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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 1, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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be the fence. the problem seems to be the fact that someone jumped the fence, run 70 yards, went into the white house with nobody stopping them. >> i saw that you have that you for psychology. you have training for survival skills, but none of which i minimize, all of which is very important. this is just processing a crime scene, director. it is not high math. it is processing a crime scene. you actually don't need 18 weeks to do. that you just need to be able walk around. >> all right. good morning, it's wednesday, october 1st. october is here with a slew of breaking developments over the past 24 hours. with us on set we have chairman of deutsche, incorporated, donny deutsche, in washington. msnbc political analyst. former chairman of the national committee. michael steele and white house correspondent for the "wall street journal," carole lee along with willie, joe and me this morning. how are you doing?
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>> i tell you, the hearing yesterday was infuriateing for anybody that wanted answers, nothing happened. bottom lean is, the keystone cops are protecting the commander-in-chief and the head of the keystone cops didn't have one shred of evidence plus you and i were talking beforehand about another incident. >> oh, wow. >> with the president. that was frightening. >> so we have two more at least, examples, of security gone amuck for the president in the united states. we will get to those stories. one is simply stunning. it's actually almost worse than the white house jumper. so we'll get to that in just a moment. crazy baseball game last night. willie. did you watch? >> oh my god, i couldn't stay up that late. i read about it. >> you went to bed. >> i know joe was up late watching it. that's why he's on vacation. >> i tell you what, it was 7-3 before i went to bed. they took out lester two early.
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the as let the royals km come back n. a team hasn't been in the playoffs since 1995. they were left for dead a couple years ago, you look at the standings, this is a cinderella story, willie, what a great start for the playoff series. >> you fight all season, you have a great season for the royals and the as. it comes down to one bad pitching performance could cost you the whole rest of the season t. royals are n. they have just as good a shot as anybody as they move on. >> 162 games, it comes down to this one game you go home. what an incredible story for kansas city. you know what, if kansas city keeps, goes well into the mica,- >> we owe her. ly tell claire we are coming,
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because she will not believe you. you owe her. >> let's get right to the latest case. first case of the ebola virus to be diagnosed here at home in the united states. at this hour health officials say the unidentified spasht fighting for his life at a hospital in dallas, texas. the cdc confirms the man tested positive for the virus but is unsure how he became infected. he took a flight from liberia to dallas on september 19th to visit family, four or five days later, the man started to feel sick. right now the cdc says there is quote zero risk to others who were on board the same flight the agency says the man did not sew symptoms at the time and was not contagious. we will talk about what that means, officials were also working to quickly trace the patient's path and to determine with whom he may have had close contact. the director of the cdc says he
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understands why americans may be concerned, but he is confident the deadly virus can be contained. >> ebola is a scary disease because of the severity of illness it causes and we're really hoping for the recovery of this individual. at the same time, we are stopping it in its traction in this country. we can do that bus of two things, strong health care infection control that stops the spread of ebola and strong core public health functions that trace contacts, track contacts, isolate them, if they have any symptoms and stop the chain of transmission. >> and doctors at texas health presbyterian hospital are confident they are fully prepared to treat the patient. they say the man has been in isolation since he was admitted on sunday and that all possible precautions are being taken. >> we are caring for this patient because this person came to us for hem and they came to
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us sick and it's the right thing to do. our submission to improve the hepp health of the people in the communities we serve, our focus on compassion is at the heart of everything we do. >> all right. a lot of questions around this let's bring in dr. zeke emmanuel. a lot of questions about how one can contract this. how can officials be so certain that this can be contained since it is here now? >> well, it's here, but it's, again, it's hard to transmit ebola. it doesn't go by breathing on someone or sneezeing on someone. you need contact with bodily fluids like blood, like urine. so it's not going to spread very wisely, on the airplane, this person had for the symptoms. it took four days for symptoms to occur when he arrived in the
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united states when you are not symptomatic you don't have a high fever and are you not transmitting the virus. they are confident about the airplane. they will do very contact specific tracing. the difference twiens is we have a functioning health care system and functioning public health system. we can do what the doctor said, which is isolate people, care for them with gloves and masks and gowns to make sure we don't spread the virus. >> so zeke, as you say, we hope no one on the plane would have contacted this, that wafb airborne, juanes he arrived if dallas, emts, doctors in the hospital. people like that. >> so again when people are examined and stuff, we now have universal precautions, so contactings his blood or something, they would have used gloves and masks.
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it's possible but very unlikely to transmit. remember we have now 30 years in this country with training with hiv and other infectious agents. we have put into effect very good infection control measures in hospitals. it's something that the country has been working on for a number of years. while it's not impossible to transmit it, it's not going to break out and transmit a whole neighborhood or whole city and in that regard i think the notion that we will not have an outbreak of ebola here, more than just an isolated person or two, i think is very reliable and very true. >> all right. zeke, thank you. other news to cover, more trouble for the secret service with new reports president obama rode an elevator with an arm felon. they only realized the private security guard had a gun after they confronted him for refusing to stop recording with a cell
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phone. the 3457b man was fired on the spot with his supervise or only then did the secret service find out. it has congress coming down hard on the president's body guards. in just a few hours the plan accused of jumping the white house fence and getting into the first family home is facing a judge. it comes ahead of one day after the secret service director was grilled. she is promising a full review to make sure it never happens again. >> so, in fact the federal complaints and early reports were not accurate. is that correct? yes or no, please? >> i think the original report is accurate that mr. gonzalez scaled the fence. >> ma'am, hold it. i have very little time. the american people want to know is the president safe? >> i want it to be crystal clear, you make a run and a dash
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to the white house, we're going to take you down. i want overwhelming force, would you disagree with me. >> i want our officers and agents to execute appropriate force for anyone attempting to challenge or breach the white house. >> why would he say there is no weapon? >> you have to ask mr. donovan that question. >> you haven't done that? why would the secret service put out a statement to the associated press, did you correct the associated press? did you call them back and say you got that wrong? >> i have no knowledge of. this is beyond the pale and i have listened to your testimony very deliberately here this morning and i wish to god you protected the white house like you are protecting your reputation here today. this is the secret service against one individual with mental illness and you lost. you lost and you had three shots at this guy. >> have you ever heard of these guys?
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this is, it's not very costly. you can subscribe, but that can be installed. it's a simple technology device and company private system that can do that. so i don't think we have to spend a lot of money. >> okay. meanwhile the washington post reports the suspect in that intrusion omar gonzalez was tackled by an off duty agent assigned to president obama's daughters. the agent just happened to be walking into the white house moments after the obama family boarded a helicopter and, joe, i don't know if this is too cynical, but it's a little too easy for lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, who is going to have an argument about how bad this is? >> but the problem is, julia pearson went there she had no answers, she was doing a cya operation. americans want to know what happened. she didn't tell them anything. all she was doing is covering herself instead of protecting
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the president. there is a good reason republicans and democrats came together united against her. she needs to step down, i tell you what, somebody needs to go in there, top to bottom, 13 secret service out, because if they don't, somebody's going to die, the president is going to die or, god forbid, a member of the first family is going to die this first family or the next first family. this is unacceptable. you know what, you can have an irs -- you can have an irs officer cover her back side for a month or a year like we are seeing of the irs right now with lois lerner, you can't, though, in this case. in this case, if they don't do their job, we have a constitutional crisis because the commander-in-chief is killed or disabled. she has to leave. she is not up to the task and i want to know why she's still there. >> all right. we -- we learned of this latest
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vent in the elevator which is absolutely ceil chilling on every level. have you the sign language person who was a few feet away. you can go, there is now a legitimate list of security breaches that border on pathetic if being the secret service is what their job s. you cover the white house. you cover the president. how hard is it for to you get into the white house? >> well, it's pretty difficult. you know, too, have you interviewed the president. you guys have been to the white house. there is a whole procedure you have to go to. you have to submit your social security number. you go through a number of levels of security. you take cdc incident in the elevator t. reporters there to cover that event had to arrive hours earlier to be screened. there is sort of an emperor has no clothes element to all of this. it's a crisis for the secret service. it's embarrassing for the white house. you have a president that travels around with massive
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amount of security. when he travels there is a whole apparatus that goes with him. the idea that it's that porous and somebody can get to the president who is carrying gun and taking photographs inches from him. it raises more than questions than answers. yesterday what you saw is there is growing tension between the white house and the secret service at least in the communications job and that's only going to get womplrse. as joe was talking about, it's how long will the director be able to say. >> her career is what it is, she was tasked with improving the image of the secret service in light of the prostitution scandal and i'm not seeing, i'm not sure about the steps in her career and if they match the job. i got to tell you. >> she's had a pretty distinguished career. he's done details of three different presidents and moved
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up in the ranks, that wasn't in the performance, she was sent up there to protect the reputation. >>ly touch the question that everybody is afraid and i'm going to touch on it. i'm not going to say it. >> so we get a new shock in this story every day, yesterday, two days ago it was the intrude tore the white house, omar gonzalez got much farther than we thought, yesterday, we learned he was only taken down by an off duty secret service guy who was going home and happened to see a guy running around the white house and tackled him. that's one. the second spoort this guy at the cdc who was acting very strangely and, in fact, had a gun about a foot away from the president inside an elevator. you ask yourself, how can these things happen? we have secret service had this cloak of infall ability. we understand they are doing something behind the scenes to protect that cloak. >> it is unfathomable. we will probably move on to next
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isis, can terrorists around the world watching this you go, wow, how does this incentivize them. what eyes does it open there. joe mentioned the irs. it's one more institution we can lose faith in. the irs, congress, secret service, you know the issues with the church. the things we think are just so solid and that basically are our security of killers, our life is built on, every time we look there are cracks. here, once again, secret service. >> that's unbelievable. that's a great point. michael steele, all the scandal, one scandal after another scandal. it's been a particularly tough two years for the united states government. whether you talk about the nsa, now the secret service, it seems the only institution that americans have any respect for right now is the u.s. military. >> yeah. >> this is a real body blow for the secret service. i'm wondering, why is julia
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pearson still there? >> yeah. >> why is she still there? >> i think a little bit is the white house is caught flat footed on this. i think they're learning exactly the depth of incompetency of protecting the president as we are. remember, this was brought about because there are whistleblowers inside the secret service, frustrated agents, apparently, who have been quietly speaking about this. now they're elevateing it telling reporters there is what's going on. there is a serious morale issue with the rank and file. i know a number of agents. i talked to them about it. they're very frustrated. the idea that their training is lapseing in terms of just the day-to-day protection. someone commented, joe, that you know probably with those guards that night, this gentleman was rung across the lawn, they were probably looking at their iphones or not paying attention, you have this letting down the
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guard that's really frustrating. the white house now has one more thing to deal with, one more agency to deal with. they're trying to figure out how to get their hands around it. she was brought in to fix things. >> tern left, past stairs that ran into the residence, he ran the entire length of the white house to the other end of the east room before he was tackled by a heavy armed counterassault agent near doorway to the green room. >> all of a sudden, that was a little map of what happened. we need to see it again. it's horrible. >> michael has a button, it's like a garage door opener, he does an makes at home on his mac book. my car, i don't really understand why she still has her job, mica, i don't understand why the white house isn't going after this more aggressively. it is the president, the first lady and the children who are most at danger now. >> i want to go further.
