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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 3, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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♪ all right. welcome to "morning joe." it's friday. >> the lights are off outside. >> and inside. >> yeah. >> it's october 3rd. do you feel it outside. >> i don't. >> it's sweater weather. you have been on e-bay again. >> i haven't been on e-bay. >> a $25 sweater off of e-bay. >> steve rattner is here.
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>> i think you bought it off of alibaba.com. >> a lot of stuff going on latino night in sports. baseball, those orioles -- >> the baltimore team. i was just in baltimore at johns hopkin. >> orioles just took control of scherzer and the tigers. that was a big surprise. i thought tigers would do better. >> tigers are tough they have that batting staff but they got to scherzer early and often. the other game the late game how can you not love the kansas city royals. >> royals are crazy. >> they won again in extra innings. this team hasn't been in the playoffs since 1985. hard not to root for those guys. >> really big news out of college football last night, while we were sleeping, number two team knocked off.
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huge implications for the rest of the area. >> arizona with rich rodriguez left michigan goes out to arizona, turns the program around. got to say congratulations to the wildcats. >> i'm sick. >> he was out late last night. >> i wish. i hope it's only a cold. >> i'm joking. >> oregon loses how about the weekend in the sec? alabama at ole miss. auburn and lsu. texas a&m and mississippi state all six of those teams undefeated. >> crazy weekend. mika, we know what you're doing this weekend. >> i'm going to a track meet. >> you'll be watching sec football. >> that's what i do. >> where is the alabama game. >> at ole miss. >> if i were a better, i would take alabama. >> i bet you a sweater. you taking o.le miss.
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okay. i'll give it to you. >> let's get to the news. a fifth american has been infected with the ebola virus and for us here at nbc news it is a story that's now hitting close the home. a freelance journalist working with dr. nancy snyderman has been diagnosed with the virus. ashoka mukpo is being flown back from liberia to the u.s. for treatment. his father says that his son worked there for three years and felt compelled to return to liberia to help shed light on the crisis. dr. snyderman and the rest of the crew are being monitored. as of now they are showing no symptoms but are being flown back to the u.s. on a private charter and put under quarantine for 21 days. dr. nancy says they present zero to minimal risk and yesterday she reported from where thomas eric duncan was parental infected. >> reporter: this is the front door of mr. duncan's apartment that he was renting in this small hamlet and in the pink
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house across the courtyard where the young woman, pregnant and now infected with ebola was calling for help and he responded. so you drove your taxi. jim was the taxi driver who picked up duncan, the young woman named natalie and her father. >> reporter: you picked up a sick, pregnant girl but had no idea she was sick with ebola. they were told they were afraid she might miscarry. how did she strike? >> she was helpless. she was not able to walk by herself. >> conditions are terrible. >> this is what i said yesterday. we keep saying oh, nobody is in a panic. so next to impossible to catch this thing. no. people are picking up this
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disease by simply carrying other people by the legs. i'm sorry, the standard is not quite as high as the cdc and everybody else says. so if you can't touch somebody, all right, tell us you can't touch somebody with ebola virus without possibly contracting the disease. they need to be straightforward. i'm not trying to make anything up. but i'm reading these articles and yesterday when i brought up the papers -- come on they must have had sex with somebody. everybody yesterday -- no. this the second day in a row we heard stories of people getting ebola by simply touching somebody. >> let me help you. joining us live from london dr. alexander, an infectious disease expert and fellow for the institute of international humanitarian affairs at fordham university. detective tore you heard what joe is concerned about. is there a disconnect in the communication as to how you can
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contract this? >> so, it is a really difficult issue to understand this, because you're absolutely right. the terrifying thing is that we're seeing people contract the disease not only touching people but who are wearing hazmat suits or at least personal protective gear in some gayses. nevertheless it is important to understand that the conditions in liberia are very different than conditions in america on both in terms of the quantity of bodily fluid around. people are profunnily sick so touching somebody with full fledge ebola is a different business to sitting next to someone on an airplane or subway who is barely symptomatic. i think when we look at this, we do see as it spread through a population it isn't very contagious not very easy to catch. net and this is the difficult distinction. if you get bodily fluids then you're likely to catch it.
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>> doctor, you're saying people wearing hazmat suits are contracting the virus? >> so what's very important, that's why we're so terrified of this because we see people wearing their personal protective gear and getting ebola. that was the case with ken brantley and the other aid workers. the important thing to say is inside those suits in liberia it's 115 degrees. so it's very hot. and they are working very, very long shifts. very understaffed. in that context it's easy to have a breach of protocol. the situation would be very, very different in dallas where you have many more doctors. temperatures aren't as high. it's easier to change, the facilities are better and so on. i don't think what we're seeing here is a virus that is easy to catch and start an epidemic in america. i really don't think there's any chance of having an epidemic in america. but the cdc needs be all over this case. in dallas they need to be all over future cases because i
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think we're likely to see this happen again. >> what would you say to anyone who was on any of the three planes that mr. duncan took as he made his way to the united states through brussels, to washington dulles and on to dallas. they were told there's not much risk. but you look at the number of people he came into contact with, which is about 100. if you're on that plane what should you be thinking right now? >> look, as far as we know to the very best of our knowledge he was not symptomatic on the plane and therefore not contagious. so what i would say to those people don't worry you'll be okay. but this is a new virus. we've only known about this virus since 1976. we haven't had very many cases world wide. it's very hard to study. only a fulabs where you could
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study this virus. if i was a regular passenger on that plane i would want to be reassured and know results were avail valuable to help me. at any point cdc to really be on top of getting those manifests and phoning everyone because what you want is people at the cdc who are good at doing that. so far they have dropped the ball twice and i'm worried they will drop it again. >> dr. alexander, thank you so much. come back please and update us. we have a lot going on. you want to move on to politics. >> another thing, and you were looking at it, we need to talk to the cdc. we have this virus >> enterovirus 68. here's the way the "new york times" puts it. it's unlike any previous outbreak of the disease public health officials have ever seen. >> it's frightening. >> we'll talk about that next block as well. >> let's go to politics quickly. you know what willie and i do we have a very set day.
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we get up and do jumping jacks and a lot of toe touches. this is really important. gets the blood going up to the brain and everything. >> you get. grumpy. >> but anyway we do that. then we sit down, right, and we have our skin block day. we listen to npr because that's what we do. >> yeah. >> yesterday we're listening to npr. you know, laying out the porridge for the kids. most incredible thing. they list the money that spent the most money this year in politics. the p.a.c.s. because we've been hearing all year -- this is interesting because it's confirmation of what harry reid has told us. harry reid has been speaking out against the evils of big money in politics all year. we hate big money in politics,
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right, mika >> yeah, there's some big money bags. >> bad for politics. you know it's bad for america. senator reid believes so strongly in this crusade that he's attacked the koch brothers repeatedly for their sins against democracy. he calls them sins against democracy. in fact he even called the koch brothers unamerican. let's get the best of harry reid. >> koch are shrewd businessmen. what's unamerican is when shadowy billionaires pour unlimited money into our democracy to rig the system. the koch brothers are willing to invest billions to buy that america. senator republicans are addicted to koch. you see when you make billions of dollars a year you can be as immoral and as dishonest as your money allows you to be. it's too bad they are trying to buy america and time that the american people spoke out against this terrible dishonesty of these two brothers who are about as unamerican as anyone i
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can imagine. >> speak out against unamerican people that spend a lot of money. he says they are immoral, deceptive. senator reid accused the koch brothers pulling strings more than anybody else behind every crucial race in the country. koch plan on spending $300 million. headlines go on and on. so i'm listening to npr, right. the kids go is that my porridge. yes. >> are they british? >> we have some british kids here. their parents came over here, you know, to go skiing and abandoned them. so, yes, they are they are brit. british. should have done a few more. so i asked who are the biggest spenders in america as i'm listening to america. number five guess who is number five. >> koch brothers. >> no.
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it's actually the nera. who is four? >> koch brothers. >> no. tom to stayer. who is three? >> one of the koch brothers. >> maybe charles or david. >> charles is very generous. >> it's karl rove, american crossroads gps. which means the koch brothers have to be number one or two. who is number two. you think david koch. no it's the u.s. chamber of commerce. so we all know, we all know the number one evil unamerican what else did harry reid say, unamerican evil immoral lying sack of poo-poo whatever he's called them, number one group according to npr and independent groups are -- is it the koch brothers? let's look at an ad and see who it is.
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>> i learned tillis supports a plan to end medicare and raise premiums. tillis is bad news grandma. >> i know. >> arkansas is agriculture. tom cotton voted against the farm bill. he wondered if the guys being influenced by outside interests. >> your whole world torn apart. for congressman gardner make it harder pushing to outlaw a woman's right to choose. >> 30 years later mitch mcconnell is still in washington and kentucky is still near the bottom in jobs. >> the koch brothers are spending millions to support joni ernst's campaign. >> who is number one? what? the number one big spender, willie, i just spit some of my oatmeal out, it's harry reid's own senate majority p.a.c.
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i'm sorry. >> what happened? >> what happened, mika? we've been hearing on and on how evil the koch brothers are. harry reid goes on the floor -- let's bring in a guy that knows a little bit about big money. do you have charts on the hypocrisy. the guy that's been using this and calling other people unamerican has spent more than anybody else in american politics in 2014. >> what's also interesting about this and i assume true and certainly contrary to the narrative out there is that the koch brothers haven't even spent $10 million during this cycle which is incredible to me. >> because harry reid has called them unamerican. the thing is everybody, you know, people that have tv shows every night, koch brothers, koch brothers, koch brothers, koch brothers. it's like they gin themselves up and if they keep repeating it people will believe them even if
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they're not telling truth. harry reid is the number one spender and outspending republicans. harold, i don't know. we talked about david koch and what he's done for new york city. and we've also talked about how this narrative is insanity. harry reid should apologize to the american people for using the senate floor and being such a hypocrite. >> look, there's too much money in politics. those who complain about the other side spending money should probably stop especially if they are going to do the same. >> harry reid -- let's be very specific. harry reid said the koch brothers were unamerican. harry reid said the koch brothers were immoral. he said they were deceptive. and yet talk about deceptive here's a guy that's raised and spent more money than anybody else in this entire athletics cycle. is there outrage? should democrats and republicans
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not come out and condemn this man? >> look, he'll have to answer the question about whether or not there's a hypocrisy. i appreciate what the kochs have done here in new york city and elsewhere. >> is the harry reid being hypocritical. he called the koch brothers for unamerican for doing things he's done more. >> it's wrong to refer to anyone as unamerican for participating in the political system. you shouldn't refer to people who are out to influence political system legally as you are as well as being unamerican or deceptive. that being said there's too much money in politics. harry reid should address that. you shouldn't attack someone because they spend their money or raise money in order to influence the political system. >> maybe they spent $10 million
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so far this cycle. harry reid is spending -- hell, he's spent $9 million in north carolina alone. >> the koch brothers have spent more. >> what's interesting, the democratic senate campaign which is not the big super p.a.c. types but just the people who give smaller amounts have outraised the republican senate campaign during this cycle. there's more money that's behind the democrats right now than behind the republicans. >> all right. we're going to continue this conversation. >> unbelievable. by the way that's from national public radio. that's from, i think center for responsible politics, people who track nonpartisan groups. >> opensecrets.org if you want to know who is spending money. >> rattner has charts coming up on richest americans and obama's
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speech on the economy. >> what do you think? >> number three. >> still ahead on "morning joe," former major league pitcher al leiter to break down the race for the pennant. and hollywood actor ron perlman joins us on set. there's many questions on the ebola virus. we'll get some answers next when we speak with the cdc and we'll ask about the enterovirus. and one of the real housewives of new jersey is going to jail. the latest on that trail in just a few minutes. i'm not that interested but i guess we'll do it. we'll be right back. there comes a time in everyone's life when you want more. like a new meticulously engineered german sedan. finely crafted. exactingly precise.
