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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 9, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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l.a. today, taking his midterm message on the economy to millennials. he'll also make remarks and answer questions at a dnc event coming up this evening. and the illinois man accused of trying to travel travel over join isis has a detention hearing in federal court today. police say he wrote a letter to his parents about going to the, quote, blessed land of syria but they say he didn't make it past chicago. all right. that's going to do it for "way too early." "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ this is the first military intervention in that years without a code name. now, might be because our chin stroker in chief wants to avoid an embarrassing acronym here like past rejected code names operation afghan free dam which spelled oaf by accident or operation iraqi liberation which spelled o.i.l., but so far the
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only actual name military planners have suggested to the pentagon was "operation inherent resolve, which was rejected because as one military officer put it, it was just kind of blah. i agree. i agree. although given the mood of the country right now, i might go with "operation kind of blah." >> good morning, it's thursday, october 9th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set we have the managing editor of bloomberg politics mark halperin. >> hi, mika. >> in washington former white house press secretary for president obama, robert gibbss and mike barnicle is with me. how are you doing. >> very well. >> that's good. we have a vast array of news to cover. we'll start with isis where there is new evidence that isis may be making gains despite american air strikes and resistant by kurdish forces. isis now reportedly controls much of the northern town of kobani.
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gunfire could be heard by observers just across the border in turkey but turkey remains on the surveillance sidelines for. their inaction prompted protest from kurds that turned violent leaving at least 20 dead and now "the new york times" reports that with the americans' renewed focus on isis syrian president bashar al assad has been freed to resume hisbombing campaign dropping bombs on rebel towns and villages. coffee-mate dense is flagging in president obama's ability to manage the conflict. a poll shows 51% of americans disapprove with 40% supporting. and the mother of an american hostage held by isis posted a message on twitter to the leader of the terror group. her son who converted to islam was kidnapped while delivering aid to syrians and her message reads in part this "i am trying to get in touch with the islamic state about my son's fate. i am an old woman and abd
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abdul-rahman is my only child. my husband and i are on our own, with no help from the government. we would like to talk to you. how can we reach you?" it's not just the american people who have lost confidence, in an interview with "the ft. worth star telegraph" the 39th president of the united states is critical of president obama's middle east strategy saying, it "changes from time to time and that president obama draws lines in the sand and never follows through." "we waited too long, we let the islamic state build up its money, capability and strength and weapons while it was still in syria and then when isis moved into iraq, the sunni muslims didn't object and about a third of the territory in iraq was abandoned." he added, "if we keep working on in iraq and have ground troops to follow up when we do our bombing, there is a possibility of success."
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president obama recently blamed the media for his negative press saying "all it does is feed cynicism and cook up phony scandals." robert gibbs, and then mark halperin, is that a fair assessment of the press can we'll start there and also, your reaction to jimmy carter's statements. >> well, look, i think what former president carter has said is what others have said, so my hunch is that the white house is somewhat used to the criticism. again, i think they've heard whether it was the line in syria or waiting too long that's criticism they've heard. you know, look, i think this is going to be a time period in which there is certainly going to be, you know, second-guessing and i think it's going to take some time to move and make gains with isis using air strikes. >> which he did say. but it's not just jimmy carter, mark halperin, critics close to
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the administration i think you have a former president and you have two former secretaries of defense have a little bit of a problem, leon panetta says the president lost his way and that pulling out of iraq created a vacuum in terms of the act of that country to better protect itself and it's out of that vacuum that isis began to breed. bob gates splits with the president over the issue of boots on the ground saying troops are necessary if there's any hope of success and former secretary of state hillary clinton was at odds with president obama over arming the syrian rebels after leaving her post she told "the atlantic" that president obama's failure to do so led to the rise of isis. she also took a swipe at his foreign policy doctrine saying "great nations need organizing principles and don't do stupid stuff is not an organizing principle." mark halperin, some of this i think is easy to say when you're not the president. >> right. >> it's always easy to say boots on the ground would be better. it's always easy to say that. >> we all want the president to
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succeed and no doubt the fact on the grounds are bad. robert's former colleagues can easily dismiss this stuff and say it's just chatter, just insiders, the reality is when leon panetta joined this and jimmy carter, the president does have a public relations problem and image problem and hurting him not just with elites in the united states but oversea, as well. and last thing i'll say is that, you know, leon panetta's criticism is shared by a lot of senior people still in the government. >> but he's getting criticism for doing it now. >> i would like to see a poll on how many would feel comfortable with jimmy carter leading the united states rather than barack obama. >> down, boy. >> i would assume barack obama would have resounding success on that. we are surrounded with no allies. joe biden came pretty close to the truth last week -- >> he always does, by the way. >> yes, he does. he was pretty close. we're surrounded by allies that are not allies.
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president erdogan said, "for us, pkk, the kurdish political party within turkey, for us pkk is the same as isis" the. that's what we're dealing with. >> a member of nato. >> letting a slaughterhouse miles from their boarder. >> we have an air base 100 miles from the syrian border and turkey, erdogan refused to allow that air base to be used for offensive operations against isis. that's what we're dealing with here. >> then we look at the midterms and what's coming ahead because we're counting down to that. senate democrats are eyeing a new battleground where republicans thought they had things locked up. national democrats are pumping a million dollars into south dakota on negative ads against republican candidate mike rounds reporting this is a last-minute attempt to hold on to a seat they view as winnable. >> democrats are really crafty and never take anything for granted.
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the senate operation is smart. what they looked at is a four-way race where mike refuses to run negative ads frustrating republicans, a million bucks is not a lot in the context. they have two candidates that could win and keep senate control. look at kansas which is, of course, very much in play for the democrats to take a seat but they hold south dakota and win either kansas or georgia and if they win both of them they keep senate control. >> so most polls show rick weiland and larry pressler down by double digits. >> a candidate who refuses to run negative ads. tell me about him. >> mike rounds is a nice guy and succeeded in politics there two-time governor not going negative. he doesn't believe in it and helped him. >> all right. >> somebody is going to win this maybe with 35% of the vote and it could be pressler and weiland or probably most likely be rounds but if they can take it, big. >> kansas, independent greg orman is giving republican senator pat roberts a run for
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his money. a new fox news poll shows him up by five points slightly better than recent polls, just 1% separating them in another. a new "usa today" poll shows kay hagan clinging to the slightest of leads and jeanne shaheen seems to be holding on. robert gibbs, what do you think? >> well, look, i think this will be an important month to determine senate control this. is when campaigns really matter. a lot of these candidates are going to go into debates, a lot of campaigns are going to get a chance to show what their message is standing next to their opponent and i think it's a huge month. i think we have a lot of races still up in the air and, you know, many of the races that mark mentions whether it's a place like georgia or louisiana, these are places that could see
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runoffs and extend the debate as to who will control the senate into december and maybe even early january. i would also point out, you know, a poll just a couple of days ago that showed kentucky, the democrat, alison grimes up on mitch mcconnell by two points so i do think there's a lot still left in play. >> i want to turn now to the ebola crisis, a look at the front page of today's "dallas morning news" tells you everything you need to know about the fear gripping the city and it's in dallas where we have the first death from the virus in the united states. thomas eric duncan has passed away eight days after testing positive for ebola. as nbc's ron mott explains there are now questions if hospital errors cost duncan his life. >> reporter: he complained of symptoms on the 24th, went to the hospital on the 26th but was sent home with antibiotics. two days later he returned by ambulance. he was given fluids, put on a ventilator and treated with an experimental drug. now comes the delicate and
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critical process of handling duncan's body which is dangerously contagious. wearing protective gear workers must wrap the body in three layers of plastic for immediate cre cre cremation. direct contact, his fiancee and her family. their pastor broke the news to them at a home where they are being quarantined keeping a safe distance. >> their thoughts not only going to the shock and sadness of losing mr. duncan but also whether this will be the course that their life will take next. >> adding to the anxiety in dallas, a sheriff's deputy who was inside duncan's apartment has been hospitalized after feeling ill. at this hour officials say he is not showing symptoms of ebola and there is very little risk that he has the virus but it is the latest example of a city that will remain on edge for the near future.
