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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 8, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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panic. >> well, good morning. it's wednesday, october 8th, everybody. >> the mighty fall the angels have the best record in the american league, they're out. nationals have the best record in the national leak. they're out. a lot of depressed people in walk for good people. >> the naatitude. >> what a disappointment. to do it with bases loaded. a wild pitch a. killer. now you move on. you have the giants playing the cardinals. cardinals meet the dodgers last night. >> isn't that something? what an organization they have. i never seen anything like it. >> the red sox, obviously, they've had their successes. these cardinals have been better than anybody. they find themselves back fourth year in a row t. cardinals taking on the giants. now the orioles on the other side. with the royals, three or four
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very interesting teams. >> how many people said abetter pujols went to california st. louis was done for? the this organization keeps coming at you. it's the best organization in baseball. it's got to be. they keep coming at you. albert pujols, he is sitting at home t. cardinals are going to the playoffs. you know, meika, the quote on a lot of different things, napoleon, when he said, if you will take vienna, take vienna. >> he has given me that advice. >> vienna is one place east of paris. but we are involved in a war against the most radical form of extremism in syria and iraq. if we are at war, then we have to win. how's winning going to be defined? well, in this case like in world
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war ii, it's simple. evil has to lose. right now, it's on the march. right now the beheadings continue. right now, towns and cities continue to fall and right now the terrorist spreads. like the american people, you know, i have been supporting the president's steady approach to this war. now that we are there, it's time the commander-in-chief tears a page out of collin powell's handbook. as a former secretary of state and chairman of the joint chiefs said, when we go to war, we don't want a fair fight. our military commanders should be allowed to throw everything we vice president at the enemy. destroy their war-making machine. bring their sons and daughters home as fast as possible. you will learn today, that's not happening in iran and syria. instead, we have a president accused too much of the hand winging of domestic policy. now as commander-in-chief, like
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solomon, seeming intent on the baby. this won't do. our weakness, islamic radical strength. we are at war. it's time we start acting like we are at war. if you want to take vienna, take vienna. if he is not willing to do that. he is willing to give the commanders what they need to get the job done. tell us, bring our sons and daughters home today. stop spending billions and billions of dollars targeting pick-up trucks. because we will find out, lisa meyers is back. she has a heck of an investigation on exactly how ineffective this war is. we will have reports throughout the three hours about how isis is on the march. >> you make this point as another syrian city is about to fall. so we'll pick things up right now where joe left off. in just a few hours, president obama will meet with top pentagon and national security officials about the threat from islamic state militants.
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it comes as turkey's president warns the syrian city of kobani is about to fall to isis. if that happens the militants would control a large area. kurdsish forces are engaged in heavy fighting with islamic state militants the city is seeing the most extensive airstrikes yet meanwhile, u.s. officials say they are outraged, turkey is refusing to commit. turkey's inaction led to heated demonstration in that country. 14 people are dead after clashes between police and protesters. >> willie, why don't we arm the kurds and let the kurd take care of it? >> someone need to explain to us, the thinking behind turkey not entering this fight.
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isis is now six miles from the border of turkey. the isis flag flies over many buildings in kobani. still turkey refuses to join the fight. >> unbelievable. we will, of course, come back to this. vikings quarterback adrian peterson, a spokes woman says the football star will definitely plead not guilty to charges of reckless or negligent injury to a child. they say the defense will push for a speedy trial date. peterson's defense team wants it resolved as soon as possible so he could resume playing if he is exonerated. meanwhile, the tribune says money failed to go to the intended recipients and one of its credit cards paid for a
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hotel room used for an orgy. >> that's not good. >> no, it's not. >> you don't use charity money that way. the corporate card for an orgy. >> we actually have that chiselled in stone. >> i'm so glad. >> you have to draw the lean somewhere. it seems like an orgy is the place to draw the line. >> a story on twitter adding quote i guess never let the truth get in the way of a good story. oh. oka okay. >> an indiana man is suing the local. i don't think you have seen this. suing a local police department for excessive force, false arrest and battery following an incident late last month. the man was riding in a car with his girlfriend and two children when they were pulled over. the officers asked him to show
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identification and then appeared to draw their guns and order him out of the car t. female driver calls 911 and the teenager hits record on his cell phone camera and catches it all. >> now they're asking me to open my door so i can get out. i'm scared. if you can pull out a gun in front of two kids in the back seat. no, now they're about to. >> i'm not the operator of this vehicle. if you do that, i'm not the operation of this vehicle. >> are you going to open the door? >> why do you say people are not going to hurt you? people are getting shot by the police. >> oh, ah. oh, man. >> get on the ground. >> that's horrible. this is a horrible thing. >> it's very important that we say to you that police from the reports, dan, let's get this
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right, how long had the police been asking them to get out of the car? >> at least 13 minutes. >> so the policeman asked them to get out of the car at least 13 minutes. that's still extraordinarily excessive force. >> he was reaching in the back. so. >> if are you a cop. it looks awful. it does look awful. but 13 minutes they're asking them to open the door. >> they need to wear cameras, which is something you brought up. you got to see the different angles of the story. >> again, i would like to know why they didn't open the doors. >> i would, too. >> for 13 minutes at least. >> just open the door. >> again the reason i keep asking this question is because we have a responsibility to ask that question. we just showed the final few seconds of 13 minutes of the cop saying please open the door. >> so i understand that. the official statement from the
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police reads in part quote police officers who make legal traffic stops are allowed to request passengers to exit a stopped vehicle for the officer's safety without a requirement of reasonable suspicious i suspicion. when the passenger displayed movements inside of the stopped vehicle, that included placing his hand in places where the officer could not see, officers concerns for their safety were heightened. >> so let me say one final thing quickly. i constantly talk about how the white kids would not be treated the same in certain circumstances or whites would not be treated the same as black adults in certain circumstances, i'm not' sure in this case. if my son had three of his friends refuse to open the car door for 13, 14 minutes and they made movements that caused concern to the cops, i'm not so sure the cops wouldn't break opened the glass you know what,
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we ought to figure out what the prop -- what they should have done in this case. it looks horrible. >> we will wait for more to come out. i worry about commenting on one angle. >> i worry about the dash-cam video. there was a traffic stop. >> did they see children were there in the car? it doesn't look good from this angle yeah. . >> the movement. >> you see in the car? >> do they know there is a gun inside the car? >> okay. >> i gave him my information. >> i'm saying. i gave both them. you all got my information,
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righ right? >> if you are going to give me a ticket. they did give me a ticket. >> that went on for 13 minutes. >> let me get one more story n. we will go back to isis. jennifer lawrence is speaking out about the photo hacking scandal for the first time in the new issue of "vanity fair." she says it's not a scandal. it's a sex crime. a sexual violation, it's disgusting. the law needs to be changed. we need to change. she says because i'm a public physical or actress does not moon i asked for this. it does not mean it comes with the territory. i can't believe we even live in that kind of world. lawrence was one of several actresses who had personal photos leaked online. rihanna, kate upton, selena gomez and kim cash dashian. >> my grandma would say, if you don't want people to see your
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ass, then don't show your ass. >> she didn't say that? >> i'm saying, if you take this to a bigger thing. >> they were private pictures between private people. i wouldn't trust technology. >> it's terrible. i'm telling you what my grandma would have said to me. >> you have nothing to worry about to be clear in terms of leaked photos. >> just me eating a lot of cheese in a dress and stockings, other than that. >> sort of ruling guiliani sir ka, whatever, i get those. >> remember that. >> there was actually the orgy that was paid for on adrian peterson's credit card. >> you were there? >> well a friend of mine was there, an associatech isn't it
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funny how these two stories have come back together. >> you guys look alike. >> it was my i vel twin brother skippy. word about him in doonsbury. >> can we get back to our top story, please? >> yes. >> now back to our top story t. rise of isis in the middle east. joining us from capitol hill. we have bbc correspondent, give us a sense of how imminent this is. >> talk about turkey, willie was saying earlier, turkey's continued refusal to get involved. >> sure. let me first bring you up to date with the latest from this morning. we have colleagues on the outskirts of town watching what is going on. they're reporting the coalition airstrikes that have taken place over the last few days have helped stem the advance of isis
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but the threat no ought over ked yet t. kurds are fighting back quite hard they are being held by the coalition airstrikes. there are reports of five already this morning. so there is having an impact but as i said this is not over yet. the threat is still there with. when it comes to turkey. we have been saying this already quite a few times. every time we talk about isis. there are a lot of conflicting agendas in this coalition. not only do the turks want us to focus on assad instead of only focusing on isis. but they have their own domestic politics they have to worry about. everybody has domestic politics and for the turks, it's the kurdish separatist ambitions. they're very worried about the group that is fighting in that county. they are worried about the kurds
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fighting there they are worried this will give them that in turkey. >> at this point shouldn't turkey be worried about itself when you have isis that close to turkey's border, shouldn't the politics internally and the united states be pushed to the side in the name of self-defense, if for nothing else? >> well, you would think so. we have heard from the turkish president minster eduan who said in his view isis and the pkk are almost equal ly bad and for turkey's domestic politics, it has quite large imlicks if this group does get empowered. it is a tricky situation. >> thanks very much. we have a lot more on this story with jeffrey goldberg and investigative reporter lisa meyers coming up.
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also ahead, former wesley clark, house whip steve socalise -- scalise. we'll till why hairgate, iphone 6 owners are voicing new concerns and vladmir putin is turning 62. moscow is giving the birthday boy a special tribute. loshd, what would happen if they didn't. we'll show you that next on "morning joe." $21. could something that small make an impact on something as big as your retirement? i don't think so. well if you start putting that towards your retirement every week and let it grow over time, for twenty to thirty years, that retirement challenge might not seem so big after all. ♪ when laquinta.com sends him a
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. >> okay. just got off the phone with adrian peterson, he says, he wasn't at that orgy. i think he has to give money to doctors without borders. >> in other direction. >> we had all these.
