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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 15, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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announced it would immediately deploy a team of specialists when a hospital confirmed an ebola case. the change comes amid criticism over how when the hospital confirmed the case. the situation how it is handled the situation in dallas. >> i got it. i wish we are had put a team like this on the ground the day the patient, the first patient was diagnosed. >> that might have prevented this infection. but we will do that from today onward with any case anywhere in the u.s. >> meanwhile, nina pham is listed in good condition a. union on behalf of several nurses is criticizing the facility after the virus was spread there. national nurses united claims there was no system if place to treat ebola patients and nurses did not have protective gear. the hospital, however, says it has numerous safety measures in place and will respond to employee concerns.
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meanwhile, there is a grim warning from the world health organization which says there could be 10,000 new cases of ebola per week. within two months, a few poll shows more than two-thirds of americans say they support restricting travel from the ebola-infected countries in africa. before we get an update from democracy, joe, why don't you jump in right there? >> i talked about this weeks ago, raised questions about whether the cdc was doing everything they can do. what the world health organization has done, remember in april, rot though, it was the organization telling us about 10,000 cases a week by december if this isn't contained. six months ago, it was saying it was much ado about nothing. weeks ago, you had the cdc accusing the head doctor if doctors without borders of trying to panic, of being too panicked and too pessimistic.
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it seems to me, mica, as this is spread, any time anybody has raised any questions, daring to question medical authorities that, somehow that equals stirring panic. it doesn't equal stirring panic. 67% of americans have a reason to ask why we haven't had tougher travel restrictions from the start from these countries as if you are somehow zena phobic if you decide to do the same thing on a larger scale to protect americans as that businessman did if sierraly own kept his district completely free of this disease. we are going to have to be able to ask tough questions without mindless chatterers on cable fuse and broadcast fuse and mindless editorial writers saying you are causing panic. as i said, sometimes fear is the appropriate response.
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i wish george w. bush had more fears before 9-11 about the reports from the cia. i wish barak obama would have been more fearful before taking our troops out of iraq him we have to ask tough questions. now the democracy hospital admitted they crew screwed up. the cdc admitted they screwed up. the world health organization said they have screwed up. we can't just sit back and say you know what, let's just trust the authorities. i never heard so many authorities say, hey, let's just trust the authorities and not ask tough questions. >> we keep hearing, we got it. oh, the we had. let's go live to mark poter if democracy. what do we know about this patient. how much concern is there that we got more on the way? >> reporter: hi, my car, we have a lot of concernle although, officials say they would not be surprised if they have another case. coming in more than an hour ago. state health officials say
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another healthcare worker here at texas health presbyterian hospital has tested positive for ebola. those test results coming at midnight from a lab in austin, texas. they will take those tests to the cdc for confirmation. this is an unidentified health care worker. we do not know if it was a man or a woman that cared for thomas eric duncan the first ebola patient that died a week ago toda today. the patient late eest patient presented himself or herself complaining of a fever. now we have these results. the patient was interviewed upon possible contacts. they will be monitored depending on their circumstance. we know about nina pham the first nurse who presented symptoms on friday. her test results came up midnight or late sea.