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i want to know why she has that job to lead the agency and i want to know why she still has it. still ahead, we will do that. >> you did that softly. >> that was soft as opposed did she get the job because she's a woman? >> she's the first woman to lead the agency. i don't understand it. do you? do any of you get it at this point? the agency seems to be really coming apart at the seams. >> why she still has her job? you are asking why she got it. >> i want to know. i'm asking the question, that illegal? it is not. >> i think the question is we got to be very careful. >> hold on, willie. let me check. i'm checking the law books here, noer, it's not illegal. >> it was a good question. >> nobody is saying it's illegal. mica. >> you guys are looking shocked. >> >>. are you sucking mica if she got
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the job because she's a woman and still has it because she's a woman? >> i'm asking how and 82 she got the job, given the state of things today. it's interesting to me the whole thing, i'm reading her ascension to the job. she has a very distinguished career, but that place is apolice and as a woman brought in to clean up sort of the reputation of the agency and problems with prostitution and drinking, i am not sure. maybe there is more. we'll ask white house press secretary josh ernest about reports that president obama missed nearly 60% of his daily intelligence briefing. that's actually an interesting story that. can be explained. maybe not. we will ask him about this issue as well. also, broadway joe namath swings by the set in our 7:00 hour. >> that will be smooth. plus, is jimmy kimmel the most dangerous celebrity working today? we'll explain why that's true. are you watching "morning joe."
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time now to take a look at the morning papers. by the way, i was at the ad week, brand genius awards so much fun. i got to watch the best commercials ever made and meet the grand geniuses, maybe we'll have some nikts this lifetime. the philadelphia enquirer, police in pennsylvania have uncovered new evidence for the search of the man they say ambushed two state troopers, killing one. two pipe bombs were found in the woods where survivalist eric frein was. they say they were fully functional. nearly three weeks into the man
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hunt, police say they are confident they are searching in the right placement they call on him to surrender saying he is significantly stressed and making significant mistakes. there is a $100,000 reward leading to his capture. tracy morgan is saying he can't believe the retailer is blaming him for the accident. wal-mart claims morgan and others who are injured are at least partly to blame because they were not wearing their seatbelts. after that claim, morgan wrote a statement where he said i felt i had to speak out. he and his friends are fighting hard. he is working hard to recover from his injuries. wal-mart said while we were required to respond to the lawsuit, we have also taken systems to encourage settlement discussions. we remain committed to doing what is right. olympian michael phelps has been arrested in baltimore. the 29-year-old failed a
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sobriety test after being caught going 84 in a 45-mile-per-hour zone. ten years ago he served 18 months probation after pleading guilty to driving impaired. the 22 time medallist had begun training again in april to re-enter competitive swimming. he apologized by writing on twitter, earlier this morning, i was arrested and charged with dui, excessive speeding and crossing double lane lines. i understand the severity of my actions and take full responsibility. i am deeply sorry to all i have let down. >> what do you think, willie? how does he come back? >> second time is pretty rough. >> he is retired for one thing, it may not affect his career. last time he lost endorsements with kelloggs when he was caught with the bong. he's had a few run-ins, i'm not sure they can chip away at his
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incredible athletic legacy. >> let's go to the washington post. >> the sec had sacked the four decade old sports blackout rule that prevented some games being aired on tv. despite the ruling, the nfl can still establish blackout rules with cable companies and broadcasters. >> and the los angeles times in california, the days of receiving plastic backs for your purchases are coming to an end. governor jerry brown signed a state wide measure tuesday that will phase out single use plastic backs from grocery convenience and liquor stores as well as pharmacies, stores will charge at least 10 cents for paper bags or reusable backs. skrik critics are putting it up for referendum. they are a win bifor the littering caused by those bags. >> they named jimmy kimmel the
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most dangerous celebrity on the internet, according to mcafee study. >> i am the most dangerous man on earth. if you don't want me to leak your search history to your mother-in-law, you will do everything i say. it's an honor to be nominated. who would have guessed a boy that used to carry a briefcase to junior high and play the clarinet would be the most dangerous person of 2014. i am the most dangerous man on earth. if you don't want me to leak your search history to your mother-in-law, will you do everything i say. it's an honor to be nominated to win this thing, i can't believe, you hear that every girl in the school who wouldn't go to the prom with me, which was every girl in the school. >> he's so nice. all right. coming up, the reviews were not good yesterday for the head of the secret service's testimony
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before the congressional oversight committee. a ranking member of that committee, congressman elijah couple micu mr. mins explains. cum mins explainmins explains
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>> 31 past the hour. joining us with the must read opinion pages, msnbc contributor mike barnacle. i have the new york times serving without protecting frank rooney. what we have discovered about the crackerjack operations of the secret service boggles the mind. we can fly drones over pakistan, we can't summon a proper lock smith to 1,600 pennsylvania avenue. time and again washington validates the naysayers who like to dismiss it as the capital of bureaucratic incompetence. in the end, it's people that make the difference t. secret service needs better ones. joe. >> i couldn't agree more. i mean, donny deutsche, you talk about, you know, obviously, we talked about branding. you talk about marketing all the time. you brought up a good point earlier today right now the federal government, itself, is just awash in one scandal after
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another. this is a real governing crisis that goes all the way into the white house now. >> it really does. although this is an incident to the secret service. if you are an american, you question the health care system. you question everything. this should be a layup. this kind of stuff. you walk around town. any time the president is in new york, you see 80,000 secret service guys outside. so clearly the man power is there. clearly the money is there. the comp tennessee is not there. you start to go from pillar to pillar as we talked earlier the nsa, the irs, secret service, congress, you go, who's got it right anywhere? as you pointed out earlier, the thing we still believe in, is the military, hopefully, that will not let us down some day. >> here's the "wall street journal" white house down. the start of rebuilding professionalism is accountability. >> that should include firing secret service director julia
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pierson and anyone else who lies to the public the secret service, also ought to respond to the white house with lethal force. the next omar gonzalez may be a terrorist strapped to a bomb. is that being hysterical or being sensational? at this point i actually don't think it is. >> mica, if are you a terrorist and you want to cripple the united states government, you have found out you don't do it by knocking down the biggest buildings in america, you don't do it by blowing up the pentagon, but what could do it? jumping the fence and instead of just having one guy that's mentally derangeed jumping the fence, what if you actually planned it out? what if three or four people had jumped the fence from like four or five different places? they can't even handle one guy. this is, mike barnacle, this, i don't think we're actually being
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dramatic enough. this is far from hysteria, i don't think tough enough questions are being asked. the moempbt question this morning is why does julia pierson still have a job? and the next question, mike, is, how do we clean it up after she leaves? >> well, joe, those two editorials we just read were clearly written before the revelation late yesterday afternoon that a man with a gun got on an elevator with the president of the united states in atlanta, georgia at the cdc. >> that and that alone is cause enough for a full sweep of the top personnel of the united states secret service. i'm sorry, i don't like to see anybody lose their jobs in any economic environment. but this is absurd. this is absurd a. man with a gun gets on an elevator with the president of the united states, the secret service agents the white house detail don't really know who he is? i'm sorry.
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top to bottom, you got to reshuffle the deck. >> i want to bring up a point tamika delicately touched on. i will touch on a little less delicately obviously we move forward as a society as we promote women into positions of authority. you spent a lot of time as well we should. we need to be careful, though, we are never ever throwing the baby out with the bath water as far as the best person always has to get the job. mica, as we go through her resume coming off the prostitute scandal, women on top good for the brand if you will. the brand doesn't work if it's not competent. in positions of national security quota second competency first. it's a delicate subject. >> while we go on this delicate subject, let's talk about the woman in the white house that got overpowered by this guy. if a woman is 16' 4" can tack am
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big guy that's intrudeing. that's one thing. but we can't have people standing between the brought of the united states and a terrorist that can get knocked down for political and it's there for politically correct reasons. and i understand what you are saying. i understand what donny is saying. after the prostitute scandal, somebody thought, hey, you know what, it would be really good for the secret services brand to have a woman running the place. >> look. >> maybe she's still there because of that. i don't know. but if she's the most competent person in washington, d.c., hire her. if not, don't, obviously not now, she needs to zblo. >> what we have are two issues, one a woman at the door. then we have julia pierson's career and her ascension to head up the secret service and to be the first woman to do so in light of scandals that really involved degrading women and
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i'm, you know, looking at her resume which we're going to go through and ask questions about. i think it's worthwhile. >> you keep talking about her resume. is there something that seems -- >> no, she served for three years at the orlando police department. she served in the miami field office for a couple of years. she also then served on the presidential protective details of presidents george h.w. bush, george clinton and george w. bush. in 2008 as director pierson served as chief of staff and assistant director of the office of human resources in training for the secret service and she was always kind of on the cutting edge, the highest ranking woman in her position. i really don't know more than that. i the know, though, that we have now like four or five stories surrounding the secret service which has been under a cloud of scandal already that really
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don't bode well for the agency's strength and our confidence in it as a whole, so we'll ask these questions. >> we'll ask josh. it's very interesting. i'd like to get some answers on how long the white house is going to be comfortable with this secret service protecting the first family. i wouldn't be. >> this is barak obama. i want to see him react as a man, into the president. if all of a sudden you think your children are in danger. if this does not bring out the immediate hammer if you will, nothing will. >> i bet he is privately. >> you know, the umbrella over all of this is, you know the people, groups around the world who sit there thinking of such a, you know, conducting such a violent act, kimming the president of the united states, this just emboldens so many people out there who thinks we are crazy to begin with. coming up next, democrat
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elijah cummings is our guest. ebola in america, a cdc patient. are we prepared to deal with the virus before it spreads. we'll be right back .
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♪ >> here with us now from capitol hill democratic representative from maryland and ranking member of the oversight and reform committee congressman elijah cummings, great to have you on the show. >> it's good to be here. >> what did you think of the head of secret services testimony, overall, are you impressed with how she is doing her job? >> i am not impressed.