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>> what's that? >> medical gore. it was great. anyway. what's up? >> it's time now for the morning papers. >> what are you talking about? >> i asked if you are medicating? >> yes, i did. >> i wish i had. usa today the average life expectancy for an american is 78.8 years a. record high life expectancy. >> usa. >> slightly higher at 81.2 years compared with 76.4 years. >> why do you think that is? why do women live longer than men? >> smarter. a little more self sufficient. >> ablown to that. >> scientists sa i the difference between genders may stem from behavioral choices as men tend to engage in more ricky behavior than women. >> what are they talking about? risk? >> i don't know what that means, charity funded orgies maybe. >> that's not risky.
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>> wal-mart plans benefits for some part-timers. beginning next year, wal-mart will no longer provide coverage to employees who work less than 30 hours a week. this will wage affect 30,000 workers, about 5% of the work force. target and home depot recently made similar decisions. berkeley, california has become the latest battleground on sugary drinks. so far, they are trying to defeat the proposal. law makers in berkeley are optimistic the measure will pass. the issue goes before voters in november. first it was bendgate. now it's hairgate. >> why? >> the latest woe says following social media backlash over the report that the phone bends, some users are saying it pulls out their hair or their beards
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within they make phone calls. >> wow. >> we are getting whiney. >> you spends $8,000 for a telephone. >> how does that happen? >> it gets caught in the seam where the alluminum meets the glass. a little opening in there. >> what are you doing with your phone for that to happen? it's weird. >> scratching. >> i just want to know if it works, if it doesn't break. i'm going to try the bigger one. are they 20-something people? >> i don't have the data. >> all right t. "wall street journal," vladmir putin is celebrating his 62nd birthday and, of course, it's quite a scene. one day art exhibition in moscow called the 12 labours to face
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the russian president as sick. this man is not right. >> why is he choking franco harris? >> what is going on? >> is he not a steelers fan. >> putin is seen fighting a terrorist. another features him grappling with the multi-headed monster of western sanctions. >> oh, wow. >> he is seen as the protector of syria from american warplanes and as the hero of the winter olympics in sochi. why did we do that? thank you. he is shown riding in. >> hold on. >> no, i want to see the ox. >> wrestling a -- is that a kangaroo that was checking yesterday? wow, okay. >> he is seen riding an ox to symbolize the brick away from
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crimea from ukraine. finally as the overseeer of russian oil power across the european continent. what is wrong with him? what is wrong with him? >> i don't know. >> let's go back to franco harris picture. >> coming up -- it's really disturbing. >> he's disturbed. a disturbed man with about $54 billion in his pocket. kurdish fighters. >> there is franco harris. >> pulled isis militants from taking over a key city on the turkish sillian border. 5,000 civilians could be slaughtered. we have the effectiveness or lack thereof of u.s. airstrikes from stopping the attack. plus the must read opinion passenger. we'll be right back with mu much more "morning joe." ♪
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. >> 2008 past the hour. joinering us for the must read opinion pages, mike barnacle. we will start with the washington post editorial board, which writes a faulty u.s. air campaign. two months after the united states airstrikes, forces are still advancing. the enemy victory suggests the u.s. air campaign is failing to achieve the expansion of islamic
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state, much less degrading and destroying it. for now, the operation in iraq and syria is defined mainly by its limitations. the restrictions on his commanders are not combatible with the objectives he has asked them to adheev. >> mike barnacle. you are hearing from your contacts. a lot of unese in the pentagon. >> a lot of unese between the pentagon and the white house staff and the president of the united states. leon panetta, apparently, according to peel you speak to yesterday spoke for a lot of people with his concern about the leadership of this campaign. now we have the city of kobani and turkey on the turkish border in syria, six miles from the turkish border of 50,000 people. it will fall, i am told, within a couple of days. >> 5,000 people. >> extreme, just an extreme
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divide between the white house and the pentagon now. >> with, yeah, with a clear direction from the white house as to what this strategy is. this is an incredibly complex situation. no one in the pentagon is calling for the fifth manner division to be transported into syria. >> right. >> invading another country. but there seems to be a sense of, in the pentagon, a sense of there is a drift in the white house. there is no clear real day-to-day direction. >> so the "wall street journal" data says isis marches to massacre and, in part, writes this, as we went to press on tuesday, isis was on the verge of a major military victory in kobani. the city's fall would mean a massacre of civilian and kurdish fighters so soon of mr. obama's call to arms, it would be a blow to american prestige and a huge recruiting tool for isis. this early crisis in the obama campaign exposes flaws in his strategy that will continue to
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under mine the military effort and the anti-isis regional reliance. no war plan is static. mr. obama needs to adjust this now if he wants to stop a massacre in kobani and the march of isis. i think, willie, it would be a blow to the mission's effectiveness in such a huge way for thousands of people to die. >> and as we talked about at the very beginning, a huge, huge victory for isis. >> absolutely. the isis flag, that black flag is already flying over some parts of kobani as you know well. so we are talking about avoiding a massacre here. it feels like it's a little late tint. doesn't it? >> well, several thousands of people from the town have left. they have been flooding into turkey. there are several thousand. left in the town. yes, this is a key moment for the coalition. a, because on some level, what happens in kobani could be a template or could, i don't know if it's too late, could have been a template for how you do
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it elsewhere. you have local boots on the ground, the kurds fighting. you have coalition airstrikes from the air. it's not unfolding very well, unfortunately. so that template may not be able to be used elsewhere. when it comes to the turks, it's also important to ask the question, what exactly are we asking them to do? are we asking them to participate in airstrikes? why? well there are other countries doing that. are we asking them to send troops into across the border into syria and, if so, there needs to be a discussion with them about what their concerns are, because no doubt they also are worried about if we send troops, can we get them out and how is this going to unfold. the same concerns the u.s. would have about sending troops into a country. >> but mike, if an invading force was on the mexican border, we wouldn't be asking turkey to push them back. i mean, i don't understand --
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>> well, i think one of the issues here, i'd like to ask him about this. isn't one of the unspoken complaints so far has been turkey's reluctance, some would say, refusal to address their border situation with the influx of fighters going from turkey into syria and syrian, and the cross border transportation. >> that would be a great pla is to start. >> isn't that one of the principle points of contention? >> it is definitely a point of contention. the turks have always said a lot of these, you know, supporters of isis who crossed the border into syria come to turkey on tourist visas. they're not crossing the border with arms. on some level, they're not exactly wrong. i have been looking very closely at the instructions given to isis supporters who are coming to turkey and want to cross to syria. they are very, very detailed instructions about how to evade sort of turkish under
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surveillance and what to say when you enter the country. it's not as simple as just closing the border. remember, it's traffic goes in two ways. so you also want to make sure that it's possible for refugees to come into turkey. but you know the big picture here is also what matters. this isn't just about turkey and whether it's closing the border or not. this is about the wider coalition, how this strategy is being implemented and what is being done within the arab world to counter the ideology of isis? >> and we have reports wage related to that coming up. in our next hour, retired four star general wesley clark explains why he thinks it is time for the u.s. to adopt a new war strategy. plus, twitter is suing the federal government. we'll tell you why. we'll be right back.
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. >> there are some strategic things we are going on. some of our successes we have seen on the ground by the iraqi security forces. one moment well, i'm find these. sorry. i wanted to highlight that does not at all mean that. there have been the iraqi security force versus pushed back and regained territory. >> it wasn't exactly skwarz copp
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in '91. >> we heard it in washington. mike's heard from people very high up. there is a political war going on between the pentagon and the white house and we actually see leon panetta's book out when a lot of people inside have been vetting for years about the president. it's coming at a bad time. >> there are two actual wars going on a. real war is going on. unfortunately, we are not doing that well in. when you see this, it's difficult. she's the state department spokes woman for the united states, she's not a democratic party spokes woman, to stumble so much when you are up there speaking on behalf of the united states, there is the pentagon. >> stumbling is not being able to fame off the top of your head, we have zane taken back 50 miles. we will be doing this. we are hitting pick-up trucks.
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it seems like this morning washington, d.c. is waking up and everybody is saying the same thing, which is this president's plan is ineffectual and isis is actually advancing. >> i asked someone that does a lot of work under president bush and president obama. what itself the campaign plan? show me, look at a map. he says, there is no campaign. there are bombing missions, some have done a little good. they stopped advances of isis. but there is no campaign. we did a bombing on a campaign in the balcans, we managed to pull it off pretty much entirely from the air. if you went to wesley clark to the pittsburgh to secretary cohen and said, what itself the strategies, we will hit this here, morrowf there, unfortunately, i don't have a sense that exists in this case. >> the president hasn't promised this would be done right now and
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we would be victorious. he says this could take years. >> isis can't march into towns and slaughter 50,000 people. after the president of the united states, after the commandner chief stared into the camera and said to the world, with regoing to degrade and destroy isis and they are marching into a town to slaughter a town of 50,000. >> he said this could take a generation. >> every time you can't say oh, it's terrible. again, this is where people have to have confidence in a plan t. former secretary of defence writes a book, goes on tv and makes it sound like the president isn't engaged in actually developing plans to win wars. >> i'm not sure it's the president we should be looking at in terms of engagement. >> who should we be looking at? >> congress step up. the president went on tv and said i'm asking congress to come back. i have to send ground troops in. he would have bipartisan support and more support from republicans i would say than democrats. so you can complainant the
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partisanship in washington and all that. it's not the republicans criticizing the president. it's leon panetta. >> let's talk about, let me ask you a question that when we were talking to kim gattis of the bbc, what do we want turkey to do? let me ask you that same question, at what point do we say you are not our allie, few had a vote, you'd be out of nato. it's disgusting. >> turkey is a nato allie. so that's a serious problem when turkey has gone so far south in terms of being willing to cooperate with us. the president was very proud of his relationship with erdowan. >> that hasn't worked out so well either. this is supposed to be an administration that was good with the soft power. >> why do we feed turkey? >> we don't need to have turkey, we need to know what they are doing so we can side what to do. they have enemies in common.
