland of america which probably made cbs happy because it generated a bunch of publicity. he's losing that blow hard persona that he's used for the last nine years. >> is there anything to what limbaugh said? >> i don't think there is. colbert is a comedian. he's done this act for nine years. he said in an announcement right away yesterday he was losing it. so i think you'll see a new stephen colbert next year. >> you want to hear it, john? all right. here's rush limbaugh on stephen
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colbert. >> you care what i think of colbert getting letterman's gig? cbs has just declared war on the heartland of america. there is a -- here's the -- no longer is comedy going to be a covert assault on traditional american values, conservatives. now it's just wide out in the open. they've hired a partisan so-called comedian to run a comedy show. >> a partisan comedian. i mean -- >> if cbs wanted to declare war on the heartland, wouldn't they cancel some of the police procedurals, that whole lineup of shows that are very popular in the heartland? >> that's right. it appeals to an older audience, that network. "ncis" and the like. >> when he is political, he skews democrats and republicans. but i think the persona has led rush baa to believe he's going
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to skew. i bet he gets away from most of the politics. >> joe, help me to understand why conservatives are upset about this. i get it to an extent, but i'm thinking humor is a good thing. >> here's the thing. david letterman was a liberal. you know? i think most conservatives like myself grew up listening to music and singing along to songs and laughing at comedians' jokes who had never voted for a republican once in their life. so it's not a great shock. most comedians on the national stage are liberals. that said, johnny carson won and dominated. and jay leno won and dominated. i think jay is a progressive guy as well. but they won because they wanted a central time zone. people who know tv know you win broadcast networks and certainly les moonvez knows this you win when you win the central time zone. not when you win new york and
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l.a. the markets are going to take care of this. if stephen colbert decides to go far left and he won't on cbs, then jimmy fallon will be the luckiest guy in new york city because nbc is going to get massive ratings. the market will play this out. again, you look at cbs as massive success over the past years under les. it's come in the central time zone. colbert is a smart enough guy to understand that. >> i don't think les has a bad track record on creating successful programming. >> les is absolutely brilliant. and les understands this as well as anybody in america. >> well, if you looked at some of the pictures they showed there, he was at a state dinner earlier this year, sat next to michelle obama. but he was also sitting there
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yukking it up with a family guy. les believes he'll appeal to both sides of the aisle. >> peter lattman, thank you so much. we'll see what happens. it's certainly interesting times in the late night wars. coming up, does jeb bush's aspirations depend on taking a page from his brother's playbook? we're breaking down the 2016 latino vote next on "morning joe." ♪ so ally bank really has no hidden fees on savings accounts? that's right, no hidden fees. it's just that i'm worried about, you know, "hidden things." ok, why's that? well uhhh... surprise!!! um... well, it's true. at ally there are no hidden fees. not one. that's nice.
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♪ the coveted latino vote could deliver republicans to the white house in 2016. that's if the gop nominates the right candidate. so does that make jeb bush the man to beat? derek crunches the numbers for us. >> jeb's comments on immigration may have raised eyebrows on the republican base, but it tears a page from his brother's successful presidential playbook. mitt romney's bid was crushed by hispanic voters running away from his candidacy. his policy on illegal immigration resulted in only 27% of the hispanic vote. that's down four points from 2008. by comparison, 2004 saw jeb's
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older brother george w. get 44% of the hispanic vote. critical to his slim victory over john kerry. with national latino participation increasing steadily since 2004, several key swing states tell a simple story. in the governor's home state of florida, latino voters have historically voted for the republican nominee. in 2008 president barack obama bucked this trend capturing 56% of the latino vote. increasing the margin further in 2012 to 60%. in a state where hispanic voters make 17% of the total vote share, this could spell trouble for the gop. it's a similar political picture in other swing states. furthermo furthermore, exit polling shows on the deal of immigration, latino voters believe a path to citizenship is the best way to deal with the issue. while only 18% say deportation is the best answer. nationally voters are not too far off with 2-1 agreeing that a path to citizenship is the right
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choice. >> yes, they broke the law, but it's not a felony. it's kind of the -- it's a -- it's an act of love. >> he's a popular former governor of a political swing state. the question is will jeb bush's scandal pay off or is he overplaying a hand? back to you. >> derrick, thanks. is jeb bush adding a much needed dimension to the conversation the republicans should be having over immigration? >> well, republicans have been talking about this since the 2012 loss. there's been a lot of hand wringing, a lot of soul searching. but you look at the numbers that derrick laid out there and it's simple math. unless there's some seismic changes in how people vote in 2016, there's a simple rule. i mean, if republicans get in the 20s like mitt romney did in 2012 with the hispanic voters, they're going to lose just about any presidential election. if they get in the 40s like george w. bush among hispanic
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voters in 2004, it's kind of hard for them to lose. so this is a critical issue. however the republicans come down on it that they show themselves not as being anti-immigrant. >> not just politically stupid but politically suicidal to not vote someone that can get 40% of the hispanic vote. his thought was he can be loosy goosy this year. there's such a vacuum now because there's no front runner. he's being pulled into it. he suddenly has to watch what he says. he can't be his normal philosophical self. and immigration is where he can make his stand. mika is right. i think he's doing himself a macro-favor by putting this on the table. but he's got to get through the nomination process. >> what do you think about that? you reap what you sow. so what is jeb bush potentially trying to harvest out of