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i was extremely disappointed. in fact, i went in hoping to hear news that our president was being properly protected. maybe we were missing something. but when i left i was just extremely upset. i am being very frank with you. it was very difficult for me to sleep last night. >> wow. >> elijah, it's great to have you here. thank you so much. it was good to see the republicans and democrats yesterday standing up. i think they're fighting to protect the first family, fighting to protect the kids, fighting to protect the president of the united states. >> and our former presidents. >> and former presidents. i think the question most people have, well, two questions, one, why did she get this job? and, secondly, and a lot of, we're hearing a lot of people saying it's a direct response to the prostitution scandal. i don't know that you can say that or not. number two, why does she still have her job? >> i don't know why she got the job, but i do know that, joe,
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it's a very difficult job for her to do. she claims that she's going to make things better, but as i said to her yesterday, when have you secret service agents who are more comfortable becoming whistle blowers and telling congress the problems with the secret service and revealing to congress incidents that happened and they feel more comfortable talking to whistle blowers than the congress than to her and to her upper people, that's a major problem. as i see it, joe, there are several problems, one, there is a protocol problem. there's training. there's morale. you got, clearly, there is a culture now in the secret service where they are distrusting of each other. >> that has to affect morale. >> boy, that's terrible. >> go ahead. >> you can talk about how she got there, i have come to the
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conclusion that my confidence and my trust in there director miss pierson has eroded and i do not feel comfortable with her in that position. >> why, specifically, did you have trouble sleeping last night? >> well, because i always say that our committee. this is our watch. and if i have any responsibility with regard to making sure that our president, his family and his daughters and former presidents and vice presidents are safe i have a duty abcr as other members of congress have a duty to make sure that diplomats will say i just did not come away feeling that that was the case. as a matter of fact, one of my colleagues said to me, this sounds like the keystone cops. >> wow. >> the other thing that bothered me and i told director pierson this, is that she is losing trust.
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whenever you give me a report that says that somebody came into the white house and had and doesn't, you don't mention a weapon in your first report and then you don't even talk about the fact that he ran throughout the white house and not revealing that, i think that's a major problem. >> what's next? >> it leads to distrust. >> congressman, we have been talking about the invasion of the white house endlessly for a couple of day, at the centers for disease control in atlanta a few days ago, bake amelie, a shopping mall cop, the equivalent of ap shoing mall cop. >> that's right. >> gets on the elevator. he's armed. with the president of the united states, begins taking picture of president of the united states, he has a weapon. are we going to find out how this happened? >> i am sure we will find out how it happened. i will not rest until i do. but you lead to, you are leading up to another point. it seems like every week we are learning new things about what's
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going on at the secret service and the, i mean, no matter how wonderful miss pierson may be, the public's confidence is erodeing and there used to be a time few thought about the secret service, you do not dare do anything that might even make them think about you harming the president. as a matter of fact, even what i meant to say in the union address i am careful to even pull my pen out. i don't want to alarm the secret service. well, that reputation is going. >> that's amazing. >> it's like mike barnacle said a little earlier, this only embodyens terrorists, people that want to do us harm. >> no doubt about it. >> you got to clean this operation up. elijah agrees. we got to clean this operation up and send a strong message to people that want to kill the president of the united states. don't even try it. >> yeah, i say, joe, i don't want you to even imagine, imagine, imagine, imagineing
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that you can get beyond the shield of the secret service. >> congressman elijah coupleings, thank you so much. >> thank you. >> coming up, is the president left in the dark on national security matters and is it his own fault? bill crystal and howard dean debate that next. later, all time nfl great joe namath is here on the set of "morning joe." ♪ there's confidence... then there's trusting your vehicle maintenance to ford service confidence. our expertise, technology, and high quality parts means your peace of mind. it's no wonder last year we sold over three million tires. and during the big tire event, get up to $140 in mail-in rebates on four select tires. ♪
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. >> the next political ad highlighting the report that president obama has missed 50% of his presidential daily briefs.
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some say that report is misleading. with us is brill crystal, former governor of vermont, howard dean, two good people to talk about this because of the roles they played. you, obviously, bill, were a chief of staff to a vice president. how important are these daily briefings and if the president says he gets it by paper. some people like reports getting it by paper. some like doing it face-to-face. what is wrong with him if he is more comfortable reading the daily briefs? >> i will answer that, you and howard were out gal vanting and had a nice chat with joe namath. howard, were you a huge jets fan? >> a huge jets fan. >> i remember that january 12th, 1969, super bowl like it was yesterday, the jets 18 point. underdogs, joe namath led them to victory. you should get back here to new york occasionally. you can meet interesting people. it's fun, actually. >> i forget the question, is it
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okay for the president to read the briefings instead of getting face-to-face? >> i worked for the vice president 3.5 years. i was the chief of staff, advised to sit in on his daily briefings, which were one, the cia guy came over and did it. he came to the residents, president bush preferred them to be face-to-face, can you get follow up questions and reports later on things that were unclear. obviously, the president obama if he wishes to can do that with a piece of paper with ain't printed brief. no one will be questioning this if our foreign policy weren't in tatters and he hasn't pointed fingers at the intelligence community. it's one thing if he chooses to do it. he is saying he was misled, but they didn't tell him stuff. they did seem to testify about and told everyone else about. maybe he should get a few more in person briefings.
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>> howard dean, you get 42% of the briefings face-to-face, 42% in the second term, missed the rest s. that a big deal? are there sometimes you'd rather read something than have people talk? >> this rises to the level of obama was born in kenya and is a right wing muslim. i saw crossroads did this he has no credibility whatsoever. the presidents, leaders, governors do things differently, i just think this is ridiculous. i can't even believe we are talking about this. this is silly. this is a part of a political ad designed to when elections for somebody in the senate some place. it has nothing to do with reality. >> didn't the president say -- >> i don't think it will be that effective of a political ad. and so i don't really care about the partisan political blathers as you speak to. being a fight in the intel community. you wonder, it seems to be a
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legitimate question, we were talking about this before, whether or not he should be sitting at the table talking about people wielding the greatest threats to america zpli think it's silly. this is operational stuff. some people do it in reading. some do it by you sitting in meetings. i think everybody is going to do it their own way. this is ridiculous. it's not that president obama isn't working hard is silly. think president obama doesn't care what isis says is silly. this is a part of the republican attack line. >> that's silly, howard, it is operational stuff. operational stuff matters. you don't just get to give speeches as president. you have to run -- >> it's up to the president. it's ridiculous conversation. >> are you happy, do you think his relationship with his intelligence community is what it should be, do you think he understood. >> i think the relationship with his committee is much more healthy than george w. bush's with the intelligence committee
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who got us into iraq in the first place and whose regime is cause for what is going on right now. >> then you should inform the intelligence community. you shouldn't keep owe glow if i were sitting in that chair, that is true. >> guys, joe, willy is watching. he is not pleased. what do you think? >> i love the way howard kind of casts you all off as goodness gracious, this is a waste of time. we'll actually waste more time. it's not. no. i think it's interesting. i think it's interesting. >> you think it's an important question to ask? >> i do. i think people have different ways of doing their job. i'm not sure counting briefings is fair, it's aer whoth while question. i do think you get more out of face-to-face. still ahead, we have a lot to do. we are taking a closer look at the head of the secret service and why won't the president fire her some are asking. as ebola comes to america, what is being done to make sure ever
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. >> welcome back to "morning joe," howard dean, michael steele donny deutsche still with us along with joe and me. at the top of the hour. we want to get to the latest on
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the first case of ebola to be diagnosed here in the united states. at this hour, health officials say the unidentified patient is fighting for his life at a hospital in dallas t.cdc confirms the man tested positive for the virus. he is unsure how he became infected. he took a flight from liberia to dallas on september 19th to visit family. four or five days, the man started to feel sick. right now the cdc says there is quote zero risk to others who were on board that same flight t. agency says the man did not show symptoms at the time and was not contagious. officials are also working to quickly trace the patient's path and to determine with whom he may have had close contact. the director of the cdc says le understands why americans may be concerned but he is confident the deadly virus can be contained. >> ebola is a scary disease because of the severity of illness it causes and we're really hoping for the recovery
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of this individual. at the same time we are stopping it in its tracks in this country. we can do that because of two things, strong health care infection control that stops the spread of ebola and strong core public health functions that trace contacts, track contacts, isolate them if they have any symptoms and stop the chain of transmission. >> joining us from dallas, texas, congressman is miles from the hospital where the patient is being treated. in new york, pbs need to know doctor. if you can tell me from a government perspective and a medical perspective, should we be confident in the cdc's contention this can be and will be contained? >> well, i do think the cdc has been pretty aggressive about
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maintaining under surveillance over in western africa and maintaining under surveillance here. i have been in pretty constant communication with them since the middle of the summer on this issue, but, you know, dr. freedman is right. this is a scary disease. it's a scary disease because of the effective and lethality of the disease. the fact that we don't have an effective treatment or a preventative vaccine so people are correct to be concerned. i think dr. freedman is also correct. the risk is small. but it's not zero. it's not neg linlible. as a consequence of the disease the overall legality certainly gets people's attention. >> emily. you are not just a doctor. you are a medical correspondence, so you know how the media responds and the public responds and messaging. tell me what your first thought was when you heard there was a case in dallas. >> really not surprised at all. i think this is probably not the last time we will see somebody
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coming from one of the countries where ebola is such a problem. i have to say, i knee the cdc has been very aggressive about educating everybody who would be on the front lean here in this country about what to look out for. what to be watching for. so the degree of suspicion i believe amongst most health care workers in this country is very, very high. having said that, we see a case here of this patient apparently did seek care and really wasn't isolated or hospitalized for a few days after that. so, you know, we've got to perfect our system. what they're doing to protect themselves on the front line is something that doctors and nurses and emts do every single day. >> joe. >> i know, mica, it's, first of all, i want to thank the congressman for being with us, i greatly appreciate it. mica, another story, obviously, the walk post has done an
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extraordinary job breaking the story about the secret service and all the problems. we, obviously, this morning have been focusing on julia pierson. you have been asking some questions. them us a bit about who she is. >> well, julia pierson is the first ever female to head up the secret service with a lot of different facets to her career, which started in law enforcement in the 1980s three years later, she was in the secret service as a special agent, herself, with the miami office. she went on to serve as a four-year student with the presidential protective division. that position does not require senate confirmation. pierson held several different titles throughout her 30-year career and comparing to the last, to her predecessor, it's similar. you know the bicker question i guess you can ask, she was brought in to clean up the frat boy culture. but it looks like everybody who leaves has actually been brought
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up in that culture. and you wonder about the choice for a lot of reasons, but let's get to the news in terms of what has happened and what we have learned since the case of the white house jumper broke and the hearings began, this then we discover. more trouble with the secret service, news reports that president obama rode and elevator with an armed felon, i parentally the detail only realized the private security guard had a gun in the elevator with the president after they confronted him for refusing to stop recording with his cell phone. the man was fired on the property by his supervisor only then did the secret service find out he had a weapon. it happened at the cdc in atlanta three days before another major scare that has congress coming down hard on the president's body guards. from a few hours the man accused of jumping the white house fence and break back to the first family's home is scheduled to face a judge. it comes one day after the head
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of the secret service was grilled on capitol hill about the security breach. joe. >> yeah, there are so many questions to ask here, mica. michael steele, you just wonder how long the white house keeps julia pierson in charge. one incident would be enough but the washington post delivers a new one every day. >> yes, they do. i think the clock is ticking here, but i have a question for you, joe, because i think you really kind of touched on sort of an undercurrent that really needs to be brought a little more to the surface. in light of what we know about miss pierson and mica put out there and the questions surrounding her coming on to head the agency, down that they should look outside the president should look outside the agency for her replacements to bring in someone to shake up that culture, really shake it up, instead of promoting from within where you really
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perpetuate some of the attractable stuff that you apparently can't root out right now? i think that's something the president really has to answer for himself in terms of really putting this agency back on track? >> i really don't know the answer to that question, let's bring in chuck todd. chuck. it makes a lot of sense, it also suggests there aren't good people inside the secret service. you know better than most americans how many really good, talented, dedicated men and women there are from that agency. this i mean i see you and i, my car, we all see so many of these men and women working and they are the best of the best. this seems to be a clear lack of leadership, though, from the very top down. wouldn't you agree? >> welsh that's what's missing here, leadership. then let's talk about technology. look, she was picked because of the frat boy image of the secret service after colombia. that's why she was put in place.