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she is now being treated. she is said to be in good condition. there are 76 patients they are looking at now who had contact with duncan being monitored. >> i guess the question is, willie, of the ones that should be in isolation, there may be more that need to be put into isolation and watched. >> and the way they treated ebola in the hospital, it was completely on the fly, they were adding layers. >> the people at the top of the cdc were saying, our system can handle this. >> i don't know, would you expect every hospital large or small in the united states be ready for ebola? perhaps no. we hope they will get to the strike teams that can reson quickly. >> for the, if you have ever been to an e. rchl, most of us have, you know the chaos and the heroics that happen in there. i'm not surprised. but we are certainly learning the hard way. in just a few hours, president obama will meet by video conference with european leaders amid growing questions about the
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united states strategy to defeat islamic state militants. president obama sat down with top defense officials yesterday as american officials encyst the military maigs mission is working. but turkey is complicateing matters by bombing kurdish rebels inside its own country while resisting pressure to attack isis. ignacious writes in the washington post president obama is facing growing pressure to expand military operations before isis makes additional gains. ignacious says secretary kerry says president obama faces a quote fundamental question of how to carry out his pledge of degrading and destroying isis and the brand few nbc/"wall street journal" poll shows more than 40 pshs of americans both support the use of airstrikes and american combat troops a. reversal from just one month ago. joe. >> if you look at davidic nacious' column, this president
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is getting pressured from all sides to step it up. actually send more ground troops, send the ground troops. do many other things, he just doesn't want to do right now. i think for good reason after a decade of sending american men and women to combat. a lot of us are concerned about that. right now, he's engaged if tough war. the first problem is these seed issues, you have turkey, of course, bombing the people that can be boots oak. the worst allie. i can't imagine turkey to be worse of an allie than they have been right now. then of course, you have assad also conducting bombing operations, using this inside of syria as an opportunity to kill some of his resistance. it is a terrible situation. you also have a dire warning from the front page of the new york times.
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a warning not from the "times" but a warning from history, arming rebel troops and hoping it will turn out well rarely turns out well. when you have the secretary of state, you have a man very isolated and alone. >> and more of that coming up in papers. let's get to politics. a new poll of caucus voters shows the gop is flux, while the democrats seemingly sold. mitt romney leaves the potential field. chris christie and jeb bush barely register. for the democrats, hillary clinton is way out front. the next closest is elizabeth warren who is 43 points back. earlier this week, enron told
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the new york times not only are mitt and i done, but the kids are done, done, done, done. four times also, day later she seems a little less adamant. you have seen this sometimes. how is the washington post? honestly, we have no plans, i don't imagine circumstances changing. as for jeb bush's wife the former florida governor says she is close to florida for a possible run. how important are the spouses chiming in? >> well, have you two different things happening, jeb bush is going around, hearing from a lot of people that they can't support him if his family is not all in. jeb, of course, is not going to run if his family is not all in. jeb bush is somebody that has hated politics from the second he got into politics is certainly a signal that jeb bush may be getting closer to running in this race. i think what was so stunning,
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though, is if you look at the polls, willie geist, look at those polls and in the top tier, even on our top screen, you don't have jeb bush, or chris christie and other polls that have been out this week, jeb bush trailing far behind where even mitt romney is. i think right now mitt rom fi, willie, is the candidate at least from the establishment when of the party winning in iowa, winning in new hampshire easily, winning nationally. pretty stunning. jeb bush at 4% in iowa. >> it is. michael steel, you have to go far down that list that people inside the bellway are talking about, people like jeb bush, people like chris christie. i think that's why mitt romney's kaim name comes up. you think at least there would be one or two front runners. but will is still a lot of uncertainty, a year or so away
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from when the campaign is. >> that's not to be surprised. you have a lot of people still sitling on the side lines, even the today, you know, infamous ones like chris christie and rand paul haven't officially put together the formation, except rand palm has organization and the various states. the reality is this is beginning now to shape itself out. come november 5th, the day after the election, this thing is on him then you will begin to see stomachtist gel around a particular candidate him up to this point, the kind of makes sense to me it is where it is the polls are showing where they are showing, mitt romney is in the lead because no one else is there to fill that gap. >> except you have jeb bush, a guy 100% of voters see sitting at 4%. i think for jeb bush and chris christie, 5 points behind dr. ben cashson, a guy who like compares america to nazi
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germany. obama's america, i guess, i should say. >> right. >> the establishment not doing very well right now and i think 4% for jeb bush is new. >> what i think also, joe, if i could real quick. i think what you will see get played out. you talked about the i talked about this, the conservatives in the party really do want a conservative. there is that internal battle that will get worked out. whether or not this time they nom night the right conservative. >> can i take a contaxpayerian point of view, it would be this this poll and other polls ranking candidate's strength at this particular point in time are meaningless him people are worried about ebola. they were worried about a war in the middle east. they're worried about the fact that they haven't had an increase in take-home pay in three or four or if years. you rank -- >> let me add on to that maybe those, right now we're staring