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planting something like this so early on? >> i think he's doing himself good, frankly. because there is this vacuum. there's nobody else out there who's sort of commanding the gop establishment attention. so i think he should be jeb bush. he should say what's on his mind, kind of stake out this territory for himself. and see how it goes. i mean, clearly he seems to be more and more likely to jump in. so why not clear an area for yourself and get the wider conversation going? i think it's very healthy. >> because that's something -- >> see if he can bring the party db he's not going to bring the whole party to his point of view, but get the party used to talking about these issues in a different way. up next, a new look at world renowned minister billy graham. the authors of a new book who just happen to be his grandchildren. they join us next. you're watching "morning joe." [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman,
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[ female announcer ] when sweet and salty come together, the taste is irresistible. sweet and salty nut bars by nature valley. nature at its most delicious. ♪ here with us now for faith on fridays, the grandchildren of world renowned evangelist billy graham. arem and baz. what do you all think? >> not bad. not bad at all. >> i'm mika brzezinski. >> you know what it feels like. >> i do. i feel your pain. >> thank you. >> somebody who wouldn't, joe scarborough. >> yeah. i'm always asked of all the presidents and prime ministers and rock stars and movie stars i've interviewed, everybody
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always goes who were you most excited about interviewing. i go, that's easy. billy graham because when i interviewed him for a southern baptist family, it's sort of like the pope. but everybody in my family could write a thousand notes on thanking billy graham for what billy graham did. this is a great concept. tell us about it. >> well, you know, growing up as a grandchild of billy graham, you have people approaching you everywhere wanting to tell you their story of how our grandfather's ministry affected their lives. right after the doctor popped in and wanted to share his story. >> that's a little much. >> it was a little much. a little awkward. it happens all the time. we heard so many amazing stories that we wanted to compile them all into one place. that's what we did. >> that's a great idea. >> arem, the amazing thing about
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your grandfather is certainly those of us that grew up in evangelical households will remember the crazier things got in pop culture, the more conservative with a small "c" our parents get. it's almost like this bunker mentality in the '70s of church goers. somehow your father kept a light touch and his ministry was based in love so much so that he upset a lot of conservatives when he wanted to go to the soviet union. they thought he should stay out of the soviet union and yet he said communists need to hear about jesus' love as well. isn't that the remarkable thing about him through the years? that he always led with love. >> jump in. >> i think that is remarkable. first of all, joe, you said your family could submit thousands of stories and i'm wondering how come they haven't? >> yeah. where are you on the thank you website? >> exactly.
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but i think he stuck to a very simple message. what i always remember, the crusades that i attended was he said if you remember one thing when you leave here, it's that god loves you. and that was his central message really. >> which is in many ways saying i love you. which you want to actually take the word of god, the message of god and bring it to the people. and he has a way of saying that to people in a way nobody else could. >> well, he's unique in the sense in a day and age where you have so much polarization, he reached across aisles regardless of political affiliation, gen r gender, race. that's been a tremendous example to us as grandchildren. >> he did. and people now are talking about how remarkable pope francis is. his approach, much like your grandfather's approach. which was, yes, god tell us what to do.
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god gives us guidance because he loves us. but at the same time my job's not to judge you. my job is to tell you about god's grace and god's love. and yes, god's judgment as well. but billy graham, again, that's -- look at all the people that are at these revivals. he seemed to realize that jesus came to the world not to heal the healthy, but to heal the sick. >> joe, one of the beauties of this book is we heard what famous people had to say about billy graham. but not from the people who filled the stadium and watched the programs, hear their stories. the wonderful thing about this book is we're finally hearing the stories of the masses. and they're pretty unbelievable. >> tell us some of your favorites. >> i don't know if i have a favorite specific story, but i have a favorite type. and it's full of stories where the decision of one person ended
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up affecting multiple generations. there was one guy who said because of the decision that his dad made, his grandparents, his brothers, his sisters, cousins. i mean, it spanned multiple generations of lives were changed. those kinds of stories i think are pretty amazing. >> and -- >> i'm sorry. >> jerusulah. you're a pastor's wife, mother of two, and woman's minister. is that you? >> it is. >> so your life literally has taken the path in every way. >> yes, it really has. i mean, in the ministry we have a church in our hometown of south carolina. i think dear to my heart is the message of my grandfather's. it is not my place to give you rules. it's just my place to tell you that jesus loves you. and the most hopeless people in
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the world still have somebody -- the most hopeless people in the world, jesus is there for them no matter what your circumstances are. >> joe? >> and you guys are talking about the masses of people that came to all the rallies throughout the years. we're showing also pictures of your grandfather with bill clinton which of course angered some republicans. just like when your father was with richard nixon. that angered democrats. again, he just didn't care about political affiliations or stations in life, did he? he really did lead a jesus-led life. he just cared about the person. >> i think he -- which has been an impression upon all of us is he cared and saw each person made in the image of god. their position wasn't important. it was their person. i think whether he was talking to a president or whether he was talking to somebody, you know, who takes care of the house, it doesn't make a difference.
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all has value in his eyes. i think that's the message of the gospel as well. >> no doubt about it. that's what he did. >> amen. >> thank you, billy graham. thank you very much. >> thank you. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." ♪ [ banker ] sydney needed some financial guidance so she could take her dream to the next level. so we talked about her options. her valuable assets were staying. and selling her car wouldn't fly. we helped sydney manage her debt and prioritize her goals, so she could really turn up the volume on her dreams today...and tomorrow. so let's see what we can do about that... remodel. motorcycle. [ female announcer ] some questions take more than a bank. they take a banker. make a my financial priorities appointment today. because when people talk, great things happen.