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♪ here with us now from atlanta the director for the centers for disease control and
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prevention, dr. tom friedman. >> thank you for being with us. here's what we're saying around the set. i'm guessing people at home are saying it too. we're hearing these stories about people picking up ebola from carrying other people. and we wonder whether you, whether doctors, whether health organizations really have their arms completely around how you contract this virus. if it may in fact be more simple to contract than what we're hearing right now. >> really there are two things that you have to keep in mind about how you can catch ebola from someone else. the first is how sick that person is and the second is the nature of the contact. when someone doesn't have symptoms they are not infectious. the sicker they get the more infectious they are. if someone is so sick they have to be carried they might have a lot of virus in their secretions. that contact needs direct with
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them or their body fluids. that's really important. ebola doesn't spread like flu or the common cold and that's really how we can help stop it. >> we have two cases we're looking at specifically, one which is an nbc news freelance cameraman and the second is a situation in dallas where the hospital had issues in terms of communication and that leads twlornt we're prepar to whether or not we're prepared to contain it. when you work in the foreign country one thing they are not doing is touching things. they are observing. i'm still not -- we don't want to be sensationalistic about this but are we certain about how this is contracted? >> well, you know, we have more than 40 years of experience fighting ebola in africa. we've looked at the cases that we're seeing come up around africa, and in virtually every case we can trace it back to a known contact with someone who
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very ill. the situation in africa is such that right now in parts of the three countries of west africa there's a lot of ebola and people are very sick. people are dying and not well isolated. >> dr. friedman let me ask you about airport screening. seems to a lot of people we should stop people from coming for the time being from monrovia flying into the united states. when all you're doing is a simple fever test and asking someone to see if they came into contact with someone, they can check no and they come to the united states. should we tighten up the airports. >> there's a lot of checks in place. it's not perfect. what that gets to, we all want and wish we had something where we were at zero risk. the only way we'll get to zero risk is by stopping the outbreak at the source. that's the only way we'll do that. there are things we're doing and can do reduce that risk like
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checking temperatures. this individual wasn't infectious while they were traveling. we know as long as the outbreak smolders in africa, as long as it's in africa, we're potentially at risk because even if we tried to close the border, it wouldn't work. people have a right to return. people ran the set upping through could come in and it would backfire because by isolating these countries it's harder to help them, spread more there and we'll be more likely be exposed here. >> doctor, willie and i have young kids. a lot of other people with a young kid looking at another disease. enterovirus 68 seems awfully frightening to us. can you explain what it is and what we can do, especially in my situation, i got a child that is on a he n nebulizer. >> it's a new virus. we've seen it before but nothing like we're seeing this season.
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we're still understanding more about it. tried and true methods help. wash your hands. cover your cough. get a flu shot this year. if your kid has asthma make sure they are in good control because that reduces their risk of getting sick. these are simple thing that people can do to reduce the risk of severe illness. >> dr. tom friedman, thank you very much. hopefully we'll talk to you soon. we want to take a look at the morning paper. "wall street journal," jpmorgan chase is revealing the full extent of the cyber attack waged against the bank over the summer. this attack is larger than the ones on target or home depot. no account numbers, passwords or social security numbers were compromised they say, but hackers were able to steal names, addresses, phone numbers and emails of customers who used online and mobile banking. officials are still investigating the attack. jpmorgan chase say there's no
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unusual customer fraud that has been detebtd as a result of the breach. >> "the washington post" despite serving as chairman of the federal reserve, ben bernanke was turned down for mortgage refinancing. he revealed the news yesterday. he added lenders quote may have gone a little bit too far on mortgage credit conditions. >> just a touch. >> wow. >> they are getting tough. >> sorry bernanke. >> the "new york daily news," school officials say they will investigate the circumstances that led to the death of a high school football player on the field. during a wednesday game in long island, a 16-year-old varsity player collapsed after colliding with an athlete from the opposing team. he's one of three high school players nationwide to die within just one week. one student died from an apparent blood clot and another from an aneurysm.
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>> the big house for real housewife of new jersey and her husband, teresa giudice was sentenced to 15 months in prison after pleading guilty to mortgage and bankruptcy fraud. the sentence handed down hours after she learned her husband would serve more three years. the judge agreed to stagger the sentences so one parent would be home with their four young children. teresa reports to prison on the 1st. >> this is one of those things that america never saw coming. >> coming up -- >> like the "titanic." you never thought -- >> coming up new clashes between police and protesters in hong kong as thousands march for free athleticses.
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bill ne elections. bill nealy will join us. we'll be right back. >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program.
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♪ ♪
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joining us now for the must read opinion pages, nbc news chief global correspondent bill
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neely. stopping just for a second in new york and then going back, going global again. good to have you here. nice to see you in person. we have two must reads the first is from the "new york times" editorial, the fundamental horror of isis. even in a part of the world where terror has been perversely enshrined as a legitimate weapon by islamist zealots the islamic state stands alone in its deliberate systematic and public is a avalanchery. the grievance resentments and frustrations that drive young muslims. but no islamist group before has no nakedly adopt ad cult of sadism not only as a weapon in its stated goal of establishing an islamic caliphate but as the very reason for its existence. the "wall street journal" who lost iraq. this is the paper's editorial as well. leon panetta's account in his
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forthcoming me moire about how the white house bungled negotiations over keeping u.s. troops in iraq past 2011 is a bomb shell that explains the real reason americans must fight again in that country. those on our side viewed the white house as so eager to rid itself of iraq that it was willing to withdraw rather than lock in arrangements that would preserve our influence and interests. all of this comports with our own reporting from 2011 but it is nonetheless distressing to have confirmed how much the white house put their political desire to withdraw from iraq above the u.s. national interest. >> this comes down to status of forces agreement whether the u.s. could keep our troops there and have them operate under u.s. military law which is our policy. obama administration says they couldn't get an agreement. outside commentators said they could have if they tried. what's your sense how that went down? >> i just came back from iraq and somebody told me something
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very interesting. they said that the month after american troops left iraq, the iraqi army commanders began selling off equipment. it wasn't that the corruption hadn't existed before then, but it just spiraled after that. and the result was this shell of an army, 50,000 troops in mosul, they run away in their underwear, all those billions of dollars that we went on the iraqi army just seemingly created a ghost army and that still is the problem. my experience there yes there were u.s. air strikes but no sense that either the iraqi army or the kurdish forces were taking advantage of them. they are not rushing in to regain that ground. so that is the issue with this war. >> this is an ongoing problem. it's a historic problem. i remember in 1991 hearing about the iraqi army, the fourth largest army in the world, the
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united states marine corps can do their best and boom we're in baghdad. the same thing happened in 2003, they are going to stop us. every time we have overestimated the iraqi army when they were on saddam hussein's side, this time we've overestimated the iraqi army when they were on our side. maybe the iraqi army just historically has been pathetic and my only thing, i would say to leon panetta and others that said we should have stayed in iraq forever would things be different ten years from now? >> i don't want to change the subject or countries what are we saying about afghan army. we got x number battalions. let's see what happens when u.s. troops pull out. >> exactly. so let's talk about hong kong. after days of protests demonstrators in hong kong have an agreement to hold talks with local officials who are backed by the central chinese government. hong kong's leader is staying
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put defying protesters who threaten to occupy buildings if he doesn't resign by-month. clashes broke out between anti-government protesters and those who support beijing. >> tens of thousands of people. >> it's stunning because wherever i travel, i love asking people, what place do you love to go to the most. hong kong. hong kong. you know, it is extraordinarily advanced place. a wonderful city. it's east meets west and i would guess very few people that have traveled there and love it so much would ever expect to see images like this coming out of hong kong. >> we know what those images look like. the ghost of tiananmen square is in those images. we know in beijing is the immovable object. you know, the president must be obeyed. he has a city in open revolt.
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>> what's at the heart of this? for americans watching this peripherally they are seeing these big crowds. what are these people protesting precisely. >> what you're seeing is the contradiction of 1997. that clever deal that was cooked up by british governor and chinese. one country two systems. at some point that was going to give and i think it's giving right now. >> how stunning is this for you to watch this? >> quite stunning. to answer willie's question what they are protesting specifically in 1997 they were promised free elections in 2017. they are going to have elections but not quite so free because a central committee will pick the candidates and that's what this comes down to. also the fact that the current chief executive is unpopular. >> what happens to china financially if we have repeated tiananmen square in hong kong. i don't think it's possible but
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what happens. >> it's a disaster. which is why i agree with you. their whole financial system is tied into hong kong. hong kong is this one country, two systems, very much a part of china. and so it would be disaster for them, disaster for us, disaster for the world because as you intimated, hong kong, new york, london are the three cities that matter. i don't think the chinese willett it come to that. >> bill neely, great to have you here. thank you very much. coming up the hospital in dallas says the reason why they missed the ebola diagnosis and why they sent the patient home. plus are you better off than you were six years ago. the president thinks so. will that work as a mid-term pitch to voters as "morning joe" continues after a quick break. [ male announcer ] tomcat bait kills up to 12 mice, faster than d-con. what will we do with all of these dead mice?
