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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 2, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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he's going to deliver remarks on the economy this afternoon. and then later, the president will address the congressional hispanic caucuses' 37th annual . that will do it. "morning joe" from d.c. starts right now. ♪ how did this intruder get so far into the white house. don't they have guard dogs. >> there were officers and they were concerned that the dogs might attack them instead. [ laughter ] >> sounds strange but makes more sense when you fine occupant a lot of secret service agents are cats. [ laughter ] >> all right. good morning, everybody. it's thursday, october 2nd and with us on set in washington, d.c., boy it's great to be here. busy night last night. jeremy peters is here. good to have you.
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former white house press secretary for president obama robert gibbs. abc news political commentator and npr senior analyst cokie roberts and on capitol hill the host and managing editor of tv one's daily morning show, news now roland martin. >> we have a lot to talk about. cokie, i want to start with you. i was reading about the ebola virus and the gentleman that's in dallas how he contracted it. you know we've been hearing people, come to the show there's no reason to be worried unless you exchange bodily fluids. you're thinking somebody has to spit in my face or have sex with them. this guy in texas got the disease carrying a pregnant woman by her legs helping a family member -- okay. they are yelling at me, we don't know that's how he got the disease. i read in the "new york times" that's one of the things he did.
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a brother of the woman, alex talking into my ear, a brother of the woman who was carrying her by the other leg i believe contracted the disease and died. >> we don't know -- >> we don't know. >> i don't want to say anything disgusting at 6:00 in the morning, but we don't know what her situation was. let's just put it that way. >> so from your -- i'm just trying to figure this out. how hard it is to spread the disease? >> you have a lot of people who don't have washed hands and -- >> look at the situation. >> who are in a terrible, unsanitary situation. then it's much easier to spread the disease which is why you're seeing any of the medical teams covered up looking like they are in, you know, on the moon. >> if you look at the pictures in the "new york times" even as an example you get a sense of the conditions for the victims and people suffering from it, and i mean --
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>> i just got an e-mail from the abc doctor who has been over there working with these kids and one of the kids he had followed died this morning and it's heartbreaking, and he said if that child were in america that child would be alive. >> really? >> that's what we're dealing with. we're dealing with totally gun prepared health systems. totally unsanitary situations. in many cases no water or clean water. >> right. >> so these are places -- >> we're capable of dealing it here. it doesn't mean we won't see it again. >> we can handle it. >> we have the infrastructure. the ability to quarantine somebody. >> and we have units for it. >> roland? >> except for one thing, if our hospitals are following the proper protocol. yesterday i talked to a medical doctor with "the dallas morning news" and one of the issues this hospital initially released him.
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then he goes back out and so now you hear him going through dallas, now being around school children as well so part of this is will american hospitals, how will they recognize it and follow the right protocols? that's a real issue right there because the hospital in dallas released him and he gone for three days. >> unbelievable. exactly. so, let's move on the top story and boy "the washington post" has been doing an extraordinary job. i mean -- you know you're doing a great job when the head of the secret service has to call the president of the united states because they know the "post" is about to tell him something. last time bill had to wake up hillary and say something will break in the newspaper. can you believe -- first of all can you believe she didn't tell the president of the united states there was a guy with a gun in the elevator? >> i'm going rewind back 24
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hours and i just am surprised that the white house, you know, appeared on our show today, gibbs maybe you can explain this to be. please explain to me how they could so vehemently defend. >> the morning josh earnest was on. we have to go to the video. and he was defiant. no we have total confidence in this director. >> and capture if you could based on our questions, i couldn't even think of another question to ask him because the conversation seemed so needlessly -- >> by the way, this is something, you can't talk to this because josh does. i once said this of mccain campaign person who lied to me the night before it was very obvious, i called the person up, okay, so let me ask you this. did you not think the sun was not going to rise the next morning? did you not think i wasn't going
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to have a tv show to tell everybody that you guys lied through your teeth to me. don't be stupid. josh didn't have to come on yesterday beating his chest when they already knew that she had lost confidence by not telling the president. >> members of the democratic party in the house of representatives were already saying she needed to go. >> right. >> losing confidence and resigning are two different things. right. i think josh would probably tell you right now he did not know that she was going resign. he did not know -- >> that's not the question. the question that mika asked and that's why this was a confusing response from him. you asked do you have confidence, does the president have confidence they can still protect the first family. why he would say yes. you almost wonder if he had spoken to the president about this at all. >> jeremy, the question is he may not have. >> that's a problem. >> but, roland -- we're going to
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go to you in a second but we'll run this clip and hopefully it has mika's mortified look. >> are your telling me this morning the president of the united states and the first lady have confidence in julia pierson to run an agency that's supposed to protect her two daughters. >> yes. for the reasons i laid out. these are men and women who wake up every day, professionals prepared to put their life -- >> i think the professionals actually deserve to have better leadership than they have. >> there's a responsibility she takes very seriously. i can tell the white house staff and the president takes this very seriously. the president has articulated he's concerned about the security around his family as any parent would be. >> okay. we don't have mika's face. >> i did ask four questions before joe asked that question. >> it was like that. >> what is this. >> so, roland, i don't know.
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that hurts his credibility moving forward. >> actually it doesn't. that's the only response they can give. you're talking about -- when you talk about protecting the president you also talk about conveying confidence to the american people. the president and josh earnest cannot come out and say well we really don't know so you have to project that even though behind-the-scenes you're going what the hell are you doing. you have no other choice but to do that. >> the person that must be saying that is michele obama. >> oh, my gosh. >> if i were she i would be so angry. my children are in there. honestly, our own houses are better protected. >> the elevator incident is perplexing because i've been in plenty of elevators with the president. the only people in the elevator with the president are people that are either in the secret service or people that the secret service knows exactly who
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they are. >> as carol leigh said she pointed it out yesterday, "wall street journal" white house correspondent, it seems even more preposterous when we the media had to get there three hours beforehand, sit there. then they let this guy everybody amble on with a gun. >> that's what i'm hearing from sources close to the spouse. julia pierson the director resigned yesterday telling bloomberg news in quote, i think it's in the best interest of the secret service and the american public if i step down. congress has lost confidence in my ability to run the agency. media has made it clear that this is what they expected. officials say -- i'll tell you what they say happened. president obama lost faith after learning he shared an elevator last month at the cdc with an
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armed man with a criminal record. pierson told obama only moments before it was reported. >> i can tell you the white house first learned of that incident yesterday afternoon shortly before it was reported by a news organization. >> she did not tell him about that or the agency did not tell the white house about that until -- he didn't know about it until yesterday. >> until shortly before it was reported publicly. that's correct. over the last several days we've seen accumulating reports raising questions about the performance of the agency and the president concluded that new leadership of that agency was required. >> so, what we've gotten from sources close to the white house and the secret service is that there were three options to replace the secret service director who was being removed. and it was an african-american, a man, and a woman. and they went with the woman because the optics would be good. that's number one. number two, the thing that
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really led to this resignation was not the white house fence jumper but it was the elevator. >> it was the elevator. >> she didn't bring that up to him when they first met about the fence jumper. >> so there's supposed to be, when the president is in a room, or a contained space there's a manifest and everybody in that space with the president is supposed to be on it. and this guy with a weapon -- >> and a record. >> and a record was on a elevator in the cdc with the president. >> shooting video. >> oh, my gosh. >> shooting video of the president. >> thank god he was just shooting video. >> i do think -- look, first of all, having worked with the secret service for four years, they were, i always was struck by the utmost professionalism. these are people that sign up to stand in front of the president if something goes horribly wrong. i know joe clancy.
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i think joe is a fabulous interim pick. i would not be surprised, my apologies to joe and his family if he doesn't get pushed and pulled to stay on as a more permanent director. i think joe is going to have a lot of confidence among the agents. but let's just pause for one second on the resignation. a security apparatus is literally, has to be strong every where. right? >> that's right. >> director pierson was not at the white house the day somebody who previously had been stopped at the white house, climbed the fence at the white house, ran through the grounds of the white house, got through the door of the white house, ran into the east room of the white house. so i think what we have to under -- i think joe's first responsibility is to look at there clearly were a series of security lapses that september 19th.
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>> you had two guys that were down on constitution avenue, who said there's gunfire and somebody said no, no, it was just backfire. and they said, no, there's a shooting. >> roland? >> i got to push back on that. first of all, she did not instill any confidence when she was before congress in that hearing. she couldn't give very clear and concise answers. i understand she wasn't there at the white house or in atlanta. the problem in atlanta was she had someone on the presidential detail stay back to do an investigation and then the "post" reported didn't report further investigation and didn't tell the president. not only did she fail as a leader. had she appeared before congress and been more forthright, more focused, more disciplined, more clear folks would have seen okay she has to hand tell situation. but not tell the president? that was it.
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>> i don't disagree -- i'm certainly not here to say i don't think she shouldn't have resign. i think she should have resigned two weeks ago or somebody should have made her resign two weeks ago. i'm suggesting joe's first job as interim director is to figure out what went wrong in 2011, what went wrong a few weeks ago. let's be clear. you know, testified at the hearing that people observed this man again who had been stopped in august with a hatchet, small axe, on the south lawn. people observed him, recognized him, watched him for a while and notify anybody. that, again, i agree that there has to be and should be a change in leadership, but, again, this is -- >> somebody needs to be -- my dad told a story last night at ciss. when he first got his job. he said what about this threat
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that we're facing. we need to make sure the president can get out of here. we can get him out of here in two minute. really? let's do it. right now. he called everyone on it. everybody had to rally and the chopper had to get in place. took them much longer than they thought. he did a drill completely unexpectedly. they put three-foot fences up. i start doing drills. catch people with their pants down right and left and fire them and figure it out. >> i was struck by the fact in the hearing, 116 people over the past five years have climbed the fence. now, i'm not a security expert and i'm not trying to be flip but the first thing i would do is build a bigger fence. >> let's get jeremy in here. >> my colleague did some reporting on this and found the fence is actually a historic artifact. so you can't tear it down. could you. but it would be problematic to tear it down. the secret service's culpability here is clear. but what about the white house's
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handling of this. robert you could speak to the fact. this doesn't look to be the most adept crisis management. they are leaking things how this woman wasn't their first choice. doesn't seem very professional. >> you have to live with the choice you make. i think this and one of the things in josh's defense all too often and i was in some of these meetings and i did some of these meetings specifically with joe. there's a small circle of people that will get read into the security moments of a president for obvious reasons and josh may just not have known exactly what was happening at certain points with some of the security moments. that doesn't mean josh is uninformed by any means. i think if you look back at this, what, to read the story on saturday night or sunday morning about what happened with the shooting, to understand that we didn't know how far that person got into the white house until the eve of the shooting, it's incumbent upon the secret service and josh said this in
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the briefing. >> he lied to us about it too. >> josh said this, think got to be much more transparent not in the way that compromises security -- >> don't need to lie. start there. >> this morning's "the washington post" also mika has more details. >> it does about julia pierson's time in charge of the security service. staffing shortages under her watch and it called for 100 surveillance office towers patrol the would you say. she urged for far fewer. pierson honored a request from d.c. mayor to open up a street near benjamin netanyahu's hotel. the mayor had traffic concerns even though the street had been closed for years to prevent a possible attack. and removed fencing when the president hosted the france's summit this year. pierson who worked at a costume character at disney world as a
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teen said we need be more like disney world. >> she didn't say that. no. i think they are making it up. >> look. it is true sometimes the security drives you completely nuts and there's been a lot of overreaction in washington shutting down pennsylvania avenue and all that. which shows you, shutting down pennsylvania avenue only -- >> do we need to be like -- >> have you ever been to disney world. >> of course i have. many times. >> i was there once and left immediately. okay. >> stop. >> i'm sorry. >> we'll be on pennsylvania avenue later today. >> she had a 30 year service with the secret service. so it's not quite fair to talk about what she did as at that teenager. but the fact is that this was a major, major failure.