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at two ridiculously scary things, isis and ebola. two-thirds of americans say the country is going in the wrong direction. there is a psychological reason to go to mitt rom fiand that is wow. >> amen. >> we get to do a do-over. he was right about syria, he was right about a lot of things. oh, things can be okay if i just get a do-over. >> hey, donny. >> i think there is a big cycle -- >> i late to say this, donny, i hate to say this, donny, you are dead right. there is a rev. why mitt romney has come out of nowhere. these are bright times for young millennials right now about to go to slope after playing x-box all night and streaming music on spotify, you may not remember, but we only elected a certain kind of leader when the soviets
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existed and we had to elect somebody with their finger on the bomb. you know who those type of people were? they were like mitt romney. we didn't give-a-damn whether somebody was excited. we didn't give-a-damn whether they talked about hope or change, whether they could play saxophone on arsinio hall. we didn't care. donny, you are really on to something. there is a reason why a guy who seems dull and boring and stiff and can't be glib on the campaign trail suddenly is popping up in the polls. we need somebody like romney who has actually run something before and isn't going to be marketed like a pepsi or like some spark food, mica. this may actually ironic enough like ronald reagan's time a guy seen as a joke up until the night he won in a historic
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landslide. things are very frightening right now. we need competence. think about what michael dukakis said, that's what we need in 2014. americans want competency. mitt romney is competent. >> this is a water shed moment, it's never uttered, 6:00 am october 13th, joe said, donny, you are right. >> like i said, these are dangerous times. >> yes, they are. you are lucky you are not sit riekt here. i think too team needs you. let me get this next story, they are pulling funding away from allison griernlgs instead the campaign is putting millions into battle grounds, georgia, south dakota. grimes had a rough week after avoiding questions of what she
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voted for if previous elections. >> did you vote for president obama in 28-2012? >> you know, this election isn't about the president. it's about making sure we put kentuckians back to work. >> why are you reluctant to give an answer on whether or not you voted for president obama? >> bill, there is for the reluctancy. this is a matter of principle. our constitution grants here in kentucky the constitutional right for privacy at the ballot box. >> no way. here's what she said in a documentary set to air on pond. look. >> tell me about the first time you voted, who did you vote for and what issues were most important to you? >> well, i turned 18 if 1996. unfortunately, it was after president clinton's election. i hope to be able to vote for him. i got a chance, though, to vote for secretary clinton in 28. the issues then in 1996 that were at the core of the campaign
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are the same issues that we're fighting for today, how to make sure that we can put hard working kentuckians back to work and grow the middle class. >> i think the constitutional right only works when she likes it. >> i'm confused, though, i didn't think clinton was on the ballot. >> the simple answer, yes, of course i voted for him but i disagree with a lot of things he's done. here's what i believe. >> she had two chances. >> that to me dump. >> you can't fix that. >> it says something about your core. it just says a lack of constitution, whereas, basically, it's okay to say, hey, i voted with him. by the way, so did most of the country. by the way, a big mistake, a, b, c, d, e, there, there was no medal. >> joe, real quick. >> i want to say, we're starting to see a few things happening politically. i have been pushing back on republicans saying this may be a big republican 84 for the past
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months. right now, though, when you wake up this morning and we were going over it at 1:00 this morning, a lot of bad news for democrats, whether it's in kentucky, mary landreau fired her manager in louisiana. you have democrats saying they're trying to avoid a historic defeat in the house of representatives. we said last week pat robertson, polls are showing him close or ahead by a few points. i think, you know, we always talked about, mica, how foreign policy doesn't rule today. the fact is that foreign policy has mattered this fall when president obama said foreign policy, whether it's golfing right after beheadings, are now seemingly lost if figuring out how to respond to isis. that has been a drag on democrats. their numbers went up after they
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announced we are going to degrade and destroy isis. he was showing a burden that's there, the democrats, right now, it's barak obama goes on foreign policy the democrats seem to be going in the polls and that can all change attorney general of course. right now, democrats in retreat. >> okay. still ahead, there may not have been weapons of mass destruction, how u.s. still came in contact with some piles of chemical weapons, their explosive investigation ahead. how much money do you need to be one of the wealthiest people in the world, in that half of the people? the amount will surprise you when it's a bad sign for all of us. are you ready for hillary? this ten-year-old really s. look at that. it's like one direct just showed up. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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it's time now to take a look at the front paper. >> let's do it. >> an incredible investigation, a sweeping piece on what it calls secret casualties of iraq's abandoned chemical weapons. americans and iraqi troops came across thousands of warheads, shells and bombs left over from saddam hussein's regime. in several case, soldiers were wound. they include pus tard agents and nerve agents destroyed while exploding them. here's one control explosion back in 2008. >> wow! look at that. >> oh, it's mustard gas.