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syria, i think told turkey, we have to watch out for ourselves, if we have to cut a deal with isis, that's okay. you know what, the u.s. isn't going to be there. >> since turkey has been such a bad allie, would you support the kurds, basically, say, how about it? clean up the north? >> i would be more comfortable if there were u.s. presence there. it's not like the kurds could be given arms. this is again having some u.s. advisers on the ground, more u.s. engagement would be helpful. i would be more active in terms of helping the kurds. the ukrainians, we decide boots on the ground. this administration is reluctant to give arms to people fighting for themselves and for interests we share. it's one thing to say, don't send ground troops, another thing not to harm them when russia has invaded their countries. >> the weekly standards posters on capitol hill. john mccain and lindsey graham say we have to take out assad,
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how do we take out assad? >> look, i think it would be good to take out assad, short term, we can set back isis a lot and it would change the dynamic in the region. so i don't know exactly how we take out assad in the short term. >> it's not realistic right now? >> who knows? with a very different. >> i think that's our problem with turkey as well. >> it is, because we said we would do it. then we didn't do it. agree with that. >> thank you, it's awkward. i'm reading it. there are some interesting -- what? coming up spending $140,000 on missiles to blow up $20,000 trucks. what military experts thif of that strategy. lisa meyers has incredible new reporting in the atlantic. jeffrey goldberg who has spoken with an intelligent official about that town about to be overrun by isis. also ahead, he said he has given better answers to tougher questions. >> did you see this?
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>> biel get senator mark prior's excuse for fumbling his answer to casey hunt's very innocent, sweet question. more "morning joe" in just a moment. o. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out.
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. >> 48 past the hour.
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here with us senior correspondent, lisa meyers and jeffrey goldberg. earlier this week, jeffrey, you spoke about what you describe as a desperate sounding kurdish intelligence official who are fearing a blood bath in kobani if isis is allowed to take the city. tell us. it's a terrible, terrible slaughter. >> i have been talking to people in iraq and turkey, kurdish officials about this. and there is a sense in their voices of really honest desperation, which is quite, you know, unnerveing when they can, you know, see their future unfold and describe it in a reasonable way. their prediction is based on past experiences with isis, could hold true. what they are saying based on past experiences of other towns and villages in syria, if isis breaks through from kobani, they will go hunting. they will go looking for every
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kurdish enemy and non-kurdish enemy they have. we know what isis does, they cut people's heads off and put them on spikes. the thing that makes this particularly ba rocky or crazy 300 yards from nato. >> turkey is sitting back, you have been doing investigative reporting. you found out these airstrikes are not having the impact we were told they are having, a lot of people believe they are just for show? >> exactly. i mean, from the beginning, the pentagon has been skeptical to the strategy of air power alone would work. now i am hearing from military intelligence sources profound misgivings about the way the strikes are being conducted and the concern that these strikes are more for show than about doing maximum damage to the enemy. here's y. they say, first of all, we gave the enemy a lot of notice. so it gave them time to move
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their installations, meld into the civilian populations. many of the targets we are hitting are abandoned or empty buildings. secondly, two months in, we are doing pin 'prick operations, here in kobani, five missions, they got three armed vehicles destroyed, a damaged tank and a vehicle with anti-aircraft weapon destroyed and this is an air campaign which one analyst says basically is, we are throwing $140,000 when bones to take out $20,000 trucks. look at the results. >> lisa, one of the points you just raised, maybe flush it out a little bit more. in terms of fighters on the ground, very difficult to bomb them. they travel two, three at a time. they don't travel in packs. they don't travel in platoons or company size outfits. do you have an idea the total estimates, our costs are of this bombing run over the last four
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or five weeks? >> well, the overall isis operation they put out an estimate of $1.1 billion. certainly the bombing component of it is in the hundreds of millions of dollars t. tomahawk and naval missiles alone are if excess of $60 million. which would be fine if we were having impact. what people don't understand, one senior pentagon official says, we know how to do this we know how to do airstrikes that make a difference. but we're not doing it and we don't understand why. we're doing these pin prick operations instead of sustained, intense bombing that would actually degrade isis. >> one way you do -- >> so reporting jeffrey and reading your reporting from there intelligence official says quote, a terrible slaughter is coming. if they take the city, we should expect to have 5,000 dead within 24 or 36 hours. >> that's based on past
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experience. this is not just, yes, there is a level of anxiety that you have to discount. on the other hand, we saw. in sinjar we saw in other places, when isis goes into a town, we know what happens. again, it's, coming back, there is one interesting point. to add to lisa's, what people say, what experts say if you want to have an effective air campaign, you need ground spotting. you will feed people helping you target your airstrikes, but because we're not allowed to, by the president has decided not to put in any ground troops, anybody to do that. you know we have limited visibility on the ground and, therefore, you have these more symbolic strikes. now i totally understand why he doesn't want to ramp up and put americans in harm's way on the ground. it raises this question of why bother at a certain point? lisa is right. you spend $140,000 to destroy a
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pickup truck. they have a lot of pickup trucks. >> jeffrey, i ask this not rhetorically, sincerely to you. where is turkey, in terms of kobani, if have you as you say 300 yards from its border, isis on the march. why aren't they doing anything? >> they're not doing anything. they have a bigger problem. >> we lost your mic. >> pick it up there. >> if you can get a little assistance there. >> that is a question. let me be honest with you. there seems to be some reluctance with the past guests here to call out turkey. >> it's been very clear turksy has been the pipeline to terrorists going into syria and they know it. the world community knows it. >> when we get jeffrey's sounds back up. he might allude to the fact, well it's not a fact, but many, many people in the upper echelons, in both the pentagon and the white house think the turks are more afraid or leery
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of the kurds than they are of isis. >> so, lisa, a big split right now between the pentagon and the white house. what can you tell us about that? >> well, i think their deep feelings in the pentagon, they feel they're not listened to. within it comes to conducting a mission they have been given, they don't feel they have the final say. i think that there the a problem with targets in syria because of lack of people on the ground, but i am told there are more targets than we're taking advantage of. particularly given the assault in kobani and the need for urgent need for help there. there is also concern because the isis is now within our artillery range of the baghdad airport. >> yeah. >> the u.s. >> goid go ahead. >> finish your thought. >>. just recently, the u.s. used some apache helicopters in the backed area to try to help the iraqis.
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but even that did not stop, stem the march towards baghdad. >> all right. lisa meyers and jeffrey goldberg, thank you, very much for bringing your reporting to us. coming up, for mark prior struggles to answer a simple question about the ebola outbreak. his response the company is now responding to again and the gaffe that started eight ul. plus the catholic church gets a lesson about the birds and the beesing making for an awkward day at the vatican. another disappointing end to the national season playoffs. oh my lord. this is sad. >> painful. >> painful highlights coming up next. all that when we return. when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting. and when alan gets all powered up, ya know what happens?
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it is the top of the hour. live pictures from sparta, north carolina. look at that beautiful sunrise. >> beautiful view. last night some surprises in major league baseball. the best record in the national leak eliminated. the angels a couple days ago, the best record in the american league eliminated. you can never predict what will happen in the playoffs. >> playoff pedigree, giants and cardinals, washington nationals, terrific team. bryce harper, terrific young star, matt williams, radioing
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can i manager with rookie mistakes. that's why the nationals are going home. >> the there a better team in baseball than the cardinals? >> the giants are close t. cardinals are way ahead in both leagues in terms of the way they run their organization the general manager of the cardinals, you alluded this earlier, let bpujols go. the young farm system, the young crop of terrific young pitchers, all home grown. >> it's unbelievable. >> cardinals have nine of the last 15 championship series, they've led. absolutely incredible. sense i have no rooting interests here, i'd kind of like to see that movenlt world series. i love. that back to 1985, royals-cards. >> maybe they'll get the playwrite tonight. >> huge ratings. >> you know what, says the man
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who says that everybody that lives west of the hudson river lives in beijing. >> that's the pacific ocean? isn't it? >> all right. so this morning, we have been asking a lot of questions, where is turkey? where is qatar, where are the saudis? more important question, a question pike asked me when he came on set was, where's congress? where are the liberals back in their district. they so bravely complain, no more war then they stay out there. we're the other members of congress paid to protect america's interest and the constitution of the united states. where are they? they're raising money, kissing babies, they're counting votes hey, congress. the constitution they demand you be counted and your vote be
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counted. where are you when the world is burning and why do you keep raising money, why do you keep counting votes and shirking your constitutional duty? get back to washington, debate this. educate americans, do the job the constitution the united states demands i to do and, oh, yeah, do the job the taxpayers pay you to do. look, it's an empty place. >> in a phrase, joe what you could say, getting ready to go to work. kids go to school, that people running for office in the senate and the house today basically what they're telling you is, your job is more important than the country. they should be in washington debating these issuings, my job, retaining my job is more important. >> than holding out another two
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years or six years. >> this as 5,000 people's livings are on the line. in a few hours, there is someone in walk, president obama meeting with top pentagon and national security officials about the threat from islamic state militants. it comes as turkey's president warns the syrian city of kobani is about to fall to isis. if that happens the militants would control a large area of the turkish-syrian border. turkish forces are engaged in heavy fighting with islamic state militants right now t. city is seeing the most extensive airstrikes yet from the u.s.-led coalition the strikes have done little to deter isis. meanwhile, u.s. officials say they are outraged, turkey is committing to military involvement. turkey's enaction led to heated demonstrations across that country. 14 people are dead after clashes between police and protesters. so this hour, we will be
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speaking with four star retired general wesley clark about the challenge. david ignacious will be joining us. he has an interesting report on a possible shakeup different angles. an indiana man is suing for obsessive force false arrest and battery following an incident late last month a. man was riding in a car with his girlfriend and two children t. officers asked him to show identification and appear to draw guns and order him out of the car. they did try to get him to come from the car him he did not as one of the children hits record on his cell phone camera. >> now they are asking me to open my door so i can get out. i'm scared. if you can pull out a gun with two kid in the back seat.