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>> all right. >> but we shouldn't react by closing down washington. >> we got a lot coming up including -- i want to talk to cokie about two polls coming in. one from kansas, pat roberts an independent may actually beat pat roberts and out of wisconsin yesterday we were talking about scott walker new poll comes out shows him moving ahead in wisconsin. a lot to talk about and more cross currents. pretty incredible. >> okay. >> in different parts of the country parties are doing differently. >> still ahead senator bernie sanders says the u.s. is wrong to go after isis in the middle east. he joins us in our 8:00 hour. up next are you ready for the age of unlimited vacations? >> yes, i am. >> i'll tell you why richard branson thinks that's what the workforce needs. he's not alone. burger wars. we'll explain japan's fascination with dark burgers as mcdonald's offers up a new item to challenge burger king.
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all right. we had a busy night last night. you know what? you know how when you have a lot of kids that are busy and running from event to event. i'm going to show you retirement. brzezinski style. this is my mother's bench. my mother did an event, talking about her new book "the lord of the forest" and her incredible body of work and we had a great audience and she was fantastic. and as you know, her work is unbelievable. it's on display right now at the phillips collection as well as at the krieger museum in washington. then i had to dash over -- >> then your dad. >> my dad was being honored at
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center for strategic and international studies. they have opened up the brzezinski institute, which is focused on geostrategy. he spoke and had a wonderful time actually able to make it to both events. >> that was wonderful. >> i'm not sure how to keep up with these two. >> you're a very lucky woman. you walk into the brzezinski institute and you go in and he goes welcome. i walk in and there must be a detector. you know you are stunningly -- >> really wonderful dinner. i'm glad we were there for a few minutes. so now let's take a look at the morning papers. we have thomas in new york as well for that but we'll start thomas with st. louis, the "st. louis dispatch." prosecutors from st. louis are investigating allegations of misconduct in the grand jury investigation into the death of michael brown. a twitter user claimed to have
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inside knowledge into the case saying quote, i know someone sitting on the grand jury of this case. there isn't enough at this point to warrant an arrest. the post and twitter account were deleted. the graj has been weighing evidence in the case since august 20th. if there was a breach the entire process would have to start over. thomas. >> on a lighter note we look at "usa today" and they are talking about mcdonald's launching a new menu item as the fast food wars are heating up in japan. this is in honor of halloween. they are going to be selling a limited edition of black burger. it's no match for the burger king version. look at the side-by-sides here. it's the all-black once. cheese and special squid ink sauce. the mcdonald burger sports a bun dyed black but keeps the yellow cheese. >> it's like green beer on st. patrick's day. >> still no word if the burgers
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will come to the u.s. if they do we'll have a "morning joe" eat off contest right here on the set. >> that would be the worst japanese invasion since pearl harbor. keep your burgers over there. >> i want to see them in person. up close. >> why? >> from the "l.a. times" netflix has signed a deal with adam sadler. he'll problem ducing and starring in four films exclusively for the streaming site. the first movie can arrive as early as next year. thomas it's something netflix has really gotten into the original content business. >> being a great. mika has been asking for a "happy gilmore ii" and "happy gilmore iii." >> richard branson has given his personal staff 200 people unlimited vacation days.
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the chairman and founder of virgin group said the staff is free to take off whenever they lining, for as long as they want and they don't need to get manager approval. this was a idea inspired by netflix. but if the policy is successful, then sir richard will encourage the company's subsidiaries to adopt that policy as well. i can't imagine it not being successful. >> i'll apply today. is there a virgin tv group? >> i think that's -- i think that's innovative. i think they will get higher productivity. i think it could be counter intuitive. >> if you hire the right people obviously that will work. there was a guy that i know runs creative shop somewhere who understands he's got some very creative people there and sometimes he'll say take a month off. he says he knows that when they come back from the month, they are just going to be like
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animals that were caged that come out and will just work. >> be interesting to see if these people do take time off. they probably would be scared to. if i leave the office what will happen. >> mika, that's obviously why i never take time off. >> we've been talking about the ebola outbreak in west africa and confirmation the virus has jumped to america. joining us now "time" magazine's health editor. it takes a look what the virus is doing in west africa and potential damage here in the u.s. thanks for being on. i guess let's go to the question that comes to everybody's mind. the conditions, obviously, in areas in west africa are horrific and lead to the virus spreading. are we certain, though, about containment here in the u.s.? can we say we won't see x amount cases? >> we can't say we won't see any more cases, but the thing about
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ebola that's important to realize is that we actually do know how to contain the virus. there's a very straightforward protocol and given the resources that we have and the resource like a country with the u.s. with a great health care system we can contain this case, no question. he's in isolation, contact tracing is the best practice which means going out over tory single person he contact with and monitoring them for 21 days as well and in the hands of the cdc this can be contained. >> front page of the "the washington post" though talks about ebola misstep in texas. do you think the mistake of the texas hospital is probably going to change the game for other hospitals arose the u.s.? >> i'm glad you brought that up and i think it sounds the alarm. first and absolute most important thing is that a patient be in isolation as soon as possible. so it was a misstep. there's no getting around that. hopefully that won't happen the next time someone shows up with
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symptoms of ebola. >> five people an hour in sierra leone contracting the disease. so it's really -- it's spreading like crazy. you know, one of the really sad things africa was doing pretty well. there was a lot of good news coming out of africa. and now this has setback those countries for a generation. >> the story i told earlier this morning robert that i read in the "new york times" and everybody jumped on me, here i am trying to embrace your newspaper and everybody acting like i crawled out of a sewer drunk. but in that story you had this poor woman, this 19-year-old pregnant woman has ebola, she's rushed to a hospital there and they turn her away and she goes home, seven months pregnant and dies at home a few hours later. there's just an infrastructure problem. >> absolutely. i think the answer in some ways to mika's question how do we not have it spread here is we got to
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have a surge in that west africa it's not generated here unless you come in to contact with somebody that has it. that person came from west africa. that's obviously where this has started. it's where it has blossomed. it's the only place that we -- that's the place where we have to correct it. >> we are. when the u.s. military is setting up a hospital there. the usaid is sending in a lot of money and other organizations like save the children are going in. >> thank you so much. the new "time" cover "chasing ebola." thank you very much. coming up did julia pierson do the right thing by stepping down. we'll talk to the former director of the secret service in his first interview since testifying on capitol hill. plus we'll check in on what the top columnists are writing today in the morning's top opinion pages. that's next on "morning joe." ♪
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♪ joining us for the most read opinion pages, staff writer with the hillis back with us. we'll start with the "new york times." what isis could teach the west. in one sense the terrorists are
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fighting smarter than we are. these extremists use arms to fight their battles in the short terms but to hold ground in the long run, they also combat western education and women's empowerment. they know that illiteracy, ignorance and oppression of women create the petri dish in which extremism can flourish. shouldn't we try to compete? we're tactician, alas the extremists may be better strategists. >> the "wall street journal," what's at stake in hong kong. >> this is a big story happening right now. the desire for self-government is natural when a society becomes as of a fluent as hong kong. but talk to the protesters and another theme emerges. saving the qualities that make their city unique. they want democracy as a bull wark against the influx of mainland authoritarian values with their understanding that democracy is both about political choice and moral
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values. the people of hong kong are today in the vanguard of the global fight for freedom. >> doesn't look like there's much give, cokie. if you look at the editorial on the front page of the paper today, the communist paper. they are not backing down. >> no. i mean sort of scary to think what happens next. the protesters are saying they are going to occupy government buildings, and when that starts to happen -- >> you know what, it's 1965 and you'll take over the columbia professor's office that's one thing. i don't think that's going to go over too well in hong kong. >> people in the reports, people from the mainland who have come and seen what's going on in hong kong can't believe it. if this were happening at home we would be dead. >> the china, though, at the same time are facing much more complex situation aren't they in 2014 than they were in 1989. >> sure. >> they cannot respond the way
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they responded at tiananmen square. >> let's see what happens next then. because if they don't respond that way what do they do? this is 150,000 people. >> gloets to your story today in the hill. more plane cancelations coming before the elections. nearly 50,000 people are going to lose their current health coverage in the coming weeks and you talk about the political consequences before the mid-term elections. >> that's right. we're wondering whether this will move the needle in tough races. there are probably about 14,000 planned cancelations coming in kentucky. about 50,000 across the country, maybe more. some of these are the result of the president's health care law, some are just natural upheaval in the individual market. but i think the fascinating thing is that republicans aren't jumping on this issue the way they promised to a we're ago because obamacare has receded as a political issue at this point. >> roland, is this baked in to the cake already, though, for
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republicans and democrats and independents or could this have a significant impact as we move closer to the election. >> in terms of the affordable care act absolutely not the president has been running victory laps. for republicans you back away from it. the real issue for them i think moving forward is look a lot of democrats have had self-inflicted wounds and so you're really allowing them to be on the defensive while you go on the offensive and so republicans -- the numbers are there for them. democrats right now are freaking out when it comes to black turnout for arkansas, north carolina as well as louisiana, republicans are saying unless they get massive turnout which isn't the case in mid-terms they think they can take those three seats and so for them you don't just add more fuel to the fire you say you know what? you got it. we'll leave it alone. our numbers look too good to take back the senate. >> jeremy. >> one of the things i'm hearing this has been demoralizing for republicans. they want to see their candidates fighting on obamacare
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and they are not. i'm wondering, your getting a sense that that may change? >> no. in fact we're not expecting to it change prior to election day. we expect gop to broaden its message given roughly a year ago we were thinking this entire election would hinge on obamacare. things can happen so quickly and clearly the party doesn't see it as the winning issue as it used to. >> the ads are all about isis. and since the national security is going to be a good issue for them. that's probably true. >> it almost seems like another time to see an ad about obamacare at this time. like an old ad rerun by the state. >> not that it won't have an impact, it clearly well but it's baked in. >> you can't touch it anyway because you have republican governors who are cutting deals. kasich in ohio. the problem is you have republican governors realize field goal i don't expand medicaid i'm screwed with health care so if you go against i want
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you'll get your own party and you need them the ground operations in those states to win the senate seat. >> yep. thank you very much. >> roland martin thank you as well. up next is a change of leadership the only change the secret service needs? former secret service director joins us for an exclusive interview. ♪ [ male announcer ] even more impressive than the research this man has at his disposal is how he puts it to work for his clients. morning. morning. thanks for meeting so early. come on in. [ male announcer ] it's how edward jones makes sense of investing.