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hey, let's get rid of this sort of flat boy culture, wheels down, rings off, that sort of bs taking place with some of these agents, particularly the advance agents. let's not -- let's try to -- let's not throw the baby out here with the bath watt. these guys have been unbelievable. they have to be correct 100% of the time. when you think about our polarizing climate. more idiots make threats every day, think about the number of investigations they open on a daily basis because of threats to the president, threats to former presidents, so there are an incredible amount of capable people. i think what we're getting at here is let's look at some brass tax here. they do some things at the white house that technology should be doing rather than the human, rather than some human being. some of that stuff seems to be behind the times.
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you know why, is it that local law enforcement has better equipment in some cases for security issues than the secret service or it looks like they're even using it in a way the secret service doesn't. i think michael steel fe is right. i think you need a bob mueller, sort of an outsider the way the fbi brings in outsiders, the cia brings in an outsider, just for new thinking. sometimes that's all you neechltd you need to get out of that a little bit. >> right. >> i think howard dean the first thing i think of is a story that i heard as a teen ageer, one of the first things my dad did was conduct an emergency drill. we need to get the president out of here in two minutes now. have everybody scrambling to see how good the system was. i just don't know enough about if this agency is nimble and it seems. >> sorry. it remind me a little oddly enough about tail hook scandals
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and the gillibrands in view of going outside the chain of command. if you investigate rape. our military is a good institution, if they're in the culture, it's a problem. i think michael sfooel steele is right. you got to bring somebody in from the outside. i think that will solve the problem. you got to take a fresh pair of eyes. this is bad. i was upset by the fence. >> student: okay. they can fix that. this business about an armed guy getting into an elevator with the president of the united states. that's -- they have the ability to stop that. they have the ability to stop it. i think you need somebody at the top who will take a whole look and get rid of this incumbent culture. this is sloppy. shis sloppy. >> you know, governor, before you get to we have in an outsider to take a look at the agency, itself, b bill crystal having worked for vice president
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cheney, this latest incident of an armed felon on an elevator with the president of the united states at the cdc in atlanta. this would seem to me to be a job immediately for the chief of staff, dennis mcdonnough about the contingent white house protected detail around the president, having less to do with miss pierson than who was in charge of the white house detail that day. how did that man get on the elevator? no. >> i would think so. you want accountability. you know, peas in a pod. >> sorry. >> that's okay. i can be associated with either one. i was thinking watching the story of one of my teachers, late james t. wilson a late student of bureaucracys, he studied law enforcement, all other kind, they don't have competitions, these are unique government functions. it's not the private sector, some are doing their jobs, private security firms are doing
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a good job. you can't do that with the secret service, how do you build in responsiveness, adaptability to events and few technology, i do think that's a real challenge. a lots of people thought about that. the secret service has been, you know, i was there as the chief of staff. they're good guys. you work with them every day. you don't want to challenge them. what do i know what the real threats are. i think over the decades, if there is a problem, let's bring on more people, do more checks of civilians, make things more inconvenient around the white house for tourists. let's not do the sensible things to make the white house secure. >> we should point out the threat level has never been higher. >> that is a good point. chuck todd, you know, i touched earlier on gender issues, which is causing twitter to just explode here. but there is a national security issue at stake here. this conversation is as real as
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it gets. >> it is. and especially everybody is a little on edge, particularly in walk. it was interesting yesterday watching the law makers grill director pierson. you sat there and said, you know it was one part was oddly heart warming to me. i felt like they were, nobody had a political agenda when they were grilling director pierson. it was actually for the first time i felt like every single member of congress up there democrat or republican actually was genuinely outraged, genuinely trying to get to the bottom of the problem, genuinely looking for accountability. it was one of those moments. >> how'd she do? >> look, i don't think she did well at all. >> right. >> but at the same time i am hesitant to drop the hammer on her considering she was just brought in to try to do a cultural cleanup. now the problem is, maybe she's making a cultural cleanup but we still have a technology problem. we still have a sort of thinking
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about, okay, you know the fence jumping. there is fence jumpers a lot. why hasn't somebody said, hey, let's do the curve fence. you wonder, it feels as i would call it aggressive thinking when it comes to what the different little threats that the white house faces. look. i knew the minute i heard about this incident, the fence jumper. what time of day and whether the president was there or not. it's just human nature to watch those guys, let their guard down. when the work day is over at 17:00 at night and when the president is not there. that's a human thing. will you never erase the human element out of this so find technology, do different ways of trying to fill that gap. >> chuck, you just don't have years in a job like that to fix problems. you don't have years, are you accountable as direct -- i think, you know, we were talking earlier, why she was chosen, how she got the job, probably too early to ask those questions,
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but as the first woman to run the agency, i think it's fair at this point given what we have seen to question her qualifications, to question her ability to do the job and i push back at those who are saying you can't say that about a woman because i will say i was extremely, extremely hard only roger goodell. it has nothing to do with gender when it comes to quality. but we do have to look at the choices we are making and we can't make them solely based on gender and it's worth raising. it's worth looking at. it's just a question. i think it's a fascinating one. >> i don't think you would have asked this question if you hadn't seen the hearing yesterday. >> that was right. >> that was not an impressive performance, for someone who was supposed to bring if change, to clang the culture. she seemed like someone there above all defend the agency. we didn't do anything wrong. >> talk about under grilling, watch hillary clinton smash back at these people. you watched the complete opposite performance.
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>> chuck todd, bill crystal, howard dean, thank you so much. still ahead, broadway joe. >> oh, yes. >> he comes to "morning joe." we hope he will be wearing his iconic fur coat. if he doesn't have the fur coat on i'm leaving, oh, no, takes us to wisconsin to see if they can avoid an upset. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ady for the? you don't know "aarp." he's staying in shape by keeping his brain healthy and focused with aarp's staying sharp. with online mind sharpening exercises developed by the top minds in brain science. and exercise and stress reduction tips that can impact brain health. so he's ready for the real possibilities ahead. if you don't think top of my game when you think aarp, then you don't know "aarp". find more surprisng possibilities and get to know us at aarp.org/possibilities.
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it is time for daily papers, mica. before we go to daily papers, let's talk about last night. you had a heck of an event for ad week, didn't you? >> it was crazy. it was the brand genius awards. we put it on. we were celebrating the best in the brand business. you know that cheerios commercial with the multi-racial couple. they won a big award. gopro for the hero 4 camera.
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all of them had these tiny little amazing cameras. shooting every angle of everything. really, the most brilliant minds in branding got together in new york. it was fine. >> the event was done so well. you and i do a lot of events. you did this event last night. went away from it saying they, i mean, it was an extraordinary evening. >> it was because you really saw, you know, the minds behind these ideas and these messages and where they came from and the people that put them together. they usually don't get celebrated. there were some organizations that have been incredibly effective i was like okay. the ufc, which is the like gladiators, the fighting club. >> that guy got up there. i was scared. but it was fun and they do, they are the brains behind the brands, that's for sure. it was fun to be there, thank you, athd week for having me. >> i was following you last night on twitter in bed in my
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plastic -- >> in what? >> was thinking, gosh, you work so hard, you are out at this event. i'm turning in, are you on the red carpet, taking the stage, doing your thing. i'm thinking, my goodness, the woman works so hard. >> you are so nice, i'm take a break, come with me. >> no, when the sun is up, it's time for me to go to bed. >> way too early. >> let's go to the baps now, we'll go to the oklahoman, the suspect accused of beheading a co-worker in oklahoma, altonly a sander nolen has been charged with murder him he could face the death penalty. he openly admitted to beheading the first victim and attempted to behead the second person who is expected to recover. he was charged with first degree murder and assault with a deadly weapon. the da says while they are investigating the background, for now they have ruled out a possible link to terrorism. >> that's one to watch for sure.