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no, don't mess, now they're about to mess my, no. >> i'm not the operator of the vehicle. if you do. all right. >> i'm not the operator of this vehicle. >> are you going to open the door? >> whether to say somebody will not hurt you, people are getting shot by the police. >> oh. ah. >> that was strange. >> that is horrible. >> incredibly chilling video. the children were hit by glass in the back seat. the guy was tasered. the passenger refused to comply after failing to open the door. police officers who make legal traffic stops are allowed to request passengers exit a stopped vehicle for the officer's safety without a
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requirement of reasonable suspicion. when the passenger displayed movements inside the stopped vehicle that included placing his hand in places where the officer could not see, officers concerns for their safety was heightened. >> you have obviously covered cops on the beat for a long time. you come to a stop. you ask somebody to get out of the car for 13 minutes. they don't comply and then the cops claim he made movements to, where they couldn't see where his hands were going, what does the cop do? >> look at the video. it's horrific. 13 minutes, i'm sorry, i got to go with the officers on the scene. now, what do you do? you front end and back end the car so there can be no movement of the vehicle and continue the thing for how long. get out of the car. >> i will say i can't imagine being in a car for three minutes. when cops tell me to get out of
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the car. get out of the car. it's not like they always ask you politely to get out. >> if you feel you are in danger, i know i would get out to get the danger away from the kids, even if it cost me. >> she was on the phone with 911. >> there is obviously racial overtones to this and to questions. >> it's out there. >> all right. other news, twitter is suing the fbi and the department of justice over the right to publish the number of times the government has requested user information. the social media site claims it's entitled to release the information onto the first amendment. the government settled with google, microsoft and other tech companies in january, agreeing to scale back disclosure rules. critics accuse twitter of using the lawsuit to drum up public good will. democratic senator morocco prior is responding to fallout from
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something we showed you on our show yesterday. it was his interview with casey hunt. he had a hard time answering a question about the ebola outbreak. yeah. prior and his campaign have accused his opponent of voting against legislation that would protect americans during a pandemic. so msnbc's casey hunt asked for prior if president obama was doing as much. >> do you think the president is handling the ebola crisis? >> umm, i would say that it's hard to know i haven't heard the latest briefing on that i read the paper and all. but my impression is we have people over there from the cdc and other medical-type people and even some engineers that try to build, you know, medical
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facilities. that's what they need over there. they need the medical. >> reporter: they aren't aggressive enough? >> umm, again i have to see the latest numbers. >> see the latest numbers. just read the newspaper. >> for this morning, we have a response from senator prior. the statement says, quote, i have given better answers to tougher questions. the fact is, we have to do everything possible. that starts with containing the diseases spread in western africa and our military and screening efforts are the right thing to do. what is not right, however, to vote against adequate funding for the centers for disease control which congressman cotton has done. >> you know, willie. this is what happens when members of congress are so afraid to say anything positive about the president and not hey,
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listen, the president is doing a good job. it's a world health information. they're going to answer it. why can't you say that? >> let's go to little rock, arkansas. casey hunt is. >> i'm scared of her. were you surprised be i the response you got? >> the statement still doesn't answer the question of whether or not he thinks president obama is doing a good job in illustrates how toxic the obama administration in aanyway is down here in arkansas. that itself partially. >> that explains bill clinton being here. he is somebody who can appeal to
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the obama coalition. he needs young voters him bill clinton can speak to them without alienateing rural white voters, mark prior needs to hang on to his seat. >> to casey's point. to criticize the president. it's like the stupid pill. can you say the president is doing a great job on this. they were the first to go into africa with tons of resources because they knew. on other issues, i have to say, i don't understand. >> it's not hard. you can split the baby. in this area, the president is doing well. in other areas, here, we seem to be working together in funding republicans and democrats alike there is such a fear of saying anything nice about president
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obama down there that you have mark prior, a sitting united states senator begging bill clinton to come over to a selfie. cowering in the corner, when asked a simple question. it would seem to me some in arkansas will find this unbecoming. the question is, can he pull out arkansas? >> reporter: sougat some point, are seeing the cotton campaign has seized on prior remarks. he as joe klein reported on the show yesterday says he is worried about terrorists potentially weaponizing ebola and i asked cotton about ebola he did have an answer, he said he thought there should be aditional travel restrictions for anybody from west africa. >> casey hunt. thank you very much. don't get too close to hurry.
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other news, jennifer lawrence is speaking out about the photo hacking scandal for the first time in the new issue of "vanity fair." the 24-year-old actress says it's not a scandal. it's a sexual violation, the law needs to be changed. she says, just because i'm a public figure. because i'm an act tres does not mean i asked for this. i can't believe that we live in that world. lauren is one of several actresses who had personal photos linked online. also, the targets of hackers. >> and of course justin verlander. >> what? >> i have been on the google for a month now trying to remember. >> my guiliani shots are on the internet. >> ver landers in the picks.
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>> did you not make something. >> i keep trying to find verlander. i can't. >> my kids, my 11-year-old daughter told me about the google. i'm trying to. >> still ahead, former general wesley clark is here. then musician and author, john secada joins us. what? oh my goodness. plus is president obama planning a make shakeup in the white house? up next. the relatives of the one and only aunt jemima are suing quakeer oats for more than $2 billion. let's find out why. next.
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announcement, a political ad last night they thought was mitt romney. i may be mistaken. here i brought it in. i want you the take a look at it. >> mitt romney will not run for president in 2016. but he will endorse republican candidate mitch romney. he never disparaged 47% of americans. plus he's a devoted father to five sons and loving lubd to his wife and there are trucks, then there is mitch romney. >> i'm mitch romney and i approve this message. >> ouch. >> that guy, yeah, it looks like he's got all the really good characteristics of mitt romney. >> i am hearing rumblings. >> let's look at the papers the new york times the eric garner's family, he died after a july confrontation with police plans on suing new york city for $75
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million t. family's claim says officers acted quote recklessly and negligently in placing a choke hold on garner. the city's medical examineer ruled the death a homicide. the grand jury is hearing evidence on whether or not criminal charges will be filed. >> the daily mail as a 61-year-old grandmother is headed to jail after stealing $500,000. her explanation, she thought she'd be dead of cancer before anyone found out. she used the money to settle debt, pay rent and provide quote treats for her family. she will spend four years in jail after pleading guilty to one count of theft. the new york daily news, two great mondaysons of one of the women who portrayed aunt jemima are suing quakeer oats, claiming an agreement existed dating back to the 1,800s, before she came on board t. two men say they are
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owed a percentage of revenue for every time her likeness has been used. plus a share of future revenue. quakeer oats denies a contract exists and says the image quote symbolizes a sense of caring, warmth, hospitality and comfort and is neither based on nor meant to depict any one person. >> a big number. >> that would be a big number. usa today, a check couple visited the vatican, where they visited a lecture on the joyce of sex. the australian couple married 55 years spoke to hundreds of cardinals, bishops and pope frances himself about sexual intimacy. one report summed it up saying, quote the audience celibate men was taken aback. >> how would you like that? i don't know how many of them are celibate. coming up, retired general
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wesley clark. is it time to bring new help to the white house? david ignacious has that story. "morning joe" will be right back. alright. let's share the news tomorrow. today we failrly busy. tomorrow we're booked solid.
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. >> he said they under stinlted the crest of isis. was it a white house failure or
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the white house not listening? >> as a cia director, you always could use better intelligence. i think what happened here is a combination of intelligence plus policy decisions that fed into what we have now with isis. >> here it is now, retired u.s. army general, general wesley clark, out with a new book "don't wait for the next war." a strategy for american growth and global leadertion. also joining the conversation, columnist and associate editor for the washington post david ignacious. >> we have so much to talk to you about. we have a book out. this morning the washington post, leon panetta getting slammed for his loyalty saying you should not be ataking the commander-in-chief to sell books. do you agree with that? >> i this i the american people want a sense of where the country is going. we got a crisis in ukraine, a crisis in the middle east. we have just seen hong kong
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demonstrators, you know the economy is still not doing what we want. median incomes not going up in america. although the top 1% is doing great. people are asking what is this about? fair game? >> should panetta attack the president? >> i think the whole political system is a part of the issue right now. i think people will be asking. so i think if you are going to have to address these kind of issues. >> but it's a fair game for leon panetta to attack the commander-in-chief? is that fair? >> leon panetta is a fair leader. is it fair game? that's defined by how the american people accept it. i think they are asking questions. they want answers. >> so let's talk about this morning, we are hearing reports and a split between the pentagon and the white house. a lot of you say, what itself the war plan? you, bill crystal of all people came on and saluted you for
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having an exact war plan in the as a result can, are we missing that right now? >> you can't tell from the outside. look, you never go into a war unless you know what the outcome is. the problem if syria from the begining is the syrian opposition hasn't really had the political structure and stature to direct the military operation. this has been the fundamental problems. when you put the weapons into is syrian opposition, you didn't know what they were going to be used for. it's still a problem when the president is using military force there. >> so given that, david ignacious, let's now move to the current national security structure and the relationship between the white house and the defense department as we take on this crisis. >> you are talking about possible shakeups in the white house. tell us about it. >> joe, my car, i had a column in the washington post this morning in which i talked about the possibility that some personnel moves are ahead,
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presumably after the november congressional elections. talking to senior white house officials. they're frank to say they understand they need more band width to deal with crises that are as severe as any in recent memory in iraq and syria, in ukraine. they cite the appointment of general john alan as the president's special envoy to deal with iraq and syria as an exam of what they are likely to do more of. bring in people of stature. it's hard to find someone who doesn't like general alan, he doesn't respect him, to help out with these problems. this is a team that is so tight and centralized and in a sense insular. that's got to be reenforced by the flap over panetta. they where i in panetta, they bring in putin, bob gates. it's the team of rivals. wham, when they leave the white house feels like they are getting slammed. even so, i think after the
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election, we will likely see changes. >> david, specifically, what kind of shakeups are we talking about? are there well known people that won't be there after the elections? >> i honestly couldn't take it that next step. if i could, i would have put it in the paper. i've listed the cast of characters who are seen as needing some help, which of them will go, which of them will stay. who will be brought in to supplement them. those are the questions. we'll see. >> a couple bigger issues. then i want to play something for you general clark. have you countries enganld, specifically turkey, engaged on a real level that could help stamp out isis. at the pittsburgh, it was asked, the state department. this is the communications person answering the question. take a look. >> we just outlined, there are strategic objectives.