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it's one more part of our commitment to america. here's how dysfunction swral the secret service is at this point. congress had to help them come up with solutions. >> how much would it cost to lock the front door of the white house?
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>> have you ever heard of these guys. maybe put some vegetation barriers, simple things like spanish bayonet. >> spiky plants. you never want to be in charge of guarding the president of the united states and could be replaced by at that plant. [ laughter ] >> with us now we got former secret service director ralph basham. ralph you testified the other day and also you spoke to director pierson after her testimony. obviously very deflated, right? >> you know, sitting there for almost four hours, and during what i called a sort of a feeding frenzy and clearly there was a lot of red meat to go around. >> to feed on. >> exactly. no. it was a very, very stressful,
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both emotionally and physically. >> a lot of bad things have happened over the past several months that all can't be put on her shoulders. so what's happened to the culture of the secret service over the past five or six years >> well, first of all, i don't believe that the secret service has a problem to the depth of some of so-called security experts are saying. any organization that is challenged like secret service is on a day-to-day basis, they are going to have these challenges. they are going to have problems. and -- >> with all due respect, i think some of the thing that we're highlighting -- i understand the feeding friendy aspect. i definitely understand even, you know, the media kind of jumping on it. come on. someone in an swraert the
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president with a weapon who is not on the manifest. >> who has a record. >> who has a record. >> there's no question, there's no excuse for that. that was a clear failure. >> if you were in charge and that happened on your watch -- >> well, i would take appropriate disciplinary action there. someone did not do their job. someone did not go to the, follow the protocols. >> were you surprised at all? when you found there was somebody in the east room of the white house, when you heard that there were bullet holes in the glass in the white house, i mean did you say what's going on there? >> i think that it was a catastrophic failure on the 19th of september. the director pierson has said that. i've said that. and clearly there was a huge breakdown there. and they need to get to the bottom of this and get to the bottom of this quickly. >> let's ask you about that. we talked earlier about the
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drills my dad had right when he got in the office. i keep hearing we're going to get to the bottom of this and do investigations. right now what should be happening in the secret service to make sure nothing like this ever happens again? >> i think that what they are doing right now. they are increasing -- look when you have the white house sitting in down opportune an urban area with a pickett fence, literally a pickett fence separating the public from 84, i think 80 yards to the front door of the white house, and we allow individuals access to that street and sidewalk, this individual got over that fence, into the white house in 29 seconds. 29 seconds. that's just unacceptable. but i'm not making an excuse. they should have taken that individual down. they should have released the
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dogs. >> been shot? >> no, i don't agree with that. i do not agree with that. you want to make policy. >> i want to understand what taking him down. >> thank you so much. we greatly appreciate it. >> i want to know more. up next this secret service mess says something about the president's leadership? that debate ahead. plus another tense exchange between u.s. and israeli officials, andrea mitchell joins us with benjamin netanyahu's response. thank you very much. >> thank you, ralph. ♪
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>> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life.
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it will never increase, guaranteed. this is lifelong coverage that can never be cancelled as long as you pay your premiums, guaranteed. and your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. you cannot be turned down because of your health. call for your information kit and read about this rate lock for yourself. you'll also get a free gift with great information if you're retired or will be soon. both are free, with no obligation, so don't miss out. call for information, then decide. read about the 30 day, 100 percent money back guarantee. don't wait, call this number now.
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♪ this is beyond the pale. and i listened to your testimony very deliberately here this morning. and i wish to god you, you protected the white house like you're protecting your reputation here today. the secret service against one individual with mental illness. and you lost. you lost. and you had three shots at this guy. >> congressman steven lynch earlier this week fired off about julia pierson's testimony about a string of secret service breaches. congressman lynch is joining us from boston and hear in washington, congressman jack kingston. >> jarks let's start with you. the white house hired this woman
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for optics after the prosecution scandal. >> that's what some are saying. >> that's what our contacts are saying. secret service and also inside the white house. did they get what they deferred? >> i think there's a big question about that because i do think that she did not have the background that was needed to run the entire agency. she had a good career but probably -- >> post-9/11 absolutely no protection. >> no experience with protective services and you can't play around with this. you had the situation in colombia and that was a public relations disaster but one of the statements that she was famous for making was that the secret service needed to resemble disneyland more. that's not the case at all. we want these folks to be tough, we want them to be unmerciful, we want them to protect the president and his family and visitingdignitaries. >> i'm not sure of the context
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of that. steven lynch, do you agree? >> the white house got what they wanted. they looked at the frat boy nature, the prostitute issue down in colombia and they brought in someone who was opposite of that behavior. the security issue was secondary i think. >> so, jack, where do we go next? what do we need to do next to make sure this doesn't happen again. >> what chairman mccall and john boehner talked about is having a blue ribbon commission to figure out what to do. this wasn't the only time. i had an experience getting on the elevator by mistake with president bush. that alone should have been a big question. how does that happen by accident, somebody with a record getting on an elevator. >> with a weapon. >> so should be easy for us to
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blame director pierson but obviously we've had one mistake after another after another after another. isn't there a much bigger culture problem here? that actually might encourage terrorists across the world to take a shot at the president? >> i think so. i think so. i think we need to start at the very beginning. we need to look at what we're doing in georgia and we got to make sure that what we're training our agents for today is really the reality on the ground. i think in some sense the secret service may be fighting the last war, and we need to make sure that they are war gaming all these possibilities with terrorist groups looking at the white house, especially, you know, they must being a greatly encouraged now because we had one mentally ill gentleman able to get in the green room. so if this was a nefarious group with resources and a plan things could have gone much, much worse. >> let me say this.
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you mentioned the federal law enforcement training center in brunswick, georgia which is in my district. i'm very familiar with it. they do a great job. there were five rings of security that were breached in this case. the secret service did not shut down the room, they did not lock it down, if you will, they did not raise threat level, there was an alarm that apparently had been put on mute. all the training in the world, you know, they were trained to do that. they did not follow their own protocol. they ignored it. >> jack, thank you. >> thank you both. still ahead, a patient shows up at a dallas hospital complaining of fever and abdominal pain. said he just traveled from africa. the hospital sends him home. there are some serious concerns about how ready the u.s. is to hand tell ebola virus. we're going to talk to the nih's top expert on infectious diseases ahead.
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there is a broader review that's under way to determine what exactly happened that night, what was the secret service's response to that incident, and what changes need to be made whether it's staffing changes, whether it is additional technology that should be deployed to protect the president and white house. are there some protocols that should be different, response to these incidents should protocols be changed. this is a pretty broad look that they are conducting. >> you know that whatever is going on -- >> mika, i didn't suggest they couldn't talk about it. i think i just gave a long
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answer to it. what i won't be in a position to talk about are the details and security protocols in place. >> your telling me this morning the president of the united states and first lady have confidence in julia pierson to run an agency that's suppose freezing drizzle text her two daughters >> yes, joe, they have confidence in them for the reasons i laid out. these are men and women who wake up every day, professionals prepared to put their lives -- >> i'm not talking about professionals. i think the professionals deserve to have better leadership than they have. >> welcome back to "morning joe." >> you have the worst poker face in the history of television. >> no. my face says what i'm thinking. okay. i'm sorry, josh earnest, i actually was trying to visit him today. i don't think he'll have me. >> you can walk in. >> i don't understand -- >> it's so funny. we were trying to get in here this morning and we had trouble get through the gate.
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somebody said it's, you know, it's easier to get in the white house. that's the new sort of fly. >> who said that. >> i'm not sure why they so vehemently defended julia pierson. the events speak for themselves. i'm not even sure why she didn't resign before the hearing. i don't get it. >> people say that oh, you know, josh had to say what he had to say. he didn't. there are a thousand different ways to say that. >> trust me, i can recall many times in which you're the pith of the sphere and you know something will be different in five hours. but you're there. >> a event jumper, i'm asking you, is the president safe and are there going changes in the secret service? what's your answer. is it like that? >> here's the question. i think the president -- of course the president is safe.