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♪ joining us now from dallas "the washington post" abby phillips. she's been covering the ebola outbreak since back in june when the epidemic first started to spiral out of control and abby, a lot of focus is on what happened in the hospital when this patient was released. and i know that there are some. claims that there were electronic errors but it seems to point to more of a bigger problem in terms of our ability to contain this. >> it is a bigger problem. the thing is a lot of hospitals around the country are using these electronic medical records and there was definitely a failure to factor in the clear evidence that he been to a country that is dealing with ebola and also had many of these symptoms. the doctors in this case never saw that information, and it's not because it wasn't available it's only because it didn't automatically show up on these
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electronic forms that this hospital was using. it's a problem that i think we should probably be asking about whether other hospitals around the country have looked into it and that's one of the reasons why this hospital released this information last night. >> we do know this patient thomas eric duncan lied on his form as it pertains to travel and other ways so he might not have been the most helpful. >> that's right. >> i'm just wondering what was the real breakdown in the hospital? how can this -- it sounds like almost he said it to some people but it didn't get communicated up. >> right. he said to it a nurse because the nurses are the first line of defense. they look at all of the patients who come in to these chaotic emergency rooms and try to figure out who needs urgent care. the nurse asked where have you travel. he said i had been to africa. she asked him have you had contact with anyone that was sick and just like he did on his form to come in to brussels from
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liberia to the united states he did not tell them he contact with a sick patient. and we know that when he was in liberia he carried a woman, a pregnant woman who later died of ebola. >> abby, it's willie geist. good to have you on this morning. we talked a few minutes ago to dr. friedman the director of the cdc and how we should tighten things up at the airports and he said that was not a good idea because it isolates the countries even further and makes it harder to treat people who have it and stamp it out at its source. is there any talk than having a simple fever test and checking a box on the form before you dome the united states? >> there's probably no question they are looking into other ways of doing it. if you look at the way that the system works right now they are relying on all of the countries between west africa and here to do some sort of check on passengers to make sure they are not symptomatic. that's the biggest area of concern because once you're
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symptomatic you're contagious. other hand there's not much more you can do. you can't give people lie detector tests to make sure they were not in contact with an ebola patient. in some ways you have to take their word for it. on the other hand, could we be testing people more frequently for symptoms like high fevers? probably. there were some reports that he had been tested in liberia on his way out but not necessarily tested in the united states on his way in. >> abby phillips, thank you very, very much. >> obviously the most important thing is we have to make sure every hospital has something in place to make sure this doesn't happen again. >> certainly this hospital, unfortunately is being used as an example as it should. coming up, indisputable being that's what from calls his assertion that the economy is the stronger today than when he took office. we'll dispute that ahead. plus, an uncensored look behind-the-scenes of "saturday night live." "morning joe" will be right back.
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this progress has been hard. but it has been steady and it has been real. it's the direct result of the american people's drive and their determination and
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resilience but also the result of sound decisions made by my administration. so it is indisputable that our economy is stronger today than when i took office. by every economic measure we are better off now than we were when i took office. >> president obama talking about the economy yesterday at northwestern university and joining us now former white house press secretary for president george w. bush ari fleischer and juoan walsh. >> ice like saying there was 100-foot hole and now it's a 90-foot hole. yes he dug us out of the hole a little bit. >> wouldn't democrats say it was
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actually our party that put americans into the 100-foot hole? >> actually that is true, joe. he did inherit a deep recession. the problem is policies he's implemented haven't gotten out of us. the top 1% have gain but for the average american worker, the average household income has dropped from 56,000 a year in 2007 to 50,000 a year. poverty rate is up to 14%. you don't have to convince the american people there's a recovery. they would know it. >> that's the question. let me go to joan. wages haven't budged. i don't think people are feeling it. i wonder how this can be a winning message. i'll convince you you are doing better when you don't feel it. >> there are some incontrovertible facts. under the president there were 4.5 million, almost 5 million we'll get job numbers today jobs created in his two administrations as opposed to
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1.5 million in the entire eight years under george bush. the stock market is booming. people at the top are doing well. i'm glad ari are concerned about so much of the recovery going to the top 1%. i didn't know that was an issue for him. i'm gas we can take that on together. >> joan, it's an issue for all of us, let me say. that's why americans aren't feeling a recovery because the richest are getting richer, the poorer are getting poorer and the middle class keeps losing. >> we saved the banks and now the banks aren't lending near what we need. ben bernanke can't get refinanced. >> but joan who has been the president for six years. i would blame george w. bush for his failures over eight years. will you blame barack obama for allowing the rich to get richer and the poor to get poorer over the past six years. >> i don't think he's done enough for the people at the bottom and that's why a lot of mistakes were handling in the fallout from the financial crisis. but he inherited that.
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he inherited a bipartisan consensus that we were going to privilege financial capital. >> ari, let me ask you this. what are the republicans going to do? are we going to break up the banks. are we going to stop billionaires getting 14% tax rates. how do americans have an alternate message. >> that's the wrong focus. the focus needs on growth. the problem with the president's policies and he's the one that's on the ballot this fall and his policies are on the ballot this fall. the president focused on redistribution of income in stead of economic growth for all. when the president does that he hurts everybody. the rich will always do fine. the issue isn't the rich doing well. is the president's policy raising every american up. you need policies that focus on growth. we need a new tax code. we need a business environment that encourages job creation. we need to reform entitlements.
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>> the tax code under bill clinton created 22 million jobs. that was the strongest recovery in my lifetime, ari, so this idea -- >> the tax code, a hi-tech bubble that created those jobs. >> there was an underlying financial strength and there was also an emphasis on -- yes, redistribution, giving people the earned income tax credit, expanding their income tax credit to make work pay. >> by the way -- >> a lot of things were a lot better than they would be if the president hadn't done that. >> very important question for you, joan. san francisco giants how far do they go? >> you know, i'm worried about nationals out there. we have a lot of experience with october baseball. you saw that game against pittsburgh the other night. they are getting hot at the right time. i'm wearing my black and orange. did you notice? >> ari, who will win it all. >> since i want won't be the yankees and mets i'm for the
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nats and o's. >> okay. >> joan walsh, thank you so much. still ahead one of the biggest threats our country's stability to respond to disasters like eboll skra. the head of the national center for disaster prepareness will tell us what is it. plus why europe has it so much better than the u.s. what a new study says about the american lifestyle. i'm moving to liechtenstein. once there was a girl who always mixed and matched. even in her laundry room. with downy unstopables for long-lasting scent. and infusions for softness. she created her own mix, match, magic.
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♪ the gop is actually in trouble for using stock photo. they use stock to off the black woman in one of their ads and pretending she's really a republican. [ laughter ] there it is. that's the photo. so a tv ad. it's pretty obvious using a lot of stock photos. check it out. >> we here in the gop have real solutions for real americans. real americans like this old woman about to skateboard. or these two men playing chess while a parrot watches. or this man dressed as a cowboy drinking whiskey and pointing to his computer. we've heard from all of you. asian couple high fiving. smiling man from the '90s. d.j. grandpa. man in water offering wet apple and little baby dressed as a business woman and we're ready to fight for you.
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>> that's funny. >> we're a diverse party. >> that was great. welcome back to "morning joe." steve rattner and harold ford jr. still with us and "huffington post" sam stein joins us from washington. good to have you on board, sam. a fifth american has been infected with the ebola virus and for us here at nbc the story hits close the home. freelance journalist working with dr. nancy snyderman has been diagnosed with the virus. ashoka mukpo is being flown back from liberia to the u.s. for treatment. his father said his son has worked there for several years and felt compelled to return to liberia to help shed light on the crisis. dr. snyderman and the rest of the crew are being monitored. as of now they are showing no symptoms but being flown back to the u.s. on a private charter and be put under quarantine for 21 days. i want to bring in the medical
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director for national center for preparedness. how do you characterize given what we've seen in dallas, how we have a freelance journey in our own family on his way home being treated for it. how do you characterize the level of concern that americans should have without being sensational but also not overlooking that there have been some real problems in terms of hospital process? >> yeah. actually the whole situation uncovered a lot of flaws in the public health system and public health system. the rob for public officials this is an awful disease in terms of the fact that when you die from it and the fatality rate very high it's a very, very ugly death and it's just fear some. we're not west africa and we have capabilities in the u.s. to control a major spread of this disease. we'll see some cases here
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inevitably. we'll see more cases here because there's plenty of people from west africa in the united states, in many major cities. and we're going to see more. but the reality is that we're not going to see a real epidemic or a pandemic that we could see with the bird flu that we used to talk about and that's still looming in the wings out there. right now i think public officials are walking this very fine line between on the one hand wanting to do what science direct which is that you're not really able to transmit the disease if you're not symptomatic. then dealing with public anxiety which is a whole other agenda and trying to make sure they cast a wide net of people being tracked and so forth. it's a complex problem with a public health point of view. rather confusing on some level the science from the public per accepts of what's actually going on. >> harold ford. >> quickly, we have questions abound this morning about travel procedures, should there being a greater health protocols before
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we allow entry or re-entry into the country. number one, do you agree we should do that. number two, we spoke with a specialist this morning from fordham university who said we don't know enough about this disease yet to not take extra precaution. do you agree with both of those sentiments and most important should we do something different about travel from west africa to the u.s.? >> the problem is the system for screening people that are coming and going out of country, et cetera, when we're looking for the possibility of a disease like ebola is we're depending on personal reporting. you ask a person questions. they answer. they may or may not answer truthfully. you can't cut off all travel among countries. it's out of the question. we have too many people that need to go back and forth. there's a lot of economic consequences if we even attempt to shut off a country. that would be impossible. here we are left with this reality we have to ask that person, you're is going the
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u.s., you're leaving from this airport. i see you don't have a fever. have you been in contact with somebody that has had ebola. if you're at risk of ebola and in liberia where would you rather be treated. you can imagine where somebody would say no i'm fine and really rather be in the u.s. if that person develops symptoms. >> doctor, thank you very much. we're going to move on to some politics. we have a lot. >> we got new polls that are coming up. again continue to show a real change in politics, but, you know, before we get there. let's talk about big money in politics. we had harry reid speaking about the evils of money in big politics. we hate it. all this big money is bad for america. senator reid has been attacking the koch brothers for their sins against democracy and went so far to call them unamerican. here's his greatest hits. >> charles and david koch are shrewd businessmen.
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what's unamerican is when shadowy billionaires pour unlimited money into our democracy to rig the system. the koch brothers are willing to invest billions to buy that america. senate republicans are addicted to koch. you see when you make billions of dollars a year you can be as immoral and dishonest as your money will allow you to be. it's too bad that they are trying to buy america and it's time that the american people spoke out against this terrible dishonesty of these two brothers who ares about unamerican as anyone i can imagine. >> sad and pathetic when somebody calls a person unamerican especially when they are bigger offenders of the action he defines as unamerican. who are the biggest spenders this year. nra at number five. number four the climbed action. number three is karl rove. u.s. chamber of commerce is number two.