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we want to look at the seattle times we have this new report saying an inmate's escape from a washington state jail went undetected for two days. sources say it's not until the man's lawyer came to speak to him that officials noticed the guy was gone. under surveillance footage showed that he backed out of a door and then into a hallway when fellow prisoners returned from a bible study class the man is now in custody, faces possible escape charge in addition to a previous robbery allegation. out the back door. >> the boston globe, the nfl is admitting it is wrong yet again, this time for an on field celebration. nfl officials say the chief hussein abdullah a devout muslim should not have been penalized for dropping to prayer on sunday. although rules state players can't celebrate while on the
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ground, league spokesman said, quote the officiating mechanic in this situation is not to flag a player who goes to the ground as part of religious expression. okay. governor scott walker is one of the most prominent governors in the country. as it turns out, she also among the most vulnerable. casey hunt is just back from wisconsin, where both he and his opponents are bringingin some of the biggest names in the country. [ music playing [ music playing ] >> what they want to do is make an example of him to other governors around the country. they want to show other politicians, don't do what scott walker did, because if you do, we're going to punish you the same way. >> reporter: some day they might be riefb also, this week chris christie was in wisconsin standing side-by-side with governor walker. >> showing off our good work
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here. pretty cool. >> reporter: but before walker gets to 2016, he has to survive this year's re-election. if you lose this election, can you pick yourself up, dust yourself off and run at 2016 or a loss here means you have no shot at being president? >> my plan is to be governor. >> reporter: are you committed to serving a full term? >> that's my plan. >> reporter: he survived a re-election in 2012. now he is running neck and neck with a former executive. she's striking a more pro-business tone than some of the democrats who lost to walker in the past. >> i love our dear friend the next governor of wisconsin mary burke! >> reporter: burke got a boost from the first lady this week, drawing a crowd of thousands, president obama is slated to campaign here before election day. >> reporter: do you think the president is a good model as an executive, is it someone you would model your own leadership after? >> i'd probably look to other
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models. there are a lot of people i admire, whether it's abraham lincoln or george walk, there are different things to take from different leaders. >> reporter: neither candidate has been free from scandal. walker is caught up in a campaign fundraising investigation, looking into whether his team illegally coordinated with outside groups. do you feel you operated within the spirit of the law? >> absolutely. >> are you 100% comfortable with everything that you and your aids did for fundraising? mm-hmm. >> democrat pare burke accused of plajerizing merely word-for-word from other governors, tripping up this morning when asked to define plagiarism. >> it's probably using words, exact words from a source that doesn't, that isn't cited. >> she said she spent hundreds of hours putting the plan
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together. i would think if you are putting hundreds of hours into a plan you know where it came from. >> it's about governor walker trying to distract from his really poor jobs record and the fan fact that he doesn't have a plan that actually is working. >> reporter: can you name a plan in your jobs plan that are original to you? >> i say all of them i support. >> reporter: are they ork nale to you, your ideas? >> yeah, they're once i believe will work here. >> reporter: republicans across the country have looked to walker as an example of how to govern like a true conservative. now democrats have one last chance to throw him out of office. >> and i'm not backing down, not one inch from this. you know why? because the future of wisconsin is at stake. >> you know i was going to ask you casey about the strange relationship between chris christie and scott walker, but i just am stunned at mary burke even in wisconsin trying to desense herself from the
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president of the united states talking, i just sort of gasped when she said, no, i wouldn't use him as an example of the type of leader i'd be. i guess you are seeing this everywhere across the country. even in blue states like wisconsin. >> i was a little surprised by that as well, especially being there, it is so clear and obviously we know from being here that it's a base election in wisconsin and it's really going to depend on driving turnout t. number of undecided voters in wisconsin is so, so low. it's like 4% of the electorate at this point. i thought it was telling that she needed to distance herself from the president. she is one of the people that has president obama coming in later to campaign for her this month. you saw michelle obama and so for her to both say on the one hand, hey, yes, love to have you. on the other hand, she clearly feels pressure with that small independence to put some distance there. >> casey, at the republican side, how much is scott walker's
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current scandal with the investigation into the recount? how much is that impacting his support in wisconsin? because six months ago, a lot of talk was he was going to coast to victory and be a prumtive gop favorite. now he's neck and neck. is it because of that investigation? >> i think that's a part of it. it's pretty clear it's kind of dogged him all the way along. he recently faced a setback, a federal panel said the state court could continue investigating him if they wanted to he has been aggressive of pushing off questions. he says, hey, this investigation has no merit to it. i'm not the target of it. it is pretty clear there is something going on here. you are starting to seeker walker has, the attacks he has levelled at burke have been somewhat impossible. over the summer, he had an ad millionaire mary, where he talked how mary burke has treked bicycles. the "wall street journal" said it was pulled out of the obama
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playbook and that's not how republicans should talk about free enterprise. he has to go to the mat. >> casey hunt. thank you so much. still ahead, ebola is diagnosed in the united states for the first time ever. why has a massive international effort failed to contain the deadly disease? plus, the hunt for the man who shot two pennsylvania troopers last month. "morning joe" will be right back. [ music playing ] ♪ there's confidence... then there's trusting your vehicle maintenance to ford service confidence. our expertise, technology, and high quality parts means your peace of mind. it's no wonder last year we sold over three million tires. and during the big tire event,
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some are asking how the ebola outbreak went undetected for so long and what can be done to contain it. joining us now, senior writer for "time" magazine bryan walsh. good to have you on the show, joining us from walk, "vanity fair's" jeffrey stern has been tracking the virus' path. what are the questions we still don't know answers to in terms of the efforts to contain it. are there any? >> i think one of the really important things is from the very beginning why did we lose the cooperation of the population so quickly? one of the things that happened
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is the international community when it responded responded quickly, doctors without borders, cdc, world health organization, that's right. but in a lot of cases, no one had heard of ebola before there were men in space suits sort of tramping into their village to take grandma aby a. we started to lose the population early on. >> looking domestically, brian, what do you think? because everybody we have on who is an expert on this says it will be contained. it can be contained. no worry here. is there really no worry? >> there is not no worry, of course. it is concerning any time disease this dangerous appears, but the cdc director was very clear if have you an out of control outbreak in a place like west africa, will you get the occasional case here in the u.s. but doctors are ready to deal with it. chances are it will be contained. it will be one additional spread. you are not likely to anything anywhere near out of what we are
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see income getting liberians in sierra leone. >> absolutely positive in terms of the u.s., will we see more cases? >> whether we see it linked to this particular patient or we see another person coming from that area, it's out of control, coming into the u.s. or somewhere else in the world as well. >> we had this patient in dallas, jeffrey stern, what gave it away, that he was bringing it here and how do we know it wasn't passed to others? >> i don't know that we do know that yet. i think that he was showing symptoms. i've heard he went to the hospital. then returned home and came again. i this i the cdc will be doing mapping contact tracing. they are very good at. i seen them in very remote areas. i have full faith they will be able to do that here, too. >> 21 days incubation period i understand for ebola outbreaks. the people on the plane, do they have to be monitored for 21 days? >> they should be kept track of.
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he wasn't actually sick, showing symptoms while he was on that plane. so it's almost certainly that no one would have been at risk. you actually have to be sick, vomiting, anything like that to actually spread this disease so people can krirt certainly, they will concerned. it will be more of an issue with say those who took care of him. took him to the hospital, family members who had close contact with him when he was sick the last few days. >> we can't forget, you have to vomit on somebody, there has to be urine involved. >> all right. we will stay on this story. bryan walsh, jeffrey stern, thanks to you both. up next, he had the honor of reading his poetry at last year's inauguration following in the footsteps of other great poets like dr. mia angelu. then joe ma math comes in a suit
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no fur coat? all right. "morning joe" is next.
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when folks think about what they get from alaska, they think salmon and energy. but the energy bp produces up here creates something else as well: jobs all over america. engineering and innovation jobs. advanced safety systems & technology. shipping and manufacturing. across the united states, bp supports more than a quarter million jobs. when we set up operation in one part of the country, people in other parts go to work. that's not a coincidence.
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it's one more part of our commitment to america. . >> one sun rose on us today, kindles over our shores, peeking over the smokys, greeting the faces over the great lakes, spreading a simple truth across the great plains and charging across the rockies. one light waking up rooftops, under either each one a story, told by our silent gestures, moving across windows. >> that was poet at president obama's inauguration in 2013. planco is chosen as the fifth
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inaugural poet. openly gay brir to hold. richard is out now with his memoir, the prince of los cocuyos, a miami childhood." richard is with us now. >> that moment has got to stay with you for zblefr still, there are morning, i wake up, i'm like, did that really happen? and every once in a while as we did now in the monitor wlorks is that guy? you know, it's this wonderful sort of de ja vu feeling. >> this guy right here. this is you on the cover of your book a long time ago with the same hair as mike pointed out. tell us why you decided to put together this memoir. >> i had started writing it a couple years before all the hoopla of the inauguration. it was also a way of going back. one of the things that fascinates me is this identity formation and growing up in the
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united states and growing up many miami between the memory of cuba and my parents world and miami, we like to say, we love living there, it's so close to the united states and you don't need a passport t. idea that america felt a step removed. so i really wanted to go back and investigate sort of that sort of straddling between those two cultures and identitys and who we become how we bomb who we become and i want to think about culture and sexual identity. it sort of comes in the mix. how it goes in the pot and makes in this case little ricky. >> that would be you. >> how do you do that when you think of the stew the man richard blanca has become. we den hear the author, the poet richard blanko, latino, openly guys, lot of adjectives have to
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go in front of your name. are you comfortable with that and getting all those things are you known for other than being richard blanko? >> i say i don't have a problem between labels and stereo types. if you take the label into a stereotype we have to have a conversation. those are my stories. i am cuban. i am gay. aam the first this, the first. that i want to own that, i don't want anyone to take those stories away from me. i think there is a fine line between the label and the storyio type. so i always try to sort of direct that, if it comes to. mike. >> when you watch the intro, the film intro, you saw yourself there on the podium with the president of the united states, you were thinking who is this guy. >> yes. >> so how long did it take you struggling through, you know trying to figure out what america was all about. born in madrid, how long did it take you to really physical out who this guy was? >> well, i think one of the most
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important moments. >> are you still trying to figure out? >> it's interesting, that's one of the questions i'm asking in the book. an individual questioning my identity. it's an american question. we are still trying to figure out the story of america. it's a pretty young country t. narrative is still being written. but it was actually the inauguration just moments before i stepped up to the podium that i really had this great sort of very emotional motel and until then as an immigrant or the son of immigrants as well, there is still a little part of me that said you are not quite peter brady. are you not quite american. as i sat there with my mother in a dirt floor in cuba. this is the american story. it always has been, duh. so i realized i had my own sort of prejudices about what it meant to be american and the los cocuyos you read it with this idea of this little hooski kid
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my mother used to call me this chubby kid from miami, negotiating tlfg for his parents and all these other things, this little precocious boy grows up to be the fifth inaugural party of the urine, my life and this memoir is a quintessential sort of american dream story which i think is sort of just wonderful. >> well the book is the prince of los cocuyos. it is so good to have you on the show. >> role model, role model. >> up next the legend, former quarterback joe namath is here. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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joining us now, hall of fame quarterback joe namath. so nice, i mean, in such a good mood. joe's the benefactor of the neuro logical research center which opened yesterday in florida. on a mission to combat the effects of traumatic injuries from concussions.