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have there been breakdowns. absolutely. let's be clear. they are standing out in front of the white house right,000. if we don't think they are safe somebody should call the national guard. >> ron, you worked in the white house. >> hold on. i'm not defending the director. i think the director resigned appropriately. as i said last hour it would have been appropriate if she resigned two weeks ago. i think the press secretary gets put in awkward positions where they don't have all the answers. >> that's the job. >> is there a better way? you have grilled. >> yeah. >> i've been there. i can see the wheels moving. >> there are ways to do it without just -- >> there are. but the real issue here is, obviously, it is the president's security and people who work in the white house are they secure. are the children secure? really this is symptomatic we're having at our government institutions and social institutions where it's built
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for another time and we have to look at things more than at that director. we have to look at things should they come out of dhs. maybe we should promote people up the ranks. maybe they should focus just on security. >> andrea, you said back to treasury. >> after 9/11 everything changed. they created this mega, not just homeland, but 16 intelligence agencies. ask anyone in intelligence and you know a lot of folks there where they are having a dni is a director of national intelligence is better than when the cia was the standalone operation and reported directly. it is insane. there have been things that happened with the post-9/11 reorganization. >> their first job is counterterrorism. >> the day the president was killed. i'm just saying. >> 24 hours ago what is wrong with saying these are serious breaches, they are being taken seriously, there will be serious
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consequences and you can be sure this will never happen again. >> he did say a lot of that. look -- >> no. no, he really didn't. >> he went through the fact that they are looking into -- >> you guys have an association where you guys drink beer at the end of the day. they have -- >> i like them. >> the reason they drink beer what you don't see in that is his feet are tap dancing. there's a lot of times you're not given the lot and i don't know how many times i would go in the meetings and they said it would be good if you didn't get that question today. guess what? >> this is leadership. i'm sorry, i don't know julia pierson. she sat there. i could have testified to congress and had a worst brief and been more effective than she was. you know what john mccain said to me yesterday, he said andrea we've seen this movie before. she's going to be gone. when you've lost someone like congressman cummings and we
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respect her on the both sides of the aisle you lost her. >> congress pulled them out of treasury and put them into this monstrosity. >> we should do oversight? what a concept. >> we have a lot of things to talk about. i see you're wearing the detroit tigers tie. >> we have the nats. >> the game two nights ago where the royals came back. i can't believe they came back and beat the a's. last night the giants obliterated the steelers. last night this is just a heartbreaking picture on the front page of the "new york times." and we ask why ebola is spreading as quickly as it's spreading. here is -- here are two young
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girls in the foreground, a 4-year-old girl who they think had ebola. and talk about bodily fluid, there's human excrement on these floors where children are lying. >> here "the washington post" where a little girl's mother died from ebola and she's in isolation. the conditions, obviously cater to it spreading. >> conditions are miserable. a lot of questions being asked this morning about the dallas hospital that sent a guy away who was throwing up, who had a fever and said i just came from liberia. >> that seems like maybe a misstep. let's move on. the spread of ebola in america so far has been limited to one man. this morning there are concerns over possible new case. a patient in hawaii has been placed in isolation after showing symptoms consistent with the virus.
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though it's not confirmed. in texas health officials are monitoring a second person who had been in close contact with duncan, five children are being kept home from dallas area schools and watched carefully and yesterday parents of other students in those districts plugged their kids from school to have them tested. meanwhile health officials are scrutinizing dallas's hospital's response to that case. duncan tried to get help on september 26th complaining of fever and abdominal pain after returning from west africa. his travel information was overlooked and he was sent home with a diagnosis of a simple mild fever. his nephew says it wasn't until they called the cdc two days later that duncan was treated appropriately. >> he's in our prayers, and we are really praying for him. he'll have a lot of work to do when he gets out and everybody is praying and rooting for him. i know the whole nation is
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rooting for him. >> regretfully that information was not fully communicated throughout the full team and as a result the full import of that information wasn't factored into the clinical decision-making. >> now health officials are tracing who duncan came in contact with. at least ten people. he departed monrovia. days before duncan left liberia he reportedly helped an intented pregnant woman carrying her by the legs to a cab to get her to a hospital but she was turned away for lack of space and later died. >> the story also says her brother, pregnant woman's brother also helped carry her i think by the other leg. and he's passed away as well. just think about how bad the
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situation might be if this man, if mr. duncan hadn't picked up the phone and called the cdc. we were just saying -- >> but he did it, thank goodness, and he was the responsible party here. >> but hospitals have -- >> absolutely. >> a direct responsibility. >> i think they all have the message. i would be very surprised if this happens again. >> from bethesda, maryland, we have the director of noogs institute of allergies and infectious disease, dr. anthony fauci. >> so, doctor, thank you for being with us. can we be assured that hospitals in their home towns will ask all the right questions, and act appropriately moving forward in the way this dallas hospital did not >> well, i hope so. i think this will certainly serve for the rest of the country as a very cogent lesson learned. the cdc over the last several weeks to months have been really
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putting out the message that when people come in with symptoms that are compatible with ebola it's important to ask for a travel history and factor that in to what your decision is. unfortunately that didn't happen in this case. i think we need to put that behind us and look ahead to make sure that in the future this doesn't happen again. >> andrea mitchell is here and has a question. >> dr. fauci, you've made the point and i think it's important to emphasize that it is containable in our society, unlike these horrific pictures of children on the streets in liberia. tell us, again, about how difficult it is to catch this, given our own experiences here in america. >> well, its important for the public to understand that. we have said for some time now it's certainly feasible and it's happened to prove the feasibility somebody will get on
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a plane in a west african country, being infected with no symptoms, have no symptoms, come here, land in the states and wine up appearing at an emergency room. that's exactly what happened. the important thing is when you're not symptomatic, when you don't have any symptoms history shows us it's not transmitted that way. so when the person was walking around not only when he was on the plane but even for the four days from the 20th of september to the 24th when he had no symptoms, that is a situation where it's not transmitted. however, when he became symptomatic people who came into contact with bodily fluids such as when they get sick, some vomit, some bleed, that's the risk. the reason i'm saying there won't be an outbreak here. there maybe another case. may be one of those contabts that that person came into contact at actually will get infected ultimately. what the cdc does and they do it very well is what is called contact tracing. which means you take everybody
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that that person came into contact with. you identify them and monitor them for 21 days. >> let's go to cokie roberts. >> that's what's happening in dallas. the airplane you say. there's no need to get all those people that were on that airplane. >> no, there's not. because the person was clearly without symptoms. not only on the airplane. but for four days after he got off the airplane. then the history -- >> so that's not a rob. >> cokie wants to know if she has to worry about going to dulles airport. >> i don't think there's a problem with dulles airport. >> you've never been to dulles airport. all right. thank you so much, doctor. doctor, before you leave, i want to ask you one other question. ? enterovirus -- >> a lot of little kids getting this mystery illness.
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and we now hear that four have died. i got a young boy that has asthma. and obviously i'm concerned. a lot of parents are concerned about this mystery disease. what can you tell us? >> well, it's important if you have a child that has asthma because first of all this is really quite an explosion. there have now been more than 40 states that have had this outbreak of this enterovirus d 68. it's a particularly nasty virus particularly in children who have a predisposition to asthma because it with cause respiratory distress to children. so we got to be careful and that's reason why we say have children wash their hands as much as possible. stay away from kids who clearly have a respiratory illness. and if the child is sick make sure the child does not go to school. that's probably the best thing to do. >> 40 states? >> 41 states at least. >> all right. thank you so much, doctor.
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greatly appreciate it. we'll be right back. you guys stick around if you can. >> andrea stay with us. >> still ahead on "morning joe" much more independent outspoken senator bernie sanders joins us in the next hour. i want to talk about how another independent from kansas may be joining him very soon. >> plus a marine trapped in mexico. new hope for a release in the coming weeks. up next guilty of murder after a dispute over loud music. how long will michael dunn be behind bars for killing an unarmed teenager. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ there's confidence...
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all right. let's take a look at the morning
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papers. we'll start with the florida times union the man who shot and killed a teenager during a dispute over loud music will spend the rest of his life behind bars. a jury found michael dunn guilty of first degree verdict in the 2012 shooting death of 17-year-old jordan davis. the conviction comes after jurors in the first trial couldn't agree on whether there was a specific and premeditated intent to kill. in florida first degree murder carries a mandatory life sentence. thomas? >> we look at the hartford current gang and sandy hook elementary school. evacuated on wednesday following a bomb threat. no device was found. however the students were sent home as a precaution. officials say they are still investigating the source of that threat. all right. the jackson clarion ledger, political blogger who snapped photos of thad cochran's wife as she laid in her nursing home was indicted. back in may clayton kelly was
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charged with exploitation of a vulnerable adult. photo voyeurism and conspiracy. new charges include burglary and attempted burglary. kelly who is an aspiring political blogger and supporter of chris mcdaniel remains free on bail. >> we look at this one from the "new york post." top hollywood attorney is threatening to file a million dollar lawsuit against google over the celebrity hacking scandal involving nude pictures. the lawyer who represents famous clients says google is making millions from the victimization of women claiming the images are still online weeks after they went public and he's demanding the public immediately remove those photos. even comparing the site's response to how the nfl dealt with the ray rice controversy. >> still up? >> they are still up. >> i thought they would be down by now, mika. >> go ahead, thomas. >> some people saw it. >> can i ask you a question,
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because, you know, we got a detroit tiger fan here. i'm sure he would love to know if the naked pictures of their star pitcher is still up. >> that's beside the point. they will beat the orioles. >> they will not beat the orioles. >> i have no comment on naked pictures. >> they will not beat the orioles. they will not beat the orioles. >> okay. your mom didn't want jesse severe la verlander to do that either. >> move on. >> the orioles will win. anyway. >> yes. >> a lot of little boys out there want to be just like their dads and 8-month-old hadley is no different. take a look at this little guy.
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>> he's going to be the hulk. paint him green, he's the hulk. >> how funny is that? >> that's so cute. >> so cute. >> that's a good one. i like it. >> coming up -- that was a lot of fun. you know what was not fun? interviewing netanyahu. andrea mitchell's exclusive interview with israeli prime minister coming up. my gosh, we'll talk about a contentious set of events that led up to that interview. more "morning joe" straight ahead.
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>> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life. it will never increase, guaranteed. this is lifelong coverage that can never be cancelled as long as you pay your premiums,
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guaranteed. and your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. you cannot be turned down because of your health. call for your information kit and read about this rate lock for yourself. you'll also get a free gift with great information if you're retired or will be soon. both are free, with no obligation, so don't miss out. call for information, then decide. read about the 30 day, 100 percent money back guarantee. don't wait, call this number now. ♪
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♪ welcome back to "morning joe." the united states and israel trading strongly-worded statements after a face to face meeting between president obama and prime minister benjamin netanyahu with the white house on wednesday. if you're hanging without the kids on the sidewalk and asking you how long was the hand shake, you're not going to know the answer unless you read this article this morning. the answer coming in at 2.2 seconds. it was a grim hand shake. 12th the two leaders met and first time since israel/gaza war
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this summer. we'll go to andrea interview in a second. but andrea and i were talking before, we were shocked despite the new settlement announcement that you actually had josh earnest and jim talking going out and actually attacking the prime minister right after he left. >> it wasn't ugly in the meeting. it was tense and awkward. then it got ugly as soon as he left. it was one of those hand shakes they are staring at each other in the eye. then they do the pump. i timed it. maybe 2.1 seconds. that's what it was. >> nice rounding it. >> they said what had to be said about the very special relationship and all that and you can see that obama was tip toeing. he's like don't let this guy blow like right here in the oval office like he did previously. >> you dating somebody in college you want to get out of the restaurant before the explosion happens. >> obama with his leg crossed.