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who is number one? it's not a group bought and paid for by the koch brothers it's actually harry reid's group, the senate majority p.a.c. we can show you a lot of ads that they have been running but a lot of negative ads all over the country. reports are from npr, this all came to our attention from an npr report but harry reid has poured $9 million into the north carolina race alone according to nonpartisan groups. the hypocrisy is absolutely staggering to call the koch brothers unamerican for doing an act that actually he's done so much more of this year. >> he pushes back saying the koch brothers have spend more if you look at americans for prosperity. >> no. you look at the p.a.c.s and, you know, apparently -- >> the point is the same. >> apparently, though, as steve rattner said the koch brothers
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may have only spent $10 million so far this year. regardless harry reid is number one according to npr, the number one big spender in the 2014 campaign. so if you want to talk about big money in politics this year, it starts with harry reid. >> the only thing we don't know is that there are still undisclosed contributions to super p.a.c.s that lois lerner got into so much trouble. what we're looking at are the p.a.c.s in which the donors disclose their identities. as we say where the koch brothers are below the $10 million mark. >> got a snapshot of where things stand in tight races with little more than a molest. recent polls show democrat kay hagan clinging to a small lead in north carolina. >> boy what a race that is. >> mary landrieu holding on for dear life in louisiana. and mark pryor up two on tom cotton. >> let's stop right there.
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harold ford showed three states in the deep south and the reddest of the red states and in all three states democrats are stubbornly hanging on to their lead with about a month to go. nobody would have predicted that a long time ago. it's stunning. prior landrieu, hagan doing well. >> landrieu has shown throughout her time in the senate she knows,000 win as you get near the end. to watch kay hagan i thought many people believed from the out set she's maintained a lead throughout this race. more power to her. >> pretty stunning. if republicans don't start pulling away those three deep south states their ain't going to be no way. people talking about a wave election today are dreaming. >> look at iowa. republican earns earns is
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surging. >> sam stein, things could change, obviously. look pat roberts down a couple of points in kansas. things can change. as of today, any republican that talks about a big landslide election is dreaming. because you look at these latest polls they are down in kansas. they are down in arkansas. they are down in louisiana. and they are down in north carolina. and, yes, most of those are within the margin of error. but if you got to talk about being within the margin of error in the deep south and places where barack obama has approval ratings in the 20s, there's something wrong with your party. >> yeah. i think on the broad level you're right. democrats have proven stubborn. they aren't fading away in a lot of they states. on a microlevel there's some things to discuss. louisiana for instance that race will go into a runoff if none of the candidates get above 50% it goes the top two and landrieu is
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in a bit more trouble. right now the probability, very, very small probability the senate control changes hands but basically a coin flip in terms of probability. there's that. but, you know, the key question for me is will the incredible expenditure that democrats have made, senate democrats have made in the ground game operation which they poured millions of dollars into will that end up defining these polls and boost democrats further. dnc is banking a lot on that. they think they figured out a way to get people out. that will determine the control of the senate. >> all the republican candidates in the three race we showed have tried to attach the democrat to president obama. it's worked in some states. working in kentucky for mitch mcconnell. >> couple of these races you have basically household names and brands from the state. the pryors for significance in
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arkansas, the landrieus in louisiana, the voters know who these people are and don't judge them through the prism of the white house. that's been a bit more difficult than republicans have thought initially. then the second thing i would say for as bad as the president is doing and he's toxic in a lot of these states, he's an anchor on these candidates the republican party is not polling in a lot of these states. these republican candidates have had to contend with their own problems. what you've seen is people like tom kline has attacked towards the middle on these issues, embracing a stead wide minimum wage hike, being squishy on mepd accommodate expansion. it's not just the president who is toxic. the republican brand is toxic too. >> steve on some of these issues you have a closer look on how the average american is doing compared to dunn's richest citizens. the president was touting the
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economy's improvement at northwestern yesterday. >> under barack obama the rich have gotten richer. the poor have gotten poorer. >> not a lot poorer but haven't done better. what the president was trying to do was to frame the positive news. what's underpinning this and underpinning a lot of these political races is what's going on between the rich and the average american. so "forbes" came out with this 400 richest americans and we took this and went backwards to the 1980s to see how the rich have done. what you see if you go back to the depths of the recession in 2009 which is essentially where those blue and red lines hit bottom there, the richest 400 have doubled their average net worth from $3 billion to $6 billion. >> what's the blue line? >> the blue line are average americans, median income in terms of their wealth and you can see if you go back to late 1980s they were not in the same place in dollars but starting
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from the same point in the race. they did very well through thoughts boom the red line pops up. that's the housing bubble. the housing bubble collapses. their net worth collapses. it basically hasn't come back. meanwhile the blue line which are the wealthiest 400 americans as found by "forbes," their net worth has doubled in the last four years. >> why is that? >> why is that? stock market has been surging. wall street has been doing well. their incomes are rising. >> why is that stock market rising and main street is flat. >> corporate profits are surging. corporate profits are surging because companies can hold down their cost by holding down their wage bills. they are not increasing their workers pay. >> we're seeing 30-year-old techies becoming billionaires. this list has very -- you know you look at this thing 20, 30 years ago it would be these families who inherited billions of dollars from their parents. now there are a lot of tech start ups. i won how much -- we talk about tax policy and a lot of other
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issues people like to talk about income disparity. how much is the i.t. revolution since the early 1990s impacted those lines. >> the whole information technology revolution is impacted several ways. people like mark zuckerburg who had the biggest increase than anybody on "forbes" list. >> willie and i were saying who is the guy buy this stock. >> that's not the way i remember it. >> you were ask youed. you're liberalism. >> you have a bunch of tech billionaires but you also have a lot of people whose lives, who benefit in other ways, people who have software engineers, all kind of people up and down the food chain who have the skills you need to actually make the tech work. >> willie? >> how do we attack this? we had a lot of presidents try to go after this problem. a mayor in new york city who made it a priority in his campaign. where do you begin? >> where you don't begin in my
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opinion is with some of the things mayor de blasio is doing. i'm all in favor of a minimum wage but impose $15 minimum wage on new york business will hurt the city. the president went through a checklist. it is the checklist of things you want to do. education. training. infrastructure. all the stuff -- immigration reform. all the stuff he's been talking about has not been able to get through congress is what you want to do. he laid out a very clear checklist. >> the thing that's most disappointing look where the growth has been in this economy. lift the ban on exports of petroleum. >> wait a second. why do we ban? >> it goes back to the 1970s at the time of the oil embargo. >> we're not in the 1970s any more. >> these are the higher paying jobs. more than 1/3 of all private money. we have focus where the good paying jobs are being create
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snooped one of the. simplest most bipartisan things you can do is lift the oil ban. >> wouldn't that make us more competitive? >> it does. >> against russia. >> so many good things for us. >> who is stopping the president from doing that. what special interest group is stopping him from signing that? >> i think it's politics. it's having some cain out on the campaign trail demagoguing and saying the president is allowing our oil to go overseas. >> the carry interest rate. raise the minimum rate. simple things can to be done. steve has written about it. >> do your daughters use facebook? >> yes. yes. >> because i know facebook's value is going up. i don't know people that use facebook any more. like five years ago everybody used facebook. i'll tell you none of my kids use facebook. they are on instagram now. they are on snap shah chat. they are on twitter. they don't use twitter. that's why i hear his income is
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exploding. it must be exploding from other sources because facebook is -- >> instagram is posting. >> occasionally. i got to say this sounds like the oldest person conversation i ever heard. >> actually, sam. >> grandpa. >> you actually have it backwards. would be like us sitting around asking if people still use eight track tapes. facebook appears to be going away the way of myspace. >> facebook is for people who want to post pictures of their children, which, you know, a lot of people want to do. >> i'm just saying children are not using it any more. five years ago everybody was using it. i don't know a lot of people who are using it now. >> it's more of a women's think. it's is skewed to women. >> i'm trying to figure out where things going.
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i have kids. a range of kids from 6 to 25, 26. i look at what they are using. they have fled facebook like everybody fled myspace back in 2004. >> i don't know if they flee. >> the stock price doesn't lie. >> still ahead on "morning joe," three-time champ al leiter will be here to break down major league baseball's post-season. then a no holds barred look behind the scene at "saturday night live." you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. machines will be sprayed to be made. and making something stronger... will mean making it lighter.
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it's genius. shh! i'm watching tv. tiny sharon is mean. i'm right here. watch any channel live on any device around your home. the x1 entertainment operating system only from xfinity. ♪ there's only one story to talk about today. the "daily news," the giants prince is finding his game since losing his virginity.
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"the big bang theory." he was having trouble playing football. hold on. prince now over the hump. sex is helping him put woes to bed. he got married and playing much better. >> back of the "post" has the same headline. he said he wouldn't lose his virginity until he got married. >> time now for the morning papers. >> kids here's a lesson four. if you're having trouble, running that 40 under five seconds, go ahead. >> your kidding? >> yes, i'm kidding. of course i'm kidding. >> time now for the morning papers. the san diego union tribune, the search has been called off and a marine is presumed dead after an aircraft malfunction in the pertion gulf. two pilots and two enlisted personnel were aboard a military plane when it lost power shortly after takeoff. two crew members jumped into the ocean when they thought the plane was about to crash but what two pilots were able to
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regain control. the other marine was pulled from the water. >> the "new york times" a group of top female soccer players are suing fifa over use of artificial turf at next year's women's world cup. they say it's gender discrimination because men always play on real grass. female players tried to negotiate with fifa but so far the organization has been quiet. >> columbia bus dispatch embattled clothing company abercrombie & fitch is back in the news. the justices agreed to hear an appeal by the equal opportunity commission over the company's strict dress code and claims of religious discrimination. workers claim they were barred from wearing a head scarf. others were told to remove their religious cross.
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they will remove logos from their clothing. >> shouldn't a business be able to tell people what they wear when they are inside their business? >> someone who worked there and they have a real -- the kids who work wear and they are young people wear the clothes and they kind of go hey how are you doing when anyone walks in. what's up. they have a whole kind of -- but i do think there's a problem there. you should be able to be who you are. >> it's ironic about this. the whole thing with twice with no shirts when you walk in, but you can wear -- >> yeah. >> got to spray cologne on you. >> where do tatoos stand on. >> the heisman quarterback winner, despite avoiding criminal charges after a woman
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said he sexually assaulted. legal experts say the woman has another two years to file a suit against winston. his lawyer is characterizing this as a shakedown as the woman -- >> a shakedown is when you try to steal crab legs from a supermarket. >> they are good. the lawyer says this is the woman's potentially seeking money from winston's multimillion dollar nfl contract. >> so, willie, this guy has been accused of rape. he's going to get sudden for sexual assault. it's a shoplifter, got busted for stealing crab legs. he stood in the middle of the most public place while people -- just shouted the most profane offensive things. >> was suspended one game for that. >> suspended one game for that. if you're running an nfl team, do you go boy, i want some of that? >> somebody wrote a piece about this last week and they talked
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anonymously to gms every time a story comes out despite his physical gifts he slips down. you look what's happening at the nfl they don't want a problem. he's only a sophomore. he can grow up and redeem himself. if these sexual assault charges turn out to be true that's a major rob. >> coming up do parents have to add the ebola virus to the growing list of heart concerns. we'll go to dallas, texas where three more children were pulled for fear of being exposed. but first al leiter standing by right here on "morning joe". there comes a time in everyone's life when you want more. like a new meticulously engineered german sedan.