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we are going after refineries, strategic locations. let me pick through these him some of our successes wove seen on the ground by the iraqi security forces. one moment. sorry. well, i'll find these. sorry. i wanted to highlight them. >> that does not at all mean that, there have been the iraqi security forces have pushed back and regained territory. >> this is what you call a perfect storm. general, you have certainly seen there in washington. everybody wakes up one day from all different directions. the administration is getting hit. this morning they are getting hit on not having an effective war plan or stop isis. what do we do? >> you talk about your book at the same time, long-term, what
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do we do? >> america has to have a strategy, pulls together the country. when i say don't wait for the next war, this is the american pattern and foreign policy going back to a century ago. we always wait until the last minute. then the politicking stops. a couple times, a famous strategy that led us through 40 years of the cold war. bush tried to pull us together. george w. bush after 9-11. led us into iraq. it came apart after three or four years. what is the strategy now and so what i'm suggesting is, it's our basic american principles are good. we got to hang on to nato and europe. the real issue as we look ahead is, we got terrorism, cyber security. financial systems, climate change and the ascent of china. we have to manage all of that. we have to grow our economy but stay strong to do it and we have
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to deal with the crises like the crises in the middle east. mike. >> david ignacious, i'd like to ask you in reference to your piece today. i was speaking with someone in the pentagon, fairly high up. they were talking about the meeting that the president had the dinner meeting he had a couple weeks ago, that formed national security advisers. this person said to me, it's been a long time since he had a group of high ranking officers from the pentagon to the white house for dinner to talk about our side of this engagement. he went on to say one of the things that has happened or not happened within the white house is they have fail to recognize in his view that iraq and syria basically are gone as countries. they will not exist in our lifetime the way they once existed. so, what about that? >> well, i think the white house is trying to think of how to reach out more effectively across the board with the military to civilian
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strategists, the appointment of general allen i mentioned earlier was significant and generally seen as a good choice. another person that got less attention is the person chosen to do the training of syrians and iraqis. that's a general major general who is one of the most highly regarded special forces officers around. i think in a sense what you are looking at is strategies, some assembly required. in other words, this is being put together as they're rolling forward. it happened so fast. the administration was unprepared. the initial war aims were to protect your bill. protect backed, protect the mosul dam in the north. those were accomplished. now they're into a second phase. i think they are struggling to physical out what are our goals and they need help. >> all right. thank you so much, david ignacious. we greatly appreciate it. make sure at home that you
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actually read david's column in the washington post or online in the pawing post.com. it's an important column. also, on my reading with general clark, don't wait for the next war, general wesley clark. >> thank you so much. >> we appreciate you being here. it's always great to see you. >> coming up, congressman steve scalise joins us on set. then the musician jon secada will be with us. then "morning joe" will be right back. oats go! wow! go power oats! go! go power! yayyyy! twhat do i do?. you need to catch the 4:10
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>> the obama administration is taking new action to prevent the spread of ebola. they said airline travelers will soon undergo additional screenings at both end of their journeys. >> i'm glad they're checking at both ends,estly, that's where the ebola squirts out. i want to know how you are doing. go to colbert nation, take my poll. how worried are you on stopping the unstoppable virus seconds away from infecting everyone you love. somewhat? very or hazmat bubble has me preventing on clicking on answer. >> oh my gosh. >> pulling them off. >> colbert pulls it off. joining me house whip republican from the great state of louisiana, congressman scalise. good to see you. >> good to be here. >> plet me ask you, the question we have been asking, north america is at war. yet congress is out campaigning,
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raising money, kissing babies, shaking hands. do you feel like congress should be in washington debating this critical issue? >> we actually did debate it when the president asked congress to give him an authorization to train and vet syrian troops and give them authorization to arm the troops. we debated it extensively, passed legislation, to give him that authority and we stand ready if there is engels that congress needs to do. right now the president in that authorization asked for some specific things. we gave him that authorization. he has to put a coalition together now. that's part of what the authorization we passed was to put a coalition together of countries in the middle east that will help combat the terrorists isil all around the region. >> the authorization was to arm the syrians. >> to first vet and train. >> there is what the president. >> we have obviously moved beyond that. we are now bombing.
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why isn't this debated more? you have a lot of people saying the president is not giving them what they need. should we be having armed service committee meetings? >> there have been a lot of hearings, what a lot of us have asked for is a broader plan from the president. not just air bombing. what is the president going to do, if he says he wants to eliminate isil. what is his plan to do that? he hasn't laid that plan out. ultimately, barak obama is the commander-in-chief. >> shouldn't the president call you all back? >> he can call us back. we will be there tomorrow if he wants to layout a broader plan. if there is anything else the president needs to address islamic terrorists, we will be there tomorrow. >> i heard in part the president didn't want an expanse, a lot of democrats would be left out there, not supporting him. i wonder, obviously, republicans are going to be more aggressive in this fight against isis.
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i wonder whether the president calls everybody back. >> maybe the president is used to dealing with a congress that no matter what he says or does, the congress the majority of congress balk at whatever he says. >> we gave him the authorization ewants. for once, he actually responded to the request i had. we debated extensively. committee hearings have been held on this. we said we'd like the president to layout a broader plan. he's been reluctant to do so. >> i understand. it's different today than two weeks ago. have you basically isis whatever you want to call sit a par 5 from the turkish border. a city of 50,000 people with mayhem and violence, they are stone cold killers about to take over that city. wouldn't it be edifying for the american public as well as for the congress, itself, to have
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someone from the pentagon meet and say why is there no plan. what are the outlines of the plan, within the fog of that? we actually had those hearings two weeks ago. those hearings were held in congressch they were broadcast on c-span. we had that debate on the floor, where we asked for the president for broader plans to be laid out. in the meantime the president asked congress for something specific. he said he had something specific. >> what does the president need? we are hearing the pentagon and the admirals saying he is not giving the commanders what they need. what would you personally want the president to do to stop the slaughter that's happening right now? >> i think to be a lot more aggressive. what the president said is what he won't do. i don't think it's a good plan to say we're not going to do this, we're not going to do that. >> should there be ground troops? >> i think that should be an
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option the president keeps as an option on the table. don't necessarily put it on the table. don't take it off the table. what he should be doing is putting that coalition together so those countries in the region are putting their boots on the ground. >> that is what the president said he would layout. we gave him the authorization to go and put that coalition together to be able to accept funds from these other countries and troops. >> do you consider turkey an allie from the united states still considering what they have done over the past year to help isis build up? >> when you look at a lot of countries in that region, there are questions about what involvement they had. many want to take on assad. many had other interests. our interests are to eliminate isil. >> how would we characterize them? in there are they an allie? >> i don't want to get into saying what each of the countries in the region have done. some say we don't really support. some are countries that have theability to be a part of this coalition and help us right now. we got to be concerned about is
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what are those countries in the region going to help us, if they're willing to do that, they will be important to this coalition. they have other agendas, themselves. we got to be focused on what's important to protecting america's national security. >> what if the president of the united states came to congress and said, listen, we have a plan that involves working with iran to defeat isil, what would your reaction be? >> i would like to see the president stop iran from developing nuclear weapons. i don't think he's doing that adequately. one of the bigger, broader questions, mr. people brought up. does the president want to re-visit the existing authorization for use of military force. >> that goes back to 2002. >> that itself the last time congress debatesed and voted on that. does the president have his own fingerprints he wants to put on it. what is his authorization for use of military force? congress should be able to debate it. that's ultimately the president's responsibility. we asked to come up with those kind of plans.
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>> congressman scalise, thank you for coming in, still ahead. >> almost represents james carvel. >> a sliver outside. i have some of the city of new orleans and suburbs. >> a great city. great people. >> we will catch up with entertainer nick cannon in our 8:00 a.m. hour. first, musician jon secada reflects on a career spending two decades and multiple grammy award. he joins with us his debut book next on "morning joe."
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now, that's progressive. ♪ here with us now, two-time grammy-award winning singer and songwriter john sakata. the author of a new memoir, "a new day." >> we asked when your parents left cuba to get away from castro. the answer's always '60. you didn't get out to '69. >> it all started in the mid-'60s for my parents. my father was a political prisoner in the mid-'60s. he tried to get out legally in that time. in that decade, if you got
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caught leaving the island, you got put in prison. he was in prison for three years. he got out. we applied to leave legally. the process of leaving and the paperwork and everything that had to be done at the time. so we left in '69. we couldn't come to the states directly. you had to have family during that time to claim you. so there was a couple governments that accepted refugees. spain being one of them, mexico another. so we went to spain. >> eventually got here, became a huge star. you won two grammys. what i love about this book, you talk a lot about your parents in this book. >> yes, i do. >> they obviously still have a huge impact on you. >> i consider my life, my career, what i've done. this book, kind of the -- i guess the basis of the fabric of this book, is really is. so it's an immigrant story.
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it's about what i'm all about as an hispanic american who came to this country with my parents. i was raised as an only child. we kind of have lived the american dream. >> certainly this story is a true beautiful story of living the american dream. but not a lot of people get to meet gloria estefan right away to help them live that american dream. explain how gloria and her husband were really impactful in guiding you properly and giving you to all of uss. >> i was raised in miami. huge community that deals with -- as it is, really a base for so many. i went through college, got my bachelors, masters degree in music. a lot of the guys that became members of the miami sound machine that i went to college with and that kind of got the ball rolling.
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emilio estefan met me. he was looking to represent new artists. right city, right place, right time. just a booming time for south florida during that time. >> you had a phenomenally successful career. grammy awards. broadway. your voice. your recordings are known to literally millions of people. and yet, you've also been a producer. you've helped other artists produce their records. so what happens to your ego, which i would assume would be considerable and deservedly so. what happened to your ego when you have to talk to someone about that? >> i love it. i love that i'm able to be in that position. i started as a writer. when i got into the business of music, it was to be a musician. so i love the fact that i've been a arranger, a producer,
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first, before anything else in my career. i was happy doing that. i talk about it in the book, that was all of my career was going to encompass, i was fine with that, behind the scenes, so to speak. my ambitions took me to another level. it was a blessing. i love the fact that i can -- even when most of my career got going, i was able to write, work with other artists and hem them along. and kind of help new artists. in my career, i've done tv shows and things that deal with the process of kind of working with new young talent. >> the book is "a new day." thank you so much. it's great to have you on the set. coming up at the top of the hour, the vikings adrian peterson will be in court today facing child abuse charges. while new allegations have surfaced over the running back's charity and -- just not sure, that's being -- >> you're putting that in quote marks -- >> plus, the very latest on the
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confrontation with police officers in indiana and their reason for smashing in this car window and tasering the passenger. and no pools, no problem. the st. louis cardinals continue their playoff march. ahead on "morning joe." ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you outlive your money? uhhh. no, that can't happen. that's the thing, you don't know how long it has to last. everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive.. confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor can get the real answers you need. well, knowing gives you confidence. start building your confident retirement today. into one you'll never forget.