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our joe scarborough, i'll tell you, he's been giving me fashion advice so he's multitalented. >> hey, joe. >> hey, man, how you doing, it's always great to see you. you're everybody's hero. >> yes. >> for a lot of different reasons. i want to get to the great work you're doing. instead of the negative question about football, a positive question about football. everybody's going back to that incredible game in 1969. yesterday mika was on, talking about how she was at camp david. she knew at the time this was going to be something she'd rather forever. did you have any idea as a kid what you did that week in 1969 would still ring as one of the great moments in sports history a generation later? >> no, joe, no, i didn't. was more into the now, the time, agewise. didn't have the experiences, life's experiences. but the lessons only after we
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get the experience, right. so no, i had no idea. >> when did you start to appreciate that you had been a part of a moment that will be talked about as long as the game of football's played? >> you know, joe, being a member of the jets, new york jets in the afl, we had some real competition going on with the established league. there was some urgency to get our league established and accepted by the football fan throughout the country. >> mike barnicle. >> you've had five or six concussions. they do brain damage, concussions. now you're involved in jupiter, florida. >> the joe namath neurological treatment center. >> and you've undergone oxygen
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treatments. tell us about what, what it has done to benefit you. >> you know, anybody else, that's the thing. it's not just athletes that get concussions. kids fall off bicycles. our warriors get hurt, you know, people have accidents on a daily basis around the country. having lived in jupiter and using the medical center with my family over the years, i established social friendship and so -- with the doctors. i needed to find out about myself. i had teammates that were deteriorating, actually talking with six, seven years ago, and the fear that they had, what was taking place and how they were living. so i felt like i needed to find out about myself. so i talked with the doctor. we did brain scan. we did cognitive tests. that end i started the hyperbaric chamber treatments. >> that worked? >> we restored the cells. we have the pictures from the scans initially where the cells
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weren't working on the left side of my brain. and we restored them. i had as recently as last week a new scan and the brain is healthy. >> that's amazing. so two questions. because obviously no better place to put this research center than at the jupiter medical center. two questions about the nfl. do you think they need to be acting on the concussion issue within the league and make changes so that, you know -- obviously it's good to have incredible research and medical advances that help deal with them, but should the nfl be doing something to prevent something? >> they have been. they've been trying. they've changed some of the rules. but the fact of the matter is, as great as these bodies are from our maker, evolution, whatever we want to look at, that's a contact sport. there's going to be injuries. any time you play it, there will be injuries. the nfl does a good job. >> and then secondly, you've
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been following obviously everything else going on with the nfl. you stand by roger goodell? >> you know, i don't -- yes, first of all, i do. i believe in roger goodell. i don't know all the facts and details. i don't know if we've got all the facts and details at this point. i know it goes beyond the nfl and beyond football players. this is a social issue that goes on around the world. this business about -- the neighbor, it's none of my business, that's their business. excuse me, we all have to step up. not just the athletes, nfl, all of us, individually, in our neighborhoods. you see someone mistreating someone, step up, say something, do something about it. the nfl unfortunately what's transpired with the spousal abuse, the various mistakes, has brought to light these issues. >> hey, joe, before we go, 45
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year suffering, life long -- >> i know what -- >> i watched you at 12 years old. what are we going to do for the jets? >> if i were closer to the situation and have a better handle on it, you see -- >> one solution. >> one solution? there is not one solution. it's a team game. it's like the issues we're talking about. it's a team effort. not one guy in that locker room can point at geno smith and say it's your fault because there's not one guy in the mirror that can look and say, i haven't made a mistake. how do you change that? most businesses start at the top and it goes down. discipline, how you go about things. i don't know how they're going to change what they're doing. but a change needs to be made pretty soon. they better start winning. if they get in the loss record,
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their head coach might be in trouble. >> that's for sure. >> it wasn't so long ago we weren't saying the same thing about the university of alabama. it really does start at the top. we just get upset when you lose a game or two here. this weekend, bama and ole miss, you had a few of those rivalries. it's a big one this week for the first time in a long time. >> that's the one -- i don't even get upset -- a whole lot upset watching the jets play. the first game of the season, joe, i was worn out in the first quarter watching west virginia. and ole miss coming up, ole miss can play. >> yes, they do. >> the joe namath center in jupiter, thank you for being on, we'll be right back. ♪ there's confidence...
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good morning, it's wednesday, october 1st. october is here with a slew of breaking developments over the past 24 hours. with us on set, we have chair hchairman of deutsch incorporated. in washington, former chairman of the republican national committee, michael steele. and white house correspondent for "the wall street journal," carol lee, along with willie, joe and me this morning. joe, how you doing? >> well, i tell you, the hearing yesterday was infuriating for anybody that wanted answers. nothing happened, bottom line is, the keystone cops are
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protecting the commander in chief. and the head of the keystone cops didn't have one shred of evidence, plus, talking beforehand, about another incident with the president that was frightening. >> so we have two more at least, examples, of security gone amok for the president. one of them, simply stunning. almost worst than the white house jumper. we'll get to that. let's get right to the latest case of the ebola virus to be diagnosed here at home in the united states. health officials say the unidentified patient is fighting for his life at a hospital in dallas, texas. the cdc confirms the man tested positive for the virus but is unsure how he became infected. he took a flight from liberia to dallas on september 19th to visit family. four or five days later, the man started to feel sick. right now, the cdc says there
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is, quote, zero risk to others who were on board the same flight. the agency says the man did not show symptoms at the time. and was not contagious. we're going to talk about what that means. officials are also working to quickly trace the patient's path and determine with whom he may have had close contact. the director of the cdc says he understands why americans may be concerned. but he is confident the deadly virus can be contained. >> ebola is a scary disease because of the severity of illness it causes. and we're really hoping for the recovery of this individual. at the same time, we're stopping it in its tracks in this country. we can do that because of two things. strong health care infection control that stops the spread of ebola and strong core public health functions that trace contacts, track contacts, isolate them. if they have any symptoms.
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and stop the chain of transmission. >> and doctors at texas health presbyterian hospital are kt they're fully prepared to treat the patient. they say the man has been in isolation since he was admitted on sunday and that all possible precautions are being taken. >> we're caring for this patient because this person came to us for help. and they came to us sick. and it's the right thing to do. our mission is to improve the health of the people in the communities we serve. our focus on compassion is at the heart of everything that we do. >> all right. a lot of questions around this. let's bring in former white house adviser for health policy and vice provost for global initiatives at the university of pennsylvania, dr. zeke emmanuel. a lot of questions about how one can contract this. how can officials be so certain this can be contained since it is here now?
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>> well, it's here but, again, it's hard to transmit ebola. it doesn't go by just breathing on someone or sneezing on someone. you need contact with bodily fluids like blood, like urine. so it's not going to spread very widely. on the airplane, this individual supposedly had no symptoms. it took four days for symptom, when yhe arrived in the united states. when you're not symptomatic, you're not transmitting the virus. i think they're pretty confident about the airplane. then they're going to do very explicit contact tracing. the big difference between us and west africa, liberia and sierra leone, is we have a functioning health care system. we have a functioning public health care system. we can actually do what dr. freeden said, which is isolate people, care for them with gloves and masks and gowns to make sure we don't spread the virus. >> willie. >> as you say, we hope no one on
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the plane contracted this because that would have been airborne and you can't transmit it that way. what about people, once he arri arrived, emts, doctors in the hospital, people like that? >> again, when people are examined and stuff we now have universal precautions, so contacting his blood or something, they would have used gloves and masks. and i don't think that -- it's possible but very unlikely to transmit. remember, we have 30 years in this country of training with hiv and infectious agents. we have put into effect very good infection control measures in hospitals. it's something that the country has been working on for a number of years. while it's not impossible to transmit it, it's not going to break out and transmit a whole neighborhood or a whole city. and in that regard, i think the notion that we're not going to have an outbreak of ebola here more than just an isolated person or two i think is very reliable and very true. >> all right, zeke, thank you.
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other news to cover. more trouble for the secret service. with new reports president obama rode an elevator with an armed felo felon. apparently the president's security detail only realized the private security guard had a gun after they confronted him for refusing to stop recording with his cell phone. the man was fired on the spot by his supervisor and only then did the secret service find out he had a weapon. it happened at the cdc in atlanta. just three days before another major scare that has congress coming down hard on the president's bodyguards. in just a few hours, the man accused of jumping the white house fence and breaking into the first family's home is scheduled to face a judge. it comes one day after the head of the secret service was grilled on capitol hill about the security breach. director julia pierson says the incident is unacceptable and she's promising a full review to
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ensure it never happens again. >> so, in fact, the federal complaint in the earlier reports were not accurate. is that correct? yes or no, please. >> i think the original complaint is accurate that mr. gonzalez scaled the fence -- >> ma'am, ma'am, hold it, i have very little time. the american people want to know the president is safe. >> i want to make it clear. you make a dash for the white house, we're going to take you down. would you disagree with me? >> i want our agents to execute appropriate force for anyone attempting to breach the white house. >> why would he say there's no weapon? >> i would have to ask mr. donovan that question. >> you haven't done that since the incident happened? >> why would the secret service put out an official press release -- put out a statement to the associated press? did you correct the associated press? did you call them back and say, you got that wrong? >> i have no knowledge of that. >> this is beyond the pale. and i've listened to your
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testimony very deliberately here this morning. and i wish to god you -- you protected the white house like you're protecting your reputation here today. this is -- the secret service against one individual with mental illness. and you lost. you lost. and you had three shots at this guy. >> have you ever heard of these guys? this is -- it's not very costly. you can subscribe. but that can be installed. it's a simple technology device and company, a private system, that can do that. so i don't think we have to spend a lot of money. >> okay. meanwhile, "the washington post" reports the suspect in that intrusion, omar gonzalez, was tackled by an off-duty agent assigned to president obama's daughters. the agent just happened to be walking into the white house moments after the obama family boarded a helicopter. joe, you know, i don't know if this is too cynical.
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but it's a little too easy for lawmakers on both sides of the aisle -- who's going to have an argument about how bad this is? >> but the problem is, julia pierson went there, mika. she had no answers. she was doing a cya operation. americans wanted to know. she didn't tell them anything. all she was doing is covering herself instead of protecting the president. there's a good reason why republicans and democrats came together united against her. she needs to step down, mika. >> that's what i'm thinking. >> somebody needs to go in there, top to bottom, clean the secret service out. because if they don't, somebody's going to die. the president's going to die. or god forbid, a member of the first family is going to die. this first family or the next first family. this is unacceptable. you know what? you can have an irs -- you can have an irs officer cover her backside for a month or a year like we're seeing at the irs
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right now with lois learner. you can't, though, in this case. in this case, if they don't do their job, we have a constitutional crisis. because the commander in chief is killed or disabled. she has to leave. she is not up to the task. i want to know why she's still there. >> this latest event in the elevator, which is absolutely chilling, on every level. you have the sign language person who is feet away from the -- i mean, you can go -- there is now a legitimate list of security breaches that border on pathetic if being the secret service is what their job is. carol lee, how hard -- you cover the white house, you cover the president. how hard is it for you to get into the white house? >> it's pretty difficult and you know because you've interviewed the president and you guys have been to the white house. there's a whole procedure. you submit your social security number. you go through a number of
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levels of security. you take the cdc incident in the elevator. the reporters there to cover the event had to arrive hours earlier to be screened. there's sort of an emperor has no clothes element to all this. it's a crisis for the secret service. it's embarrassing for the white house. you have a president who traveled around with a massive amount of security that, i mean, the white house alone has a massive amount of security around it. when he travels, there's a whole apparatus that goes with him. the idea it's that porous and somebody can get near the president who is carrying a gun and taking photographs of him while he's in a private moment -- >> inches. >> inches from him. it raises more questions than answers. i think yesterday what you saw is there is some growing tension between the white house and the secret service. at least in the communications shop. and that's only going to get worse. as joe was talking about, it raises questions about how long the director would be able to stay. >> willie, i'm just reading about her. her career is what it is.