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♪ fly ball will hit to right. calhoun is back. and that ball has reached the seats. it's a solo homer. >> all right, mika. >> joining us now former major league baseball pitcher three-time world series champ. >> look at that. she looks confused. >> you got to go front to back.
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hold on. that's the "top gun gets look. we remember that. can i give you a gift. >> only if it's from the mlb network. >> our studio analyst for mlb network. al leiter. how is this one? is this okay? >> so al, mlb network, it is on -- >> 24 hours a day baseball. >> i was going to say at my house, starting in the fall -- i'm trying to help you, al. starting in august we keep it on mlb network all the time. and this year, for me has been a very exciting year even though my republicans have been pathetic. you look at these teams, it's classic. you got the orioles. they won the world series in '70. you got the royals. we haven't seen them since '85. you got the tigers, classic one
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of the first world series i remember against st. louis. you got these classic midwest teams and of course, you know, thomas' orioles. there's a lot of great stuff. >> a little obsessed. >> o-r-i-o-l-e-s. ♪ magic >> let's talk about a couple of games. obviously the orioles last night, boy they showed a lot of power. >> they did. you know, just looking at the way buckman nagged the end of the game, american league game -- oh, oh, that's okay. american league you never know. tillman couple of home runs, scherzer, reigning cy young winner, they get a big lead with the big explosion. what happens he still continues to pitch. i think what's happening guys if
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you look at kansas city i don't know how much of a baseball fan you are. but because of baseball where they are now, moving along with having less home runs, fir time in a long time, less than 100 home runs against the kansas city royals. did you watch that game. versatility of baseball games. you'll see that more. buck showalter has done the best. >> bullpens. >> really that's the big premise as we see teams moving forward as to who dominates. >> the royals unbelievable. >> a time not long ago where spring training could rule out teams like royals. baseball has, it's a cliche but there's parity in baseball and anybody can win. talk about the royals. team if you live on one of the coasts you didn't watch much this season but now they are winning these games in dramatic extra innings. >> willie, you know what i think about. pitching and defense, lorenzo
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cain, three athletic outfielders. i think of this, a retired pitcher and i was on a team in toronto that we had a couple of great relievers, three great relievers. for me right now with what the royals are bringing out they have three great relievers that shorten the game. the $25 million starter. if you don't have to pitch seven, eight innings and only have to go six because you have three guys. >> changes everything. >> what the tigers will do for one good relief pitch. >> from what we saw yesterday ace for ace the tigers are better than hat the orioles have and that was just basically a mental strategy of how buck of able to figure out where they wanted to place the orioles pitchers and in the eighth it just exploded for them. >> tillman, you know, did you not think those couple home runs early on, oh, oh, against scherzer. so look at that with the tigers. their bullpen has been absolutely their problem all
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year. if you look at the team offensively, amazing power, miguel cabrera is back. but you have trouble with getting the 27. that's their problem. every one of these teams we see outside of the nationals in my opinion they all have some kind of flaw. back to what you said, willie. i think with parity and with what bud selig has done it's taken at that long time for them to figure out how do we disperse the money to where each of these teams can be competitive. your opening comment about teams like kansas city royals being competitive is awesome. >> who will win the series? >> the world series? >> yeah. let's ask the man who knows. >> i know what thomas will say. >> nationals have the least amount of flaws. nationals american league is cloudier. i like the orioles. i'll not under estimate buck.
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what the beltway series. >> possible beltway series. possible missouri series. possible l.a. series. very exciting. >> l.a. series is very attractive because you have a 5:00 start and to be done at 8:00. >> harold ford jr. who do you like? >> the orioles. >> there we go. if i had to place a bet right now it would be the o's. >> game two between the cardinals and dodgers tomorrow. game three between the nationals and giants on monday. >> do yourself a favor turn on the mlb network, keep it on through the series. as we go to break, we can only going to break singing one song since most of us picked the o's. take it away thams. >> he's feeling it. ♪ magic magic magic >> it's not right. >> it's not right at all.
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♪ dallas hospital is on defense over the handling of the thomas eric duncan case the whann who tested for ebola. those closest are living in quarantine. we have kate snow with us joining us from texas. a lot of questions about how the hospital may have missed some of the signs. we're hearing also the patient may not have told them the whole truth and nothing but truth. but is it safe to assume other hospitals across america and administrators you're talking to are bending over backyards to make sure there's a formula they go by, a system? >> reporter: that's what the hospital said. in a statement late last night they said we wanted to clarify what happened in the hopes that it helps other hospitals make
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changes moving forward. they have made some changes here now. i'll get to those in a minute. the bottom line they had to come out last night and clarify what happened a week ago when the patient walked in the er and sent home. when thomas eric duncan wait a minute to the emergency room last friday he had a fever and other symptoms caused by other things. he said he had not been around anyone who has been ill. now disease detectives are on a frantic search to track down anyone who had contact with him monitoring those at high-risk. >> these people will be called once a day, visited once a day, take their temperature, look for
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symptoms. >> reporter: people who live in the apartment where duncan got sick are being closely watched. >> i'm worried. >> reporter: oliver spoke to nbc news from inside the apartment. four days after duncan left in an ambulance his dirty bedsheets were still inside. >> why do they have us quarantined in an apartment that's highly contaminated that has such high-risk to contract the virus? >> reporter: late thursday a cleaning team and hazmat gear arrived. city firms arranged for the specially trained cleaners to come and sanitize the place. it's unclear if the cleaning has happened yet. a food bank sent in a three day supply of meals leaving the boxes outside the door. down the street also quarantined the daughter of duncan's girlfriend, her husband and four kids ages 2 to 11. they are going stir crazy. i spoke with them by phone. her young kids spent a lot of time by duncan last weekend. >> maybe they would be like
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hugging him, maybe he would be kissing. >> reporter: no visitors. his mom in north carolina recorded this video message for her son. >> i want to come and hug you. >> he's suffering. but this is not the way anyone would want to go down in history. >> reporter: the cdc says that they are offering opportunity of experimental medication to the family if they want to go down that road. meantime the hospital as i mentioned has made some changes. one of those changes sim proving their electronic records so that when a nurse enters the word africa where someone has traveled the doctors will be able to see that information as well and i'm sure other hospitals will follow that course too. >> kate snow thank you very much. >> still ahead, the legend of lauren michaels how the creator of "saturday night live" has kept the show relevant 30 or 40 years. and then, america by the numbers. the country is change. we'll explain how it's going to
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impact us. >> did you see that map that also shows how europeans live so much longer than we do. >> we'll talk about that. we. >> it's not fair. introducing dance-all-you-want bladder leak protection from the experts in feminine protection. new always discreet underwear for sensitive bladders. only always discreet underwear has soft dual leakguard barriers
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"saturday night live" has been keeping america up late, very late every weekend for 40 years and here with us now, award winning journalist jim journalist jim miller, the co-author of "live from new york, the complete uncensored history of saturday night live." >> there is so much history to talk about. why don't we start with -- chevy chase said that john bellucci told you really was responsible for so much of the start of "saturday night live" because he dragged everybody in from second city. how important was john belushi in the show? >> incredibly important. the original cast started off in '75 and then chevy left and bill murray came in. those first five years created a foundation for the next 35. we had never seen anything like it. >> belushi, how did belushi's death change the set? >> i think it affected a lot of
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people. interestingly enough, a lot of people were so shocked by it, because while john was on the show, it seemed like he could handle a lot of things. and the fact he had succumbed to -- you know, that really shocked people, because it would be 11:00 at night, half an hour before the show would go on, and he'd be lying horizontal and people would think, wait a second, then he'd rise to the occasion. and be great. >> a lot of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll in those early years? >> yes, but in the last 12 years, it totally changed. tina fey said we're making appointments with personal trainers, we're vegetarians, we'd never survive then. >> rock concerts in the '70s, '80s, '90s, bands would be stoned out of their head and put in horrible performances. at some point comedians and musicians started taking yoga or
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something and being vegetarians. it's amazing how it's changed. >> they all want to go home to their families. the last thing they want to do is go to the after after party at the bar at 3:30 in the morning. >> it's one those things you don't know what you got until it's gone. how important was tina fey to "saturday night live's" resurgence about eight years ago as a writer? >> yeah, she had a big impact on camera but also off camera. she was the head writer. by the way, the first book, 12 years ago, everybody used to talk about "snl" as a boy's club. after tina became head writer and tina and amy poehler were on "weekend update," i never heard anybody use that expression again. a huge shift in the culture of the show. >> when she left, we missed her the most as a writer. i mean, let's just be honest, there was a huge drop-off when she started writing. the writing, her performances,
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at a moment in which american politics was riveted. the way she was able to play sarah palin. dig dignity, tremendous amount of humor. you write eddie murphy, the impact he had on the show, in some ways, it was his presence in the '80s that saved it. >> look, there were some lean times for "snl." eddie, by the way, only 19 at the time. he had such a presence on the show that it kept it alive. >> let's go willie geist. you look at the most iconic moments, you've got to talk about the buck wheat deal, the assassination of buck wheat and -- >> mr. rodders. >> you've got to talk about hot tub. 30 years later. you still have grown men going around, hot tub.