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i lochecked bag.ee with my united mileageplus explorer card. i have saved $75 in checked bag fees. priority boarding is really important to us. you can just get on the plane and relax. i love to travel, no foreign transaction fees means real savings. we can go to any country and spend money the way we would in the us. when i spend money on this card i can see brazil in my future.
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i use the explorer card to earn miles in order to go visit my family which means a lot to me. ♪ let's go back to mitt romney
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now. he was saying he didn't know if he was going to run for president or not. then i saw this very strange announcement. a political ad last night that i thought was mitt romney but i may be mistaken. i want you to look at it. >> mitt romney will not run for president in 2016. but he will endorse republican presidential candidate mitch romney. he's a devoted father to five sons. and loving husband to his wife annalisa. there is trust, then there is mitch romney. >> i'm mitch romney and i approve this message. good morning, it's wednesday, october 8th, everybody. >> the angels are out. the nationals have the best record in the national league. they're out. a lot of very depressed people in washington, for good reason. >> the nattitude is done for
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2014. >> what a disappointment. >> just a killer. now you move on. the giants playing the cardinals. they beat the cardinals last night. >> those cards. i'ver in seen anything like -- >> obviously, they've had their successes, but they find themselves back for the fourth year in a row. the cardinals taking on the giants. now you have the orioles on the other side with the royals. three or four very interesting teams. >> how many people said that -- albert pujols went to california, that st. louis was done for? this organization just keeps coming at you. it's the best organization in baseball, it's gotta be, they
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just keep coming at you. pujols, he's sitting at home. the cardinals, they're going to the playoffs. the quote we've been using a lot around here, on a lot of different things, napoleon, he said, if you're going to take vienna, take vienna. it's one of the few places east of paris we haven't sent troops other past decade, but we are involved in a war against the most radical form of islam ic i iraq. if we're going to war, we have to win. how's winning defined? quite simple, evil has to lose. right now, the beheadings continue. right now, towns and cities continue to fall. and right now the terrorists spread. i've been supporting the
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president's steady approach to this war. now that we're there, it's time the commander in chief tears a page out of general powell's handbook. as a former secretary of state and chief said, when we go to war, we don't want a fair fight. our military commanders should be allowed to throw everything they have at the enemy. kill and capture their leaders. destroy their war making machine and bring our daughters and sons home as fast as possible. instead, we have a president who have accused too much on hand-wringing in domestic policy. now seeming intent on splitting the baby. this just won't do. our weakness is radical islam's strength. we're at war. and it's time we start acting like we're at war. but if the president's not willing to do that and he's not willing to give the commanders what they need to do to get the job done, then just tell us and
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bring our sons and daughters home today. >> in just a few hour, president obama will meet with top pentagon and national security officials about the threat from islamic state militants. it companies as turkey's president warns the syrian city of cobanny is about to fall to isis. if that happens, the militants will control a large area of the kurdish/turkish border. engaged in heavy fighting with islamic state militants. the city is also seeing the most extensive air strike, yet from the u.s.-led coalition. but the strikes have done little to deter isis. meanwhile, u.s. officials say they are outraged turkey is still refusing to commit to military involvement. turkey's inaction led to heated demonstration, across that country. at least 14 people are dead after clashes between police and protesters. we'll talk to bbc correspondent kim gaddis about that in just a moment. >> turkey's inaction is
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unbelievable. why don't we just arm the kurds and let the kurds take care of it? it's unbelievable. >> someone needs to explain the thinking, the rationale, behind turkey not entering this fight. don't do it for the united states, do it for yourself. isis is now six miles from the border of turkey. six miles. the isis flag flies over many buildingings in cobanny which is six miles away from turkey and still turkey refuses to join the fight. >> it is unbelievable. vikings running back adrian peterson will face a judge today in connection with his child abuse case. the football star will definitely plead not guilty to charges of reckless or negligent injury to a child. sources tell nbc sports the defense will push for a speedy trial date. peterson defense team says it wants the case resolved as soon
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as possible. the minneapolis star tribune reports money raised by peterson's charity failed to go to the intended recipients and that one of its credit cards paid for a hotel room used for an orgey. >> that's not good. willie, you don't use charity money that way, right? >> never use the corporate card. it's our old -- >> awful. peterson listed -- >> we actually have that chiselled in stone. >> that's good. i'm so glad. >> no, you just -- you have to draw the line somewhere. this seems like an arbitrary place. >> peterson listed a series of excuses for the story on twitter. add, quote, i guess never let the truth get in the way a good story. oh. okay. >> or never let a good story get in the way of the truth, adrian, i don't know. >> an indiana man is suing the local -- i don't think you've seen this. suing the local police department for excessive force.
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false arrest. and battery. following an incident late last month. the man was riding in the car with his girlfriend and two children when they were pulled over. they appeared to order him out of the car. the female driver calls 911 and the teenager hits record on his cell phone camera and catches it all. >> now they're asking me to open my door. i'm scared. if you can pull out a gun in front of -- there's two kids in the back seat. >> do you understand? >> yes. >> all right. no, don't -- now they're about to mess -- no! now they're about to mess with my window -- >> all right, i'm not the -- operation of this vehicle -- >> why do you say somebody's not going to hurt you? people are getting shot by the police. >> get on the ground. >> that was crazy.
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that was horrible. this is a horrible -- >> it's very important that we say to you the police from the reports -- dan, let's get this right, how long had the police been asking them to get out the car? >> at least 13 minutes. >> at least 13 minutes. that's still extraordinarily excessive force. >> he was reaching in the back so -- >> yeah, if you're a cop and you see somebody go down -- >> it looks awful though. >> it does look awful. but 13 minutes -- they're asking them to open the door. >> this is why they need to wear cameras, which is wear something you brought up. you've got to see the different angles. >> again, i would like to know why they didn't open the doors. >> i would too. >> for 13 minutes at least. >> just open the door.
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>> again, the reason i keep asking this question is because we have a responsibility to ask that question because we just showed the final few seconds of 13 minutes of the cop saying please open the door. >> i understand that. the official statement from the police reads in part, quote, police officers who make legal traffic stops are allowed to request passengers exit a stopped vehicle for the officers safety. without a requirement of reasonable suspicion. we the passenger displayed movements inside of the stopped vehicle that included placing his hand in places where the officer could not see, officers concerns for their safety were heightened. >> let me say really quickly, i've constantly talked about how white kids would not be treated the same as black kids in certain circumstances or whites would not be treated the same as black adults in certain circumstances. i'm not so sure in this case. if my son and three of his friends were refusing for 13
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minutes and they made movements that caused concern to the cops, i'm not so sure the cops wouldn't break open the glass. you know what, we ought to talk to commissioner brattoner or somebody. figure out what they should have done in this case. looks horrible, absolutely horrible. >> we'll wait for more to come out. stay on it. i worry about commenting on one angle. >> exactly. i wonder if there's dash cam video. presumably, the squad car -- >> could they see children were there in the car? it doesn't look good from this angle. let me get one more story in. we're going to go back to isis. jennifer lawrence is speaking out about the photo hacking scandal for the first time. the actress says, quote, it's not a scandal, it's a sex crime. it's a sexual violation. it's disgusting. the law needs to be changed and we need to change. she goes on to say, just because i'm a public figure does not
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mean that i asked for this. it does not mean that it comes with the territory. i can't believe that we even live in that kind of world. lawrence was just one of several actresses who had personal photos leaked online. rihanna, kate upton, selena gomez and kim kardashian were also targets. >> you know what my grandma would say? if you don't want people to see your ass don't show your ass. >> you didn't say that. >> i'm not talking about jennifer lawrence, i'm just saying. take this to a bigger thing. >> these were private pictures. >> i know they were private pictures. i know they were. >> i wouldn't trust technology, that's true. >> i wouldn't trust technology. that's terrible. that's terrible. these things leaked and everything else. all right. i totally get it. >> you have nothing to worry about, to be clear, in terms of leaked photos? >> just me eating a lot of cheese in a dress and stockings.
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but other than that -- >> a little jewelry. >> sort of rudy jewgiuliani cir whatever. >> remember that? that was just halloween. >> there was actually the orgey that was paid for on adrian peterson's credit card. >> you were there? >> well, a friend of mine was there. >> i see. >> associate. isn't it funny how these two stories have somehow looped? >> it was your brother and you look alike. >> my evil twin brother skippy. >> can we get back to our top story? straighten up. >> remember george h.w. bush's evil twin skippy? finest moment. >> now back to our top story. the rise of isis in the middle east. joining us from capital, we have bbc correspondent kim gaddis. we're looking at a syrian city falling. give us a sense of how imminent
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this is and -- >> also, can we talk about turkey's continued refusal to get involved? >> sure. let me first bring you up to date. we have colleagues watching what's going upon they're reporting that the coalition air strikes that have taken place over the last few days have helped stem the advance of isis, but the threat is not over yet. the kurds within the town and around it are fighting back quite hard. they are being helped by those coalition air strikes. there are reports of about five air strikes already this morning. so this is having an impact. but as i said, this is not over yet. so the threat is still there. but when it companiy comes to think we've been saying this already quite a few times. there are a lot of very conflicting agendas in this coalition.