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the ukrainian government is now vowing to remove a group of pro-russian separatist from administration buildings in the eastern part of that country. now, of course, the risk of violence dramatically raises the stakes in what the united states is calling a blatant attempt by moscow. and many in america fear it's a pretext for a possible invation. our frequent guest ian brzezinski testified yesterday at a senate foreign relations hearing on the international response to russia's actions. this is what he said -- >> to date the west has jet to generate a response that is likely to deter moscow from further aggression. nato's response to the invasion of ukraine has been underwhelming. it has been limited to a largely symbolic reinforcement of nato airspace, and the tasking of
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force posture studies. it raises concerns about the u.s. pivot to asia and about the reduction of u.s. combat capability in europe. it affirms who those who say washington's and nato's commitment has declined. >> mark, obviously ian is echoing a lot of the concerns that john mccain has echoed when we had the showdown earlier this week between john mccain and john kerry. two old friends, vietnam vets, who didn't seem so friendly earlier this week. there is the question that looms for barack obama and the administration, what do they do if vladimir putin moves forward and keeps going west? >> you know, it's off the front pages and off the news for the most part. as the president goes forward, it's pretty clear he does not want to be a war president in a new region. and the russian advantage on the ground is overwhelming, so i think the president's just got to hope it doesn't happen. and if it does the criticism is going to rain down on him because the charge is going to
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be that his failure to be stronger in this period gave putin the thought that he could go in and do it. i still think the strongest card the president has might be considered leading from behind by some is to keep europe united with the united states to try to deter as much as possible. but if putin wants to go in, there's very little this president or any president could do. >> and to avoid world war ii i at home when we put a graphic can we put i. brzezinski because it said brizinski and didn't say any of them. i'm in trouble, joe. ian and dad totally disagree. obamacare has enrolled 7.5 million people through exchanges. how will kathleen sebelius' tenure be viewed? [bell rings]
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good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a live look at new york city. back with us on set, we have mark halperin and eugene robinson. we're starting with stephen colbert, is that what i'm supposed to stay? from now on?
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but i love colbert. >> he'll always be colbert to me. >> he's always colbert to me. he's set to take over david letterman's desk when the late night talk show host retires next year. holding up their phones and saying, oh, my gosh, i'm thinking what's going on and it's who is replacing letterman. even "usa today" devoted their masthead to the comedian colbert who is -- i can't say it. it doesn't sound as good. too femme niinine. has quite a resume including a peabody award, multiple memmys and even a grammy and it will be a new role for colbert who for the past nine years has played a character on "the colbert report," he spoke about being in and out of character on a pair of "meet the press appearances." >> you have three kids and said you don't want them to watch your show because you want them to know you, dad. >> right. i say things i don't mean and a child just is not going to know
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that's a character and they're going to say i don't mean it when i say i'm proud of them or i don't mean it when i say i love them and, you know, i'm going to tuck them into bed one night and they're going to say, i love you, honey, it's good, dad, it's very dry. >> is it hard going in and out of character? >> i have started at second city and chicago and the saying was wear your character as a cat, you can take it on and off as you need. >> is it hard for guests to adapt to you in character? what do you like to tell them beforehand? >> i say thank you so much for coming because i'm grateful i know it must be a tough booking sometimes because it's not like going on charlie rose, you know, you -- you don't know necessarily what i'm going to say or what i'm going to ask because i'm an active idiot and as i say to the guests, i say thank you for coming, have you ever seen the show, i do the show in character. he's an idiot. he's willfully ignore rant of
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what you know and care about. please honestly disabuse me of my ignorance and we'll have a great time. >> an active idiot. i like it. joe? >> well, i mean, as an inactive idiot i'm very excited. >> oh. >> what do you think, mika? i think he's a great choice. >> i like it a lot. i like it a lot. >> i think it's a really smart choice by cbs, actually. because, you know, he can -- he can do interviews obviously. but in his own personality as well he's got the young demographic audience, you know, i think it's a smart choice. >> go ahead. >> i was going to say it should be interesting because remember the show "strangers with candy" he's an actor on that show and he's been a good actor but we can see he's authentically a great and interesting interviewer he's politically interested and he has celebrities on all the time so i think for some people it might be kind of a quick decision, like, cbs -- like a week to the
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day that dave announces he's retiring and they've got him ready to go. it seems kind of fast but good for them. >> i know. and other big major changes sometimes they've gone too slow, so now the big question is just please don't set him up to fail. please don't set him up to fail, please let it be until he takes over. one big question is whether colbert can lift letterman's sagging ratings. one of the critics say he's at odds with a much wider audience. this is interesting. >> you care what i think of colbert getting letterman's gig? cbs has just declared war on the heartland of america. no longer is comedy going to be a covert assault on traditional american values, conservatives, now it's wide out in the open. they've hired a partisan so-called comedian to run a comedy show.
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>> so, i guess some conservati e conservatives don't like it, he's making fun of them. i bet you he can make fun of it. >> he makes fun of liberals. >> he makes fun of us. we'll see. >> he can talk to conservatives. >> there's reaction all around. let's get to other news out of washington, after overseeing the troubled rollout of the affordable care act health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius has resigned. the project has been hit by delays and canceled coverage and massive technical glitches on healthcare.gov but sebelius painted a rosy picture before the rollout last october only to see the website all but collapse under the available of heavy volume and questionable security. >> deadline after deadline missed. it's as if the agency is in disarray trying to meet the october 1st deadline. >> we will be open for open enrollment october 1st of 2013. and we will be enrolling americans across the country january 1st, 2014.
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>> you can assure us no further delays -- >> i can to only telling you, we are on track to meet october 1st. i can't tell you what exactly will happen at every step along the way but i can tell you that is the determination we're on track to meet it. we'll test it. >> were you not on track to meet it? the >> we've had a few slowdowns and glitches but it's sort of a great problem to have. it's based on the fact that the volume has been so high and the interest is so high. >> i'm going to try and download every movie ever made and you are going to try to sign up for obamacare and we'll see which happens first. >> okay. >> businesses were given a delay of a year. but that individuals were not given that option. why is that? >> in these early weeks access to healthcare.gov has been a miserably frustrating experience for way too many americans. i am as frustrated and angry as anyone with the flawed launch of healthcare.gov.