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>> the president did say that the status quo is not acceptable in the peace talks. >> gently. could you see what was coming. >> hours after the meeting the white house condemned what happened over in israel. israel's plans for new housing projects in east jerusalem calling it a provocative act. that toledo a stern response from the prime minister in an interview with our own andrea mitchell. >> you had a meeting with the president and white house and state department say that the new settlements in east jerusalem undercut your commitment to peace. that it could poison the atmosphere. it could turn the world against you. what is your response to that when the president says that to you? >> i think you should be aquainted with the facts. first these are not settlements these are neighborhoods of jerusalem. we have arab neighborhoods and jewish neighborhoods. >> when you walk out of the white house and two hours later the white house press secretary and state department spokeswoman both slam israel, talk about poison. how does that make you feel?
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>> it doesn't make me feel good. i think the important thing is to get the facts right. i mean start with the facts. >> you think president obama has the facts wrong? >> we didn't discuss it. i have to tell you. there was a generic statement. we didn't get into these specific instances. >> all right. andrea mitchell, where do we go from here and talk about iran if you could as well. >> the relationship is just so fraught. during the whole gaza war the president was getting angrier and angrier. we overheard john kerry say that's some pell of a pinpoint operation after the u.n. shelter was bombed. so they are coming -- it's mars and venus. there's no coming together. and netanyahu is trying to cover it up and say, well, we didn't discuss it but clearly it's out there, and on iran they have completely different views about iran. he says iran is isis, isis is iran, he dismisses rouhani has
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no power. what's the military option you'll take them out. he said well i don't deal with that. i said you're the one that does deal with that. he said we just reserve our options. >> what does he want? everybody would say they want peace, right? >> who? >> all the players in the game here. >> all the players. yeah. >> they have different definitions. >> they have different definitions. obviously, dana, as you look through this and you read your article and you watch the interview, you wonder how the united states can be a broker if the president's own people are going out and condemning israel for this. >> this administration has given up on that idea. when your secretary of state is accused by israel of launching a strategic terrorist attack on them, each administration in the past few started out saying okay
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we're the guys, we'll solve this problem and nobody has for decades. they enter it, it looks promising for five minutes and then the whole thing deteriorates. >> that's why hill ray stayed out of it. >> we're back where we are. >> ron, you're obviously covering the bush white house for a while. the bush white house from the beginning and i actually agreed with them, they said we'll get involved in a peace process when both sides actually act like they want to be involved in a peace process. same thing with hillary clinton. and you just wonder if that isn't the stance the united states should make because if you go chasing after peace like john kerry did, and, you know, maybe that was a good earnest thing to do, this ends up. >> i think the bush white house and hillary clinton learned a little bit from bill clinton who did chase peace and it didn't turn out very well in the end. it's a tough issue. i wonder if israel if -- you know, you can see what they are
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doing in the short term. we really have to protect our security and play to our domestic concerns. long term do they understand how -- look at these polls that show how young people in the world view israel. it's a long range -- >> post-arab spring what netanyahu said to the u.n., to the president and to me yesterday is that the arab leaders, the saudis and egypt are closer to him and now are willing to help support a peace agreement that they have these new arab allies. >> if that's the case you sit here and wonder. because i believe that is the case. but if that's the case, then why announce new settlements. why take the cheap shot and i'll call it that as a long time supporter of israel, i'm sure i can find my key to tel aviv somewhere. if you have hamas on the run, if you that have moderate arab states on your side why provoke? why get in the way of a positive step forward by announcing
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settlements because your poll numbers are low at home. >> that's a good question. >> we all pay for it. >> up next an emotional day on capitol hill as congress works to free a marine vet suffering from ptsd from a mexican visit. >> some of the symptoms i'm talking are symptoms i live through on a daily basis. sometimes depression. sometimes hyper vigilance. i can walk in this hallway in congress where i'm most protect and be afraid to walk in that bathroom. >> we're going to be talking to congressman salmon who preside over the hearings yesterday. we'll be right back. when folks think about what they get from alaska, they think salmon and energy. but the energy bp produces up here creates something else as well: jobs all over america. engineering and innovation jobs. advanced safety systems & technology.
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♪ welcome back, everybody. there's some breaking news we want to get on fasht diagnosed with ebola in texas.
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state officials telling several members of that patient's family not to leave their homes. nbc's kate snow is joining us live now outside of the hospital where the patient is being treated. kate, update us on the information that's now being imparted to this patient's family. >> reporter: right. good morning. a couple new details. one is that four members of the family are being told to stay home out of an abundance of caution because they may have been exposed to ebola. the other piece of information we just learned moments ago is that 80 people, 8-0 people were at some point in contact with this patient. that's a much bigger number than we had previously been told. so dallas health officials telling us that they are in touch with and looking into how 80 people had contact with this patient. again, trying to track down anyone who may have come in to contact to try to contain this disease. the dallas independent school district is telling parents send your kids to school, everything is safe but i can tell you a lot
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of parents are nervous this morning, not planning to send their kids to school. in an exclusive interview we did with the nephew of the patient said hospital personnel put people at risk by not taking this case seriously enough. >> he's doing all right. he's a fighter. he's still fighting. >> reporter: this morning the nephew of 42-year-old thomas eric duncan is making explosive new allegations accusing texas health presbyterian hospital of dallas not taking the ebola threat seriously. when duncan walked into the er last friday he told the nurse he came from liberia. >> that information was not fully communicated. >> reporter: he was sent home with antibiotics. by sunday ambulance took him to the same hospital. doctors still weren't treating dunn condition like a potential ebola patient. the nephew said he called centers for disease control himself. >> i called cdc again, some action was taken because i was concerned for his life.
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and he wasn't getting appropriate care. and i was fearing -- i feared other people might, you know, also get infected if he wasn't taken care of. >> reporter: we now know duncan traveled from liberia to brussels to dulles airport in washington, d.c. to dallas. one he fell sick he came into contact with up to 18 people. >> the only lose contact we're aware of this patient is with his immediate children. and his wife. and so now we're looking at close friends. >> reporter: on wednesday the school district sent letters to parents telling them five students are now being monitored because they may have had contact with duncan. >> they were in school earlier this week. >> do you know when they started staying home from school? >> today. >> you got to remember if the children have not shown any symptoms and the only way this transmission happened is when you are showing the symptoms. >> reporter: their classmates are safe >> their classmates are safe. >> reporter: parents rushed to take their children home early.
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>> i started crying. i was hysterical. >> i just wanted to get to my kids. so i went and got them and i feel much better when i got them. >> reporter: we reached out to the hospital for a statement. we reached out the state health department and so far have not had any response to the nephew's allegations. >> kate snow reporting there outside of the hospital there in texas where this patient is being treated. again, a big update there from kate and being informed about the family who is being told to stay at home. 80 people may have been exposed to this man during that 72 hour window of time where he was let loose from the hospital out of their care before coming back. >> is this an overreaction? i don't blame anybody at this point. >> at this point the hospitals can't overreact. at this point the hospitals when somebody comes in, they have conditions, traveled recently from africa, at that point you call the cdc and you start moving quickly. 80 people now possibly exposed
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because of the mistake of a hospital. i don't say that to knock the hospital. i say that to warn every other hospital in america we're in dangerous times if this isn't taken care of. >> if you've ever been there everybody is doing everything they can. it's trying to stop the dike. >> the right protocols in place. and they know to ask the right questions and when you have the right answers or the wrong answers to those questions. >> every hospital worker must know. >> you immediately move on it. it's not rocketcy pennsylvania. >> lawmakers are optimistic a marine veteran detained by mexican authorities since march 31st will be released to u.s. officials in the coming weeks. sergeant andrew tahmooressi has spent the last six months in a prison in mexico after making a wrong turn in southern california and accidentally crossing the border. but in his truck, which was packed with everything he owned,
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there were three guns and several rounds of ammunition. although the weapons were registered in the u.s., tahmooressi now faces charges in mexico. yesterday his mother recalled the days of her son's arrest during testimony on capitol hill. >> march 31st, sorry, 11:25 this year, mom, i got lost. i made a wrong turn. i am at the mexican border. you need to know this because i've been surrounded by military. in case anything happens to me i need to let you know where i am. the following morning, april 1st, 2014, mom, i've been arrested. please secure me an attorney. april 5th, mom, i'm not going to make it through the night. whatever you do do not come down here to investigate. do not come down here to ask
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questions. you will be killed as well. i need you to go underground. i need you to cancel your bank accounts. let the broward sheriff's office know. i'm not going to make it through the night. mom, don't come down to investigate. >> earlier this week two psychiatrists told a judge that tahmooressi suffers from ptsd. his attorney contends the marine should be released on humanitarian grounds citing a lack of mexican resources to treat the disorder. >> with us now the chairman of the house estimate that did the hearing on the sergeant's case, congressman matt salmon. he's spoken with the mexican attorney general to expedite the marine's return to the united states. matt, this is a story some people have been following a lot lately. why has the u.s. marine been down in mexico for six months and we haven't acted on it more quickly than now. >> that's a great question. i can't give you a great answer
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as far as why the administration hasn't done anything to weigh in. in fact, one of the juxtapositions that was raised yesterday is how he invested so much to get bergdahl released, yet this marine who served two tours of duty in afghanistan and is a her jobs he's done nothing. >> are we moving closer to a possible release? >> i think so. right after the hearing the ambassador from mexico called me and i think it was a very positive conversation, and my expectation is that within the next couple of weeks he'll be freed. >> ron? >> the administration we're talking about that they have been making high level contact, haven't been very public about it. you have to be graceful with diplomacy. i wonder why and i do commend you for having this hearing. it could help free him. why didn't congress have a hearing five months ago? >> i think five months ago we were optimistic at that time -- when i first visited him in prison, i actually visited him twice. i think we were pretty optimistic that things would
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move in the right direction. >> why haven't they >> why haven't they? >> yeah. what does mexico have to gain. >> at the time our state department people who i met with, the consulate in tijuana, they said that things were moving in the right direction and they were pretty optimistic. >> why blame the administration. >> we've been jerked around for several pose now and my feeling was it's way pastime to get this young man out of prison. and i wanted to shed some light on it. >> jeremy? >> switching gears i want to talk about isis and congress. now john boehner had said -- >> there are no isis members in congress. >> that we know of. >> right. >> that we know of. >> you watch homeland you might have a different answer. >> but john boehner has said he doesn't think that congress should debate a war resolution in the lame duck but as you know this congress has been famous for punting these issues on down
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the road so they don't have to deal with them. >> right. >> do you think that john bone certificate wrong. >> i think it should be as experiod dexpe experiod die -- fast as possible. i think our viewing that the one that was that was a decade old still applies is not a good argument. i think -- >> would you vote to repeal that? >> no. i would vote to gave new authorization of force. as you and i spoke before, i think that congress and the white house need to really come clean with the american people. i think that what's going to happen after november is troops, our ground troops will start going in to syria. the fact is -- >> despite the president's promys. >> he promised if you like your insurance you can keep it. come on. >> look at you going back to obamacare. >> joe, the better --
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>> the better way to put it is he promised it was about humanitarian aid in the beginning. that's more of the slippery slope. the president will do what the president has to do. >> ultimately, if we're going to be victorious and make sure that isis is never a threat again to us, then it's going to take all options on table. >> yeah. >> and i've said this before, and i think that waiting until after the election to do that or mass amnesty, whatever is -- i think we should lay it on the table. we should lay it on table right now. >> okay. >> all right. congressman matt salmon thank you very much. coming up, his films are beloved by millions -- >> you didn't give matt that look. hold on a second. >> i was befuddled by what you were saying. >> you were or was not >> i was not therefore you didn't get the look. anyhow, it was worst in that
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josh earnest interview. >> like that one right there? >> look -- >> that's full and complete confidence with the director. >> stop. there's this adam sandler story coming up next. >> okay.