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>> i'm on pins and needles every day in dallas. this week and, yes, throughout the whole 21 days. the science tells you this week is critical and as we move forward we want to get through the whole 21 days. >> the u.s. is now screening travelers from west africa at five major u.s. airport, kennedy airport in new york, dulles in virginia taking temperatures and asking health questions. and president obama urged 1500 state health officials to act with urgency with possible cases of ebola. he says duncan's death in dallas shows we, quote, we don't have a lot of margin of error. all right, minnesota vikings running back adrian peterson made his first appearance in court yesterday entering no plea to his felony child abuse charge with a tentative trial date for december 1st. defense attorney rusty hardin is pushing for an expedited trial
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date. >> i would ask all of you to please be tolerant of the fact that adrian is champing at the bit to publicly talk and publicly defend himself and the only reason he hasn't is us insisting and jumping up and down saying the solution is to get a speedy trial and resolve it in a courtroom. i'm going to try to be like the coach of the new england patriots for a time. instead of going to cincinnati we're on to trial. if you ask me another question i'm going to say we're on to trial. if you ask me the third question i'm going to say we're on to trial. >> meanwhile n commissioner roger goodell addressed the media after a meeting with team owners that focused on the personal conduct policy. >> was there a consensus among the owners that now it might be better for the league and for you to not be completely overseeing discipline? >> we've been debating internally for some time well over a year about whether
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there's a better process, a process more effective, that's more efficient, it's fair. i wouldn't say there was a consensus other than when things affect the integrity of the game, i believe the ownership feels that is something that is very important for the commissioner to retain that authority. >> all right. so when asked whether he should testify during an appeal of ray rice's indefinite suspension goodell said it's up to a neutral arbiter to decide. but, joe, you know, between these cases now where there's quick action and some of them are going straight to court and roger goodell making changes within the nfl organization, bringing women in, having what we just saw happen, but also what we are seeing on the local level. the new jersey story of the football season that was canceled. you see a change in culture that's been needed. >> yeah, this really, this fall has really been a defining moment for football, not just in the nfl, but also fsu having to
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back down and actually suspend their heisman trophy winner for an entire game instead of a slap on the wrist for poor behavior and high school level too. you know, mika, right now roger goodell has the confidence of the owners, you look at a poll that -- a recent poll roger goodell has the confidence of the fans, and roger goodell by default has the confidence of the advertisers that make the nfl a multibillion dollar business, so, you know, he's won the battle so far unless anything else comes out rths the bigger question whether the nfl and organized football as a whole wins the long-term war. you know and i know living in suburbia, talking to fellow parents that right now football, something that was literally the center -- outside the baptist church, football was the center of my family's life growing up. you had the bible and you had
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football. and those were the two things. it's not that way anymore. and so the question is, will the nfl be around 20 years from now, 30 years from now? most likely, but they've got to change and hopefully this was a learning molt for everybody. >> the culture and also the health issues. which we'll talk about more because there's a lot of news on this issue coming up. still ahead on "morning joe" we'll be speaking to senator rob portman and the new hud secretary, julian castro in our 7:00 hour then at 8:00 actress and activist eva longoria joins us. coming up jay leno is poised for another comeback. does jimmy fallon need to worry. where in the world is kim jong-un? the mysterious disappearance. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. when folks think about what they get from alaska,
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time to take a look at the morning papers. we start with the christian science monitor. edward snowden is topping as a likely pick for the nobel peace prize. the nomination of the former nsa contractor is supported by members of the committee as well as the editorial boards of leading norwegian papers. now, even if snowden wins, my guess, he will skip it as norway would be obligated to arrest him at the border. the nobel announcement is out this front. >> "the knowledge star ledger." new information point hazing scandal in sayreville, new jersey. a parent of a player says freshmen players would be pinned down and subjected to acts that were sexually explicit in nature. the parents claims these hazing
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rituals were performed on almost a daily basis. the disclosure of the details follow the school board's decision to approve the cancellation of the remainder of the football season, still, in a heated meeting of the school board last night parents and students expressed outrage over the entire team being punished for acts they claim were only carried out by a small number of players. >> no one was hurt, no one died. i don't understand why they're being punished. forfeit a game was punishment enough. i just don't believe that the punishment fits the crime. >> i just have one question. when is the next board election? [ cheers and applause ] >> you guys had no respect for us as parents to talk to us before you talk to the media. you should have came to us first. we found out after the fact. we have not had enough respect. >> wow. joe, you know, i don't know what
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to say except that at some point these -- this behavior from the top down has to be cut. i think it's brave of what the school board is doing. >> if, if, if kids are being -- freshmen if 13 and 14-year-olds are being pinned down and having sexually abusive acts performed on them or anything that comes close -- >> the culture has gone awry. >> the culture is so screwed up, that i think the school board stepped in and did the right thing. you know i've been asking a lot of questions on whether you should punish everybody for this. this is a much larger cultural issue. i think the players on the team should be allowed to go play at other area high schools and this school needs to think about what's happen and these coaches need to be fired immediately. there is no way this should go on in a high school locker room anywhere in america. >> an amazing story. thomas. >> think about it. like a hydra that needs to be
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extinguished. otherwise a couple of kids get punished but then the culture -- >> how do you decide. >> can you understand the parents being so po'd about it. >> we understand why they'd be angry. >> we want to look at "the new york times" and the rumors that they continue to swirl as north korea's leader kim jong-un appears to be missing in action. reports say the country's leader has not been seen in public since september the 3rd. that's five weeks ago. american and south korean officials say his health is ailing with reports he may be suffering from gout, washington officials ruled out rumors of a possible coup citing no proof. foreign officials are anticipating a public appearance possibly tomorrow on the founding of north korea's worke workers' party anniversary. >> i might have gotten gout when i had dreamland ribs for breakfast lunch and dinner eight weeks straight. >> i would do that. those ribs are good. >> they are amazing.
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let's go to the hollywood reporter late night hosts, duck, jay leno is reportedly set to host a new show on cnbc. that program is going to focus on his longtime love of cars but last year to top nbc entertainment executive said, quote, nothing would make us happier than to have leno have a presence on our network. >> that sounds kind of cool. >> residence. >> new york "daily news" the brooklyn district attorney is investigating allegations a police officer stole $1300 in cash during a stop and frisk incident. in the video can you see the officer patting down lamar joy in a brooklyn park a few weeks ago and you can see the officer then pull out what appears to be a wad of cash. when joy protests, the offices s
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pepper strpray him and his sist, as well. it was his birthday and he was carrying cash for a night on the town with his wife. a police spokesman says officers are responding to reports of a man with a gun and there are other stories -- >> mika, this is -- >> out of control. mika. i have three words for you, cameras on cops. this is out of control. we showed something yesterday and we see this. another story -- >> the teen. >> that we'll get to later that is absolutely horrifying? >> it's horrifying. a teen, let's just say arrested in his house. it was a mistake. it was a mistake. >> yeah, why was he arrested? >> i think because he was african-american. >> because he was black. still ahead -- we're going to take you behind the scenes of spotify. >> awesome. >> one of the game changers
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reshaping history. mika has sifted through all -- she was actually in the south of france last night. you're going to love what she brought back just for you when we return. ♪ make me a miracle man ♪ turn the trips you have to take, into one you'll never forget. earn points for every flight and every hotel. expedia plus rewards. ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you have enough money to live life on your terms?
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it's time now for the must read opinion pages. we will start with "the wall street journal" editorial which writes in part this, how not to run a war coalition. the crisis on the syrian/turkish border is a case studny in mismanagement if kobani falls the white house is already blaming our partner and friend turkey. if mr. obama wants turkey to help avoid a massacre, he should press for a joint military operation reassuring mr. erdogan that the u.s. military will back up turkish forces, even if it means ground forces this. is what real wartime leadership would look like. joe, what's the deal with our ability to call turkey what it is, it's an ally but it's not acting like a partner and friend. >> they certainly are not acting like a partner or friend. i go back and i've said they're the worst nato ally we've had
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since de gaulle and france in the 1960s when he decided he would be neutral in the battle between the united states and the soviet union. that is no friend. that is no ally. >> no. >> robert gibbs, though, this president is besieged from all sides, whether it's president clinton, president carter, former secretary of defense panet panetta, bob gates, you know, you can just go down the list as you know, list of democratic senators that don't have the guts to say on air what they'd love to say off air. are we not a desperate need for a reset here? almost like what bush had to do after six years of foreign policy failure? >> well, look, i think it's a bit early -- we've -- i think i'd get through the electoral season and figure out whether a lot of this criticism is electoral based rather than policy based. you know, mika brought this up -- >> robert, these are democrats. we expect republicans to
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criticize a democratic president like democrats criticize -- this is jimmy carter. bill clinton, democrat leon panetta. his own sec def bob gates. this isn't just politic. >> what i was trying to work through and say, i do think it is going to be -- it always is easy to look back three years and suggest that had we done certain things that everything would be different now. look, i do think that the isis operation is obviously going to be take some time. you know, i think everyone from the military to the president and others have said that. and i think that's the place we're in right now. we've got to ramp up intelligence. we've got t to figure out what the targets are. we've got to continue to move forward with air strikes and push through with a policy. i think the white house will
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look at whether they're going to reset politically or reset with foreign policy down the road. i think they're much more media goal is isis. >> all right. i think the pressure obviously is to as you put it, joe, take very enfather but it is time-consuming to generate collective action and i don't think it's been done effectively before. the national journal, though, goes for it too. why obama won't listen to leon panetta. democratic party officials have made it a habit to call or e-mail me almost every week of obama's second term to share their concerns about the course of his presidency. leon panetta speaks for them now. it's uncanny how his memoir and book tour interviews channel the frustrations of democrats who want the president to succeed but consider him a near-failure. who raised their concerns directly with the president or his team and were told to stop their worrying so obama seems destined to leave office no more
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confident or competent with the vague arts of leadership than he was six years ago." yet, joe, he is doing what democrats wanted him to do. until it felt uncomfortable. that nobody wanted to march back into war. nobody wants ground troops. nobody wants another engagement. and yet now they're uncomfortable with how it's going although this president has said it would be a long arduous process. >> well, listen, there are going to be a lot of democrats on the campaign trail that will be hypocrites that will do what hillary clinton do by saying it only he listened to me on syria dance lions would be spreading across northern iraq and eastern syria. that said, mark, at some point, barack obama is going to have to face the fact that he is alone and isolated in washington, d.c., every bit as much or i would say more than george w. bush in 2006. i commented at the time that republicans in 2006 would come
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to me in green rooms and talk about how absolutely horrific george w. bush was in the white house, what a terrible leader he was and then the red light would come on and they wouldn't say anything. of course, i would so i was hated. i was a disloyal benedict arnold republican for saying on what what they would never say on air. it's such a carbon copy of that where democratic senators, senior democratic senators trashing barack obama up and down when the red light is not on. red light comes on, they're muted. only difference between panetta and 80% of democrats in washington i've talked to is leon panetta is saying it while the camera light is on. what are your experiences. >> what panetta is saying what you hear from washington but hollywood democrat, the president doing a fund-raiser. i talked to prominent people in hollywood. almost all supporters feel disappointed for one reason or another. either all the elites in the
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democratic party are right or the president and his team are right and i think we'll learn over the next two years and history will record, you know, panetta says the president is more like a law professor than a passionate leader. i know that robert and others hear these things too but they largely dismiss them as not being relevant or being wrong. i think the judgment will be made if he can lead this coalition, if he can deal with the aftermath of the mid-terms question have a good final two years of his presidency but elite opinion is strongly against him on all these same issues. >> let's not forget panetta is getting paid and -- sdmres's not that kind of buy. >> he doesn't want to sell a book. >> he does. >> and doesn't want to have close ties to hillary clinton if she runs. >> he's held back on what he think. >> that's holding back? >> he does. >> okay. >> you know, part of this, this ongoing dialogue and ron gets to it in his piece and talked about it endlessly, part of it gets me
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to jack nicholson's line in "a few good men" the president is in a position where he can't look democrats or the country in the eye and say you can't handle the truth. we're going to be in the middle east for ten years fighting isis. this is not going away. but the good news is isis isn't coming here right now. they're contained. the bad news is we have an ally in turkey, we have several other allies and joe biden telling the truth last week who respect really our allies, we're in this alone and so do you want to invade syria? do you want to have another land war? do you want to commit hundreds of thousands more young americans to fight? mo. >> i don't know any of these critics who want that so we'll leave it there for now. up next new concerns over how ready our hospitals are to ham ebola cases after the first death from that virus here in the united states.
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dr. secrzeke emanuel joins us. plus, china takes over the u.s. as the world's biggest company or does it? steve ratner fact-checks the numbers ahead.