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so, let me say directly to these americans, you deserve better. >> joe? >> so, mika, you were talking to the white house yesterday. >> uh-huh. >> as this story was developing. what can you tell us? >> well, first of all, there's a couple of different reasons for her departure and none of them are completely unrelated to what we're reporting here. she feels that new blood should come in without the baggage of the rollout and all -- certain things that come along with it that have negative connotations. and yet the administration has eclipsed its initial goal of 7 million people enrolling through health care exchanges which is something to be proud of and they were celebrating last night as they were seeing her off at a dinner, valerie had dinner with her. and actually she tried to call me because i was going to talk to kathleen and i fell asleep. but they were having a great time. i got a couple of e-mails. and celebrating the work that she did and what she went through to make it ham and she's proud of serving. as "the new york times" notes sebelius was not alongside the
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president, though, during the celebratory news conference. republican leaders reacted to her departure on twitter including a backhanded compliment from majority leader eric cantor who thanked her for her service but noted nobody can make obamacare work. accord to ezra klein she's leaving because obamacare won. he writes the law has won its survival. the obama administration can exhale. personnel changes can be made. sebelius is expected to be replaced by sylvia burwell, her omb confirmation sailed through the senate last year 96-0. so, you know, depending on what side of this issue you're on maybe you take this departure differently. >> yeah. i don't know about the white house having a press conference and having her depart because she won. it certainly brings up the mission accomplished thought. this fight is going to go on for some time now. they certainly, though, numerically hit their first
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numbers. and so it's a good time for her to leave if she's going to leave. mark hall principperinhalperin, hearing? was she pushed out? was it something in the works for a while, or did she just leave because she's exhausted? >> my understanding is she was not pushed out. politically this is probably the best time for her to go. they're replacing her with someone, if she's confirmed, who is a very able manager. and who will not bring to the congressional hearings and oversight as well as the politics of the midterms the same level of baggage as kathleen sebelius. if the law ends up being successfully implemented over the years she'll go down in the history books in a very positive way. that's left to be written. she's an able person and a great public servant. she did not execute on this and i think she'll be part of the history books for that reason. but the politics of this are as good as the administration can hope for because they're nominating a younger woman who has a great record who has a lot of republican support in the
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senate and as mika just said was easily confirmed. i think they handled the politics of this about as well as they could have. >> gene robinson, let me say up front, i know kathleen and i like her an awful lot. a lot of democrats say she's a very effective governor out in kansas. i don't really know her record that well there. and she's able to leave on a high note at least for her at least to sort of, okay, i can check this box out and run out of the side door and get out of this building as quickly as possible. at the same time when her legacy is reviewed, we'll have to tell the truth about it, she appeared to be asleep at the switch when this thing launched and as a director of hhs in a white house that was not engaged. and through an awful lot of authority to her, she and her department did not seem to be ready at all, did they? >> well, look, there's no doubt about that. obviously the department and the administration was not ready when the -- when healthcare.gov
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launched or failed to launch and people couldn't sign up for insurance. that was a debacle and that will certainly be, you know, near the top of sort of wrap-up stories that are written about her tenure. but this is a -- this is a great time for her to step away. they've reached their numbers. the program is working now. i guess ezra writes that its future is assured and it's here to stay. in fact, it was always here to stay i think, much earlier when we learned that it wasn't going to collapse in some sort of death spiral. so, it was going to be here to stay. but it's looking much better now. and i think it will be a much better record now. >> well, you know, mika, whether this bill stays in its current form or is changed 1,000 times over, which i do believe it is going to be amended so much over the next five to ten years, that
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it may be unrecognizable at the end. look at the changes that the president himself has unilaterally made. a lot of that will depend on the elections coming up. we have some interesting polls in 2014. state of races changing in arkansas, in louisiana, some say even in alaska right now. and so that -- that will also have an impact on her legacy. how democrats do running on obama care. >> yep. i mean, look, i think that there's different ways to look at this departure. you mentioned mission accomplished. i don't think that's what they were doing at all. >> no. >> i think that's why she wasn't there. they didn't put a sign up. she just moved quietly out. had a wonderful dinner with her friends. and did what she thought she should do. took -- it's pretty battered by it probably. and they're moving on with 7 million and counting. so, i should think each side of the story knocks the other off
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and calls it even at least for now politically. >> there's no question she's well liked in the white house and the president has extraordinarily loyalty to her. but it's the clips you showed demonstrated she lost control of her public image. >> yeah, absolutely. >> she made public mistakes. >> totally. and, joe, you mentioned the polls, democrats face a big challenge in keeping control of the senate, but some of the candidates thought to be most vulnerable are hanging tough in polls and in fund raising. in arkansas democrat mark prior's lead over tom cotton has been growing and he now holds a three-point edge. mary landrieu is likely to head for a runoff in louisiana but she's leading her top republican challenger as well and mark begich of alaska has done more than any other democrat to distance himself from the president. split polls show him and mead tredwell within striking distance of each other, good point about the midterms. it's going to be very, very interesting. i definitely want to send -- i want to send our states of play to iowa for some of those races.