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president obama will deliver remarks at the congressional hispanic caucus institute 37th annual awards. boy, i'm doing great. will you help me out here? that's the gala tonight. here with us now, the co-founders of the polling and research film latino decisions. very good to have you both with us. the co-authors of the new book latina america, how america's most dynamic population is poigsed to transform the politics of the nation. >> so, matt, let's start with you. pretty fascinating statistic that you guys talk about. at some point in april of 2014, latino child born in the california hospital tipped the scales and made the latinos the number one demographic group in that state. >> that's right. >> you say it's going to happen in texas before 2020. the face, the democratic, demo
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gr graphic face of america. >> it's irreversible. the first is we're now hitting a shift in the population changes. where the latino population is not growing as fast from immigration, it's growing from u.s. birthings. that is from the migration we've had in the last 20 years or so. these are u.s. born latinas who are giving birth to u.s. born latinos so that's going to continue happening well into the future. >> you guys study this, you poll it, you understand the mood. it's your job to understand the mood of the latino community in america. how does that impact politics moving forward? >> it is a very unhappy demographic, i would say. it's a very optimistic population. but the political climate has been toxic. since the immigration debate has welled up. with the passage of laws, latinos feel like they're under
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attack. when laws say the police can ask for papers and identification, on the basis of we know not yet, even third and fourth generation latinos oppose those laws. >> while latinos have been trending demographic, if you look at the 2016 republican field, you have potential candidates on the republican side. how does that play in the latino community? >> well that's, you know, something we've studied and that's in the book, something we've been looking at for a long time. senator rubio has potential to make in roads. he's changed his position now -- >> he is, he's back to -- >> he actually was pulling well. senator cruz has not. he has not somehow resonated with some of those tea party positions. but rubio has potential to really help bring the party back if he sort of corrects course on
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immigration. he was a very strong supporter during 2013 when the bill passed. >> i wouldn't hold your breath on that. >> wow. >> immigration aside, i talked to a lot of republicans who say, oh, demographics, you know, demographics. hispanics are going to continue to be a bigger part of the voting population. i just don't buy it. i don't see any evidence that latinos are naturally democr democratic. >> i have no idea why you would say that because we poll them on everything under the sun and there's been a trope in the latino establishment. it turnsinos overwhelmingly don't vote on religious -- >> don't assume i'm talking about social issues. i'm talking about economic issues. i've always said to republican groups, when your message appeals to a 17-year-old latino
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voter in south central l.a. as much as it appeals to a 65-year-old hedge funder in greenwich, they'll start winning election, again. >> you have to find out what that message is. they believe in an active energetic and efficient government. they don't necessarily want a big government. they don't have faith in the free market. >> an efficient federal government. if the free market -- it's up to the republicans i think, is it not? are you saying the republicans should just pull up their tent poles and go home? i think a lot of republicans believe in an energetic efficient government. >> it's a messaging issue. >> tell the 17-year-old kid how she's going to get a job over the next three or four years. or tell the 25-year-old latino that's graduating from a great college in california why she still don't have a job and give them hope.
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i don't think the republicans have done that. >> the area where i think you're exactly right is the area of entrepreneurship. cell phone businesses. starting up small businesses. we find record high levels of support. and that's an area where the republicans can make inroads. they have to stop saying the nasty things. >> there are some issues, yes -- >> you're saying, let me get this, you're saying republicans can't insult latinos and win elections? >> not only are we saying it -- >> exactly. >> they said, if your first sentence is, we want you out of the country, we don't really care -- >> i think that's fair. >> i've been very critical of karl rove and george w. bush through the years. they were saying this in 1997. in 1997. they were obsessing about this. >> joe, you're right. >> george w. bush as governor understood this. rick perry understood it until he turned backwards in that
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debate. >> so you are right about this one. >> yeah, that we got to go? >> exactly. >> the book is "latino america." matt and gary, thank you so much. and this programming note. this year's alma awards will air on msnbc highlighting the best american latino contribution, to music, tv and film. that's friday october 10th at 10:00 p.m. eastern time. don't miss it. up next, we need to be more like disney world. i'm not sure if this is -- >> that's what the now former director julia pierson said of her vision for the secret service. straight ahead. and mika's funny faces. then there's trusting your vehicle maintenance to ford service confidence. our expertise, technology, and high quality parts means your peace of mind. it's no wonder last year we sold
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good morning, everybody. it's thursday, october 2nd. with us on the set in washington, d.c., boy, it's great to be here. busy night. "new york times" reporter jeremy peters. good to have you. former white house press secretary for president obama robert gibbs. abc news political commentator, npr senior analyst cokie roberts. on capitol hill, the host and managing editor of tv 1's daily morning show "news 1 now." roland martin. we've got a lot to talk about. i want to start with you, you've done work with save the children. i've just been reading about the ebola virus and the gentleman in dallas, how he contracted it.
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we've heard people who say to the show, you know, there's no reason to be worried unless you exchange bodily fluids. so you think somebody has to spit in my face. i'm not going to get the disease. this guy in texas got the disease carrying a pregnant woman by her legs. helping a family member. they're yelling at me. we don't know that's how he got the disease. i read in "the new york times," that's one of the things he did. a brother of the woman, alex, talking into my ear. >> who cares about -- >> -- was carrying her by the other leg, i believe, contracted the disease and died. >> well, we don't know -- >> we don't know. >> i don't want to say anything disgusting at 6:00 in the morning but we don't know what her situation was, let's just put it that way. >> okay, so from your -- i'm just trying to figure this out. how hard is it to spread the
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disease? >> if you have a lot of people who don't have washed hands and -- >> and look at the situation -- >> and you're in a terrible unsanitary situation, then it's much easier to spread the disease. which is why you're seeing any of the medical teams covered up, looking like they're in, you know, on the moon. >> if you look at the pictures in "the new york times," even, you get a sense of the conditions of the victims, people suffering from it. >> i just got an e-mail from rich besser, who's the abc doctor who's been over there, working with the kids. one of the kids he had followed died this morning. it's heartbreaking. he said, if that child were in america, that child would be alive. >> really? >> yeah. that's what we're dealing with. we're dealing with totally unprepared health systems. totally unsanitary situations. in many cases, no water, or clean water. these are places where -- >> we're capable of dealing with it here. that doesn't mean we're not
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going to see it again. >> no, it means we can handle it. >> the ability to quarantine somebody. deal with infoectious disease his -- >> except for one thing. >> roland. >> if our hospitals are following the proper protocol. one of the issues is, this hospital initially released him. then he goes back out and so now you're going to hear him going through dulles, now being around schoolchildren as well. so part of this is is will american hospitals -- how will they recognize it and follow the right protocols. that's the real issue right there. because a hospital in dallas released him and he was gone for three days. >> released him, yeah, it was n unbelievable. all right, let's move on to the top story. "the washington post" is doing an extraordinary job. i mean, you know you're doing a
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great job when the head of the secret service has to call the president of the united states because they know "the post" is about to tell him something they don't -- i mean, the last time that happened, bill had to wake up hillary and, you know, say, hey, something's about to break in the newspaper. i'm serious. can you believe she didn't tell the president of the united states there was a guy with a gun in the elevator with him? >> i'm going to rewind back 24 hours. i just am surprised that the white house, you know, appeared on our show today, you know, gibb, maybe you can explain, josh earnest. please, explain to me how they could so vehemently defend -- >> yeah, the morning josh earnest was on -- we'll have to go to the video. and he was defiant. no, we have total confidence in in director. >> and capture, if you could, my face. because i couldn't even think of
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another question to ask him because the conversation seemed so needlessly -- >> by the way, we found out -- this is really something. you can talk to this, okay. >> i like him. >> i once said this of a campaign person who lied to me. i called the person up. okay, so let me ask you this, did you not think the sun was not going to rise the next morning? did you not think i wasn't going to have a tv show to tell everybody you guys lied through your teeth to me? don't be stupid. you don't have to lie. josh didn't have to come on yesterday beating his chest when they already knew she'd lost confidence by not telling the president. >> members of the democratic party in the house were saying she needed to go. >> right. >> yeah. >> losing confidence and resigning i think are two different things, right? i think josh would probably tell you right now he did not know
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she was going to resign. he did not know -- >> but that's not the question. the question mika asked, and this is why it was such a confusing response from him. you asked, does the president have confidence they can still protect the first family. and why he would so unequivocally say yes seemed to me to just be -- you almost wonder if he had spoken to the president about this at all. >> but jeremy -- >> -- qualifications for the job -- >> the questions he may not have -- >> that's a problem for the -- >> roland, we're going to go to you in a second. we're going to run this clip. hopefully it has mika's mortified look after. let's go to the tape. >> are you telling me this morning the president and the first lady have confidence in pierson to run an agency that's supposed to protect their two daughters? >> yes, joe, they have confidence in them, i think for the reasons i've laid out. these are men and women who wake up every day prepared to put their life -- >> i'm not talking about the profession professionals. i think they deserve better
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leadership than they have. >> there's responsibility that she takes very seriously. the white house staff and the president himself take this very seriously. the president has articulated he's concerned about the security around his family, as any parent would be. >> okay, we don't have mika's face so i'll just recreate it. >> i did ask four questions before joe asked that question. >> it's like this. that was your face. >> like, what is this? and i -- >> roland, we just -- i don't know, that hurts his credibility moving forward i think. >> actually it doesn't. that is the only response they can give. you're talking about protecting the president. also talking about conveying confidence to the american people. the president and josh earnest cannot come out and say, well, we really don't know, so you have to protect it. you're going, what the hell are you doing. but no other choice but to do that. >> the person who must really be saying that is michelle obama. i mean, if i were she, i would
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be so angry. my children are in there. and they are -- i mean, honestly, you know, our own houses are better protected. >> the elevator incident is perplexing because i've been in plenty of elevators with the president. the only people in the elevator with the president are people that are either in the secret services or people that the secret service knows exactly who they are. >> well, there's a manifest -- >> as carol lee said, "wall street journal" white house correspondent, she said, it seems even more preposterous when we the media had to get there live four hours beforehand, because everybody was shut down. and then they let this guy amble on with a gun. >> well, that actually was what did it with this resignation what i'm hearing from sources very close to the white house. pierson, julia pierson, the director of course, resigned
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yesterday, telling bloomberg news, quote, i think it's in the best interest of the secret service of the american public if i step down. congress has lost confidence in my ability to run the agency. the media made it clear this is what they expected. officials say -- officials say -- well, i'll tell you. president obama lost faith after learning he shared an elevator last month at the cdc with an armed man with a criminal record. pierson only told president obama moments before it was reported. >> i can tell you, though, that the white house first learned of that incident yesterday afternoon, shortly before it was reported, before it was publicly reported. >> the agency did foot tell the white house about it. he didn't know about it until yesterday. >> until it was reported publicly, that's correct. we've seen recent and accumulating reports raising questions about the performance the agency. and the president concluded new
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leadership of that agency was required. >> so what we've gotten from sources close to the white house and the secret service is that there were three options to replace the secret service director who was being removed. and it was an african-american, a man, and woman. and they went with the woman because the optics would be better. >> for the optics. >> that's number one. number two, the thing that really led to this was not the white house fence jumper but the elevator. >> and she didn't bring that up to him when they first met about the fence jumper. >> they're supposed to be. when the president is in the room, there's a manifest. everybody in that space with the president is supposed to be on it. and this guy with the weapon -- >> and a record. >> and a record. was on an elevator in the cdc with the president.