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enagage with us. we're deeply saddened by the death of the patient in dallas despite maximal interventions we learned today that he passed away and our thoughts go out to his family, friends, he is a face that we associate now with ebola. >> all right, that's the cdc director commenting on thomas eric duncan's death from the ebola virus, the first death here in the united states.
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joining us from washington former white house adviser for health policy and vice provost for global initiatives at the university of pennsylvania dr. ezequiel emanuel and on capitol hill, the administrator of u.sad dr. rajiv shah who is going to travel to sierra leone and guinea to look at the response. zeke, the question i'd like to start with, some are dancing around, but everyone is asking, the earlier you identify that somebody has ebola, does thain crease and impact possible survival, yes or no? >> well, look, you've got a disease where the mortality rate is 50%. the flip of a coin. and it's very hard to know whether one thing or another in any individual case led to this man's death because ebola is so fatal. but, you know, obviously you like to treat things earlier,
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there was several days lost and there was obviously bad communication at the hospital, but i think it's very hard to draw a straight line between bad communications, sending him home for two days and his death. he may have died anyway but certainly we know the hospital's actions didn't help and whether they led to his death will really never be known. >> joe. >> yeah, so zeke, how we can be guaranteed or assured this never happens again in america at any hospital in america, how do you we know? >> well, look, a guarantee is impossible to happen because you have individual human judgment and that's always potentially fallible. i do think this has been a wake-up call to the country to ask questions about people who potentially might have traveled to west africa, do that travel history more thoroughly and make sure more importantly i think that the whole team, the doctors, nurses, everyone
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interacting is communicating and be aware this is a threat even here. only 100 people -- >> zeke, for us to increase screening of the five airports in the united states -- >> well, you know, i think it's still we wouldn't have caught this man because he didn't have a fever coming into the country. he developed it four days later. so all you're going to get is people who have fevers and that, frankly n. this situation is nonspecific and quarantine them but people affected and still normal will get past that screening because all we're really going to be able to measure is, you know, their contacts and their temperature, so i think it's mostly a reassurance thing, but the real issue is vigilance on the part of the country and i do think this was a wake-up call to all the other hospitals in the country so i think that's going to be important. >> so that's that part here and then the other phase of this is,
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of course, containing and tamping down the virus in africa, mike. >> yes, and doctor, you are about to leave for africa so i would ask you one of the more contagious elements is fear, is panic, both here and i assume in africa where the disease is eradicating hundreds of thousands of lives so when you get there what is your principal focus on the ground when you do get there and offhandedly, what do you think about the proposal that has been made by political people here to shut down travel from africa to the united states? >> well, you know, president obama has said that this is a national security priority and, in fact, the only way to really fully protect yourselves is to address and eliminate ebola at its source in west africa. that's why i'm visiting the region next week, it's why the united states has mounted a massive global response
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investing more than $300 million over the last six months deploying the largest disaster assistance response team and centers for disease control team out to the region. we are already seeing hundreds of u.s. military personnel quickly scaling up the effort and i'd point out i do think we are seeing some cautious signs of momentum at building exactly the confidence you reference which is required to get over the tide and to turn around this epidemic in the endemic country. >> and the lack of drugs, mark halperin and other issues make it frightening. >> a tough issue for the country and world. if you had 300 million more dollars, what would you spend it on? >> it's what we're doing right now. we have a clear coherent three-part strategy. the first is building out ebola treatment units. we've already doubled the capacity of treatment in the last three weeks and we are going to have thousands of new ebola treatment unit beds come online between now and
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mid-december. the second part is to reach deep into communities and create ebola care centers, we have 57 under way in liberia. the united kingdom is building out more man 80 in sierra leone and seeing similar progress in guinea. and the third component which is very important and sometimes undervalued by our own analysis is this community mobilization and public education. we are using cell phone, radio, television, advertising to make sure that everyone understands how do you behave and protect yourself and avoid touching dead bodies. in the last few weeks we mobilized 50 burial teams that removed more than three-quarters of all dead bodies in liberia within 24 hours. >> dr. zeke emanuel and dr. rajiv shah, thanks to you both. should the terminally ill have the right to die on their own terms? we'll tell you about one woman's
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according to date father that caught our attention yesterday china has the world's largest economy, at least in one area, dropping the united states to a close second place.
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with us former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve rattner. we talk about china, america, what the future looks like obviously, china is going to continue to explode economically but tell us why you say that what we're hearing from yesterday doesn't exactly jive with the reality out there. >> i think there's two pieces to it, joe, the first piece is that as your intro said on an aggregate basis the total size they've overtaken us this year and you can see that on some charts we have where china is the red line and it's had this rather meteoric rise recently and now according to the imf it is at 18.7%, we're at 15.4%. i think that's as of next year so slightly overtaking us. but you have to remember china has a lot more people than we have and so if you look at this on a per capita basis, you see a very different picture. what you see is china has a
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percent of the u.s. on a per capital basis so each chinese matched up against each american going from down here less than 5% in 1980 up to 28.5%, so also a meteoric rise but still only about a quarter to 30% of u.s. levels so what it means is that the average chinese has a standard of living that you could -- on income that you could basically say is roughly 28% of ours. this is also adjusted for purchasing power differences, china is a much lower cost economy. so it is a fairly accurate way the imf has done it but gives you this mixed picture. now, there are those of us who believe that economic size equals power internationally, equals influence internationally and so the growth of china on an aggregate basis is significant. when you see them arm wrestling in the south china sea with vietnam and taiwan and japan this is all a reflection of their additional economic power. and the last thing i'd say about
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china, two last thing, one, they've got a very high savings rate and save as much as 50% of their income so when you read on the front page of "the new york times" today about them buying the waldorf-astoria for $2 billion it's because they save a lot of money and can go out and buy assets with it. >> mark halperin. >> based on pollutions with pollution and corruption and government in transition how good a market are they for us? are we selling a lot there. >> certainly having other countries grow is good for us from a trade point of view but china, we do not export a lot. >> why not? why respect we doing better? >> they are the low-cost producer. the problem is they are essentially taking our jobs, their wages are still very, very low, a fraction of ours so they produce and we consume and that is not a great place for us to be. >> if we look at that perfect storm of where the streams cross back at your original graphic is it that point of 2007 where we
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went into a recession and their economy sort of hit that uptick we really lost the traction necessary to not cross the streams. >> a good point, thomas. they handled the recession better than we did in terms of actually maintaining the growth rate while we were faltering but you basically have a growing economy, theirs is growing at 7.5%, maybe a little less but something like that this year. ours is growing at 3%, probably something less than that this year, 7.5%, 3%, it's going to spread. one other thing we all talk about china camping us. if you look at the great sweep of history, china was the largest economy in the world until the 1870s. if you go back to the 1820s china was 35% of world gdp aeropostale we were 2% so in a sense china is merely resuming its historic place in the world. >> steve rattner, thank you very much. coming up at the top of the hour more concerns over the effectiveness of the air strikes against isis and now jimmy carter is sounding off against
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the president's plan. plus, we'll explore the terror threat here in the u.s. with former homeland security secretary michael chertoff. he joins us in just a few minutes, plus a man was confronted by police and even pepper sprayed for breaking into a house. his own house. we'll tell you exactly why police made that big mistake. we'll be right back. so ally bank really has no hidden fees on savings accounts? that's right. it's just that i'm worried about you know "hidden things..." ok, why's that? no hidden fees, from the bank where no branches equals great rates. as the company that's all about printing. but did you know we also support hospitals using electronic health records for more than 30 million patients? or that our software helps over 20 million smartphone users remotely configure e-mail every month? or how about processing nearly $5 billion in electronic toll payments a year? in fact, today's xerox is working in surprising ways
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casually walking up to kobani. >> tanks towards kobani moving through fairly open spaces. >> isis tanks, isis vehicles freely roaming around the countryside for the last five days. >> isil fighters saying, yoohoo! taking numerous sunbathing breaks. look, what happened to the whole destroy and degrade plan? don't you guys realize if they take over kobani our entire yogurt supply will be in jeopardy. i'm being told that's chobani. [ laughter ] kobani is apparently a syrian kurdish town on the border of turkey and does not have real blueberries mixed in it. >> beautiful shot of washington, d.c. this morning. it is the top of the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." mark halperin and robert gibbs
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are still with us. joe, the president is getting criticism all around on his isis strategy. high up in status and from the left, really. >> yeah, no doubt bit. beautiful skies over washington this morning. troubled clouds over the white house, right. and it really is. i haven't seen anything like this actually since, well, since george w. bush in 2006 when everybody had turned on the commander in chief. >> i haven't heard from george w. bush. have you? >> not yet. >> it's have he interesting that the presidents that have shown dignity and restraint, george w. bush and intelligence -- george h.w. bush were so quick to trash on their way to the white house. now they found out it's tougher. have you ever -- did you ever see "gomer pyle." >> yes, i've seen "gomer pyle." why? >> so you know "gomer pyle."
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>> mark hall trinh. >> surprise, surprise, surprise, surprise. >> what the heck -- >> so, if -- if you're as old as mark halperin and me you probably remember reruns of "gomer pyle." this was a sitcom about the hapless marine in a brusque drill sergeant, sergeant carter. you may remember this classic episode where sergeant carter decided he was going to put together on base a chorus. the only problem one of the singers was so horribly out of key, the entire project turned into a fiasco. the tough sergeant who is so sure he has the best voice on base, he keeps looking for the clunker in the group. pyle, you're a clunker but it never occurred to him until the end thafr episode that he's the one that is so horribly out of tune with the rest of the group. you know, it's kind of like when you and me drive around town and we're constantly put off by the fact that everybody else is such a bad driver and we're the only good drivers in the greater new york area.