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>> now, that's going to be a great one, mika. mark halperin, this shows how much movement there are in these states. i said in 2010 that we could have a repeat of what happened in 1994. almost a direct overlay where you had a new democrat elected in '92, a new democrat elected in 2008. they both were seen as moving too far left, so there was a right ward shift in the house of representatives. then that overreach by the house of representatives, re-elected the democratic president. everybody expected another big midterm and remember what happened in 1998. democrats actually almost took over the house. shocked everybody. they were expecting a huge victory. we republicans were. and newt gingrich lost his job because of it. you look at these numbers and the give especially in a state like arkansas where this race is tight. >> yeah. >> in recollection where the vase much tighter. in louisiana where i say you just -- mary landrieu always
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figures out a way to win by 6 1/2 votes. any republicans who think they can sit back on the lead between now and election day and think that they don't have to do anything -- >> yeah. >>-- and are believing the press reports and fighting an old war, i think they may be surprised. they're going to have to stay on their toes and work hard or else these democrats look like they can maintain the majority. >> well, there's no question the story's not been written yet. but i'll say three thing that if you're a republican you have to look at in a positive way. one is a lot of the incumbents are ahead or in fighting shape but below 50% and that's always a danger for incumbent, joe, as you know. second, most of the developments in the last couple months have been in the republicans' favor, states like iowa, michigan, new hampshire, colorado, more in play than they were before in expanding the republican -- the field for the republican. and the last thing is democrats are still looking for their message. we know what the republican message will be. democrats are still looking for what their message is going to be. is it the koch brothers, is it
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the ryan budget, is it individual demonization of some of these specific candidates? they still have to figure it out. but, i'll say it again, you're right. this story is not written and democrats are positioned to try to hold off and keep control of the senate, not by a lot but by a majority. all right, we've got one more story we want to get to and i'll throw it to thomas roberts. >> thank you. >> that works, right? >> perfect setup for me. >> did that hurt? >> last night hillary clinton was in las vegas as part of her speaking tour and she was heckler and the heckler's shoe. i might need surgery. >> what was that, a bat? was that a bat? is that somebody throwing something at me? is that part of cirque du soleil?
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my goodness, i didn't know solid waste management was so controversial. thank goodness she didn't play softball like i did. >> all right. so hillary clinton taking that -- >> good for her. >> i do not think it was a six-inch louboutin i think it was more of a payless pump hurling at her. yesterday on "morning joe" we discussed with hillary clinton can point to as her biggest accomplishment as secretary of state. lenny davis who served as special counsel to former president bill clinton weighed in writing in "the hill" by the end of former president george bush's second term essentially two lines of thinking had emerged, on the right was the preference for hard power and the use of military force and on the left was growing bias against military intervention of any kind and in favor of soft power, economic aid and incentives on human rights and democracy. former secretary of state hillary clinton in partnership with her boss president obama
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came up with a mix of hard and soft, calling it smart power with the appropriate mix between the two driven by specific facts and circumstances. in short, soft plus hard equals smart, and it could be one of the clintons most enduring doctrines and leadership at the state department in the early years of the 21st century. >> okay. gene robinson. >> yeah. >> agree? disagree? and what do ul think of the shoe? >> you know, our politicians are second to none in dodging shoes, right? >> she did good. >> we're better than anybody else in the world when dodging shoes. you know, i think that's a pretty good analysis of -- >> remember that, gene? he's good. he's quick! >> homes the bee's the best. >> he's the guy from "the matrix." >> that was good. that was good. and hillary. >> that was very good. >> let's see, let's see. let's see. are you going to roll it? >> whoa. >> that was good, too. >> man.
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>> hand clasp. >> it must have been a high heel because it fluttered like a bat. >> i prefer to think it's a bat than somebody whipping a shoe at me. still ahead on "morning joe" -- ♪ call me dr. love they call me dr. love ♪ >> k.i.s.s. gets elected to the rock and roll hall of fame but the bands' members aren't happy. >> isn't that that k.i.s.s. guy? >> disgusted by that. >> this k.i.s.s. guy hates that k.i.s.s. guy. >> oh. >> in fact, all the k.i.s.s. guys seem to hate each other which makes it all very interesting. paul stanley's going to be here to talk about it coming up on y-94 and up next the top stories of the politico playbook not quite as exciting. but, first, brittany schiff with a check on the forecast. >> okay. she's a big fan i'm sure. >> i want to hear some more of that singing.
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that's what i want to hear. it's a mild start in this morning in the northeast especially in washington where we are seeing temperatures at 61 degrees. 57 in new york. we do have a few changes as we head into this evening. we'll see showers moving in. right now just a few isolated thunderstorms. just outside of cincinnati with that moisture is going to held towards the northeast. mid-60s for chicago, improving conditions, but take a look what happens as we head into saturday. temperatures plunge for billings down to 49 degrees for the day time high. temperatures in denver at 72. but after saturday, they are dropping down into the 30s with snow expected and we'll keep a close eye on kansas city and chicago where we do expect to see thunderstorms by saturday. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ call me dr. love they call me dr. love ♪ ♪ i know a thing about an ira
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♪ time now to take a look at the morning papers from our parade of papers. "the sacramento bee" authorities are investigating a deadly accident in california overnight that has left at least nine people dead. officials say a fedex truck crossed a median and slammed into a tour bus on a freeway in the small city of or land, the bus was carrying high school students on a visit to a local college. seven students were killed as well as both drivers. 30 others hurt. joe? >> what an absolute nightmare. and "the post gazette" speaking of horrible stories, "the
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pittsburgh post gazette" believe the high school student who allegedly stabbed 22 people wednesday had no specific target and selected his victims at random. alex hribal remains in custody. his attorney says there were no signs that the teenager was contemplating the attack saying his client is not, quote, a loner or a weirdo. president obama foneld the school's principal to express his sympathies and some of the victims remain in critical condition. and google glass is going on sale next week here in the united states. but prospective buyers will have to act fast, the long-anticip e long-anticipated product will be available in limited quantities on the website. the device will set you back $1,500 plus tax. i saw, mika, a "new york times" article the possibilities of google glass absolutely fascinating. the first time i've ever been interested in using them. i don't know if you saw "the times," the "sunday times" article a month ago if you're in another country you actually put
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the glasses on and it translates signs for you. so, as you're wearing your glasses you can actually read signs in whatever language you want to read the signs in. >> that's -- that's -- >> so you read the sign on the oncoming bus, right? as you're on the street focusing on the computer on your face. >> i don't know about that. i can't get my arms around it. >> use on menus in china. >> on menus, there you go. >> "the kansas city star" a group of clever chimpanzees are back in their cages -- >> listen, mika, we just wanted to get out for a couple of hours. >> after making a daring escape yesterday at the kansas city zoo. the zookeeper says one of the chimps broke a nearly six-foot-long tree branch leend it against the wall and climbed out of the zoo enclosure. that's pretty good. the chimp persuaded six other chimps to join. officials contained zoo guests in locked areas until the