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>> according to "time's" the american public withheld word from military doctors and the troops being sent in the field. >> the troops were told not to tell anyone else not to tell anyone else in the first gulf war. incredible story. the "wall street journal," a new story says global wealth grew by 8.3 percent last year t. u.s. added more millionaires than any other country in the world. the report suggests if have you '03 $3,650, including the value of your home, you are among the wealthiest half of the people in the world. think of that. a tiny sliver at the top of rich people. >> doctors if san diego treated an enlisted soldier for an internet addiction brought on, in part, by using google grass.
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the pan says he was using the device for 18 hours a day, only removing it to sleep and shower. he reported feeling irritable when he could not use it and would even try to turn on the dallas when he was not wearing it. researchers say after a month, his symptoms of withdrawal began to subside, still, scientists warns it is a constant stream of stimuli, which takes a toll on the brain him i'm beginning to put mine down. i got a system. >> do you? >> a couple hours at a time. it's real. because we work so much and preparing, everyone is trying to contact us. >> so what's your secret? >> i have to have a little slip phone for my kids and put this down. >> good for you. >> i don't know how to, i don't know. it's a test. >> there are only so many hours in a day. >> you can see i'm recoverying. >> the washington post, we all get a little star stressed at
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times. check out ten-year-old macy the girl's fame there after coming face-to-face with hillary clinton. it happened while clinton was campaigning for incumbent senator mark udall in the state of colorado. after that, there was no way mrs. clinton could say no to a selfie. macy and hillary clinton. >> that's neat. >> all right. coming up, more women tan ever before putting off having kids, now, apple and facebook are willing to foot the bill. we will explain that in a few minutes. up next, john meacham join us for today's must read opinion pages, don't go. we'll be right back with more "morning joe." .
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when folks think about wthey think salmon and energy. but the energy bp produces up here creates something else as well: jobs all over america. engineering and innovation jobs. advanced safety systems & technology. shipping and manufacturing. across the united states, bp supports more than a quarter million jobs. when we set up operation in one part of the country, people in other parts go to work. that's not a coincidence. it's one more part of our commitment to america.
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a single ember that escapes from a wildfire can travel more than a mile. that single ember can ignite and destroy your home or even your community you can't control where that ember will land only what happens when it does get fire adapted now at fireadapted.org joining us now for the must read opinion pages. pretty pontificateing. oh. >> only offline. >> no, please stop. writer for the new york times. you have a piece coming up. we will get to it in just a moment. would you like to say something?