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eddie murphy saved the franchise, didn't he? >> yeah, he really did. especially that hot tub one. you can say it to anyone on the street today and they know exactly what you're talking about. i want to ask you about the president, the current president. one of the parts you write about in this update of an already great book is how difficult it is to play president obama. snl has taken some heat, saying they've treated him with kid gloves because of the politics shared with the show. >> he doesn't have any peculiar ticks. what they call handles. bush 41 had a lot of stuff that dana carvy could play with. bill clinton, mcdonald's. w. with strategery and all that stuff. obama is probably the most difficult politician in the show's history for them to try
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and capture and imitate. >> you interviewed sarah palin about how contintina fey portra her? >> yeah, look, she went on the show, which i thought she was a terrific sport about going on the show. everybody loved her at the show. there were writers who were going to go up to her and say certain things and then totally chickened out and then said, hey, thanks. but the truth is -- >> they did love her. we heard that and we were stunned by everybody around there that they met her and they all loved her. >> oh, the great writer on snl who wanted to talk about her and -- her wife, said she wanted to tell her, this is the face, we live together. and she totally chickens out. it was very revealing. >> that's really a very good story. >> governor palin said something interesting. she said snl's influence on the political process is way overrated. she doesn't think it makes as
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much of a difference. i tend to disagree. i think a lot of those things they do are almost like a de facto branding of candidates. once they do something to you, it's like getting toothpaste back in the tube. >> all right, the book is "live from new york, the complete uncensored history of saturday night live." jim miller, thanks. nice to see you again. how prepared is your family for a large-scale outbreak in the united states? the facts and myths behind the deadly ebola virus. we're going to talk with the director of the cdc. plus, senator harry reid calls the coke brothers un-american for their big money spending in politics. wonder what he'll call himself when he sees the new spending report. "morning joe" continues after a break.
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it's october 3rd. oh, do you feel it outside? >> no, i don't feel it. >> i feel it. it's sweater weather. you've been on ebay again. okay. >> i haven't been on ebay. >> another $25 sweater off ebay. >> steve rattner's here. >> i think you bought it off alibaba.com actually. >> what is that? >> harold ford jr., he's here. hi, willie. >> hi, mika. >> a lot of sports last night.
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baseball. those orioles. >> the baltimore team. i was just in baltimore at johns hopkins. >> the orioles just took control of sherzer and the tigers last night. big surprise to me. i was thinking tigers were going to do a little bit better. >> they got that pitching staff. blew them out. the late game, how can you not love the kansas city royals? >> the royals are crazy. >> high drama all the time. won again in extra innings. it's hard not to root for those guys. >> and really big news, harold ford, out of college football. while we were sleeping. number two team knocked off. going to have huge implications for the rest of the year. >> arizona, with rich rodriguez, left michigan, goes up to arizona, turns the program around. you got to say congratulations to the wildcats.
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>> we were out late, last night. >> i was sick with a cold. >> so you were out late? >> it's only a cold. >> so how about the weekend in the sec? alabama at ole miss. auburn at lsu. that game's at auburn. texas a&m and mississippi state. all six of those teams are undefeated. >> it's going to be a crazy weekend. we know what you're doing this weekend. you're going to be watching sec football. >> that's what i do. >> where's the alabama game? >> at ole miss. >> actually, i would like that. >> conversation about that. >> if i were a betting man, i would take alabama. >> i'll bet you your ebay account to get a sweater like that. i'll bet your sweater. you're taking ole miss. >> i'll give you the -- not that i know what the line is. >> a fifth american has been infected with the ebola virus. for us here at nbc news, it is a story that's now hitting close to home. a freelance journalist working
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with dr. nancy snyderman has been diagnosed with the virus. he is being flown back from liberia to the u.s. from treatment. his father says his son worked there for three years and felt compelled to return to liberia to help shed light on the crisis. dr. snyderman and the rest of the crew are being monitored. as of now, they are showing no symptoms. they're being flown back to the u.s. on a private charter and will be put under quarantine for 21 days. dr. nancy says she present zero to minimal risk. she reported from where thomas duncan was apparently infected. >> this is the front door of mr. duncan's apartment he was renting in this small hamlet. it was in the pink house across the courtyard where the young woman, pregnant, and now infected with ebola, was calling for help, and he responded. so you drove your taxi? jim was the taxi driver who picked up duncan, the young
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woman named nadaline, her father and brother. >> you knew you were picking up a sick pregnant girl but no idea at all she was sick with ebola? >> no, no, no, no, no idea at all. >> they told him they were afraid she was going to miscarry. what did you see, how did she strike you? >> she was helpless. she was not able to walk by herself. >> you know, i will say again, this is what i said yesterday. i mean, we keep being told, oh, no reason to panic, no reason. oh, you can't -- it's next to impossible to catch this thing. people are picking up this -- this disease. by simply carrying other people by the legs. i'm sorry. the standard is not quite as high as the cdc and everybody else says. so if you can't touch somebody,
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tell us, you can't touch somebody with ebola virus without possibly contracting the disease. they need to be straight forward. i'm not trying to make anything up. but i'm reading these articles. like, oh, come on. saying, oh, they must have had sex. somebody must have had sex with somebody. er yesterday. no, this is the second day in a row we have heard stories of people getting ebola by simply touching another person. >> our guest, senior fellow for the institute of international affairs at fordham university. you heard what joe is concerned about. there seems to be a disconnect in the communication, as to how you can contract this. >> this is, it is a really difficult issue to understand this. because you're absolutely right. the terrifying thing is we're seeing people contracting the disease not only who have only touched people but also who are
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wearing hazmat suits or at least protective ge ivive gear in som. it is important to understand the conditions in liberia are very different than condition, in america, both in terms of the quantities bodily fluid around. we're dealing with people who are profoundly sick. touching someone who has got full-fledged ebola with blood, vomit, diarrhea, other bodily fluids, that's really a difference from sitting next to someone on an airplane who is not symptomatic. when we look at this, we do actually see, as it spreads through a population, it isn't very contagious. it's not very easy to catch. yet, this is the difficult distinction, it is very infectious. >> doctor, you're saying people wearing hazmat suits are contracting the virus? >> so what's very important to say -- i mean, that's why we're so terrified of this. because we see people wearing their personal protective gear
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and they're getting ebola. that was the case with ken brantly and the other aid workers who contracted it. inside those suits in liberia, it's 115 degrees. it's very hot. they're working very, very long shifts. they're very understaffed. in that context, it's easy to have a breach of protocol. the situation will be very different in dallas where you've got many more doctors. the temperatures aren't as high, it's easier to change, the facilities are better and so on. i don't thing what we're seeing here is a virus that's easy to catch. i really don't think that there's any chance of having an epidemic in america. but the cdc needs to be all over this case in dallas. they need to be all over future cases as well. i think we're likely to see this happen again. >> doctor, what would you say to anyone who was on any of the three planes that mr. duncan took as he made his way to the united states, through brussels, washington, dulles, on to
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dallas? they've been told there's not much risk, but you look at the number of people he came into contact with, or even people he didn't necessarily touched, if you're on that plane, what should you be thinking right now? >> look, as far as we know, to the very best of our knowledge, he was not symptomatic on the plane and therefore not contagious. i would say, don't worry, you're going to be okay. but this is a new virus. we've only known about this virus since 1976. we haven't had very many cases of it worldwide. it's very hard to study because you can only study it in certain laboratories. only a few category 4 laboratories in the world where you can look at this virus. if i was on that plane, i'd want to know i was on that plane. i'd want to know resources were available to help me. i'd want to be reassured. i'm a physician so it's different for me. if i was a regular passenger on that plane, i would want to be reassured and know there were resources available to help me. i'd want the cdc to get on top
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the manifests and phoning everyone. you want people at the cdc who are good at doing that. so far, they've dropped the ball twice and i'm worried they're going to drop it again. >> thank you so much. come back, please, and update us. we have a lot going on. you want to move on to politics? >> i tell you, another thing, you were just looking at it. >> we'll have the cdc -- >> weem got this virus also -- >> it's enterovirus 68. here's the way "the new york times" put it. it's unlike any previous outbreak of the disease public health officials have ever seen. sweeping the country. we'll talk become that next block as well. >> let's go to politics. you know, what willie and i do, we have a very set rigid day. we get up, we do calisthenics. jumping jacks. this is really important. get some blood going up to the brain and everything. and you can tell the days i haven't been doing my toe touches because i stumble a lot.
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>> you get grumpy. but anyways, we go help orphans. then we sit down and we have our skim latte. and we listen to npr. because that's just what we do. >> so what did you get? >> so yesterday, we're listening to npr, you know, with the ladle, ladling out the pourage for the kids. they list the people that spent the most money this year in politics. the pacs. >> that's not breaking news. >> but this is interesting. >> why? >> because it's confirmation of what harry reid's told us. speaking out about the evils of big money politics all year. we hate big money politics. >> there's some big money bags in politics. >> it's bad for politics. it's bad for america. senator reid believes so strongly in this crew said that he has attacked the coke
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brothers repeatedly for their sins against democracy. that's right, he calls them sins against democracy. in fact, he even called the coke brothers un-american. let's get a best of harry clip. >> what is un-american is when shadowy billionaires pour unlimited money into our democracy to rig the system. the coke brothers are willing to invest millions to buy that america. senate republicans, madam president are addicted to coke. when you make billions of dollars a year, you can be as immoral and dishonest as your money will allow you to be. it's too bad that they're trying to buy america. and it's time that the american people spoke out against this terrible dishonest city of these two brothers who are about as un-american as anyone i can imagine. >> speak out against, un-american people that spend lots of money. he says there's immoral, deceptive. accused the brothers of pulling
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strings behind every crucial race in the country. coke's planning to raise $300 million. headlines go on and on and on. so i'm listening to npr. the kids come, can i have some more porridge in. >> they're british? >> yeah, their parents came over to go skiing and abandoned them. yes, they're british, they're british. >> should have done a few more of these. >> so i ask, who are the biggest spenders in america? as i'm listening to npr. it's like kasey counting down the hits. guess who's number five. >> koch brothers. >> no. who's number four? >> koch brothers? >> no. >> wloz three? >> one of the koch brothers?
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>> charles, david? >> no, karls, he's very generous. >> it's karl rove actually, american crossroads/gps. who's number two? >> david, david koch, it's got to be. >> no, it's the u.s. chamber of commerce. we all know, we all know. the number one evil un-american -- what else did harry reid say, un-american, evil, immoral, lying sack of poopoo, whatever he's called them, number one group according to npr and independent groups are -- >> koch brothers. >> koch brothers? is it koch brothers? w who's number one? what? the number one bill spender? willie, i just spit some of my oatmeal out. it's harry reid's own senate majority pac.
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>> what happened? >> what happened? we've been hearing on and on and on how evil the koch brothers are. harry reid goes on the floor. let's bring in a guy who knows about big money. >> he has charts too. >> charts on the hypocrisy? really unbelievable that the guy who has been using this and calling other people un-american has spent more than anybody else in american politics in 2014. >> what's also interesting, i assume true, contrary to the narrative out there, the koch brothers haven't even spent $10 million during the cycle which seems incredible to me. >> no, the thing is, everybody, people who have tv shows every night, koch brothers, koch brothers. it's like if they think they keep repeating it, that somebody will believe what they say. in this case, you're right.