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but she was tasked with improving the image of the secret service in light of the prostitution scandal. and i'm not seeing the -- i'm not sure about the steps in her career and if they match the job. >> well, she's had a pretty distinguished career. she's done the protective details of three different presidents and moved up through the ranks. that wasn't reflected in the performance yesterday where i think she was sent to protect the reputation -- >> i'm going to touch on a question that anybody else on the set would be afraid to touch on. but go ahead, your next question. >> we get a new shock in this story every day. yesterday, it was -- two days ago, it was the intruder into the white house, omar gonzalez, got much further we thought, in fact, passing the steps that go up to the residence. yesterday, we learned he was only taken down by an off-duty secret service guy who was going home and happened to see a guy running around the white house and tackled him. that's one. the second part is this guy at the cdc who is acting very
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strangely. in fact, had a gun about a foot away from the president inside an elevator. you ask yourself, how can these things happen. we have secret service with tfa. it looks like now there's a lot of holes in that cloak. >> what's frightening is you think about the story we'll move on to next, isis, okay, terrorists around the world watching this and you go, wow, how does this incentivize them and what eyes does it open there. joe mentioned the irs. it's one more institution you can lose faith in. the irs, congress, secret service, the issues with the church. the things we think are so solid that basically are securities of pillars. every time we look, there are cracks. >> it really is unbelievable. that's a great point. still, all the institutions we grew up believing in.
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one scandal after another scandal. it's been a particularly tough two years for the united states government. whether you're talking about the irs or the nas. it seems the only institution americans have any respect for right now is the u.s. military. this is a real body blow for the secret service. i'm wondering, why is julia pierson still there? why is she still there? >> well, i think a little bit is the white house is kind of caught flat footed on this. i think they're learning exactly the depth of incompetency in terms of protecting the president. this was brought about because there were whistleblowers, frustrated agents, who have been quietly speaking about this, and now have elevated it to the point where they're actually telling reporters this is what's going on. there's a serious morale issue with the rank and file. i know a number of agents and
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talked to them about it. they're very frustrated. you know, the idea that, you know, their training is lapsing in terms of, you know, just the day to day protection. someone excepted, joe, that probably those guys were looking at their iphones or not paying attention. you have this sort of letting down your guard. it's really frustrating. the white house has one more thing to deal with, one more agency to deal with. still ahead on "morning joe," white house press secretary josh earnest will join us. plus, michael phelps is apologizing for his second dui arrest. will prosecutors be as lenient on him as they were for his first offense? and tracy morgan fires back at walmart after the company blames him for his injuries. in a fatal crash earlier this year. but first, bill karins, we always blame him for the
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forecast. bill. >> we got some bad weather to discuss, mika. as we go across the country, first stop is in southern new england. you've been very dry as of late. you need the rain but it look like some airport delays likely. the boston area, down to new york, is where we're continuing to watch some light rain. it's going to be a rainy gloomy wednesday there for you no matter what. now, as far as the other weather goes, we're going to clear it out in d.c. after some showers this morning. and then as we go throughout the latter portions of the day, i even think that new york city will begin to improve a little bit. we had some nasty weather this morning around st. joseph, kansas city and des moines. that rain continues over missouri. this is the area later on tonight that additional strong storms -- we have a mini severe weather outbreak. wichita to kansas city. and then tomorrow, a huge area, from chicago, st. louis, dallas. just outside of houston, a chance of severe storms.
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so some interesting weather as we start our october across the country. we're still dealing with wet weather down there in florida. one interesting thing for anyone waking up early on the west coast, the forecast for saturday in l.a., 101, late season heat wave. we leave you with the shot of washington, d.c. a lot of low clouds hanging there. at least you should be dry the rest of the day. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. you probably know xerox as the company that's all about printing. but did you know we also support hospitals using electronic health records for more than 30 million patients? or that our software helps over 20 million smartphone users remotely configure e-mail every month? or how about processing nearly $5 billion in electronic toll payments a year? in fact, today's xerox is working in surprising ways to help companies simplify the way work gets done and life gets lived.
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trying to mislead you about the effects of proposition 46. well here's the truth: 46 will save lives. it will save money too. i'm bob pack, and i'm fighting for prop 46 because i lost my two children to preventable medical errors and i don't want anyone else to lose theirs. the three provisions in 46 will reduce medical errors and protect patients. save money and save lives. yes on 46. time now to take a look at the morning papers. i was at the ad week brand
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genius awards last night. so much fun. >> yeah? >> yeah. got to watch the best commercials ever made and meet the brand geniuses. thanks for having me. the philadelphia inquirer. police in pennsylvania have uncovered new evidence in the search for the man they say ambushed two state troopers last month, killing one. two pipe bombs were found in the woods where the investigation for survivalist eric frein is centered. officials say they were fully functional. police say they're confident they're searching in the right place. police also called on frein to surrender, saying he's clearly stressed and making significant mistakes. there's a $175,000 reward for information leading to his capture. >> the new jersey star ledger, actor tracy morgan hitting back at walmart's response to his lawsuit, saying, he quote can't believe the retailer is blaming him for the accident caused by one of his drivers.
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morgan claims he and the others injured are at least partly to blame for not wearing their seat belts. he said, he and his friends did nothing wrong and he's fighting hard to recover from his injuries. walmart issued a statement, saying, while we were required to reto the lawsuit, we'll encouraged settlement discussions. we remain committed to doing what's right. >> michael phelps has been been arrested for drunk driving in baltimore. after being caught going 84 in a 45-mile-per-hour zone on i-95. ten years ago, he served 18 months probation after pleading guilty to driving impaired. the 22-time medalist had begun training again in april to re-enter competitive swimming. he apologized via twitter, writing, earlier this month, was arrested and charged with dui, excessive speeding. i understand the severity of my
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actions and take full responsibility. i know these words may not mean much right now, but i'm deeply sorry to everyone i have let down. >> what do you think, willie? >> how's he come back? second time's pretty rough. >> well, he's retired for one thing so it may not affect his career that much. remember, he lost endorsements last time with kellogg, when he was caught with the bong he was smoking at the university of south carolina. so he's had a few run-ins. i'm not sure it can chip away at his incredible athletic legacy. >> wow, okay. >> let's go to "the washington post." >> the fcc has sacked the sports blackout rule that prevented some gains from being aired on tv if they weren't sold out. the nfl can still establish blackout rules through private companies with cable companies and broadcasters. >> and the "los angeles times." in california, the days of receiving plastic bags for your purchases are coming to an end. governor brown sign eed a
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statewide measure that will fatz out single use plastic bags. stores will charge at least ten cents for paper bags or reusable baggings. kritsices are threatening to put the measure up for a referendum. the bill is a win for environmentalists concerned about the pollution caused by those plastic bags. >> minneapolis star tribute. googlers beware. named jimmy kimmel the most dangerous cyber celebrity. the company says searching for kimmel carries a 1 in 5 chance you will be directed to a malicious website. kimmel had this to say. >> i am the most dangerous man on earth. if you don't want me to leak your search history to your mother-in-law, you will do everything i say. it's an honor just to be nominated, but to win this thing. who would have guessed that a boy who used to carry a briefcase to junior high and play the clarinet would end up being the most dangerous person
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of 2014. >> still ahead, a new foreign war. a possible ebola outbreak. and an armed man breaking into the east room. we have a lot of questions for white house press secretary josh earnest. he joins the conversation next. and later, how history's most innovative ideas changed the course of mankind. we'll be right back. >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time,
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call for information, then decide. read about the 30 day, 100 percent money back guarantee. don't wait, call this number now. ♪ insurance companies are spending millions of dollars trying to mislead you about the effects of proposition 46. well here's the truth: 46 will save lives. it will save money too. i'm bob pack, and i'm fighting for prop 46 because i lost my two children to preventable medical errors and i don't want anyone else to lose theirs. the three provisions in 46 will reduce medical errors and protect patients.
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save money and save lives. yes on 46.
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welcome back to "morning joe." joining us now, white house press secretary josh earnest. we have mike barnicle, donny deutsch, thomas roberts and michael steele with us as well. josh, a lot to get to. we want to talk about the ebola case here in the united states. i want to start with the head of the secret service who faced a lot of questions yesterday. did she answer them? is she qualified to do her job? >> mika, she's more than qualified. she is somebody who has a very difficult responsibility. she's responsible for leading the agency that protects the president and the white house. what you saw her do yesterday was take responsibility for the short comings that are evidence
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in the security posture at the white house. when there's someone who jumped the fence on the north lawn about ten days ago. she also took responsibility for leading a review and implementing the needing reforms. >> josh, tell me, about what, what drills has she run? what has she done to change the culture in the secret services? how can you actually say everything you just said, given the three or four cases that we've been talking about this morning, which show that people who could harm the president have gotten very, very close to either the white house, inside it, or the president himself? >> in the immediate aftermath, there were a number of reforms put in place that very evening to strengthen the perimeter, to make sure that the president was safe. i'm obviously not going to be in a position to detail all the security protocols from here. but there were some reforms that
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were implementing that very nice. more importantly, there's a broader review under way. what was the secret service's response to that incident. and what changes need to be made. whether it's staffing changes. whether it is additional technology so -- that should be deployed. are there some protocols that should be different. should the protocol for responding to these incidents be changed? this is a pretty broad look they're conducting. the president and the team at the white house are obviously very interested in reviewing the reforms they recommend. this is something the secret services takes very seriously and they need to work on. >> it's not like you can say the case is being investigated. you know that whatever is going on needs to happen now. now. >> i didn't suggest i couldn't talk about it. i think i just gave a long answer to it. all the details of the security protocols in place to protect the president. i can't talk about that for obvious reasons i think.