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okay. fine. "wall street journal," maybe that was something else. the obama campaign reached now new comic rights last week with kentucky senate candidate allison lundergan grimes' refusal to say if she had voted for mr. obama. mark prior voted with mr. obama 93% of the time. lack's mark begich has gone with him 97% of the time. they think they will somehow emerge as giants of principles independence. is there a point there? >> there is a point john meacham is a point that's not just for barak obama. you know, bill clinton experienced this in both of his mid-term elections in '94 to
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'98. one democrat saying anti-air force, anti-air weapons, bush had it in 2006 and isn't it funny, every president, john, seems to carry a whiff of descension. but more like a smoke cloud. a dust storm of condescension for everyone that preceded them and in walk, that this happens to even the best of presidents. >> it does. it does happen again and again. at this point in the second term of ronald reagan you had the
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. . >> he said he was going to be a torn in obama's ass. >> lovely. >> he did say that. and then he voted with him over 97% of the time. mark udall in colorado said he
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was going to, you know, be on his back and be a pain and his side as well. he votes with him 95, 96, 97% of the time. which again doesn't it go to politicians thinking they're so much smarter than their own constituents than those who can't read the newspaper actually where they vote? >> it is pretty condescending. all they have to do is go online and fievent i find out how their senators vote. but particularly have the moment we showed allison lundergan grimes whether or not she voted for president obama and still will not show why she did that. it shows, i hate to use the term, it would be a bit weiseley. maybe she'd be a good senator for the state of kentucky. >> next has a piece, meek you have next's piece on the new york times. >> i do. you write a sudden cash
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advantage for two republican cads, one thom tillis running for the senate in north carolina, raced $3.4 million a. spokesman said that is by far the best quarter for mr. tillis. representative cory gardner also has good news to report. he collected 4.4 million, outraising senator mark udall who took in about $4 million. does any of this money raising have anything to do with the afor mentioned drag on president obama as a local candidate? >> i think republicans have been calling out for months, leaders have been saying, guys, we're getting out raised, please send money. you have been hearing this over and over again. you heard it from the head of the campaign committee. republicans are finally saying, wait a second, could this thing we thought was a sure thing slip out of our grasp at the last
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second because there wasn't enough money? you see it with american crossroads. they've had their best september or mid-terms and they're come income with tens of millions of dollars at the last second. the question, when you get the money late the ads have been sold. the polices for remaining ads are high. early money is better. what we will see is is this late money going to help them get over the edge. >> all right. >> michael steel, off that would you be surprised, we asked the question yesterday, if the republicans did not gain control of the senate? >> no, i wouldn't, actually, for a lot of the reasons that have been discussed over the last few weeks, i think there is still support that some have not surgeoned as strongly as the party thought it would for a lot of reasons and money is the least of those reasons, by the way. but the fact of the matter is the voters are now beginning to
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focus in more clearly. that has both parties worried, as a matter of fact. >> all right. next. thank you. a great piece. john meacham stay with us if you can. up next, the company -- >> oh, yeah, you came all way up here? charity. >> all right. companies making it easier than ever before for women to delay having kids. some are. and their reasons why are ahead. and then we've had a lot of tough stories about sports laitd lately. but now, sports illustrated is calling attention to something sports organizations are doing to help thousands of homeless athletes. we'll be right back. so ally bank really has no hidden fees on savings accounts? that's right. it's just that i'm worried about you know "hidden things..." ok, why's that? no hidden fees, from the bank where no branches equals great rates. if you don't think beat con mewhen you think aarp, you don't know "aarp."
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the aarp fraud watch network helps everyone protect themselves and their families against scams and identity theft. find more real possibilities at aarp.org/possibilities. a man who doesn't stand still. but jim has afib, atrial fibrillation an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but now, with once-a-day xarelto®, jim's on the move. jim's doctor recommended xarelto®. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce afib-related stroke risk. but xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused
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or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any conditions such as kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. jim changed his routine. ask your doctor about xarelto®. once-a-day xarelto® means no regular blood monitoring, no known dietary restrictions. for information and savings options, download the xarelto® patient center app, call 1-888-xarelto, or visit goxarelto.com. . >> two major companies in silicon valley are generating headlines this morning thanks to
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their newest employee benefit. apple and facebook are offering up to $20,000 for women freezing their eggs. it could lead to more female employees and retaining more female employees. it could also be a game changeer. >> reporter: done at a young enough age, egg freezing can dramatically improve the chances of getting pregnant later in life. >> if you come in at 42, 43, we haveics frozen when you are 35, it's like we're sending the clock back seven or eight years. it's a huge advantage. >> reporter: she got an e-mail from a patient that says sums up the mood around the office. omg, just announced facebook and apple coveringic freezing costs. the majority of patients that come in, there are more and more each day, can't affordic freezing. >> what facebook did, what apple has done will be huge for women. it allows them the opportunity
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to do something they may never have been able do before. >> all right, joining us now, editor for bloomberg, if april, emma wrote freeze your eggs, freeze your career. what did you think when you heard this? i would take it you have looked at the upsides and downsides now people are seeing this is a draw for women. >> i wasn't surprised at all. i had heard there are rumblings that cover this. they're not coming out with it. they're being very private about it. because of the controversy it may cause. >> what is the problem or the conundrum these companies are addressing by putting out a policy like this. >> the conundrum they're addressing by putting it out is they might seem like they have a macmachivelian control.