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harry reid is the number one spender. they're outspending americans. harold, i don't know. we talked about david koch and what he's done for new york city. we've also talked about how this narrative is just insanity. right now, it's not true. harry reid should apologize to the american people for using the senate floor and being such a hypocrite. >> look, there's too much money in politics. those who complain about the other side spending money should probably stop, especially if they're going to do the same themselves. >> let's be specific. harry reid said the koch brothers were un-american. harry reid said the koch brothers were immoral, he said they were deceptive. yet, talk about deceptive. here is a guy who has raised and spent more money than anybody else in this entire election cycle. is there outrage? should democrats and republicans not come out and condemn this
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man? >> look, he'll have to answer the questions about whether or not there's hypocrisy and what he's done to the coach brothers. >> you think there's hypocrisy? >> i appreciate what they've done not only here in new york city but across the nation. >> what about harry reid, being hypocritical here? >> look, this is politics. it goes back and forth. >> is reid being critical here? he called the koch brothers un-american. for doing things he has done more than they've done. >> i think it's wrong for anyone to refer to someone as un-american for participating in the political system. he has every right to be critical on what they spend money on politically. you shouldn't refer to people as being un-american or deceptive. that being said, there's touch mon too much money in politics. you shouldn't attack someone because they spend money, raise money, in order to -- >> well, maybe -- maybe they've spent $10 million so far this
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cycle. harry reid's spending tens -- hell, he spent $9 million in north carolina alone. >> koch brothers have spent more if you include americans for -- >> what's interesting, the democratic senate campaign, which is not the big super pac types but just the people who give smaller amounts, has actually outraised the senate republican committee during the cycle. there is actually more money that seems to want to be behind the republicans. >> still ahead on "morning joe," the very latest information from the cdc on the ebola outbreak. television film and voice actor ron perlman explains how he overcame his own image and weight issues to defy the stereotypes. >> that's what i'm still working on. >> you're still working on it. you keep working on your health. >> first, here's bill karins. >> as we head to the weekend, we're getting over so big storms
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yesterday. especially in texas and arkansas. a lot clean-up. we associate the spring with the severe weather and damaging winds but yesterday that took place right around ft. worth. also, huge hail around denton, texas, too. right now, they're over the ohio valley. if you're going to get a rained out saturday on this, it looks like saturday morning, d.c. to philadelphia, you clear out in the afternoon. but come saturday evening, these will be lined up over delmarva, new york city, northern new england. the leaves are at their peak in the northeast too. a lot those leaves unfortunately are going to come down with gusty winds. by sunday morning, just about everybody clears it out. just a few showers in the great lakes. let me take you through your weekend forecast for your friday. of course we're talking friday night football. a lot of friday evening activities. it looks like chicago, all the way back to detroit, that's where we're dealing with some rain, especially around cleveland. atlanta, watch out for
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thunderstorms. then on saturday, i mentioned the wash-out saturday. much of the rest the country actually clears it out. the other story will be this huge heat wave in the desert southwest and right into l.a. we could be 102 in l.a. come saturday. it cools off a little bit tomorrow. so, again, the northeast, bad saturday, good sunday for you. rest of the country looks all right. we leave you with a shot a sunny washington, d.c. your best danchances of rain wi come tomorrow morning. >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door.
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insurance companies are spending millions of dollars trying to mislead you about the effects of proposition 46. well here's the truth: 46 will save lives. it will save money too. i'm bob pack, and i'm fighting for prop 46 because i lost my two children to preventable medical errors and i don't want anyone else to lose theirs. the three provisions in 46 will reduce medical errors and protect patients. save money and save lives. yes on 46.
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here with us from atlanta, the director for the cdc, dr. tom frieden. a lot to talk to you about this morning, doctor. >> we want to start with just what we're saying around the set. i'm guessing people at home are probably saying it too. we're hearing all these stories about people picking up ebola from carrying, carrying other people. we wonder whether you dr. whether doctors, whether health organizations really have their arms completely around how you contract this virus. if it may be more simple to contract it than what we're hearing right now. >> there are two things about what you have to keep in mind. the first is how sick the person is and the second is the nature of the contact. the sicker they get, the more infectious they are. if someone is so sick that they
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have to be carried, they may well have lots of virus in their s secretions, in their sputum or their sweat. that contact needs to be direct with them or their body fluids. that's really important. because ebola doesn't spread like flu or the common cold. that's how we can help stop it. >> two cases, one which is an nbc news freelance cameraman and the second is the situation in dallas where the hospital had issues in terms of communication. and that leads to whether or not we're prepared to contain it. but predominantly, when you work with camera folks, especially out in the field, especially in a foreign country, the one thing we know they're not doing is touching things. they're actually observing. so i'm still not -- we don't want to be sensationalistic about this. but are we certain about how this is contracted? >> well, you know, we have more than 40 years of experience
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fighting ebola in africa. and we've looked at the cases that we're seeing come up around africa and in virtually every case, we can trace it back to a known contact with someone who is very ill. the situation in every is such that right now, in parts of west africa, there is a lot of ebola. people are very sick. people are dying and not well isolated. >> let me ask you about airport screening. seems like a lot of people we should stop people from coming, for the time being anyway, monrovia, flying back to the united states. when all you're doing is a fever test and asking somebody to be honest about whether or not they've come in contact with somebody, they can easily check no and get on a plane and come to the united states. do you think we should tighten things up at the airport? >> well, there are a lot of checks in place. it's not perfect. i think what that gets to is you want, and we all want, and wish
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we had something where we're at zero risk. the only way is to get it at the source. there are things we're doing and can do to reduce that risk like checking temperatures. this individual wasn't infectious while they were traveling. but we know that as long as the outbreak smolders in africa, as long as it's in africa, we're potentially at risk because even if we tried to close the border, it wouldn't work. people have a right to return. people transiting through could come in. and it would backfire, because by isolating these countries, it will make it harder to help them. it will spread more there. and we'd be more likely to be exposed here. >> willie and i have young kids. a lot of other people with young kids are looking at another disease that sees to be spreading across the united states. >> seems to apply to those under 18. >> enterovirus 68. can you explain what it is and what we can do, especially in my
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situation, i've got a child that is on a neblizer. what do you do to protect your kids? >> right, so it is a new virus. weem seen it before, but nothing like what we're seeing this season. we're still understanding more about it. tried and true methods help. wash your hands. cover your cu er your cough. flu shot. if your kid has asthma, make sure they're in good control because it will reduce the risk of them getting sick. simple things that one can do to reduce the risk. >> we want to take a look now at the morning papers it "the wall street journal." jpmorgan chase is revealing the full extent the cyber attack. some 76 million household and 7 million small businesses were affected, making this attack larger than the ones on target or home depot. no account numbers, passwords or social security were compromised
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they say but hackers were able to steal name, addresses, e-mails of customers who used online and mobile banking. officials are still investigating the attack. jpmorgan chase says there's no unusual customer fraud as has been detected as a result of the breach. >> "the washington post." ben bernanke was turned down for mortgage refinancing. bernanke revealed the news while speaking at a conference in chicago yesterday. he added that lenders, quote, may have gone a little bit too far on mortgage credit conditions. >> just a touch. just a touch. >> wow. >> they're getting tough out there. >> that is something. >> just a skosh. >> florida has faced many challenges from storms to manmade disasters like bp. but the sunshine state is roaring back. we talked to the chairman of the visit pensacola board and the chairman of marketing for visit florida about the resurgence of my hometown.
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rick scott is in a real battle for his political life. a lot of it comes down to the economy. florida's economy's been up and down over the last decade it let's talk about some of the events that have driven it. the bp oil spill. now of course we're -- now it's ten years since hurricane ivan. how is florida doing when it comes to tourism? have the tour it'ses come back? >> the tourists have come back and thanks to you and mika for coming down after the oil spill. i think you did your show down here four times. and scarborough country was down there after ivan. pebs co pensacola was just devastated after that. 30% of our economy coming from tourism, you know, that takes a kick. it's certainly come back strong. all the numbers are up. that's one thing we're up there promoting is visit pensacola and visit florida. >> so pensacola, my first trip there, i was stunned at how beautiful the beaches were and are. in light of the recovery after
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bp though, what have been the challenges to get people to visit pensacola, to do exactly what you do? >> well, i think there's a lot of eyes that were on us after the bp oil spill. messages out there saying this is what's happening but everything is all right. now that's -- all of a sudden, people are recognizing the fact where we are, what is going on. the additional dollars we're able to put out there. and the beaches, awesome, some of the best. then the other things. this historical cultural aspect we have that you don't find in some other places. so that kind of messaging is what we're getting out to let folks know about our area. >> barnacle. >> is there anything that you would degin fine in pensacola a off season? >> so like the off season, the best time to go is right now. it is absolutely beautiful. >> thanks so much. coming up, the september jobs report is just moments away.
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plus, the dramatic cultural and demographic shifts happening right now in america. how they shape everything that we do. from where we live to who gets our vote. all that and much more when we return. when folks think about what they get from alaska, they think salmon and energy. but the energy bp produces up here creates something else as well: jobs all over america. engineering and innovation jobs. advanced safety systems & technology. shipping and manufacturing. across the united states, bp supports more than a quarter million jobs. when we set up operation in one part of the country, people in other parts go to work.
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that's not a coincidence. it's one more part of our commitment to america.
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trying to mislead you about the effects of proposition 46. well here's the truth: 46 will save lives. it will save money too. i'm bob pack, and i'm fighting for prop 46 because i lost my two children to preventable medical errors and i don't want anyone else to lose theirs. the three provisions in 46 will reduce medical errors and protect patients. save money and save lives. yes on 46.
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the september jobs report just out. it is better than economists anticipated. cnbc's michelle carissa. >> the unemployment rate has fallen to 5.9%. better than expected. they thought it would stay around 6%. that is the lowest number since july 2008. clearly expecting a better number, plus, we've had a pretty volatile sell-off, so maybe they are price regains. solidifying for the open. >> boy, 5.9%. may not mean as much to people on wall street but there's obviously a big political impact about a number that gets below 6%, right? >> it's huge because it impacts what the federal reserve does. what pace they decide they're going to raise interest rates. markets may be reacting positively. average hourly earnings did not
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go up. people aren't making more money per hour. the expectation was they were. so that's a real sweet spot for investors. that means maybe the federal reserve is less likely to raise interest rates because the new head of the federal reserve has made clear she's concerned about slack in the labor market. so maybe we get lososer money fr longer as a result of data like that. >> still ahead, why, if you want to live into your 80s, you better learn to speak french. >> i'm in trouble. and mika, liechtenstein? didn't one of your boyfriends say move to liechtenstein? i mean, maria von trapp, come on.