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or that you're the only member of your family that is not crazy. have you ever felt that? everybody else is crazy but me. or, well, you know, you get what i'm saying. >> yeah. >> maybe it's not everybody else in your family. maybe it's not everybody else on the road, maybe it's us that we need to look at. well, that's kind of how washington is running these days. we've actually got a guy in charge who thinks he's the most intellectually advanced, the most emotionally complete, the most temperamentally balanced of everybody else in washington, d.c. and america, what he never seems to notice is that everybody else is claiming that he's the one who is the clunker, the one who is singing out of tune. whether it's democratic presidents like bill clinton or jimmy carter, or whether it's his own secretary of defense, leon panetta or bob gates or whether it's just about any democratic senator who talks you off the record, as ron fournier was talking about last hour, you
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hear quickly the guy that needs to get in key is not the rest of washington, but president obama. let's hope he's more self-aware than sergeant carter because it would be a shame for his presidency and for america if barack obama waited until the end of his episode to catch on. and, mika, it's not just people in washington who are concerned, it's ambassadors, it's foreign leaders across the world that are very concerned about what they see, what they see as a lack of leadership and you look yesterday at what's happening in the middle east. turkey, our own nato ally sat by and did nothing while the united arab emirates was dropping bombs on isis to try to stop that siege from continuing. and what happened? turkey wouldn't even allow the uae pilots to use their airspace
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to defend turkey's border. this situation just goes from bad to worse every day. and the president, i think the president needs to shake up his white house in a significant way. >> there is new evidence that isis may be making gains despite american air strikes and resistance by kurdish forces. isis now reportedly controls much of the northern town of kobani, gunfire could be heard by observers just across the border in turkey but turkey remains on the sidelines for the conflict. on the sidelines. their inaction prompted protests from kurds that turned violent leaving at least 20 people dead and now "the new york times" reports that with the americans' renewed focus on isis syrian president bashar al assad has been free to resume his bombing campaign dropping barrels filled with explosives on rebel towns and villages. meanwhile, back home confidence is flagging in president obama's ability to manage the conflict. a cbs news poll shows 51% of
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americans disapprove of his approach with 40% supporting. the mother of an american hostage being held by isis posted a message on twitter to the leader of the terror group. her son who converted to islam was kidnapped while delivering aid to syrian civilians and her message reads in part "i'm trying to get in touch with the islamic state about my son's fate. i'm an old woman and abdul-rahman is my only child. my husband and i are on our own with no help from the government. we would like to talk to you. how can we reach you?" senate democrats are suddenly eyeing a new battleground where republicans thought they had thing s locked up pumping $1 million in south dakota, negative ads against mike rounds. halperin, you reported that last hour it's a last-minute attempt to hold on to a seat that they now view as winnable. is this a big turnaround. >> it's potentially a game changer for the republicans and democrats because if the
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republicans lose this seat i don't think they can win back control of senate. >> most polls show rick weiland and larry pressler down by double digits. this kansas independent greg orman is giving republican senator pat roberts a run for his money. a new fox poll shows roberts up 5 points, slightly better than previous polls, a recent cnn opinion research poll shows the margin even tighter with just 1% separating them. and in north carolina, a new "usa today" poll shows senator kay hagan clinging to the thinnest of leads over statehouse speaker tom tillis while in new hampshire jeanne shaheen seems to be holding on over former massachusetts senator scott brown up 6 in a new poll there. joe? >> mark hall trinh, the back and forth, pretty dizzying at this point and they seem to change every other day. right now you have a poll that actually has pat roberts number kansas and another has it tight and another has him down by ten
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points but south carolina always seems to be close, arkansas always seem to be relatively close. what are you hearing inside? do you sense that the democrats are more confident right now that they can hold on or that the republicans are more confident that it looks like their year. >> democrats are a little more confident. easy to look at the polls and not meaningless obviously but two other variables that will tell the tale as much in the last three weeks as anything he. one is the democratic ground game. those polls analyze -- make a presumption about who the voters will bement democrats' premise of saving the seat, saving the arkansas seat and trying to win in georgia is remaking the electorate turning out people who would normally volt. the other big thing democrats have to eliminate these republican challengers to win. cory gardner in colorado unacceptable. they have not done that yet. can they through negative advertising in these debates through opposition research pull
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that off? they haven't yet. if they don't do both of those things republicans will win the senate. >> robert gibbs, two fascinating stories in the newspapers in "the new york times," upshot talked about how democrats seem to be doing just as well in the ground game as they did a couple of years ago. in terms of comparisons with the republicans, they've got their ground game operation going. "the washington post" ran a story about how the koch brothers organization is pouring a lot of their money, a lot of their resources into improving the ground game in states like iowa. what are you hearing from people on both sides? does it look like it's still as mark suggesting possibly an advantage to the democrats in the ground game which, of course, made the difference two years ago? >> right, and, look, i think that the democrats have had the advantage in the last several cycles on the ground game. i think, you know, you both hit on it, which is what is the composition of this electorate? we saw the difference between a 2008 and 2010 as a big drop in
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democratic base voters, a big drop in younger voters and that's where the field program also have to kick in if democrats will be successful in states that will be tough to win. do they change that composition of the electorate from what it looked like in 2010 and end up eking out big wins? my guess is also both parties are very worried that, you know, everything could drift one direction or another in the last ten days and you could find, quite frankly, i think we'll wake up and see this, that one party will win almost all of these races, you know, the very close races by somewhere around like 51/49 but these tend to break in one big direction at the end. >> i want to get to a story out of oregon which is sparking millions of conversations online. here's the question. should people who are terminally ill have the right to die on their own terms? one woman with terminal brain cancer is using her final weeks to raise awareness about the issue.
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29-year-old brittany maynard moved from california to oregon because assisted suicide is legal in that state and she is planning to die on november 1st, two days after her husband's birthday. maynard was very active before her diagnosis in january running half marathon, climbing mt. kilimanjaro. she says she wants to live but doctors say her stage 4 cancer will be, quote, a terrible, terrible way to die. so maynard explains her decision in a video that millions have watched on youtube. take a look. >> i will die upstairs in my bedroom that i share with my husband with my mother and my husband by my side and pass peacefully with some music that i like in the background. i can't even tell you the amount of relief that it provides me to know that i don't have to die the way that it's been described to me that my brain tumor would take me on its own.
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>> and brittany has the full support of her husband. >> death with dignity allows for people who are in the predicament of facing a lot of suffering that they can decide when enough is enough. >> so, joe, oregon and four other states currently have death with dignity laws and when you think of all the things that we can provide in terms of health care for pain reduction and getting people better, sometimes there is no hope. i don't know, it makes sense to me what she's doing as tough as it is. >> yeah, you know, obviously there is a heated debate on this issue and state legislatures and online. but you look at that tape and you just want to just -- you know, leave it there. >> yeah. >> i let them make their decisions on how they want to live and how they want to die
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and whether somebody wants to in her case whether somebody wants to die that way as she says die with dignity. who am i on the east coast to tell this woman how to live and how to die on the west coast? and same with her husband this. is a deeply, deeply personal decision and the question is, for people to grapple with in the future, do you want her to die this way embassyfully in her bed or would you rather have her kill herself in a way that is not peaceful? >> exactly. >> and, yeah, i'm sorry go ahead. >> i do appreciate her sharing this so that this conversation can be had. we want to go to our top story and the fight against isis because joining us from washington is the former secretary of homeland security under president george w. bush, an executive chairman of the chertoff group, michael chertoff. good to have you on the show this morning. >> good morning. >> if i could sort of break into
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foreign policy first and ask you a little bit about the issue with turkey. because mark halperin, i'm hearing from sources that turkey wouldn't even let the uae use their airspace further complicating their mission. how do you define an ally, secretary chertoff and how should we be detyping turkey? >> well, i think, you know this, is the equivalent of a fair weather friend. it's pretty clear what turkey is doing is trying to leverage their strategic position to force us to do things that they think are more important. specifically go after assad and assad ought to be out of there but we've got to set our own priorities and this is a case where you really need to exert the maximum diplomatic pressure the u.s. has, turkey is a nato country and i think we ought to hold them to their obligations under nato to cooperate with us. >> joe? >> mr. secretary, i got a phone call from a friend several weeks ago who asked me if it was safe
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to stay in new york city because of isis. seemed like a silly question to me at the time then i had more people ask me that question, mika had more people ask that question. instead of asking you that question, i'll just ask, what is the gravest threat to citizens of new york city, to washington, d.c., to other high-risk areas? >> well, we've done an awful lot in the last dozen years to really increase our defenses and new york city has put in place a very robust intelligence capability and a really strong counterterrorism capability. i think what we're worried about is the possibility of people coming back from syria and iraq, american citizens who are entitled to return and some of them may be trying to carry on the fight here or as we saw in the case in london the other day, people who don't even go over but get radicalized over the internet trying to carry out the kinds of attacks that they see on television like a beheading, for example. are these going to be mass
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casualty attacks? probably not. are they going to be disturbing, particularly if social media are used in order to propagate bad images? yes, they could be disturbing. >> mark halperin. >> secretary chertoff, as you look at the reaction of the obama administration building the coalition, dealing with secret service controversy, dealing with the ebola crisis, as someone who looked at the question of reassuring the public of public health and national security emergencies and threats, how would you rate how the president and the administration are currently doing handling that leadership role on those three big issues. >> the challenge of communicating to the public is you've got to be accurate and also be out there and clear and explanatory and i think it's been uneven. you know, the first version of what happened with the secret service had to be amended. that's never a good thing. i think on the ebola issue, they came out yesterday with some strong presentations, i think, upping what they're doing at the airport makes a lot of sense. i think secretary johnson did a
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good job on some of the media, explaining what it is we're doing but, you know, the most important thing now with respect to isis and what's going on in the middle east is, now that we've said we'll, quote, degrade and destroy them, we better do it and as i watch kobani, if they take kobani and we haven't really put an effort in, we may have to start to look again at whether some ground elements have to go into the theater. >> secretary chertoff, thank you very much. still ahead on "morning joe" -- the latino vote may be the most coveted of all. demographics heading into 2016 and hollywood star eva longoria is doing everything she can to get out the vote. she joins us in our 8:00 hour. but first, we introduce you to spotify. they are redefining music on the web and "morning joe" had an exclusive look at their new york headquarters. ♪ come on and let me know ♪ should i split or should i go ♪
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all right. it's time to take a look at the morning papers. how are we doing. >> we're good. we're very good. >> we're good. "the wall street journal," mobile carrier at&t will pay out $105 million for putting bogus charges on customer cell phone bills. oh, wow. the settlement comes after years of claims users were being billed for services they did not request including daily trivia and horoscopes. at&t will pay $80 million to refund affected customers, 20 million in penalties to all 50 states and a 5 million fine to the ftc. all right. do we have joe? >> we sure do. >> yay. >> how are you doing, mika? >> everything is good.