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not only do the turks want the u.s. to focus more on trying to bring down assad instead of only focusing on isis, but they have their own domestic politics that they have to worry about. everybody has domestic politics. for the turks, it's the kurdish separatist ambitions. they're very worried about the group fighting in kobani. they're very worried about the kurds fighting there because they're worried about the idea to empower them and give ideas to them in turkey. >> at this point, shouldn't turkey be worried about itself? i mean, when you have isis that close to turkey's border, shouldn't the politics internally and the politics of the united states be pushed to the side, in terms of self-defense for nothing else? >> you would think so. we heard from minute erdogan who said in his view isis and the
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ppk are almost equally bad and for turkey's politics, domestic politics, it has quite large implications if this group does get empowered. it's a very tricky situation. >> still ahead on "morning joe," actor, comedian and host nick cannon joins us live on set. plus, another city is about to take on big soda. we'll bring you the latest on the vote to tax sugary drinks in the bay area. that's next. first, speaking of needing a tax on something, seriously. >> a tax on what, polyester? new york city would be funded for the next generation. >> it's naked weather casting from the bottom down. i'm serious. >> bill. >> a tax on that, that's freedom of pantslessness. good morning. let's check out the blood moon. of course it's losing its red tint. the red tint was the reflection of the light from the earth as
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it went through its shadow. now that the sun is beginning to shine back on, as it comes out watch we call totality, now it's going to look less red. there's a live look there. just starting to come back. it was a nice show for those of you who had clear skies. the northeast was not one of them. we're still watching showers exiting areas of rhode island and cape cod this morning. it will turn out to be a nice afternoon. some people with power -- without power this morning in massachusetts. overall this afternoon, it will be great. out of all the states in the u.s., if i had told you which one was going to get the worst from our hurricane season, none of you would have guessed arizona. this is the third time we've got a drenching rain in the state of arizona from a tropical system. of course these are all pacific storms. they've gotten a lot of rain in the phoenix area. as far as the drought goes in arizona, we've had drastic improvements. unfortunately, none of this has really made its way into california. so your forecast for your wednesday, that storm is exiting new england. we got the rain in arizona.
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we should be okay today. still warm in the southeast. still feels like summer there. as we go towards tomorrow, that's when the heavy rain will shift from areas into colorado and kansas. we got a really nice forecast for you. a lot of you on the east coast, you have two nice days in a row before the rain comes your way.
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it's a fresh approach on education-- superintendent of public instruction tom torlakson's blueprint for great schools. torlakson's blueprint outlines how investing in our schools will reduce class sizes, bring back music and art, and provide a well-rounded education. and torlakson's plan calls for more parental involvement. spending decisions about our education dollars should be made by parents and teachers, not by politicians. tell tom torlakson to keep fighting for a plan that invests in our public schools. i just got off the phone
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with adrian peterson. he says i wasn't at that orjy. it was the one funded from relief work i think, money to doctors without borders -- amazing -- >> in another direction. we had all these -- ways that? medical gear. it was great. >> it's time for the morning papers. >> what are you talking about? >> i asked if you medicated. >> oh, medicated. yes, i did. >> wish i had. "usa today," the average life expectancy for an american is now 78.8 years, a record high. life expectancy -- >> "usa today." >> -- slightly higher at 81.2 years compared to -- >> why do you think that is? why do women live longer than men, mika? >> smarter. a little bit more self-sufficient. >> amen to that. >> yeah. >> scientists say the difference
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between genders may stem from behavioral choices as men tend to engage in more risky behavior than women. >> what are they talking about? >> i don't even know what that means. >> charity funded orgeys maybe. >> the houston chronicle. walmart announced plans to cut health benefits for some part-time employees. the retailer says the move will help control rising health care costs. walmart will no longer provide coverage to employees who work less than 30 hours a week. this will affect 30,000 workers. target and home depot recently made similar decisions. >> let's go to "the new york times." berkeley, california, has become the latest battleground in the fight against sugary drinks. so far, the soda industry has spent $1.4 million to defeat the city's proposal for a 1% tax per ounce on soft drinks. the issue goes before voters in november.
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>> the los angeles times. first it was ben-gate or bend-ghazi. the latest whoa for the 2006. over reports that the phone bend, some users are now saying the device pulls out their hair or their beards when they make phone calls. >>cy thi cy >> i think we're getting a little whiny about a cell phone. it reportedly gets caught in the seam where the aluminum meets the gralass. little opening there -- >> what are you doing with your phone for that to happen? >> whiners. millennials. narrow shouldered millennials. >> are they 20-something people complaining? >> i don't have the data. >> they're so whiny. and entitled. "the wall street journal." vladimir putin is celebrating
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his 62nd birthday. and of course it's quite a spectacle. the one day art exhibition in moscow called the 12 labors depicts the russian president as hercules. >> that's awesome. >> this is really sick. >> what's going on? >> this man is not right. >> why is he choking -- >> what is going on? >> is he not a steelers fan? >> he is seen fighting a terrorist. another piece features him grappling with the multi-headed monster of russian sanctions. he's seen as the protector of syria. from american warplanes. as the hero of the winter olympics in sochi. >> that turned out really well. >> he's shown riding -- >> hold on. wrestling a deer for the
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olympics? >> is that one of those kangaroos that was kicking yesterday? wow. all right. okay. >> come on, joe. >> after that, he invaded another country, a sovereign nation. >> he also was seen riding an ox to symbolize the breakaway of crimea from ukraine. finally, as the overseer of russian oil power across the european continent. what is wrong with him? what is wrong with him? still ahead, actor comedian and host of "america's got talent" nick cannon will be here. first, is it time for the republican party to stop preaching and just start winning elections? joe? >> yes. >> matt lewis will explain his very compelling column. "morning joe" will be right back. ah! come on! let's hide in the attic. no. in the basement. why can't we just get in the running car?
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great. this is the last thing i need. [ hand ] seriously? the last thing you need is some guy giving you a new catalytic converter when all you got is a loose gas cap. let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of that good old midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. [ male announcer ] get the midas touch maintenance package including an oil change for only $24.99. and here's a deal, use your midas credit card and get a rebate of $25. oil. tires. brakes. everything. trust the midas touch they all lost their lives because of preventable medical errors, now the third leading cause of death. only heart disease and cancer take more lives. proposition 46 will save lives with
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drug and alcohol testing to make sure impaired doctors don't treat someone you love. safeguards against prescription drug abuse. and holds the medical industry accountable for mistakes. i'm barbara boxer. let's save lives. vote yes on 46.
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we talked about that new jersey football team, they canceled the entire season because of some hazing. that's kind of crazy. >> tough price to pay for those kids for everyone involved. the school band, the cheerleaders, under classmen. but you wonder, we don't know the entire story yet. what was the knowledge level of the coaches and the assistant coaches on that team? >> that's where it starts. >> we have a quick update about
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this story that we first told you about yesterday. last night, a new jersey school board upheld the decision to cancel the rest of the season for a high school football team amid allegation of widespread hazing. the vote to keep the war memorial team off the field was unanimous, despite emotional pleas from players, parents and alumni to reconsider. the allegations include harassment, intimidation and possible lewd behavior. at last night's meeting, some parents criticized the school for going public with the allegations before notifying them. >> i wonder, you know, mike, how far this went. i wonder what the details of this are. only because you want to talk about lewd behavior, i'm sorry. i played football like growing up as a kid in high school. there was always lewd behavior in every -- >> this is a close-knit community. i don't know the story on the
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coaches. but you would hear about this. as an adult, you would hear about it. just anecdotically would sense something was going on. and you try to get to it. it sounds like, mika, they went too far here. there's certainly no justification for any of this. if this happened to my kid, i would be raising holy hell. saying if you guys can't police a football team, then shut it down. it has to be really wide spread if you are going to wipe out every senior's, you know, football career. >> get a segment going on it for tomorrow. we have matt lewis. matt, you write in the daily caller, the moral minority, should republicans stop preaching and win? and in part you write this, ultimately politics is about choices and, yes, values. it's about standing for things and saying that certain things are more valuable than others. at least the politicians and
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movements capable of exciting, inspiring people, realize this. and we might agree a strong republican party should stand for free markets, lower taxes and a strong national defense, the notion that one might simply eschew the principles is more cowardice than pragmatic. >> as you know, i sort of cover the journal belly of the conservative movement. this is something that -- >> that's a dirty thing to cover. >> this is something -- >> someone's got to do it. >> i'm seeing it more and more. as conservatives sort of lose the culture and as trends shift, rather than admitting that conservatives were wrong about this issue or this issue, what we're doing is instead kind of reverse engineering their entire governing philosophy. for example, in the case of marriage, right, where the supreme court's not going to
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hear these gay marble riage decisionings. instead of saying we were wrong on that or wrong right on that, what conservatives are saying, government shouldn't be involved in the insurance tutitution of anyway. i'm arguing that actually that's -- if it's legitimate, if you're a libertarian, that's fine, but if you're acting or responding to the cultural shifts by all of a sudden deciding it's not government's responsibility to be involved in the institution of marriage, i think that's a problem. i think it maybe bodes very poorly for the movement going forward. >> you think the conservative movement is unnecessarily in retreat over the issue of gay marriage? >> this is obviously an important issue and it's an issue where conservatives have been losing. but rather than grapple with that, rather than stand up and say, on one hand, no, we were right about this, it doesn't matter where the culture's
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going, or saying, look, we were wrong, marriage is a great institution, it would benefit all americans. what they're instead doing is sort of a plan c, which is to say, well, we were right about it, but government shouldn't be involved. guess what, government is is involved in all sorts of things. government decides the age of consent. government decides, you know, whether or not .07 makes you legally drunk. i think it's really a form of escapism. >> it was interesting, we had ed whalen on yesterday who agreed with scott walker that on the issue of gay marriage, that the conservatives have been routed. it's quite a long distance from 2004 to 2014. in a decades time, conservatives have been beaten back on this issue. i'm wondering if that's not because more americans aren't libertarian. it's certainly not because the
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federal government is -- i mean, the federal government's gotten bigger, but not in this issue. isn't it that more americans are just instinctively libertarian, we want the government out our checkbooks and we want the government out of our bedrooms. >> i think that it's certainly understandable that republicans would want to follow these trends. i'm just arguing that's not leadership. right. the republican party was founded about a moral idea. of fighting against an injustice. >> you're basically -- so basically, mike, if your argument as a party for 30 years has been same sex marriage is going to destroy the institution of marriage, then the day after the supreme court says that you can't ban same sex marriage by not taking a case, the republican party really needs to stand and deliver.