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animals were lured back inside their enclosure. and no one, chimps included, were hurt. >> they were lured back. i wonder what lured them back? they tasted freedom. >> oh, my goodness. that's great. >> for me it was a hot fudge sundae. a lot of fun. >> let's do politico. >> that will work for me as well. with us now the chief white house correspondent for politico. give it to us. >> happy friday! >> there we have it. thank you very much. >> and happy birthday to the great ethyl kennedy's 86 today. >> oh, ethel, that's fantastic. >> good for her. >> that's lovely. >> let's start off by knowing that scott brown is officially running for senate in new hampshire but he's having trouble shaking off a little bit of criticism that he is nothing more than a political opportunist, take a look at it. >> it's sure looking good with the license plates that say
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"live free or die." as we've traveled around portsmouth, i have had a chance to see many places that played such an important role in my life. that includes obviously the river and the harbor where my grandparents used to bring me when i was a boy. i was porn in the portsmouth naval shipyard. when my mom was young she was a waitress and when they carried me home, it wasn't too far from here. the house right over on islington street. >> reminding everybody of his roots there in new hampshire. the granite state. brown is also airing a new campaign ad that looks a little similar to the spot that he ran back in 2010. >> oh, okay. >> scott brown has almost 300,000 miles on this truck. over the last few weeks it's taken him all across new hampshire. listening. learning. and what he's heard is pretty simple. people want an america that leads the world again. >> this is my truck.
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i put a lot of miles on it during this campaign. wherever i go, people tell me they are concerned about the path our country is on. spending on out of control. government keeps getting bigger and bigger. >> it is familiar there. he's talked about this truck for a long time. i thought it was interesting, though, in his speech he talked about his young daughters who were now adults and they're both getting married. and his wife gail was saying, you know, you got to adapt to the change. the girls are leaving but you'll always have your truck. >> that's true. >> but is this really an uphill battle for him to be able to unseat the democrat jeanne shaheen? what does it look like? >> it is. i asked around and people in new hampshire say no question that he's still the underdog. but this is going to be a close and real race. he's going to spend a lot. he's going to force democrats to spend a lot. but you're setup pointed to his problem. he's officially lived in new hampshire for all of four months. and that's partly why he went through that trip that he did of
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the sugar house and all the other places he's been in new hampshire. but to them he's a come here. there's a lot of voters in southern new hampshire who work in boston, there are a lot of ex-massachusetts residents themselves. but he has to make this sale. and he's using the truck because the truck worked. the truck was very effective. >> i like the truck. >> and at the very end of that new ad they have someone with a clear new hampshire accent saying go get 'em, scott! >> so, do you think he can overcome the carpetbagger look? he has established, it's true he was born and raised in new hampshire. got his start there obviously traveling into massachusetts. but he does have that local boy connection. >> absolutely. and he's vacationed there. he's been part of the state. and as the country becomes more transient, the carpetbagger thing becomes less -- much less of an issue as former senator clinton about that. and republicans in senate races
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have the wind at their back right now. there's no question about that. he's one of the people that will benefit from that. and he's one of the people that will benefit from the new supreme court ruling. >> yeah. >> a lot of people writing more checks in these races. >> joe, what do you think? >> i agree with mike allen. all you have to do is talk about hillary clinton who had no contacts with new york state when she decided to run for senator of new york. people look at a senator differently than they look at a governor. there's no way hillary would have ever been elected governor of new york state, i don't think, just like scott brown would have problems if he were running for governor of new hampshire. but as mike said, you have such -- especially in -- in -- around the border and in a good chunk of new hampshire, "the boston globe" and the boston local stations have a big impact on the media markets up there. and there is such a connection between new hampshire and boston. and northern part of massachusetts, that this is
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certainly, i would think, mike, a much, much smaller jump than hillary clinton going from the white house with her illinois background and deciding to run in new york state. >> absolutely. he speaks their language. they've been as you point out seeing media coverage of him forever. he can say that he knows the senate. he has a great story to tell, but senator jean shaheen is popular. it's a blue-ish state. and that's why he's the underdog. >> politico's mike allen, thank you. up next can wall street bounce back after having its worst day in more than two years? "business before the bell" is next. ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing
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♪ welcome back, everybody. it's "business before the bell" with cnbc's michelle caruso cabrera. this was a wild one yesterday. does it look like we'll have another rocky start? >> we had a brutal selloff yesterday and we'll see weakness in the morning. jpmorgan reported earnings weaker than expected. they made more than $5 billion of profits but that wasn't as much as what wall street was expecting and we'll see some
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weakness in that stock which is a member of the dow jones industrial average so it definitely impacts that average. and then what does it tell us about everything else? they were concerned about lackluster mortgage performance which was where some of the revenue was sluggish and the trading revenue was sluggic and that will impact some of the other banks. and the other stock we'll watch is general motors because there's a new recall related to ignitions as well. different issue. >> right. >> from the one we've been talking about. >> this one this time around just so people understand about the fact that the key going into the ignition switch they're saying that you can't have anything else on your key chain. can't have anything else to weight it down other than the key fob itself. >> right. but then there's this new recall where apparently the key can come out and the car can keep going. is the new one on the six different models, the ignition lock cylinders in all these cars that were constructed in 2003-2011. but what's coming down financially is that, you know, originally gm said the recall in
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the quarter was going to cost $300 million and up to $750 million and now it will cost $1.3 billion and they've suspended two engineers. so when you see that headline there $1.3 billion charge, that's a cost basically. you got to take that out of your -- you know, your profitability. >> michelle, from sources and people that you're talking to, do people really believe gm was not aware of the financial number crunch and this trickle-out of what we've been seeing of incremental going from 3 million to $1.3 billion, that they didn't know exactly what they were dealing with? >> it's quite possible that people underestimate the true costs of things all the time. i mean, think about the last renovation you did on your house, you know, you try to do a worst-case scenario and say, oh, we think it will be this many people turning in this many cars. undercounting is rampant and often happens, so i am not sure that they would have lied. it's possible a lot of people knew that there should have been a recall and then didn't do it,
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but what it was ultimately going to cost, that's always hard to guess. >> we'll wait to see if it's another wild ride for friday. have a great weekend, michelle. thank you. ahead our conversation with the newly elected member of the rock and roll hall of fame, there is he, paul stanley. yeah, he's going to explain why kiss decided not to perform at last night's event at the barclay's center. wait until you hear. keep it locked to "morning joe." ♪ [ male announcer ] at his current pace, bob will retire when he's 153, which would be fine if bob were a vampire. but he's not. ♪ he's an architect with two kids and a mortgage. luckily, he found someone who gave him a fresh perspective on his portfolio. and with some planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade.