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we're good. >> you seem a little concerned. a little upset. >> might have had a little fit. >> we're going to get her a bike helmet. >> you had a fit. >> yes. >> thomas, what was the little fit? >> well, we need a bike helmet in the studio because the lights are a little too close to the set and mika is -- >> over to the table and she stood up and -- >> excitedly -- >> hit her noggin. >> i always bang my head and so i'm getting a steel plate put in this morning. that's why -- i'm in a n nondisclosed location in nova scotia. they have the best steel plate implant doctor and, of course, all of canada. thomas, why don't you go ahead. yeah, thomas, why don't you -- i've been sitting here talking about absolutely nothing for the last five or six minutes hoping that perhaps someone would understand that i don't have prompter. but they haven't figured that
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out so i get to look at your beautiful faces. so, thomas, why don't you read the next article. >> reuters has a new report about a washington state woman who's facing a $700 bill for bouncing a $30 check to pay for her kid's high school lumps so a debt collection agency is now looking to garnish her wages over there. a local report says the mom of two was never served with court papers so she's going to have to appear in court to push back against this bill which includes monthly interest. now the attorney fees and the court processing costs so that's just going to skyrocket for this mom. >> so this is from "forbes" and i think it's me. a new study says multitasking may seem like it's good for business but it's bad for your brain. >> uh-huh. >> this is me. >> why do you think your head hurts right now, mika? >> it may not be the lights. researchers suggest people who handle several things demonstrated reduced efficiency in performance. another study says multitasking
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actually lowers your i.q. and negatively impacts concentration, organization and attention to detail. in addition to slowing you down it also lowers social and self-awareness. >> i thought that multitasking was supposed to be good for you. >> i'm sorry. >> yes. >> mika, stop that. >> okay. stop multitasking now. >> we look at the huffington post. police are facing criticism for pepper spraying a black teen in his own home after a neighbor reported a possible burglary. so moments after deshawn curry got home from school monday he found police officers downstairs and they had their guns drawn. the 18-year-old says that he tried to tell the police that he recently moved there with his foster parents but deshawn says the officer dis not believe that story because the foster family is white. >> oh, my god. >> and eventually -- >> no. >> even put him in handcuffs. >> it was like how can you tell
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me you stay here when all the kids in the picture are white? you know, i was like right then i really started to get mad. really? because i'm black, you know and the kids are white so you believe i don't stay here because of, you know, some pictures on wall? >> so the police department says that he was restrained because he threatened to become violent. the area has seen some increased crime, also -- >> it's his home. >> yeah, he's a foster child for this family. and -- the police did not buy his story. >> the detroit free press said a michigan police officer went above and beyond the call of duty. this week the officer pulled over a woman for not having her 5-year-old daughter secured in a car seat. when she informed him she couldn't afford one, a proper one, he asked her to meet him at walmart where he bought the child a booster seat. he says it was, quote, the easiest $50 he ever spent. i love that.
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>> that's a good story. >> yeah. all right. spotify is one of the fastest growing music streaming businesses in the world with more than 40 million users. you can access millions of songs and add them right to your personal playlist. do you have one. >> i do. i have it on my phone. >> what does it take to build such a massive digital network to find out, joe and our "morning joe" audio engineer david kwan vee, "q" as he's known around here visited and has a start-up feel and long-term goals. ♪ ♪ >> what's the secret? >> the secret is pretty simple. give something that's really compelling that people are willing to invest in and eventually they'll start paying for music. >> how did you get groups like zeppelin and pink floyd to
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finally realize that the future was here and they needed to join spotify? >> in order for that catalog to sustain and to have -- and to have meaning got to engage young people. got to go to where they are. ♪ >> what's it like being a techie here. >> we're a company about creativity. about music and to be surrounded by so much innovation helps push us to be, you know, a company about culture here in new york. >> listening habits. i love this. you say that the number one university in america that listens to jam bands is -- >> alabama. your alma mater. >> crazy. we just smoking pot and listening to fish all day dropping acid. >> we don't see some of the contexts around the listening? >> that's a surprise, isn't it? >> yeah. >> jam band. >> the cool thing with charts, charts have always been a big thing in the music industry. you get to see what we're all into. >> yeah. ♪ >> are we ready?
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>> so in the history of spotify can you tell us what the top three or four streaming songs have been. >> well, we have art i schli sa harris -- ♪ we fell in love as the leaves turn brown." >> kiza who i love. ♪ >> are you guys going to go public? is there going to be an ipo any time. >> we don't think about that. we think about taking this company from 10 million to 100 million people paying for music. ♪ >> we're going to go in to where your house band plays. thisser acalled the blacklist. >> wray. >> and they only play song tass -- >> that are bands that are -- >> you play for the house band here. >> yes. >> and joe played with you guys earlier. >> jumps on stage grabs a guitar and leads us through "jumping
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jack flash" and "should i stay or should i go ♪ ♪ come on and let me know -- >> i was actually pretty impressed. >> watch this move, okay, watch this move. watch this move. okay, ready. don't try this at home. one, two, three, four. ♪ >> that was good. joe, you can sing. >> got moves too. >> not bad. >> that octave is lower than i usually sing. the house band was a lot of fun and they asked if i like could play "should i stay or should i go" or "jumping jack flash." i said i've been playing those songs since 1943. i could play them in the dark. spotify, you know what's so exciting about this place is, obviously we love the music. we all love streaming the music from those guys. but also the tech culture in new york, especially downtown and over in brooklyn is so exciting.
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you don't have to go to silicon valley if you're a techie, you can stay right here and be a part of a lot of great companies like spot phi. >> right. like siliconally i think is the new name here in new york city. joe, they have a ton of space. that's what i was impressed by, the amount of space that you guys were touring around. it looks huge there. i want to know when we will get ping pong tables here. >> you know, it's so funny that you ask that question, i actually was thinking last night i needed to measure in our office. i'm going to put a ping-pong table -- i'm serious, where the big conference table is but i'm just wondering is that room wide enough? i think it is. >> no. >> i think it is. >> got to do it here in the studio. >> we'll do it in the studio. okay, great. >> you want to know what the "morning joe" crew is listening to on our spotify list, check out the personal top five songs while you're there. you can catch behind-the-scenes shots of our time at spotify. great piece, joe. we'll be right back. ♪
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the reason this keeps happening is that you don't show up at midterms. we get this hugely
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representative group of people who vote in presidential elections. everybody gets it. then they get around and say, well, why can't the president fix everything? oh, i forgot to vote in midterms. we know better than to let a bunch of people who don't give a rip about us come in and run all these ads slamming our officials. these ads, they make old mark pryor sound like he is leading a communication revolution in washington. the same thing will happen if you send a thunderous message to washington, d.c. by saying we know him. we knew his daddy. we know their family. this is arkansas. thank you very much. take your canned ads and go somewhere else. >> of course, one thing bill clinton didn't say is good old mark pryor is running 30-second ads saying that his opponent is responsible for the ebola virus. so there you go. with us now republican senator
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rob portman of ohio. he's with us. rob, thank you so much for being with us right now, of course. a real pitched battle for the future of the united states senate, the control of it. it seems every day we have different polls to tell us we'll go in different directions. the question to ask why is this game so close if you were putting it into sport as nals a but the party's approval ratings seem to be lower. why? >> i think republicans are ahead. i think if you look at this morning, joe, looked at the real third party average and said republicans will win 52/48 and that means winning a lot by incumbents. six seats to win the majority and looks like we're on track to do that but it is 26 days before the elected which as you well know is a lifetime in politics so things could change. looks pretty good for republican. >> mark. >> describe the democratic strategy as you see it being out in campaigning with folks to win
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to hold their majority. what's their strategy? a lot of what joe said regarding the arkansas race. a lot of negative ads and democrats are spending more on tv than republicans and trying to disqualify the republican candidates but the great thing this year for republicans, mark, is we've got terrific candidates and spent a lot on the recruiting side and tom cotton described by former president clinton, he eserved his country and did a great job in congress. that's typical around the country. joanie in iowa -- >> yeah. >> we got some great candidate. >> minimum wage is a huge issue the democrats are talking about. have you all countered that effectively and spoken to working class voters in a way you think counters that message? >> i think we have but more importantly economists have who looked at this and said, hey, this will result in lost jobs so in ohio we have a minimum wage above the national average and set to the inflation of i'm okay with that and support that but i think the problem is raising it
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too far and too fast the way the democrats want to, the congressional budget office, the nonpartisan group has said that's going to result in a bunch of jobs being lost. that's the thing people are most worried about will we start to bring back the jobs. >> a question, that's a response, that's a criticism of the policies of the democrats. if we could play a little game and put a clock on 20 second, what's the republican message? what's the positive message of the republican party? >> it's a really exciting year for republicans because we're talking about actually getting the economy back on track. bringing back the jobs with a majority we could immediately do things that would help give the economy a shot in the arm, a needed shot in the arm. think about keystone excel pipe up line happen in the first couple of weeks, the biggest in america, 42,000 new jobs. think about tax reform. the president is talking about companies that are taking jobs overseas. we want to solve that problem. we could do that. think about regular tory relief that create jobs and a great
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opportunity whether you're a republican, a democrat or independent to actually change the dynamic in washington. washington is broken. it's disfunctiysfunctional and economy moving. >> joe. >> hey, rob, a question from twitter. somebody wanted me to ask you about background checks. we talked about it the other day, quinnipiac poll said 92% of americans still support them. you voted against them. why. any way to craft a background check bill in the future you'd support? >> i support background check, joe, and as you know they're in place, the question is how do you expand that and do you do so in a way that, you know, doesn't take away people's second amendment rights. i think there may be a way to do that. but the fact is background checks are in place, one of the things i focus on is mental health as a lot of republicans saying let's deal with this underlying problem and being sure people who have mental health problems cannot get a gun but dealing with this broader problem of how do we avoid these kinds of horrific shootings we
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see by getting at the mental health issue up front. >> yeah, i certainly agree with you on the mental health issue. we need to focus a lot more on that but obviously the background check system we have is not working. what can we do to expand it and make sure more don't fall through the cracks including terrorists who want to do us harm. >> enforcing the law, a lot of people who are currently app applying for a gun and who have a mental health issue or some other disability including a felony are not being prosecuted so one of the things to do is do the prosecutions much more aggressively and get the states to enforce the law and if we do that, we'll be able to tighten up the background system which is something that i think as you say americans support. >> senator rob portman, always good to see you. how much. >> mika, thanks very much. >> after what mark just showed me, i look at you in a whole new way. he's -- >> got me in trouble. >> he's good with his hands and stealing things. >> he's america's leading
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bicycle booster in -- >> you have to explain what that is. >> my tear tippial image of you has been completely debunked in a very good way. >> no hands on the bike. >> still ahead, a "morning joe" exclusive, former san antonio mayor julian castro joins us for his first interview since becoming secretary of housing and urban development. up next why "time" magazine is saying it's critical for families to take back their kitchens. we'll explain. we'll be right back. ♪ riding around with the car top down and the radio on ♪ so ally bank really has no hidden fees on savings accounts? that's right. it's just that i'm worried about you know "hidden things..." ok, why's that? no hidden fees, from the bank where no branches equals great rates. no question about that. but your erectile dysfunction -
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blaming the national school lump program. the times news reports the food is so bad students are desperately seeking out other options from bringing their own lunch to sneaking off campus to buy fast food or skipping lunch altogether. championed by first lady michelle obama families say the program has failed their children. students say the food is bland, missing all flavor and doesn't taste good or as one parent put it, the food was, quote, not edible. you know, i think we can do better but i will not put opinion on this. i'll let others do that here with us now best-selling food writer mark bittman here to reveal the latest issue of "time" magazine, your latest book "i, i love it. we're all busy and we need to make food at home. but it's hard because you want to find recipes that are fast. here you go. and encyclopedia of how to -- i'm going to do my weights while we talk.