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and say we were right and we're going to keep fighting for this. or we were wrong. instead of just everybody sort of slipping off into the bushes and going "my bad." >> i get that as a statement. my question to you is do you think that this ideological muting, if you will, among conservatives, has anything to do with the fact that in the recent past, in the past two to four years, there have been sfrl candidates on the right who have campaigned on these cultural issues and have sounded publicly very much so like they're mentally ill? like they're crazy people? >> well, there's a variety of reasons for that. the psychological factor is when you know your ideas are not jiving, no longer in the mainstream, you end up sounding bizarre. i guess what i'm arguing for is rather than have this very convenient escape hatch of all
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of a sudden we're libertarians, let's actually grapple with the issues. should conservatives be for gay marriage? should they continue to be against it? that's a legitimate debate. here's the other concern too. it's sort of intellectually inconsistent. because if you're going to say that government has no place deciding who loves whom or who can marry whom, then you're for polygamy, all of a sudden, you have no problem with the age consent. government has a responsibility and role to play -- >> the question is, before you were santorumed here, you are foot sugge not suggesting if you're for gay marriage you're for polygamy? and suddenly say republicans have no place in these moral issues? talk about this convenient position. i guess i am just such a convenient guy. this has always been my
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position. which is i don't want the federal government banning gay marriage. i don't want the federal government accepting it. i still think that marriage, as well as some of these other social issues like abortion, can be left to the states. saying that, i of course manage to offend everybody. this is a very wonderful place to be. i must say, i've offended everybody on left and on the right since 1994. my position actually was more progressive than barack obama's position in 2012 because he was against gay marriage as a matter of course. i'm so open minded, matt, aren't i? it's scary. matt, we love seeing you. >> still ahead, he's one of hollywood's most successful entrepreneurs. nick cannon is moments away. plus, red bull gives you wing, right? right? >> what? yeah. >> okay, maybe not. the whopping amount the energy drink company is willing to pay to avoid a possible lawsuit. stay with us.
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at underwareness.com all right. >> we'll figure it out. >> sad reality. >> here we go, 41 past the hour. time for business before the bell. cnbc's brian sullivan. some would consider him to be a prince charming. >> i think he's a prince charming. >> before the kiss. >> job openings. tell us about it, prince charming. >> i love the paul simon bump in too, guys, it's perfect. here's what's interesting. these surveys come out, we dig into them so you don't have to. at 10:00, after our appearance yesterday on the show, this jolt survey came out, indicated this. 4.8 million job openings in america in august. that, my friends, is the most since january of 2001. >> whoa.
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>> 2001. >> i like that face. that's awesome. that's great news for a lot of people who are looking for work and maybe the job participation rate will go up. tell us about this red bull class action lawsuit. >> with my energy leaveful i had a red bull, i'd probably run around the building. no, apparently their marketing slogan is gives you wings. apparently some people to believe this -- i don't want to say accurate but at least give them increased performance in whatever they try to do. red bull is paying $13 million ahead of a proposed class action. basically saying the drink does not give you any more energy or performance or wings more than a cup of coffee from wherever you may get your coffee from. anybody who bought a red bull can between the last ten years can get either $10 in cash or a certificate for, you know, two red bull products. >> how do you prove that? >> yeah, how do you prove that? >> i, for one, am shocked a
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corporation would propose its product may or may not do more than it does. >> yeah, really. never seen that happen before. sort of like men don't oversell themselves. >> we're about to learn there's no prince charming. >> accord to the ad that just ran, there are prince charmings out there. >> on that note, we're going to cut your mic. brian, thank you so much. here with us now, emmy award winning producer and owner of her own company, the founder of the ad lante movement. which aims to empower latinas nationwide. i love it. you say there's opportunity on both sides here for latina women especially. >>cy thii inthink it's an incre time. as an entrepreneur, i felt like it was time to give back to my community and empower all these women. as you know, when the census came out and latinas became very
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important, there are all these earmarked opportunities for government contracts, for small business loans. and, you know, culturally latinas are very traditional. so we like to be with our kids. never in history has there been a time better to start a business when there's this digital platform. >> talk about the psychology of that. then we'll get to actually what you do, the practicality of it. because for latina women, is it little bit of a fear to jump in? what is the -- >> not so much a fear. >> what is the impediment? >> we're very middle america in a way. we care about our children, want to be with our children. i love carol, she's a friend. but when we talk about lean in, sometimes we don't even get invited to corporations. >> you nailed it. >> for political people out -- >> oh, you go there. >> who is easy pickings for the left and right? >> to tell you the truth, we have a few problems in our country politically because i
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think the republican party -- it's like you know when you have somebody at hello and you lose them, i want to see more choices for latinas, both on the right and left, because i think we are available. but i think right now there's a messaging problem. the message is, even though every advertiser wants us, we're not feeling the love. >> in what sense? >> excluded. we're marginalized. i'm happy we're talking about this on a mainstream show. it's kind of like latinas are not part of the mainstream. yet what we hear from the government is very kind of negative. and yet what we hear from the consumer products companies and the walmarts of the world and, you know, all of the retailers are latinos are the number one -- and latinas in particular are the number one, you know, industry for -- >> how are you excluded though? >> well, we're not -- i mean, i don't have to tell you politically how we're talked about. so it's all very negative.
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instead of maybe these women are the answer to the economy. >> i will define mainstream for you. latinas control $1 trillion. >> thank you, you're right. >> in u.s. purchases. $1 trillion. >> for me, as someone who comes from the media, as an entrepreneur, i wanted to put latinas out there in the mainstream and say, if you're not looking for latinas in your corporation, you're missing the boat. >> i love it. i have a deal for you. this is fantastic. nelly golan, thank you so much. this programming note. this year's alma awards airs this friday on msnbc. the ceremony highlights the best american latino contributions to music, tv and film. this friday at 10:00 p.m. eastern time, the alma awards. i will be watching. nelly, thank you so much. up next, at just 33 years old, he's already found more
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success in hollywood than most people do their whole lives. nick cannon will join the table when we come back. ring ring! progresso! i can't believe i'm eating bacon and rich creamy cheese before my sister's wedding well it's only 100 calories, so you'll be ready for that dress uh-huh... you don't love the dress? i love my sister... 40 flavors. 100 calories or less.
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play. >> learned a lot about myself lately. i'm not afraid of anything. >> a vh1 original movie. "drum line, a new beat." >> a look at the upcoming sequel to the 2012 movie "drum line." joining us now, the star and executive produce, as well as the host of nbc's "america's got tale talent." we understand it's your birthday. >> today i turn 34. >> happy birthday to you. libra zone. we would sing but we all suck. and that's your department. let's talk about that. since 2002, when the first film premiered, there's a long span of time between now and then. let's talk about the new beat. why pick this up? >> ritz kiit's kind of cool. i wanted to produce something that highlighted the culture but
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told a different story. we get the opportunity to talk about this culture that people fell in love with the first time. but now it's a whole new story. and it's also for a transition into a series on vh1. it's kind of like giving it a rebirth and life. >> you're very busy. "america's got talent." you've been doing that for six seasons. you've been dealing with howard stern. >> i love that guy, a great friend of mine. definitely extremely busy. but, you know -- >> can you believe it's lasted that long? >> i mean, it's a perfect show when you think about it. it takes it all the way back to old school entertainment. it's like vaudeville. it's like entertainment. like ed sullivan. >> and mel b. her mouth is like a sailor in the commercial breaks. >> i'm just saying, when you've got howard stern, mel b., heidi and howie, it can get a little -- >> one of the most interesting
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facts about it, it's sort of a 21st century version of the 1950s, ed sullivan show. >> all those old shows. >> absolutely. >> and it works. >> i think that's why people love it. families love it. >> any changes for the new year? >> i mean, for the show, not -- i'm not sure at this point. we're already casting and getting really for the next season so we're having fun. >> what was it like being a director for the first time, being behind the camera instead of being in the front of the camera? >> that's one of those things, i've always considered myself an entrepreneur. so behind the scene, that's where i got my start, as a writer. to actually even direct is kind of like the natural -- >> we have to ask you about a lot of different stuff. i want to talk about something that i saw on your resume. it's with thera flu. i got my flu shot. very concerned about the kids at home. there's some bad stuff going
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around. sad story obviously out of new jersey of a young boy that died of a strain of this. talk about why you decided to get involved with thera flu. >> eye bei've been an advocate health and wellness to sore l l. making sure my kids get their flu shots as well. and to partner for this program which is a five-step action plan which is really cool. to kind of just not only education but also encourage vaccinations and share. you can go to their facebook page. not only get information but also do well for others because for every like on that facebook page, it's a dollar donating for our goal of $100,000 for nonprofit organizations called families fighting. when you hear something like that, you've got to part of it.
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>> myth about the colds and flus, cold vaccine can give you the flu. myth. cold weather can cause a cold. myth. and facts about flu and colds, cool mist helps, saltwater soothes the throat, chicken soup, this is the truth, makes you feel better. >> all true. >> happy birthday. thank you for coming in and good look. really appreciate it. big 34. coming up next, what, if anything, did we learn today? man: i know the name of eight princesses. i'm on expert on softball. and tea parties. i'll have more awkward conversations than i'm equipped for, because i'm raising two girls on my own. i'll worry about the economy more than a few times before they're grown. but it's for them, so i've found a way. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners,
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no hidden fees, from the bank where no branches equals great rates. i've learned a lot of things. we don't just say nice things to say nice things. i've learned that nick cannon, he's a really good guy. >> i like the show. >> good guy. good entertainer. anyway, i also learned that vladimir putin for some reason hates franco harris. so there's a picture of him choking franco harris. >> what are you talking about? >> i am a member of franco's italian army. >> that's what i learned today. >> i'm deeply offended, mike barnicle. what is he going to go after next? he's choking the miracle. can i just say i understand why oakland raider fans would want to do that but seriously, putin,
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i don't get it. >> what did you learn? >> i learned nelly golan is calling for help. >> mika. >> no, i got her, we're going to do a project together. it's going to be so awesome. if it's way too early, what time is it? >> i think the kids say it's "morning joe." stick around right now. i know i'm going to. peter alexander. he's host of "the daily rundown." this is going to be mass im. today and today only, you know who they have on? >> peter, paul and mary. >> i thought it was paul simon. >> singing with franco harris. you'll love this. we'll be right back tomorrow. new fears of home grown aid to isis as the fbi seeks more info on a terrorist who may be american. amid tough talk from former defense secretary leon panetta, president obama heads to it s pentagon today. also, ebola patients in the united states get direct help from one of the first ones to be

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