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♪ rock 'n' roll to you rock 'n' roll to you ♪ here with us rock and roll hall of famer and original member of kiss, paul stanley. his book is "face the music, a life exposed." it's great to have you here. >> it's great to be here. >> and congrats on the honor of
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being inducted into the hall of fame. it has to be a tremendous accomplishment. >> some people think so, so i went along with it. i think it meant something to the fans. the validated us in terms of their affiliation and their allegiance to the band. i have a lot of doubts about the organization. but i did it mainly for the fans. >> meanwhile you have the two great things, you are doing that for the fans and you are doing this for the fans. the book is a true testament to your time as a front man and living the rock 'n' roll lifestyle. was it hard to put together for you, emotionally difficult to go back and tell all the stories? >> it was very easy. some people say writing a book is cathartic, but for me what was cathartic was living my life, i was born deaf on one side, i grew up in a family that was not intentionally quite dysfunctional and not supportive, so, you know, at some point in your life i figured that if i became successful that would overcome everything and be the cure.
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once i became successful, i found out i was still unhappy and it's really about what it takes to make you happy and you're either a victim in life or you go ahead and find true happiness. mine came from a great family and a wife and some beautiful children. >> you have been successful and certainly this band was extraordinarily successful, people forget how big kiss was at its peak, 100 million albums sold, six platinum albums. there's a lot of critical debate over whether the band was also a great band. when you try to trace what your impact has been on music after you, who did you influence? where do you feel you changed music through your influence? >> well, firstly, interesting, if you followed us in the '70s you believe that those were the big days. we're actually much bigger today than they we were then. our tour, last tour, small shows were 10,000. we played 100,000 people fairly regularly. >> wow. >> in terms of impact, you just have to look at every other
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band. in essence we were a wake-up call to an audience to not accept less. there were too many bands around who were not giving everybody what they deserved for their money, were not showing respect. when somebody pays for something, they deserve to be treated a certain way. i think we woke people up to the idea that when you pay, you deserve a show. hence, everybody from garth brooks to every rock band that's out there has kiss dna at this point. >> lots of great stories in the book. tell the story of the history of the makeup. >> the makeup really came about because we wanted to be the band we never saw. and wanted to take all the things that we had seen that much further. we had a loft on 23rd street, and went in front of the mirror, started playing with the makeup and came up with these four distinct characters that to this day are easily the most iconic and recognized ones in the world. you can go anywhere in the world, the four faces, although you may not know the names of the people, you ask anybody and they'll tell you it's kiss.
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>> the cat man, the space man, the star child, and the deachlen. >> indeed. >> gene simmons who was seen in a lot of the pictures. your relationship today is what? >> it's terrific. >> it's been tumultuous at times, right? >> what isn't? if you have a close family relationship there's rivalry, there's sibling rivalry. there's backbiting, there's all kinds of things going on, but it's 44 years so that speaks volumes. he lives down the street from me. and we've always had a great work ethic, which has kept us together. and through all adversity and all tensions we've never thought about not being together. >> you know, and the great thing is for, you know, a lot of us, you know, you're all grown up now. you've got kids. >> i'm not all grown up. >> there's still time? >> i have no plans. >> made that clear. >> a 2-year-old, a 5-year-old, a 17-year-old and a 19-year-old which is in college which is incredible to think you have a 19-year-old to a 2-year-old, i remember, though, as a kid i was afraid of you guys. you would come on the tv set, i was scared.