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they don't want to seem like they're trying to control the lives of tear female employees. i think they're providing another hope. >> it's interesting you said that. this is the first i'm hearing this story, on the other hand, the tremendous upside. but it did hit that nerve with me as something, it was an employer, employed a lot of people hey, don't go home and have a baby until 33, stick around until 45. there is a little orwellian thing about it. >> especially that sector, they are also trying to attract female employees. >> of course. that's one of the things. >> that itself the whole point. it's clearly, we want you. we want you to work longer. obviously, it's well intentioned. >> it is there, but it is literally as you spoke to just now, a game clanger to change your career path for women. you are 34, 35 years of age. you work for a large financial
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institution, apple, google, whatever, you are confronted with the dilemma. i want to have a child, but your career path. bomb. >> right. >> but now. >> and the reporting i did. also the women i spoke to, it wasn't they were putting it off because they wanted to work until midnight. they put it off because they didn't find a right partner. >> societal trends are being addressed as well. i have pushed the traditional, have your kids young and try and muscle through it. but i have to say, from research i have done for books, the does have the potential to help women lift up their families. a lot of women have babies, younger earlier in their careers, willie and really face that as young mothers, should i stay? i can't do this. i don't make enough. i can't physical out how to do this, so i'm just going to stop. ten they stop. they, you know, a lot of them don't come back. i have a lot of friends in that situation. if you are able make this choice, you might be able to
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provide. >> the choice is still going to be. i'm sorry. >> no, go ahead. >> it's still going to have to be a choice at some point, though. >> that's right. >> at 42, leaveing the work force in a certain way can be more challenging than at 34. so it still does not alleviate. what are you smiling about? >> let me ask you, what's the likelihood? google and apple have a lot of money to throw around. let's be honest. what's the likelihood of other companies taking this up? is this something we will see more of? >> i think big firms that find it more important to attract women. it's the start of women coming in. i do think so. i think again i think more companies are doing it that we know. maybe some will come out and say we do. the thing about egg freezing, it's so expensive, even if someone would want to, even if they had a great job at facebook, they won't be able to afford it. >> how much does it cost? >> it costs for the, one round,
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it doesn't mean it will be ripe, it will cost about $10,000. that's all out of pocket. in order to store theic, it's another $1,000 a year. >> emma rosenblum, thank you so much for coming in. coming up, kevin durant's speech about growing up as a gifted athlete, but a homeless athlete, caught the attention of the country. we had the honor of speaking with is mom about it on the show. >> we have very humble beginnings, of course, but it was our lives. and i decide i was going to make the best of it. the way that i had to help my boys to stay away from the ills that were in our area is that i was always involved in their lives. i made it my business to sacrifice my personal desires and wants and sometimes my needs for their goals and dreams. >> sports illustrated says that more than 100,000 student athletes are growing up
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. >> everybody always told us we weren't supposed to be here him we moved from apartment to
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apartment. written we moved into our first apartment, for the bed, no furniture and we just all sat in the liveing room and just hullinged each other because that's what we thought we paid it. >> it might have been the best sports moment of the year. >> oh, my gosh. >> kevin durant's mvp acceptance speech talking about his mom. joining us, he writes the cover story of this week's issue. in part, he writes, most often we hear these wrenching stories after an atmosphere leth like durant has reaped millions as a pro. but what about the current young players who bounce from couch to couch or use the team locker cool as a place to bathe, or sleep under the bleachers. john, it's good to see you. tell us you the piece was born. when did you start looking into this? >> we didn't rehearse this. >> that kevin durant speech was
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the trigger for the story. it was this incredibly poignant speech. you sort of said to yourself, great he's made it. who are the kids today and what we found is this is a huge, huge number of kids who are almost athletes in the present. >> houch how many are we talking about? >> we are talking more than 100,000. there are 1.2 million homeless kids in the u.s. we extrapolate, how many homeless kids play sports. conservatively over 100,000 kid today play sports. >> do the coaches know it or are the kid hiding it? >> it varies, obviously, i think in a lot of places the coach plays an essential role. some of it is i am bringing a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. you realize, hey, the player may