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>> shooting video. >> oh, my god. >> shooting video of the president. he pulls a camera out. >> thank god he was just shooting video. robert. >> i do think -- first of all, having worked with the secret service for four years, i always was struck by the utmost professionalism. these are people that sign up to stand in front of the president if something goes horribly wrong. i know joe clancy. i think joe is a fabulous interim pick. i would not be surprised. my apologies to both joe and his family if he doesn't get pushed and pulled to stay on as a more permanent director. i think joe is going to have a lot of confidence among the agents. but let's just pause for one second on the resignation. a security apparatus is literally -- has to be strong everywhere, right?
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director pierson was not at the white house. somebody would previously had been at the white house. >> happened to turn into -- >> i think there clearly were a series of security lapses that september 19th. >> we actually had two guys down on constitution, on constitution, who said there's gunfire, and somebody said no, it was backfire. they said no, there's a shooting. >> i agree there has to be and there should be a change in leadership. >> right. >> again, this is -- >> everybody needs to be shaken up. my dad told a story last night, just at the table about when he first got his job. said, you know, what about this threat we're facing.
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we need to make sure the president can get out of here. they said, we can get him out of here in two minutes. he said really, let's do it right now. he called everyone on it. everybody had to rally and the chopper had to get in place. took them much longer than they thought. he did a drill completely unexpectedly. they put three-foot fences up. i'd start doing drills. i'd catch people with their pants down right and left and fire them and figure it out. >> i was struck by the fact in the hearing, 116 people over the past five years have climbed the fence. now, i'm not a security expert, and i'm not trying to be flip, but i think the first thing i would do is build a bigger fence. >> let's get jeremy in here. >> my colleague did reporting on this and found the fence is actually an historic artifact so you can't tear it down. well, you could tear it down. the secret service's culpability here is clear.
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what about the white house's handling of this? doesn't look to be the most deft crisis management. now they're leaking things about how this woman was not their first choice. not professional. >> you have to look at the choice, regardless. one of the things, in josh's defense, all too often. i was in some of these meetings. specifically with joe. there's a small circle of people that are going to get read into the security movements of a president for obvious reasons. josh may just not have known exactly what was happening. that doesn't mean josh is uninformed by any means. to read the story on saturday night or sunday morning. to understand we didn't know how far that person got into the white house until the eve of the shooting. it's incumbent upon the secret service. >> and lied to us about it too.
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>> josh said this, they've got to be much more transparent. not in the way that compromises security. >> they don't need to lie. >> this morning's "washington post," also, mika, has more details. >> about pierson's time. the report says severe staffing shortages grew under her watch. pierson rejected a study that called for 100 surveillance officers to patrol the white house. she urged for far fewer. this week, pierce be honored a request to open a street near netanyahu's hotel. the mayor had traffic concerns. even though the street has been closed for years to prevent a possible attack. officials say pierson also reopened streets and removed layers of fencing when president obama hosted the u.s. africa leaders summit earlier this year. they say pierson who worked as a costume character at disney world as a teen, said, we need
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to be more like disney world. >> she didn't say that, no, she didn't. i think they're making that up. they're making that up. >> it is true that sometimes the security drives you completely nuts. and there's been a lot of overreaction in washington. shutting down pennsylvania avenue and all of that. which shows you. shutting down pennsylvania avenue only apparently -- >> but do you really need to be more like -- >> have you ever been to -- >> of course i have, many times. >> mika hasn't, she wants to know what it's like. >> i went and i left immediately, okay, the people -- >> stop, stop. >> no, i'm -- >> not like -- >> goofy on pennsylvania avenue some time later today -- >> ridiculous things, talking about 30 -- >> look, she had a 30-year service with the secret service so it's not quite fair to talk about her as a teenager. the fact is, this was a major, major failure. >> still ahead on "morning joe,"
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he is not happy with the obama administration and he's not scared of hillary clinton. bernie sanders is with us later this hour. that's one way to describe it. up next, the world respond too late? what needs to happen now that the ebola virus is spreading beyond west africa. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> we had that classic battle. fall is moving in, summer is moving out. we're getting thunderstorms. 40 million people at risk of severe weather today, including st. louis, chicago, in the dallas area. already this morning, we have storms over missouri and oklahoma. it will get worse as we go throughout the day. here's the area of concern. not everyone is going to get hit. if you're in this region, you have a chance of seeing widespread wind damage, large hail and damage and also isolated tornadoes. the best chance of any tornadoes today unfortunately is arkansas. if you're in the little rock area, you need to keep an eye on the weather, especially this afternoon.
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later tonight, memphis and indianapolis. also in the northeast, visibility's poor. we've had an ocean storm for two days. been miserable weather up there. southwest new england, especially cape cod and boston. la guardia, one-hour delays because of the low visibility. the other story is on the west coast. l.a., 93 today. we all know how horrible the drought is. this is a late season, 101 in l.a. on saturday, very dangerous fire condition, through the weekend. a shot of a drizzly, kind of dreary new york city. one-hour flight delays should improve as the day goes on. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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all right. we had a busy night last night. you know how when you have a lot kids that are really busy and you're running event to event? last night, at the phillips collection, that's my mother's bench featured there at that incredible institution. my mother did an event, talking about her new book, the lure of the forest. and her incredible body of work. and we had a great audience. and she was fantastic. and, as you know, her work is is unbelievable. it's on display right now. at the phillips collection as well as the krieger museum in washington. i had to dash other -- >> because your dad. >> my dash is being honored at the center of strategic and international studies. they've opened up the brzezinski
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institute, which is focused on geostrategy. and he spoke and had a wonderful time, actually able to make it to both events. >> it was wonderful. >> i'm not sure how to keep up with these two. >> you're a lucky woman. >> i am, so proud. >> you walk into the brzezinski institute, you go in, and he goes, welcome. i walk in and there must be detectors. you know you are stunningly superficial -- >> no. >> just for me, for me. >> it was a wonderful dinner. i'm glad we were there for a few minutes. now, the morning papers. we have thomas in new york as well for that. we'll start, thomas, with the st. louis dispatch. prosecutors in st. louis are ininvestigating allegations of misconduct in the grand jury investigation into the death of michael brown. a twitter user claimed to have inside knowledge into the case, saying, quote, i know someone
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sitting on the grand jury of this case. there isn't enough at this point to warrant an arrest. "the post" and twitter account were quickly deleted. the grand jury has been looking at this case. if there was a breach, the entire process would have to start over. >> we look at the "usa today." they are talking about mcdonald's launching a new menu item as the fast food wars are heating up in japan. mickey dees are going to be selling a limited edition black burger. appears to be no match for the burger king version. >> that's disgusting. >> all black buns, the cheese and special squid ink sauce. >> who would eat that? >> mcdonald's features a bun dyed back. >> this is worse than green beer on st. patrick's day. >> there's still no word if the burgers will come to the u.s. but if they do, we will have a "morning joe" eat-off contest
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right here on the set. >> no. >> that would be the worst japanese invasion -- >> since pearl harbor. just keep your burgers over there, please. >> i want to see them in person. i just want to see them in person up close. >> why? >> no, you don't. this from the "l.a. times." netflix has reportedly signed a deal with adam sandler. it's going to have the comedian and actor producing and starring in four films for the streaming site. the first could arrive as early as next year. it's something netflix has really gotten into, the original content business. >> what would be great, mika has been asking for "happy gilmore" 2 and 3 and this could finally get around to doing that. >> let's look at fortune. billionaire richard branson has given his personal staff, nearly 200 people, unlimited vacation days. the chairman and founder of virgin group says the staff is free to take off whenever they want for as long as they want.
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and they don't need to get manager approval. this was an idea inspired by a similar policy at netflix. the new rules are going to apply to those in virgin's head office. if the policy is successful, sir richard is going to encourage the company's subsidiaries to adopt that policy as well. >> how do we get them to buy our company? >> i know. i'm applauding the day. is there a virgin tv group? >> we've been talking about the ebola outbreak in west africa. in confirmation the virus has now jumped to america. joining us now, "time" magazine's health director shiven o'connor. with the new cover "time." chasing ebola. its potential damage here in the u.s. thanks for being on. the question, obviously, the conditions in areas in west africa are horrific. and lead to the virus spreading.
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are we certain, though, about containment here in the u.s.? can we really unequivocally say we won't see x amount of cases? >> the thing about ebola that is important to realize is we actually do know how to contain the virus. there's a very straight forward protocol. given the resources that we have and the resource-rich country like the united states with a great health care system, we can contain this case, no question. he's in isolation. contact tracing is the best practice, which means going out to every single person he's had contact with and monitoring them for 21 days as well. in the hands of the cdc, this can be contained. >> front page of "the washington post" talks about ebola misstep in texas. do you think the mistake of the texas hospital is probably going to change the game for other hospitals across the u.s.? >> i think it sounds the alarm.