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18 pounds. okay. first of all looking it he cover of "time" magazine what's the concept here and what are we missing? >> well, the concept is why we need to cook and what we're miss something that by ceding control of what we put in our mouths we're creating basically a health care crisis. i mean we all -- wasn't dough have to go over -- >> i agree. >> -- the numbers on diabetes or heart disease. we all know this stuff. the problem is what we're eating and the only way you can really control what you're eating is by cooking. by feeting yourself at home. so when the kids are skipping lunch, of course, they're better off bringing their own lunch or not eating at all. what they're not better off doing is going out and buying fast food. that's really where the problem lies. >> it changes the taste buds which take -- if you really want to change the way you eat you have to make the change for about a month to re-adjust them but your taste buds get used to salt, sugar and fat that are in the foods you boouy already prepared for you.
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> for most people if you cook your own food salt, sugar and fat aren't a big problem because you know what you're putting in there. so -- >> go ahead. >> you know what you're putting in there. you won't oversalt your food. you're not going to put a cup of sugar in what you're eating for dinner. you won't use eight tablespoons of butter while you're cooking. you'll look at this and say what's a moderate way of putting this together? >> right. >> there is a skill involved here and need to learn how to cook. we've abandoned that craft. some good, some not so good. >> how do we get over the two-parent working household and the hurdle of how to cook fast, you know, you come home, it's a takeout nation in many urban areas. you know, you get something on the way home, hot, already prepared to throw down on the table for a couple of kids and your husband or your spouse. >> it tastes awesome. >> you know, you feel like you have 15 or 20 minutes to get it done because we have -- we're so ridiculously consumed with time
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management issues. how do we get over that. >> there's a way we've made cooking a spectator sport. we have time to watch cooking on television but don't have time to do it. there's an odd disconnect there. >> oh, my lord. >> if you have a decently stocked kitchen, a well-stocked pantry and food in the refrigerator, you can get dinner on the table in 20 or 30 minutes. we talk about that in here. what my book is about. this -- it's not that much faster to pick stuff up on the way home if you're prepared to cook. if you invest some time in a pantry, if you invest time in equipment, some organization and obviously again you have to learn the skill. there is a question here of priorities. what do you want? if you want to do take-out, if you think it's better, if you think it's fine, there's nothing any of us can do about that. >> yeah. >> but we are looking at an increasingly sick population and part of that is the way we eat. >> how do you get more guys to cook. >> that's a big question too and
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more guys, when you and i were younger was almost a stigma for men to cook. it's not anymore. there are plenty of guys cooking. to some extent it's women saying this is something we need to do. >> yeah. >> and it's men recognizing it. >> you know what on a totally different angle as we go to break, eating together. >> well, the whole -- >> important for the family. >> the whole thing of you're healthier if you sit down and eat a real meal. >> all right, 25 -- how to cook everything fast by mark bittman, this could help. this could at least help. mark, thank you. we will look for the new issue of "time." how to eat now. we need help with that. up next a couple with twins thought everything was on track with their mortgage application until the lender suddenly reversed its approval. the troubling reason why and why the government got involved. also, secretary julian castro joins us next with that. we'll be right back.
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>> joining us now for a "morning joe" exclusive, housing and urban development secretary julian castro and first time here as a cabinet secretary. >> great to be with you, mika. >> you, announcing a settlement over alleged maternity leave
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discrimination. how big is this story and what is the precedent you are setting? >> this is significant because we investigated 170 cases where lenders when they find out that someone is pregnant or on maternity leave reject a loan application for a home that otherwise would have been accepted. today's settlement is a $5 million settlement with wells fargo home mortgage which is the largest home mortgage lender in the country. we had a number of these cases each year and we investigated 15 case this is year alone and settled 40 of them over the last four years. fortunately the good news is this is a settlement and wells fargo stepped up the play and agreed to make changes to how their folks approach applicants who are on maternity leave. >> is settling good news?
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maternity leave discrimination sounds like the dark ages and seems like you should move forward and act. >> no question this should not be happening. the good news is that policies will change and a clear message is being sent to the folks who are underwriting the loans that it is not appropriate to discriminate based on the fact that a woman is pregnant and a family is expecting. that i think is very positive. >> mr. secretary, what is the plan at hud for more affordable housing in urban areas where people cannot afford to live close to their work? >> thanks a lot for the question. hud spends about 86% of its $47 billion budget on keeping a roof over people's heads. we are still investing in many of the programs we have been investing in for a while and public housing and project
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assistance and section 8 vouchers and looking at new ways to work with the private sector to renovate the older public housing units that are going into disrepair and the need to be improved so folks can live in them. we lose about 10,000 housing units every year. we are also looking at working with the department of transportation and the department of education to approach this thing holistically so folks can live in a neighborhood that is comfortable and safe with a good school and close to transportation options. not just from the perspective of housing alone. >> secretary julian castro, thank you very much and good to have you on the show. up next, another tough critic. it's former president jimmy carter weighing in on the isis strategy.
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ebola's first victim on u.s. soil thomas eric duncan passes away in dallas. we will speak with the city's mayor. why the artificial turf that your kids are playing on could be hazardous to their health. an investigation that parents will want to see. much more when "morning joe" returns.
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good morning. it's thursday, october 9th. welcome to "morning joe." we have the managing editor of
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bloomberg politics. good to see you. in washington, former press secretary for president obama, robert gibbs and mike barnacle is with me. how are you? >> doing very well, thank you. >> good. we have a vast array of news. we will start with isis where there is new evidence that isis may be making gains despite american air strikes and resistance by kurdish forces. isis controls much of the northern tone of kobani. gunfire could be heard in turkey, but turkey remains on the sidelines. their inaction from po tests leaving at least 20 people dead. the renewed focus and syrian president has been free to resume his bombing campaign, dropping barrels filled with explosives on rebel towns and villages.
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confidence is flagging in president obama's ability to manage the conflict. a poll shows 51% of americans disapprove of his approach with 40% supporting. a mother posted a message on twitter on the leader of the terror group. her son who converted to islam was kidnapped after delivering aid and her message reads in part this. i am trying to get in touch with the islamic state about my son's fate. i am an old woman and this is my only child. my husband and i are on our own with no help from the government. we would like to talk to you. how can we reach you? it's not just the american people who seem to have lot of confidence. in an interview with the ft. worth star telegram. the 39th president of the united states is critical of president obama's middle east strategy saying it changes from time to
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time and president obama draws lines in the sand and never follows through. we waited too long. we let the islamic state build up money and strength and weapons while it was still in syria and when isis moved into iraq, the sunni muslims didn't object and about a third of the territory in iraq was abandoned. he added if we keep on working in iraq and have ground troops to follow-up when we do our bombing, there is a possibility of success. president obama recently blamed the media for his negative press saying all it does is feed cynicism and cook up phony scandals. robert gibbs and mark halprin. is that a fair assessment of the press? we will start there and your reaction to jimmy carter's statements. >> well, look. i think what former president carter said is what others have said. my hunch is that the white house
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is somewhat used to the criticism. they heard whether it was the red line in syria or waiting too long that is criticism they heard. i think this is going to be a time period in which there is going to be second-guessing and i think there will be time to make air strikes using isis. >> close to the administration, i think when you have a former president and you have two former secretaries of defense have a little bit of a problem, leon panetta said the president lot of his way and pulling out of iraq created a vacuum in terms of the ability of that country to better protect itself. it's out of that vacuum that isis began to breed. bob gates splits with the president over issues of boots on the ground saying troops are necessary if there is hope of success. hillary clinton at odds with
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president obama over arming the syrian rebels. she told the atlantic that president obama's failure to do so led to the rise of isis. she took a swipe at his doctrine saying great nations need organizing principals is don't do stupid stuff as organizing principal. some of this is easy to say when you are not the president. it's always to say boots on the ground would be better. it's easy to say that. >> the facts on the ground with isis are really bad. people in the white house can easily dismiss this stuff and say it's chatter and just insiders. the reality is when leon panetta joined this course, the president has a public relations and image problem and it's hurting him not just with elites in the united states, but overseas as well. the last thing is that leon panetta's criticism is shared by a lot of senior people in the
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government. >> he is getting criticism for doing it now. >> i would like to see a poll on how many americans would feel more comfortable with jimmy carter leading the states rather than barack obama. i would success barack obama have resounding success on that. we are surrounded in the east with no allies. joe biden came pretty close to the truth. >> he always does. >> we are surrounded with allies who are not allies. the president from turkey said for us, pkk, the kurdish political party within turkey, it's the same as isis. that's what we are dealing with. >> a member of nato. >> letting a slaughter house miles from the border. >> we is have a near base 100 miles from the border. turkey refused to allow that air base be used for offensive
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operations against isis. that's what we are dealing with. >> we look at the mid-terms. senate democrats are eying a new battle ground where republicans thought they had things locked up. national democrats are prompts a million dollars on negative ads against candidate mike rounds. this is a last minute attempt to hold on to a seat. they now view it as winnable. >> democrats are crafty and never take anything for granted. they looked at a four-way race where mike brown refuses to run ads. they have two candidates who can win and allow them to keep control. kansas that is in play and georgia. they hope south dakota can win. if they win both, they keep control.