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>> there are some people potentially in the secret service who are not qualified for their job. is that fair to say? >> we're talking about men and women in the secret service who wake up every day prepared to put their life on the line to protect the president and to protect the white house it it's a very unique responsibility. here at the white house, the billion you s building you see behind me, it's not just the residence. thousands of tourists will walk through that building. that is a value we protect. so this is not a matter of -- >> josh, josh -- >> -- -- protect the president and protecting the -- >> this is about people doing their jobs, josh. are you telling me this morning the president of the united states and the first lady have confidence in julia pierson to run an agency that's supposed to protect their two daughters? >> yes, they have confidence in them, i think for the reasons i laid out. these are member an and women we up every day --
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>> i'm not talking about the professionals. we've been talking all day about the professionals that we've observed through the years who are extraordinary in the secret service. >> yeah, they are, i agree with that. >> we're talking about the leadership of the secret services. we're talking about a culture that obviously is broken. >> you saw the director of the secret service step before the television cameras on capitol hill yesterday, spend hours, answering difficult questions, from members of congress -- >> she said nothing, josh, she didn't answer the questions. we still don't know what happened. >> joe, she spent hours answering questions from members of congress, trying to explain them to what exactly occurred on that evening and to talk about what sort of response the secret service is going to put in place to tight en security. this is obviously a responsibility that she takes very seriously. i can tell you the white house staff and the president himself take this seriously. the president himself has articulated he's concerned about
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the security around his family, as any family would be. he's confident in the secret service to protect him and his family and to implement the necessary reforms to strengthen that security. >> mike barnicle, i take josh obviously at his word. i just find it hard to believe the president and first lady have confidence in julia pierson to protect the people's house and protect their family. i mean, there's a guy in an elevator with a gun feet away from barack obama. >> i'm going to ask josh about that right now, joe. first of all, josh, did you celebrate when kansas city won? >> i'll just tell you, at 1:00 a.m., there's at least one person who's jumping up and downess living room by himself enjoying that game, it was terrific, wasn't it? >> it was a great game. i'm a little worried about the managerial capacities but that's for another day, okay. >> yeah. >> we could have a long tough interview about that. >> my question and joe just
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referenced it, is a few days ago, in atlanta, at the cdc, basically, the equivalent a shopping mall cop gets on an elevator with the president of the united states. he is a felon. he is armed. who told the president about this? was it dennis mcdonough? what was the president's reaction? what's going to happen as a result of this? >> well, mike, i can't speak to the briefing the president received on this issue. as you know, in the aftermath of the incident with the fence jumper about ten days ago, the president was updated by his white house staff about that incident. he was briefed just one week ago in the oval office by the director of the secret service in person to discuss some of these issues. i'm not going to get into the details of the conversations between the president and the director of the secret service. even in the aftermath of that meeting where the president had some tough questions, he
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continues to have confidence in her ability to lead the investigation into what exactly happened and to get to the bottom of any changes that are necessary to strength be the security around the white house and to strengthen the security around the president and his family. >> before you go, i take it the president's going to be speaking to kellogg school of management about the state of the economy. >> on thursday, the president is going to deliver a speech where he's going to talk about how critically important it is as the united states is leading the international response to the situation in ukraine, to the basketball outbreak in west africa and obviously the situation in isil. we see the united states playing a leading role in the international community. we can only play that leading role in the international community if we have a strong community here at home that we due a lot of strength from our strong economy. we've mad progress. we've made more progress in terms of rebuilding our economy
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than almost any developed nation around the world. that's a testament to the president's leadership. that's a testament to his willingness to put in place those policies. we need to make sure it's felt by middle class families. it's more than we can do about putting place in policies that will ensure that middle class families are benefiting from it too. >> josh, i judge to ask you something, real fast. this is thomas. so you will question kc's ed yost and his leadership but not nancy pierson? i want to make it clear. you will question him, but -- >> i wasn't screaming, because i have a newborn at home, but i was jumping up and down as quietly as i possibly could. what i will say is ned yost this morning can take solace in the fact that the results speak for themselves. he's somebody who has a playoff win under his belt and he
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deserves credit for it. >> josh earnest, thank you. still ahead, how a battle against dirt led to the invention of the i-phone. some of the very unlikely stories behind the world's biggest innovations. plus, we now know what derek jeter will be doing in his retirement. "morning joe" will be right back. ♪ [ male announcer ] when you see everyone in america almost every day, you notice a few things. like the fact that you're pretty attached to these. ok, really attached. and that's alright. because we'll text you when your package is on the way. we're even expanding sunday package delivery. yes, sunday. at the u.s. postal service, our priority is...was...
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our priority is...was... dad,thank you mom for said this oftprotecting my future.you. thank you for being my hero and my dad. military families are uniquely thankful for many things, the legacy of usaa auto insurance could be one of them. if you're a current or former military member or their family, get an auto insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life. newly retired derek jeter unveiled a new website that connects athletes to fans. he said he wants it to transform how athletes and newsmakers
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share information and bring fans closer than ever to the games they love. how cool. that's nice. let's go to business before the bell with cnbc's sara eisen. >> we just got word that jobs increased last month. showed that u.s. companies added 213,000 jobs. that was better than estimates. and it was a solid stretch in the last few months, above 200,000. at least for the private sector. we're going to be watching very closely on friday where we get the government read of total jobs, which includes private sector and government jobs. last month was a disappointment for august. we'll see what september has to bring. remember, last month, i was with you, 140,000 jobs were added. we want to see that number go above 200,000. that's what economists are looking for. we'll get more indication of how the economy's doing in september because we get the big manufacturing read at 10:00 a.m. this morning. and auto sales throughout the day.
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that's really been a bright spot in this economy. it shows just how far detroit has come. we're looking at our sixth straight year of rising auto sales. economists say we could get over the 1 million mark in the month of september. a watch for those numbers today, guys. >> sara eisen, thank you. up next, the unsung heroes that created the world we live in today. they weren't always the smartest people in the room. keep it right here on "morning joe." but the energy bp produces up here creates something else as well: jobs all over america. engineering and innovation jobs. advanced safety systems & technology. shipping and manufacturing. across the united states, bp supports more than a quarter million jobs. when we set up operation in one part of the country, people in other parts go to work. that's not a coincidence. it's one more part of our commitment to america.
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therlike a new meticulouslyone's engineered german sedan. finely crafted. exactingly precise. desire for such things often outpaces one's means. until now. hey matt, new jetta? yeah. introducing lots of new. the new volkswagen jetta. isn't it time for german engineering?
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these are san francisco sewers. there's almost 1,000 miles of these tunnels that run beneath the city hidden from view. this space is incredible. it's really hot down here and the smell is just kind of overwhelming. i'm hearing lots of little critters walking along on the sides. this is the underbelly of the city. this is what makes cities possible. >> wow. love it. >> how we got to now on pbs. here with us now, the co-creator and host steven johnson, who's the author of "how we got to now, six innovations that made the modern world."
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i have the heeby jeebies. that was tough. >> i hate looking at that foot only. i get ptsd. >> joe has ptsd just from look at that. >> it's unbelievable. steven, you say sometimes it's not the smartest guy or gal in the room that changes the world. explain that. we've always heard that about einstein. there were actually scientists that may have been more remarkable in certain areas but he looked at things visually in a way that nobody else did in 1903 and changed the world because of it. >> so many of the people that we profile in the show and in the book are people who as you said aren't necessarily, you know, kind of off the charts geniuses but they're just able to follow these obsessions that they have. they're intensely curious about the world. so they get into these strange obsessions and stick with them.
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>> isn't it fascinating? we had bill gates on yesterday, who changed the nature of the american economy in the late 80s, early 90s. people around him would say, wait, that guy doesn't know computers his half as well as paul allen and the other people around him. you could say the same thing about steve jobs. maybe the thomas edison of our time. changed everything about how we lived. and yet he wasn't the most brilliant techie. >> what you see often is that you see these collaborations between different kinds of intelligence. the two completely different minds that founded apple. neither could do it on their own. it's often you see diverse sets of skills come together to solve a problem. that's where you see the most interesting innovation. >> you break down the book that basically the glass, coal, these very huge areas are what's
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driven all innovation. >> we try to take objects that wsh -- we didn't think of them as technology. coal. we have a whole thing about air conditioning. the story about air con i dkocog is really fascinating. invented almost by accident in brooklyn, founder of the carrier corporation. the ink was running when they were printing. then it made the air cooler. er eventually, it become, this mainstream technology. home air conditioning is introduced. and that triggered one of the largest migrations of human beings in history who moved to the sunbelt, florida, joe know, to southern california, vegas. and that ends up changing the political map of the united states.
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>> it's amazing, right. >> ronald regular beagareagan's without air conditioning -- >> is the premiere of the show is on the 15th of october. what is the most interesting of the connected tissue you'll introduce? >> there's so many in there. one of my favorites is an older story. guttenberg invents the printing press. most important communications in the last 1,000 years. suddenly people realize that they need glasses. they never had a need for spectacles before. they're like, i can't read these words. that creates a need for lens makers. all of a sudden europe is a wash with all these people experts in manipulating lenses which creates the telescope and microscope which initiates a whole new revolution. >> the book is "how we got to now." steven johnson, thanks. congratulations.
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it looks terrific. we want to encourage you to check out the afternoon mojoe section of our website. you'll see many exclusive green room discussions including our conversation with a man who started the global citizen award and this year's recipient. >> it involves all the members who are part of global poverty. i think there's something like 350,000 members. i think most of them have been given a chance to vote. it's a democratic process. looking for someone doing something innovative, doing something right where there's a basic dire need. i came up with the idea of the award together with the founder of the project and we wanted to do something that really supports someone who's doing it hard at the grassroots level. >> what inner drive do you have? i mean, you could be making, you know, 2, 3, 4 multiples of millions of dollars here in the united states.
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what drives you to this? >> it's really just about i'm a human. you see something and you empathize with it, how can you not act? right? that's what i really want to encourage. i'm not an amazing person. i think that any young person, any person old, young, doesn't matter, can do this. everyone has the capacity to do this work and effect this kind of change. and that is something that people need to realize. i think people often think this is some herculean task. it isn't. you have to have the courage to go out and do it. >> for this full conversation and our discussions with other innovators, go to afternoonmojoe.msnbc.com. up next, "daily rundown" with kristen welker. have a great day.
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we are going to have some travel problems late this afternoon, especially in the middle of the country. severe thunderstorms are possible. we also could have minor airport problems in new england today with some low clouds and some rain. down in florida, once again, showers and thunderstorms are in your forecast. have a great it a. day. ered vegetables and tender white meat chicken. apology accepted. i'm watching you soup people. make it progresso or make it yourself.
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>> important message for women and men ages 50 to 85. please write down this toll-free number now. right now, in areas like yours, people are receiving this free information kit for guaranteed acceptance life insurance with a rate lock through the colonial penn program. if you're on a fixed income or concerned about rising prices, learn about affordable whole life insurance with a lifetime rate lock that guarantees your rate can never increase for any reason. if you did not receive your information, or if you misplaced it, call this number now and we'll rush it to you. your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. please stand by to learn more. >> i'm alex trebek and the announcement you just heard is for a popular and affordable life insurance plan with a rate lock guarantee. that means your rate is locked in for life and can never increase. did you get your free information kit
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ebola isn't just in africa anymore. the first patient diagnosed in the u.s. is being treated right now at a texas hospital. we'll get reaction from the white house communications director about that, as well as the latest in the secret service under fire. warehouse members from both sides took the director to task and now a top democrat says he has doubts about her leadership. plus, hong kong protests press on even with more symbolism on a national holiday for china. the outcry for democracy isn't quieting down. good morning f

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