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not be concentrating so well. it's not because he's a knucklehead. it's because he's hungry. >> i would imagine a separate sidebar to this story would be the role that so many coaches or teachers who are aware of these young people who are homeless, who are performing sometimes ordinary athletic feats, to the role that they play in that young person's life. >> yeah, no question we talked to a player again the sessions are different. i knew nothing going into this story. homelessness is probably defined as not having a permanent place to sleep at night. so it's not all park benches and bridges. it shows the kids are going from
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couch to couch. >> you talked about kevin durant. there is another name, lo lo jones, i don't think people know her background, the u.s. olympian, is similar in sleeping in the basement of salvation armies and finding her way day-to-day. >> she had an interesting point. she said, sports gave me structure. it was forall the flux in my life and changing schools and everything that comes with being homeless, sports were one constant. i think that was one thing we came across. it's not a symmetrical relationship. homelessness can upset a sports career but sports were a force of good in these kids' lives across the board. >> the other aspect of the story that has to be truly interesting, you get a high school junior or senior coming out of a motel where they are living in a motel, motel to motel, they go to school.
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they go on the athletic field. that becomes their identity. it's so important what they do. >> absolutely. we spoke about the cover image, isaiah lamb outside of battle more, his family put the car behind the laundromat mat. he would do his homework. that's where the family would bathe. at night they'd go into their car in the parking lot. those few hours when he played sports served so many different roles. some pragmatic. it was exercise the team's structure. your identity gets wrapped up when so much in your life is bleak. >> sports are also a way to keep the kids in school and they are absolutely excited. we are have been on the show. we talked about all sorts of issues, donald sterling, ray rice. it's easy to get a cynical
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coverage. >> we will be looking for the new issue of sports illustrated. thank you so much. >> thank you. >> joe, you want to jump in? >> just really quickly, willie geist last night, mike barnacle last night this is the royal, 7 and 0. since they gathered the playoffs. this is an incredible story, willie. >> they haven't lost a playoff game since the world series in 1885. granted. they haven't been in the playoffs since 1885. it is an awesome story. this is a franchise and an organization, mike, that has been in the wilder inside for three decades. you never even thought about the kansas city royals. now they're up 3-0 on the orioles. they get a chance to go to the home series a. lot more losses tan wins. >> it's truly a great story. it's an incredibly impressive story. they play in kansas city. you done hear much about them. they have an absolute killer
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shut down bull pen. it's an amazing squad. >> it is amazing. what is so amazing is tear backs were against the wall. it doesn't look like they were going to make it into the playoffs. they stackerred in. they had the one game playoff for the as on the monday the day after the season ends. it was a 163rd game and nobody would have seen this coming. >> and they were down 177-3 -- 7-3. a second worker has tested positive for ebola. we will go live to dallas for the very latest. there is a live fuse conference coming up as well. more good news for mitt romney, this time in iowa. anne says there is no chance he will run for president again. maybe. plus, he is the man behind "all in the family" "maude," "good
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so i can focus on what matters most. [ female announcer ] everyone has a moment when tomorrow becomes real. transamerica. . >> welcome back to" morning joe." it's the top of the hour. mike barnacle. bobby deutsche, me, joe, willie, joining us now, nbc political director and moderator of "meet the press" chuck todd the star
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of the latest campaign commercial. >> awesome. >> that's always fun when that happens. >> it gives you that sick feeling. >> exactly. >> no part of this? >> i'm done. >> health officials confirm the sec health care worker who treated thomas eric duncan tested positive for ebola. the latest patient reported a fever and was immediately isolated. officials say they identified potential contablths who were currently being monitored. i take it this person was not in isolation then. just yesterday, the cdc announced it would deploy a team of specialists when a hospital confirmed an ebola case. the change comes amid criticism over how it handled the situation in dallas. >> i thought often about it. i wish we had put a team like this on the ground the day the patient the first patient was diagnosed. >> that might have prevented this infection. but we will do that from today onward with any case anywhere in