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the first and most important thing is the patient be in isolation as soon as possible. but hopefully that won't be happen the next time someone shows up with hemorrhagic fever. >> give me the stat. >> five people an hour in sierra leone. contracting the disease. so it is really, you know, it's spreading like crazy. you know, one of the really sad things africa was doing pretty well. there was a lot of good news coming out of africa. and now this has set back those countries for a generation. >> well, earlier this morning, i read in "the new york times," everybody jumped on me on. trying to embrace your newspaper and everybody's act like i just crawled out of a sewer. i heard -- no. but in that story, you have this poor woman, this 19-year-old pregnant woman has ebola, rushed to a hospital there, and they turn her away. she goes home seven months pregnant and died at home a few
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hours later. there's just an infrastructure problem. >> there's a terrible infrastructure problem. >> the answer in some ways, how do we not have it spread here, is we've got to have a surgeon in that infrastructure in west africa. because it's not being generated here unless you come into contact with somebody who has it. that person came from west africa. that is obviously where this has started. that's the place where we have to correct it. >> the u.s. military is setting up a hospital. usaid is sending in a lot of money. organizations like save the children are going in. >> the new "time" cover, chasing ebola. thank you very much. coming up, a downright scary start to the month of october on wall street. will the u.s. markets rally today? first, a battle of two nice guys
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where it is about to shake things up. "morning joe" will be right back. >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day.
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john denver. >> i love that song. >> i'm a sucker.
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every time i hear this song, i just hear it up. >> i always tweet randomly like once every nine months, you know. that would be a poor man who never saw an eagle fly. >> it was definitely a soundtrack for our road trip. >> kasie is joining us. there's a lot of movement in some key races this morning. president obama of course won colorado easily in 2012 but now his unpopularity is making it tough for senator mark udall to keep his seat. kacie traveled to colorado over the weekend to catch up with both candidates. >> he's a nice guy. >> my opponent mark udall is a very nice guy. >> there's no disagreement. mark udall and carey gardner are real nice guys. in one of the year's closest
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senate races, that's pretty much where the civility ends. >> the president of the united states was in colorado in july to host a fund-raiser for mark udall. mark udall was so ashamed of his record that he couldn't even show up with the president. he's the tenth most right wing member in the house. he's more conservative than former congressman crayo with which takes some doing. >> thrilled when he ran against udall. his easy manner seemed like a good match for colorado. udall is still trying to paint gardner as an extremist. >> a big smile's a nice thing. i think we all have big smiles. your actions matter. >> reporter: the primary focus. women. more than half of udall's ads have been focused on abortion and contraception. >> gardner even championed an eight-year crusade to outlaw birth control. >> he backed away from a
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initiative that could have outlawed popular forms of birth control. he supports making contraception available over the counter. he'd rather change the subject. >> your name is still on the federal bill the life at conception act. >> there is no federal. that is two different pieces of legislation. i understand udall wants to run away from the failed economy. >> do you still support the life conception act? >> i'm still on the bill. >> gardner wants to focus on udall's ties to president obama who's deeply popular in colorado. he tried to back away from the white house. >> let me tell you, the white house, when they look down the front lawn, the last person they want to see coming is me. i've challenged this white house on a whole set of policies where they've been wrong. >> doesn't make sense to they sayer th er thithey worry about? >> i'd been a thorn in their side on the nsa, on the va, on
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the cia. they haven't always been happy to take my calls. >> both sides do agree it's been a close race since march and that it will stay that way through november. >> 40 days out, we've got a ground game here that we've never seen in a popular election. >> still, it's not clear it will be enough to withstand the national head winds or whether the senator who once had to turn back from the senate of mt. everest will come up short again. >> the point is to come home alive. doesn't count if you touch the top of the mountain and you don't make it back to civilization. >> a couple of weeks ago, we'd heard that mark udall was moving ahead in this race and, you know, this was breaking democrat. it looks like it's tightened up again. >> it has. it's one of the only places where both sides openly acknowledge they have no idea how this is going to come out. >> look at this guy. rocky mountain man here. he looks like colorado.
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his opponent looks like a connecticut guy. and is this all -- do they believe internally that his numbers are trucked down, all because of the president? >> i think the president is the main problem at this point which is kind of a flip. py would also see the governor's race is impacting this. john hickenlooper is having problems over, particularly, the death penalty and also some gun control legislation. and how hickenlooper performed could impact this. >> covered pat roberts in kansas, shifting gears here, sarah palin came in, a lot of things happened. and now we actually have the independent pulling ahead in a pu poll this morning. >> new "usa today" poll. when i was out there, in talking to both campaigns. >> look at that, lead over pat
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roberts since sarah palin came in last week. >> it's hard for roberts to make this a close race. i think at this point it's a race against time to see whether or not pat roberts campaign can actually drive orman's numbers down. there's a little bit counterconventional wisdom idea that maybe setting this up as a two-person race turns orman into a democrat which ultimately doesn't work for him. >> you have a democrat on the rope and a republican on the ropes. both for the same reasons. it's the anti-washington dysfunction year. and that's the only really unifying issue in any of these races. so you have pat roberts, it looks like he's been hang around in washington too long. and mark udall. and harry reid. >> mark's a nice guy. >> another poll that came out, scott walker. just yesterday, we were talking about how tight this race was. >> what do you make of this? >> up by five points over mary
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but. mary but has stumbled. we talked about it. stumbled a bit in the past. and maybe some of those stumbles are hurting her. >> she's stumbling most recently over this plagiar system issue. there's some questions about how significant this issue really is. but she's really struggled in how she's talked about it. she did a press conference with reporters. she sort of froze up in fryi it to explain what plagiarism was. and a really tough -- >> to say the least. >> great job. up next, he's got strong words for the president and a clear vision for what he thinks the country's priorities should be. senator bernie sanders joining us live next on "morning joe."
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it's one more part of our commitment to america. with us now from burlington,
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vermont, independent senator from vermont, bernie sanders. >> if you're going to iowa and new hampshire in the next few week, are you running for president? >> no, you're not running for president. >> senator, are you running for president? >> new hampshire, is just really nearby. >> it's a beautiful state across the river. >> we've talked for some time about hillary clinton as a possible nominee, a woman who has close ties to wall street. in the traditional base on foreign policy. does hillary need a challenger in '16 to have a full and vigorous debate? >> let me just say this, i think in america, we're not about anointing anybody. i think there are enormous problems in terms of income and wealth inequality. in terms of real unemployment
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being 12%, youth unemployment 20%. in terms of disastrous citizens united supreme court decision which allows billionaires to buy elections. there are huge issues that i think the american people want to see discussed and that we need to see discussed. we're not about anointing people. >> okay. are you going to run? >> i'm giving thought to it. what i have to determine, and that's why i'm going to iowa, going to new hampshire, is whether in fact there is this kind of grassroots support that i would need to take on the billionaire class and the coke brothers. bringing millions of people together to try to reverse the decline of the middle class, to deal with poverty, to take on the greed of wall street and the fact that some of the politicians are owned by big money interests. it's easy to give a great speech on that issue, mika.
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it is very hard to determine if you're serious and if you really want to win, whether you can mobilize people in the way that has to be done to be successful. >> jeremy. >> senator, good morning. there's some differences in the democratic caucus right now about how to approach syria in combating isis. when you guys come back from your long recess, what are you going to push for? to see debated on the senate floor with regard to the war effort? >> let me tell you what i think. obviously, isis is a brutal and dangerous organization. but after 12 years of war in the middle east, it should be clear to all of us that it is not going to be the united states of america alone that is going to defeat isis. that the countries in the region, including saudi arabia, qata
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qatar, and the other nations, including iran, are going to have to step up to the plate. because if this is perceived as a war between the united states and isis, that doesn't work. it cannot be perceived as a war between christians and muslims. these guys have got to step up to the plate. saudi arabia spends the fourth most amount of money on defense that any country -- more than the uk, more than france. they're going to have to get their hands dirty. they'll have to jump into to conflict. it cannot be simply done by the united states. turkey is going to have to be involved as well. >> senator sanders, when you decide, will you announce here, please? >> if you're going to run for president -- >> the issue is not announcing. the issue is a serious discussion about how we rebuild a crumbling middle class. >> that's what we do here. >> how to create the millions of jobs that we need. >> if you're going to talk about a serious discussion, you should probably go somewhere else.
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>> no, come here. >> if you want to be glib about it, come here. since new hampshire's such a beautiful state, should i take my children to go skiing in new hampshire this winter and stop going to vermont? >> no, new hampshire is a very beautiful state, vermont's a little bit more beautiful. >> i love it. very good. senator bernie sanders, thank you so much. we'll be right back with what we learned. ok, if you're up there, i could use some help. smart sarah. seeking guidance. just like with your investments. that sets you apart. it does? it does. you're type e*. and seeking another perspective is what type e*s do. oh, and your next handhold... is there. you don't have to go it alone. e*trade gives you the support and guidance to make informed decisions. are you type e*?
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it's time to talk about what we learned today. mika, you got a call from a friend? >> just talked to dennis mcdonough at the white house. he wanted to point out, by the way, our coverage -- >> by the way, dennis is everybody's friend. it's almost like you're at disney world, he's so nice. >> his point, the decision about pierson had not been made at the time josh was on our show yesterday. pushing back a little bit. >> because you had that funny look. >> saying josh is a part of the team and back off. >> yesterday, when the whole world knew -- >> all i did was look at him. >> -- that she was going to be fired. >> stop. >> they're saying the decision had not been made. to that, i just go -- i can't do the face as well as you do the face. but anyway. all right. so we're going to talk to him some more. we like josh. it's nothing personal. what did you learn?
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>> i learned robert gibbs is no sentimentalist and he would tear down that beautiful iron fence outside the white house. >> it's been there since like 1800. >> yeah, what is wrong with him, it is history. >> -- that you love john denver. >> oh, my god. >> i do too, don't tell anybody. >> "rocky mountain high," "sweet surrender." >> "take me home country road." >> i'm leaving on a jet plane. i want to do a take test. for the squid ink black burgers. and we're going to do a contest and see which one tastes better. >> we thought what they did on december 7th, 1941, was bad. that's horrific. >> that's it for us. "the daily rundown" is next.
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good morning from new york. i'm craig melvin. this is the "daily rundown." we start with some breaking news with new developments in the first ebola patient diagnosed in this country. state and local officials in dallas, texas, are now ordering four close family members of that patient to stay home and avoid visitors. officials say the relatives came in contact with thomas eric duncan before he was admitted to texas health hospital over the weekend. duncan remains in isolation at this hour. now

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