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the fire would burst. the tongue would come out. >> my kids are not afraid. >> no? >> no. my kids feel that dad is superman. they got clark kent and they have superman. >> you guys talked about your relationship with gene. you and gene are not on such great terms with the other two original members of the band ace freely, to the point where you refused to get back together for the rock 'n' roll hall of fame and people won't have seen the show on hbo in a month or so, explain why for one night you couldn't reunite to play one song for the big crowd? >> it had more to do with the integrity of kiss as far as i'm concerned. once you leave the band, i think that once you disrespect the band and don't live up to your obligations as a band member, the idea for nostalgia putting the uniform back on, we're not a band that goes out in blue jeans. when you go out, you represent this band and everything that's gone before for 40 years, nobody is going to say that's peter or the new drummer or the middle
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drummer. so it didn't feel right to us. and to do it with an organization like the rock and roll hall of fame which i think is fluff to begin, i didn't want to rom the dice for something of that nature. yet it's always good to see those guys in terms of we're joined together forever. we started something spectacular together. we couldn't have started without ace and peter and we couldn't continue without eric and tommy. >> what's the key to the success of the band? >> passion. i think the key to success always is passion. i tell everybody find your passion and you'll find success. passion is what not only gets you to success, but it also gets through failure. i'm passionate about what i do. we're passionate about kiss. >> name somebody you haven't met who you'd like to meet. >> well, i've met you three today -- >> check that off. >> take that off the bucket list. >> anybody else? or we were the last three? >> you know, i'm really -- i've met so many people. >> yeah. >> and the problem with meeting people is that you hope they
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don't disappoint you and some do and some don't. when you are inspired by people and you meet them, they can be a big letdown or they can continue to be an inspiration. i'd love to meet pablo picasso put it's too late. >> you've certainly been an inspiration to us today so this is definitely not a letdown at all. i love what you say about being passionate about what you want this to be successful at but that it will get you through failure in your life as well because it will happen to all of us. great to have you here. thank you very much. >> hall of famer. >> hall of famer. more "morning joe" coming up after this. paul, thank you. (meow mix jingle) right on cue.
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(laughs) it's more than just a meal, it's meow mix mealtime. with wholesome ingredients and irresistible taste, no wonder it's the only one cats ask for by name. the was a truly amazing day. without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. for over 18 years we've helped people take care of the things that matter most. join today at angieslist.com i'm on expert on softball. and tea parties. i'll have more awkward conversations than i'm equipped for, because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you.
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i appeared as the first-ever guest on rob ford's youtube show "ford nation" rob and hils brother doug ford host a show on youtube. mayor ford was asked about it today at the launch ceremony for the mayor's cricket tournament, yeah, he has a cricket tournament. here's what he had to say. >> did you get an endorsement from jimmy kimmel? what can we understand from your youtube show? he mimicked your -- are we okay
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back there? >> he came out and supported me. he was quite clear. he likes me a lot. we've had a number of conversations. he compares me to jfk and the rest of the candidates. >> right. jfk, kfc, you name it. >> kimmel loves rob ford. i mean, that's, you know -- >> on multiple levels. >> you know, we don't want to get in between them and, you know, the intercountry love affair. but let's talk about -- >> north american. >> north americans. let's talk about love lost because there's this piece in the "national journal" saying a group of conservative congressman are planning to oust john boehner as speaker of the house. according to the article they are committed to electing somebody to take over suggesting there's more muscle involved compared to last year's failed attempt to take away from the gavel from the ohio republican. the conservatives are maneuvering to get one of their own into a top leadership position. there's always been rumors and murmurs about speaker boehner being a weak leader and not
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being able to herd the cats as necessary at times. do you think there's merit to this or this is just the same old stuff? >> the party is still divided. there are no leaders including john boehner who have found a way to keep the energy of the tea party alive. look, republicans are in a good position in the house to maybe even pick up seats despite the fact they're the party in power. if they pick up seats or keep a healthy majority if republicans win the senate i think there will be a lot of good feeling in the republican party. a lot of happiness about how the election went. i can't imagine under the circumstances there would be a mutiny against john boehner. >> think down the line. if there were actual merit to this is the machinations of a eric cantor, a paul ryan behind the scenes? >> i think it's more junior members and members who are not going to be satisfied unless john boehner is fully aligned with them on every issue. boehner is trying to steer the party to a more sensible place, he doesn't always get there obviously, but it is easy to find people unhappy with john boehner today and let's see how
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they feel about him in november. >> it's the noisy young ones. >> yes and the older ones too. up next what did we learn today. you learned something. do you want to share it now? >> it relates to the tweeters. ♪ [ banker ] sydney needed some financial guidance so she could take her dream to the next level. so we talked about her options. her valuable assets were staying. and selling her car wouldn't fly. we helped sydney manage her debt and prioritize her goals, so she could really turn up the volume on her dreams today...and tomorrow. so let's see what we can do about that... remodel. motorcycle. [ female announcer ] some questions take more than a bank. they take a banker. make a my financial priorities appointment today. because when people talk, great things happen. or how ornate the halls are. tall the building is, make a my financial priorities appointment today.
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hey, welcome back to "morning joe." it's time to talk about what we learned. i learned so much. i loved the billy graham book and my family needs to go online and talk about why we're thankful for billy graham. but you have special guests with you on set. >> yes, they say roll tide. a recruiter from university of alabama, abby mottson and her newest recruit julia. i think you've done well. >> thank you. >> i think you've done much better since the days of scarborough at the university of alabama. have you upgraded? >> i think joe is great but i think julia will do wonderful. >> congratulations. mark halperin, what did you learn today? >> thomas and i don't know how to do twitter. >> julia will teach you. thomas roberts? >> you have a mean right pitching arm with the shoe and stephen colbert, colbert, colbert, i'm not sure which it will be but i think she'll be great at the "late show."
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>> joe scarborough, if it's way too early, what time is it? >> it's "morning joe." but stick around with chuck todd and "the daily run down." >> it's going to be luke. after months of scrutiny, scorn and ultimately 7.5 million sign-ups health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius says she's stepping down and president obama is expected to announce his nominee to succeed her later this morning. meantime, granite counters, scott brown makes it official in new hampshire, he wants back in the senate and he switched states to try something no one has done in modern politics. also this morning a personal appeal from pope francis, asking for forgiveness on the church's child sex abuse scandals. good morning from washington. it certainly is a busy friday morning april 1st, 2014. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert in for chuck todd and we'll have an update on the horrible bus

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