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>> most show an independent down by bubble digits. >> i guy who refews to run negative ads? tell me about him. >> he is a really nice guy and he succeeded, but he doesn't believe in it. it helped that someone will rin this race with 35% of the vote and it could be pressler and wheel and and could most likely be rands. >> he is giving pat roberts a run for his money. slightly better than previous polls. a recent research poll shows the margin sighter which is 1% separating them and in north carolina, a new poll shows senator kay hagan clinging to the thinnest of leads over tom teleis. jean shaheen seems to be holding on to the lead in a new poll there.
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what do you think? >> this is going to be an important month to determine senate control. campaigns really matter. a lot of candidates will go into debates and a lot of campaigns are going to get a chance to show what their message is standing next to their opponent. they have a lot of races that are up in the air. many of the races that mark mentioned whether it's a place like georgia or louisiana, these are places that could see run offs and extend the debate as to who will control the senate into december and maybe early january. i would point out there was a poll a couple days ago that showed kentucky, the democrat allison grimes up on mitch mcconnell. there is a lot that is left in play. >> i want to turn to the ebola crisis. the front page of the dallas morning news tells you
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everything you need to know about the we have the first death from the virus in the united states. thomas eric duncan has passed away eight days after testing positive for ebola. there now questions. if hospital errors cost duncan his life. >> he complained of symptoms on the 24th and went to the hospital on the 26th and was sent home with antibiotics. he was treated with a ventilator and treated with an experimental drug. his body is dangerously contagious. they must wrap the body for immediate cremation or to be placed in a specially-sealed casket. the ten people who had direct contact is his fiance and her family who were in the apartment where they stayed. her pastor broke the news at a home keeping a safe distance. >> the thoughts not only go to
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the shock and sadness of losing mr. duncan, but also whether this will be the course their life will take next. >> a sheriff's deputy has been hospitalized after feeling ill. he is not showing symptoms of ebola and there is very little risk he has the virus, but it is the latest example of a city that will remain on edge for the near future. >> i'm on pins and needles every day in dallas this week. throughout the whole 21 days. the signs tell you this week is critical. as we move forward, we want to get through the whole 21 days. >> the u.s. is screening travelers from west africa at five airports. kennedy in new york and dulles in virginia will be among the locations taking temperatures and asking health questions.
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president obama urged 1500 state health officials to act with urgency. the possible cases of ebola. duncan's death shows we don't have a lot of margin of error. minnesota vikings running bake adrian peterson made his first appearance in court entering no contest to a felony child abuse charge. defense attorney rusty hard in said he is pushing for an expedited trial and urged everyone to not rush to judgment. >> please be tolerant to the fact that adrian is champing at the bit to publicly talk and defend himself. the only reason he hasn't is insisting and jumping up and down and saying the solution is for you to get a speedy trial and resolve this in a courtroom. i want to try to be like the coach of the new england patriots. we are on to trial.
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if you ask me another question or third question, i am going to say we are on to trial. have a great day. >> roger goodell addressed the media with team owners that focused on the league's personal conduct policy. >> there was a consensus among the owners that now it might be better for the league and for you to not be completely overseeing it with discipline? >> we have been debating about whether there is a better princess. a princess that is more effective and efficient. it's fair. i wouldn't say there was a consensus other than when things affect the integrity of the game. i believe the ownership feels that that is something that is very important for the commissioner to retain that authority. >> so when asked whether he should testify in an appeal of ray rice's suspension, he said it's up to a neutral arbitor to
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decide. joe, with the cases where there is quick action and some of them are going straight to court and roger goodell making changes within the nfl organization, bringing women in and having what we saw happen. also what we are seeing on the local level. the new jersey story of the football season that was canceled. you see a change in culture. >> this fall has really been a defining moment for football not just in the nfl, but fsu having to back down and suspend their trophy winner for the entire game instead of having a slap on the wrist. on a high school level too. right now roger goodell has the confidence in the owners and you look at a poll, roger goodell has the confidence of the fans and roger goodell by default has the confidence of the advertisers who make it a
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multibillion business. he won the battle and the bigger question is whether the nfl and organized football as a whole wins the long-term war. you know and i know living in suburbia, talking to fellow parents that right now football is and football was the center of my family's life growing up. you had the bible and you had football. it's not that way anymore. the question is, will the nfl be around 20 or 30 years from now? most likely, but they are going to change it and hopefully this was a learning moment. >> on two levels. on the culture and the health issues. still ahead, we will be joined by the mayor of dallas following the death of the ebola patient in that city.
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later this hour, eva longoria is our guest. up next, the odds on favorite to win this year's nobel peace prize. edward snowden may be giving pope francis a run for his moan. out of sight and nowhere to be found. the bizarre disappearance of north korean leader kim jung un. he has not disappeared. bill has a check on the forecast. he is right here. >> good morning, everyone. st. louis by far the worst morning commute anywhere across the country dealing with thunderstorms and heavy rain. over a half inch of rain already and it clips the city over the next half hour and things improve for you. most of the heavy rain is to the north. you can see not a pretty morning there either. very cloudy and definitely on the dreary side. the po steshl prwe are expectin
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two to four inches today and tonight. anywhere in green is a chance of rain. some of that right along the ohio river into areas of the ohio valley. a beautiful day after a chilly start. new england and great lakes look good. tomorrow intoed from, the rain will arrive from friday night. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. so ally bank really has no hidden fees on savings accounts? that's right. it's just that i'm worried about you know "hidden things..." ok, why's that? no hidden fees, from the bank where no branches equals great rates.
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time to take a look at the morning papers. we start with a christian science monitor. edward snowden is topping a list for the nobel peace prize. the contractor who leaked reams of government secrets is evaporated by members of the committee as well as boards of leading norwegian papers. even if he wins, he is going to skip the awards ceremony. they will arrest him at the border. the announcement is out this friday. >> the star ledger with new information about the hazing scandal and the details are disturbing. a parent of a player in the school's football program, they said freshman players would be pinned down and subjected to acts that were sexual explicit
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in nature. they followed the school board's decision to cancel the remainder of the football season h. in a heated meeting, parents and students expressed outrage over the entire team being punished for acts carried out by a small number of players. >> no one was hurt. no one died. i don't understand why they are being punished to forfeit a game was punishment enough. i don't believe that the punishment fits the crime. >> i just have one question. when is the next board election? [ applause ] >> you guys have no respect for us as parents to talk us to before you talk to the media. you should have came to us first. we found out after the fact. we have not had enough respect. >> wow.
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i don't know what to say expect that is the some point this behavior from the top down has to be cut. i think it's brave what the c l school board is doing. >> if kids are being freshmen. if 13 and 14-year-olds are being pinned down and having sexual abuse acts performed on them or anything that comes close to that, the culture is so screwed up that i think the school board stepped in and did the right thing. i have been asking a lot of questions on whether you should punish everybody for this. this is a much larger cultural issue. i think the players on the team should be allowed to play at other area high schools and this school needs to think about what happened. the coaches need to be fired immediately. there is no way this should go on in a high school locker room in america. >> it's like a hydra that needs
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to be extinguished. a couple of kids get punished, but the culture is extinguished. you can understand the parents being so po'ed about it. >> i can understand why they are angry. >> rumors continue to swirl as kim jung un appears to be missing in action. he has not been seen in public since september 3rd. they said his health is ailing with reports that he may be suffering for gout. they ruled out rumors of a possible coop. they are anticipating a possible public appearance on the anniversary of the founding of the worker's party. >> joe? >> i think i might have gotten gout in college at the university of alabama when i had dreamland ribs for breakfast, lunch, and dinner eight weeks straight. let's go to the hollywood
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reporter, late night hosts and jay leno is on the tv come back. the show host is reportedly set to host a new show on cnbc and will focus on his love of cars. the details are being ironed out, but last year the executive said "nothing would make us happier than to have leno have a presence on our network." >> that sounds kind of cool. the "new york daily news," the brooklyn district attorney is investigating allegations that a police officer stole $1300 in cash during a stop and frisk incident. you can see the officer patting down lamar joy in a brooklyn park a few weeks ago. you can see the officer pull out what appears to be a wad of cash. when joy protests, the officers pepper spray him. >> good lord. >> he pepper sprays his sister
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as well. no raves were made. he said it was his birthday and he was carrying cash for a night on the town with his wife. officers are responding to reports of a man with a gun and there other stories. >> out of control. i have three words for you. cameras on cops. >> up next, the dallas hospital treating thomas eric duncan initially sent him home when he came in for treatment. that may have been critical lot of time to save his life. the mayor of dallas joins us next. how safe is the artificial turf kids are playing on. is there a potential health risk? a story every parent will want to see this morning. we'll be right back. your customers, our financing.
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america's conversation starts here on "morning joe." >> and it continues here at
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afternoon mojoe. >> innovators who are making things happen. >> exclusive introduce. >> it takes ten years of constant trying and failure to become an overnight success. >> mounting tensions in dallas. that's the front page of the newspaper where thomas eric dunk an became the first person to die in the united states from ebo ebola. could more have been done to save him. mr. mayor, good to have you back on the show. isn't the answer yes? i'm not going to play this game. isn't the answer yes that more could have been done? >> i think as you look through the process moving faster is
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better. things were a little slow as far as i was concerned early in the process. what part of that makes a difference, i don't know. i have a tough enough time taking my vitamins let alone dealing with the what ifs. there is a lot of discussion on that. needless to say we are very sad today and yesterday when we heard of his death. >> thomas? >> it is a real tragedy as we spoke earlier. this is a critical time period for the 48 people under observation, ten specifically in dallas. what are the updates like for you that it's breathless for you when you get those reports. how are the people faring? >> knock on wood. we had no reports and we test them twice a day. those folks call me. after i'm done here i will be listening for the morning report. we are in this critical stage.