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ages 50 to 85. please write down this toll-free number now. right now, in areas like yours, people are receiving this free information kit for guaranteed acceptance life insurance with a rate lock through the colonial penn program. if you're on a fixed income or concerned about rising prices, learn about affordable whole life insurance with a lifetime rate lock that guarantees your rate can never increase for any reason. if you did not receive your information, or if you misplaced it, call this number now and we'll rush it to you. your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. please stand by to learn more. >> i'm alex trebek and the announcement you just heard is for a popular and affordable life insurance plan with a rate lock guarantee. that means your rate is locked in for life and can never increase. did you get your free information kit in the mail? if not, please call this toll-free number now.
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all right. so, you know, we beat the europeans in a lot of things. maybe not in golf. but america leads in a lot of things. but not life expectancy. yesterday, i saw this. on what the kids call the twitter. i saw this on twitter yesterday. now, i want you to look. the greener the areas are, the longer people live. and -- >> oh, my god. >> the dark green areas, people have a life expectancy of 85 years and up. if you can believe that. and so you see spain, france, italy. really have an average age of 80 up. then you get to central and eastern europe and obviously some bad living going on there. >> how's america? green? >> i want you to look at central and eastern europe.
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>> oh, my god. >> it looks an awful lot like the deep south. let's go to america. see how much green you see. oh, wait. you actually don't see green on that map. you see the deep south. life expectancy very short. california does a little bit better. some states out west do a little bit better. new england does better. the only state that even has a shade of green, minnesota. >> wow. i'm -- >> where's the green? >> and hawaii. also hawaii. minnesota, there's a slight ting of green. and then hawaii. and you look at these clusters. and life expectancy. >> why, why are they saying this? health? lifestyle? people take more vacations? eat better. >> i think we work too hard. i don't think we eat as well. we eat too much. speaking of clusters and
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demographics -- >> thomas. >> we have a fascinating story. not just about life expectancy but also the way we live today. >> with us now is award winning journalist and host of the long-running npr series latino usa, maria hinojosa. her new show debuts this week on the world channel ns. we'll give you a quick sneak peek. look at this. ♪ >> welcome to the new american south. where these numbers live and breathe. by 1990, whites have become the minority in this area. now it's home to refugees from all over the world. by the numbers, it's one of america's most diverse square miles. a laboratory for the future. >> wow. on so many leaves. >> in georgia. >> that's exactly the reaction,
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mika, that's exactly the reaction that we wanted. we wanted to put these numbers out there and people go what? i mean, that's the most diverse square mile in the american south. 40 different countries. the reason why, it was a refugee location, it is a refugee relocation spot. a lot of people don't realize this is happening in the heart of georgia. that's exactly the idea. numbers make you go what. >> it's not just -- i was born in doorville, georgia, the outskirts of atlanta, and now it's been completely consumed by atlanta's growth. but it was the wonder years. it was wonder bread white. it was, you know, the whole series "the wonder years," it looks like that. i went back to doorville maybe 5, 10 years ago. and it was extraordinarily diverse. and it was -- people from all over the world in that area. >> so i love the american south. even though i was born in mexico, raised in chicago, been a new yorker, but i love the south in terms of the stories.
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because what's happening in the south is that it is the place that is experiencing the most intense multicultural growth. >> why is that? >> all kinds of reasons. immigration. job opportunities. it's pretty. it's warm. right. easy to get to in a lot of ways if you're coming from the south. >> less expensive. >> less expensive. there is a kind of warm and fuzzy feeling you get in some places in the south. >> and that's impacting the way people vote. that's impacting the way -- >> look at who's running for mayor. >> so here's what happened. when we did our pilot for pbs, we did the story about this place that is like a laboratory for the future. it's kind of like our future on steroids. what happens when we talk about democracy? so we did this whole half hour. put it on television. you saw refugees on the path to citiz citizenship. they see themselves on national television talking about this. in part, that inspires them a year later, three former refugees, to run for office.
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>> look at this number. 89% white in clark stone. now 18% white. you said it was the hub of the ku klux klan. >> it was actually where -- just minutes away from where the ku klux klan was rebirthed in 1915. so it's really a fascinating transformation. the story of the south, it's not black and white. it's like the rest of our country. and we have to come up with better words but it's multicultural. >> this eight-part series? >> yes, eight half hours. >> what is underreported, as we look at multicultural growth. what are you drilling down on to expose? >> in the first ten years of this 21st century, our population grew by 9.7%. people of color were responsible for 91.7% of that growth. so we have to understand that what happens with diverse america impacts all of us. what's not reported, the story that we found by the numbers, rochester, new york, has one of the highest infant mortality
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rates among black and latino women in our country. our country, in terms of infant mortalit mortality, is 56, below libya and mexico. with black and latino women. >> no. >> how can this be? we have to understand we also have a challenge. guam, a lot of people don't think about the pacific islands. they're american citizens. people in guam and pacific islanders serve in our military at three times the rate as anyone else. they're enlisting at the highest rates. highest rates injury and death. lowest rates of expenditures from the va to treat them for services. >> wow, it's unbelievable. there's so much information that comes from this series. multicultural majority populationings apo populationings apo populations are already existing. >> soon to come, nevada, maryland and georgia. it's all about the numbers but it's the human stories behind the numbers.
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we're expecting lots of people to tune in. america by the numbers.org on pbd. >> we love maria hinojosa, we're old friends from our cnn days. >> starting this week. great to have you on. come back, thank you. >> so you guys worked together, huh? >> we did. >> up next, you know him from "sons of anarchy." the great ron perlman. keep it right here on "morning joe."
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find new ways to save energy and money with pg&e's business energy check-up. ron perlman's acting career spans an impressive four decades. the golden globe award winning actor is out now with a new memoir, easy street, the hard way. and ron joins us now. it's great to have you on the show. there's a kid upstairs who's obsessed with you and freaking out. you need to sign that before the segment's other, okay? >> what is that? >> that's hell boy, come on. >> the poster. >> look, look. >> i don't want to see that. >> no, hell boy's a good guy. >> it's fun for the family? >> fun for the whole family. >> i love your quote here. ryan gosling says this, reading
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easy street's like breaking into your uncle's stash of best cigars. beautiful, intimidating and should charge more for. this book though goes pretty deep. you did not have a conventional path to hollywood stardom. >> well, yeah. that is all true. and, you know, the notion of writing an actor's memoir was, like, really, i mean -- so i had to figure out, like, what my angle was going to be. basically, the angle was, i have kids who are getting out of school right now who is entering a life in the arts, and i started in the 50s when they were all mom and pop studio heads. >> right. >> and, you know, tv owners. everything was owned by individuals. and now the world that my kids are coming into, it's been core pra tized and kind of desensitized and they're folding their way into this tech that fewed reality, which i want to
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chronicle. because i feel compelled to say something to the next generation of artists. having had a great career myself. having had a beautiful ride myself. here's what i saw. here's what i did. here's what inspired me along the way. so it's a question you never asked me, joe, but i'm answering it any way. >> having such a great career, a beautiful ride, you know, incredible resume, booming voice, you know, i just wonder how it is that someone like you had issues with self-image. and how important that was in your journey? >> incredibly important. i mean, it really, like -- i mean, it was the thing that springboarded me to want to feel better about myself and looking -- >> what did you not feel good about? >> by the time i was 13 years old, i was 300 pounds. so i went to -- right here in new york city, to public school all the way through college. and my college physical, failed
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because of obesity. so i was made to go on this diet and i lost 95 understood pos po in the summer and then pansed the physical. went to college. we won't go into that because it's college, you know. what happens in college stays in college, right. >> it needs to. >> anyway, what was the question? so anyway, i was this fat kid, man, i was this fat kid. you know, i had this feeling that the world kind of judged me on a bunch of pretexts that were mostly in my head. but that's what low self-esteem is. it doesn't have to do with reality. because everybody's just worried about themselves. >> exactly. >> you think everybody's looking at you. >> a long time to get to this place of self-confidence. when you look back over your career, obviously, you're very proud of your new, but what would you say is something you feel is one of your finer moments in entertainment?
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>> you know, the fact that i'm 64 years old and it's better now than ever before, and i've just finished executive producing a show i star in called "hand of god" which is being announced today by amazon, being picked up as a series. probably the most complex piece of work i've ever done. it just keeps getting better for me. the fact that this is really why i wanted to write the book, is because there's so much beaming coming, just emanating out of me of gratitude. because i know i wasn't responsible for this bull lieau life. i want to kind of go on this thank you tour before it was too late. >> ron perlman, thank you. you watch "morning joe," i take it. >> i get all my news from msnbc. >> all right. >> which is probably not wise. >> trust me, it's not. this looks great. congratulations on the new series. >> thank you very much.
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>> when are you going to go into production with that? >> well, we shot the pilot. turn the trips you have to take, into one you'll never forget. earn triple points when you book with the expedia app. expedia plus rewards. >> important message for women and men ages 50 to 85. please write down this toll-free number now. right now, in areas like yours, people are receiving this free information kit for guaranteed acceptance life insurance with a rate lock
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through the colonial penn program. if you're on a fixed income or concerned about rising prices, learn about affordable whole life insurance with a lifetime rate lock that guarantees your rate can never increase for any reason. if you did not receive your information, or if you misplaced it, call this number now and we'll rush it to you. your acceptance is guaranteed, with no health questions. please stand by to learn more. >> i'm alex trebek and the announcement you just heard is for a popular and affordable life insurance plan with a rate lock guarantee. that means your rate is locked in for life and can never increase. did you get your free information kit in the mail? if not, please call this toll-free number now. in the last month alone, thousands have called about this plan with the rate lock guarantee through the colonial penn program, and here's why. this plan is affordable, with coverage options for just $9.95 a month.
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that's less than 35 cents a day. your rate is locked in and can never go up, and your acceptance is guaranteed. you cannot be turned down because of your health. see how much coverage you can get for just $9.95 a month. call now for your free information kit. don't wait, call today. ♪ if you ware a denture, take the simple test.
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>> today at noon. playing the tigers. >> who's going to win? >> the tigers. >> no, don't say that. don't say that at all. >> that was really good. >> if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." hope you have a great weekend. we will see you monday. thanks so much for your patience. >> it's an interpretative dance. >> it's lyrical. we'll see. there's a problem somewhere here. we'll see you later. i don't want you to watch this. we'll see you on monday. new developments in the fight against ebola. overnight, we learned an american cameraman has tested positive for ebola. while here at home, new details on why that texas hospital initially missed thomas duncan's ebola diagnose. it's also the first friday of the month. that means it's jobs day. a new report out just minutes ago shows the jobless rate below

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