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i want to get through this week and get through the whole 21 days. we have to remind people there is zero chance of getting this unless you came in contact with the patient with active symptoms. those are the folks we are looking at. we have about nine, eight or and the remainder are in the low risk. >> what about the superior out of spain and the spanish nurse whose pet was euthanized. do we know if thomas eric duncan came in contact with pets and a warning for the 48 people you have under quarantine for any of their animals and any type of risk that they may pose. >> i was not toll of any animals in the apartment complex and in
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the apartment that he came in contact with and yes, we have a protocol in place where if somebody shows symptoms, high fever and any of the diarrhea or vomiting that we will make sure they are quarantined and including the animals around. that's the moment of truth when they start to be symptomatic. >> mayor, thank you very much. now to an nbc news investigation on the artificial turf that millions of children play on across the country. could some of the material being used in the turf be making some players sick? stephanie goss took an indepth look at the issue and joins us with that. >> good morning. this is an issue that is going to resonate with a lot of parents and anyone who sweeps up the black dots after practices or games and communities around the countries.
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natural gas has been replaced and now some including a soccer coach are asking is it really safe? >> casey sullivan may have taken a soccer game like this for granted. if he had never gotten that diagnosis. >> the doctor came in and said in all my years of medical practice, this is the worst chest x-ray i had seen. >> hodgkin's lymphoma stage 4. he was a college student, a young fit goalkeeper on the soccer team. >> the doctors never had a good answer. >> after beating the cancer, he saw the soccer coach amy griffin on the local news. two of her goalkeepers were diagnosed with similar cancers. a terrible coincidence until taking one for chemotherapy. >> the nurse said don't tell me you guys are goalkeepers. you are like the fourth i hooked up with this week. she said i have a feeling it has
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something to do with the black dots. >> this is the stuff. >> it is shredded car and truck tires used to fill the space between artificial blades of grass. they contain the chemicals found in most tires. the agency for cancer research labels four carcinogens and adding at low levels of exposures, they are safe. goalkeepers more than any other player roll around more than any other practice. >> we ingest it as a goal keeper and it's unavoidable. >> sullivan reached out and now he is on the list and names the coach continues to gagger of soccer player who is developed different cancer. 38 all together, 34 of them are goalkeepers. a list is not scientific proof. there is no research directionally drinking the rubber exposure to cancer. >> many are related cancers, but
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there others too. what i would say is in general it's very difficult to study the relationship between environmental exposure and cancer. >> no available is its replicate goalkeeper playing conditions, but researchers states and localities defend the safety. this man has a ph.d. in chemistry and sits on the board. >> there is a preponderance of evidence to this point. they said it is safe. >> an investigation put that assertion to the test gathering is it thes and speaking with pediatricians and scientists and group who is say more research should be done. >> turf fields come with a number of risks and real benefits. every community that is faced with deciding what they want to put in has to weigh the different risks and benefits for that situation. >> among the available studies, the turf council posts to one done by the epa in 2009.
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the agency itself describes the conclusions as limited. nbc news requested an interview, but after several e-mails and two phone calls, the epa refused. in a statement, a spokesperson said the use of rubber remains a state and local decision and more testing needs to be done. >> if more research needs to be done, why are we allowing our children to play on the surface? >> more research can always be done. the question is whether or not the synthetic turf is safe. we have 14 studies on our website that says we can find no negative health effects. >> pro athletes and school kids are playing on more than 5,000 crum rubber fields. new york city parks and los angeles schools no longer install the surface. other cities with the turf say it's cheaper and more durable than grass and provides more
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space for kids to play. he wants his girls to play soccer and worries about their exposure. >> our oldest is 4 years old and i wouldn't want her to be a goalkeeper. >> no way i would put my kid on that turf until i knew more. why can't they? >> this research is extremely expensive and difficult to do. many of the people we spoke to think it is something that the federal government needs to steep up and handle. both the epa and the consumer product safety commission have done studies in the past and now people like casey sullivan and coach griffin are asking them to now step up and take charge of this. >> that's an amazing story. thank you so much. appreciate it. stephanie goss. still ahead, how to build a business where everyone is a winner. the chairman of the container store joins the economic system.
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i love the container store. i buy things i don't need because i like them too much. i am too organized. it's time to stop. plus, you know her from hits like "desperate housewives." my brother is obsessed with her, but she is becoming a force to reckon with in democratic politics. eva longoria joins us in a few minutes. we'll be right back. when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting. and when alan gets all powered up, ya know what happens? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! he's a selling machine! put it there. and there, and there, and there. la quinta inns & suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only a laquinta.com! la quinta!
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ceo of the container store and he's the author of uncontainable. how conscious capitalism built a business where everyone thrives. i love the concept. joining us is our friend and ceo of partners miles nadal. from cnlc hebcnbc, good lord. this is a heavy hitters segment. i am uncontainable. this is a concept and a good way of doing business. >> it's a quirky yummy culture that we say that really puts the employee first. we think if you take better care of the employee than anyone else, if you do that, she will take better care of the customer and they are both ecstatic. employee first and culture. do everything you can for them and they will do everything they can for you. >> pay scales for them and
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average pay scales and health care. flush that out a bit. >> 15 to 20% above. if you pay people what people pay at the top. the people closest to the customer are making 50 to 100% above industry average. we have this thing that is so important for a great place to work. we only hire great people and that's who people want to work with. you want to work with great people and go home feeling great. >> i couldn't reiterate what you are saying more strongly. we talk about the place where great talent lives. if you create an environment where people are more productive and appreciated on a humane and professional basis and people have unlimited upward mobility and you retain the most valuaable asset you have which is the talent.
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>> let me bring that back to you. wages are stagnant. that's not going up. >> the last report when it came to that. i would point out i'm like you. it got hit really, really hard and it fell 25% almost in a day weighs of weak steals. how long do you think you can keep wages as high as that compared to the rest of the retail sector? are they under threat at all? >> the store sales were down 4/10 of 1%, 1.5% below where we thought they were. a little sluggishness in sales right now. you have sluggish sales presidentperiod cally. >> how do you get wages up?
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>> if performance appreciates, you get the compensation. that's the philosophy we had. >> is that happening? >> in ours it is, and few firms have a pay for performance culture. as you talked about a lot of it is pay at the top versus pay at the bottom. if you are paying on an equal basis throughout the organization based upon the performance of the organization and people's individual contributions, you will get paid appreciation. >> if you hire great people, you get three times the productivity. >> michelle, we are talking about point of contact in terms of you walking into the store, the person you meet, you want to like them. that is person is happy and making 50% more than the average person. my question to you is yesterday, the market shoots up because of the single word. interest rates are going to
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remain low for a while. you get very few people on wall street or in the news talking about take home pay. the big divide between wall street and take home pay. >> we have economists who talk about the fact that wages have lagged in a way that they are surprised about and this recovery hasn't been as strong as many would have hoped by now. i'm not sure they want people to have lower pay. they are addicted to cheaper money which is what we promised by the federal reserve. i don't know if that answers your question or not. >> it does as always. >> ten seconds. >> gdp is quite modest. 2 1/2% and you need that. >> that miles. he is uncontainable.
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the book is uncontainable. always great to see you. michelle caruso cabrera, great to see you. eva longoria joins "morning joe" next. $21. could something that small make an impact on something as big as your retirement? i don't think so. well if you start putting that towards your retirement every week and let it grow over time, for twenty to thirty years, that retirement challenge might not seem so big after all. ♪ are the largest targets in the world, for every hacker, crook and nuisance in the world. but systems policed by hp's cyber security team are constantly monitored for threats. outside and in. that's why hp reports and helps neutralize more intrusions than anyone... in the world. if hp security solutions can help keep
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>> eva longoria will cohost the alma awards in honor of hispanic
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heritage month. great to have you on the show. >> how are you? good morning. >> i have been following your career since you were gabby on "desperate housewives." my brother is obsessed with you. >> good! >> is there any gabrielle in eva? please say no. >> no, no, no. it was fun playing her because she was selfish and a runway model. i'm 5'2". >> you were great and you have done a lot since then. this friday you are hosting the alma awards. that will be fun and you have great chemistry. i am wondering if he is that nice in real life. >> mario? no, he's not. >> i figured. it wasn't possible. >> he's the great and the greatest cohost. he's just easy to work with and
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fun and energetic and i'm always and here we go. he's always on. >> that's a lot of energy. good luck with that. you guys are both great performers and you bring so much to the table, but there so many incredible people that you will be honoring that night. it's a big night. >> we are very excited. we will be on msnbc live. the alma awards, this is the 15th year doing it. we are the only awards show that celebrates the positive images in television and film and music. it's important that we define in the media how we want to be represented, especially in a time where news cycles constantly portray latinos as a certain way. we want to counter that with the celebrating and the applauding
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of everybody doing so much and contributing so much to pop culture. for us it's important. >> how is it exactly that they don't feel connected to the process or what is maybe the flip side to the question. what's the opportunity that politicians are missing. >> that's a great question because both things actually are very important. apathy and the future turn out of hispanic voters. so sometimes when you look at a congress like we have right now, people get disillusioned with the process. that's where this thought comes in of my vote doesn't really count. look, i didn't make a difference. things are still not happening. there is so much good luck. that's disappointing, but i people when i go across the country that politics is not a speck stator sport. you cannot have the ball and play unless you are voting. i think in 2012 we had a
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historic turn out for the latino community, but now in the mid-terms, that falls off. obviously across the board in general it falls off, but you can't elect the president of the united states and fail to show up for the people he has to work with. >> you spoke at the convention and there has been a lot of ugliness in washington and a lot not getting done in washington. is there any best case scenario given the realities of washington in terms of immigration reform that you can see happening? >> yes. there was so much momentum out of 2012. i thought when people asked me, will immigration reform get done? absolutely. everybody is on board. there is bipartisan efforts and then to see it fall apart was just so disappointing. for many reasons. not only the economics it will
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have on our country, but the normal imperative of what's happening with the people when you look at the amount of children and the crisis we just had. so i think the only way that i would have hope is to have a good turn out in 2014. >> and more stepping up from the latino community. >> thank you. >> the 2014 nclr alma awards. 10:00 eastern time and 10:00 p.m. pacific. we will watch eva and mario and other fantastic leaders coming to the stage. we'll be right back.
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heavy rain in the middle. country. numerous thunderstorms around the kansas city and storms. all the way to atlanta by later on. still dealing with rain in arizona and moving into new mexico on boast coasts. that will look good for this thursday. ut. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. and only national is ranked highest in car rental customer satisfaction by j.d. power. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro.
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with the death of the first ebola patient diagnosed, new questions over how his case was handled and new measures being put in place at key airports. we also have new details about what the secretary says about all of it this morning. >> also "the washington post" digs up more secret service dirt. this time it's about that prostitution story from columbia. the white house turned a blind eye to the

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