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the u.s. >> 9/11 i meanwhile, nina pham, the nurse that tested positive is in good condition. but a union speaking on behalf of several nurses is criticizing the facility after the virus was spread there. national nurses united claims there was to system in place to treat ebola patients and nurses did not have proper protective gear. the hospital, however, says it has numerous safety measures in place and will respond to any employee concerns. meanwhile tlrk is a grim warning from the world health organization which says there could be 10,000 new cases of ebola per week within two months. >> that is staggering, joe. >> it is staggering, my california we have soon it before. we have seen it over the past six months. health organizations have been caught off guard, off balance from the very beginning. the world health organization shamefully said this was nothing to do in april. but the end of july when it was
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already exploding, they accused people of being pessimist about growing want. about this being an international threat. with rehearing 10,000 cases by december if it's not stopped. you know what, journalists have also failed, i think not only people in america but across the world. because the response over the past couple months has been a chief response from the simpsons, nothing to see here, move along, move along. if you have tough questions you are accused of trying to invoke panic. no, we're just trying to keep health care officials honest and on their feet and for some reason, my car, they keep underestimating this threat. they've done everything but call it the jc team of epidemics. they failed us. they can't afford to fails anymore. mica, that poll that shows the overwhelming majority of americans want to restrict travel. that number is going to keep growing ifle there is a health
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official that comes out and tunnelly gives a reasonable response as to why limiting movement doesn't make sense and nobody has. >> all right. they have been doyleing back every step of the way here on the top levels of the hospital and even at the cdc. what we will do is monitor this because there is a fuse conference that is potentially going to be under way during this show in dallas. we will drop into that. let's go to politics now. a new nbc "wall street journal" poll shows republican voters are taking a much greater interest, in states with key senate races, there is a preference for a democratic held congress, 47 to 42%. 43% say tear mid-term vote won't signal age at all about the commander in chief. chuckle. what does that say? >> you know, this is an interesting poll in the respect that you can look at it in different columns and i can support a teary, i can tech off
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all of the reasons for the republican way and i can simultaneously show you why this is going to be a bizarre election that has as much impact on both parties as we think a wave election might have just on the democrats. >> it is. i heard joe talk about this earlier this morning. structurally, it should be a big republicanier. there is something that clearly is not kaveng on for them. i think the independent voters are showing no interest. in wave elections, they move to the party that's about to have the big election. that's not happening here. they're not engaging and that tells you that i think we're going to see some weird things. turnout will matter. go ahead, joe. >> you talk about strange things. in 2006, independent voters went for democrats plus 16. >> right. >> in 2010, independent voters went republican plus 16. the fact that independent voters
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are disengaged now the fact that barak obama's approval ratings are low. the fact that republican approval ratings are lower leaves us three weeks out guessing. there seems to be trim lines, i think anybody suggesting a wave elect as of today with the washington post 95% certainty, i they're looking at numbers that neither you nor i are looking at. >> to me, kansas and soet dakota stories, people want to say, that's cookie, crazy stuff happening. for six years, there has been an anti-two-party movement building. right, frustration with both parties, sort of frustration with the gridlock. kansas and soet dakota have a vehicle. those sooex don't consist in 48 other states. they exist there they gravitated quickly. we see more senators with
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anything we had before, which is one sign of a protest in the two parties. i think we could see one or both independents. >> i think the reason to chuck's point, it's so confuseing is your last point is that i think people are so fed up with both parties, i'm just going to vote for the person i like better. people have taken off their uniforms. i think that's why you are seeing this kind of mosaic out there. i think you will see something down the middle. i don't think party lines at this state, at this moment in time matters. >> be i the way, if we have a status quo, that means weird stuff would have happened. >> somewhere between the wave and status quo. >> which would feel like it. status quo would be considered a
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huge loss. not president of the new york times editorial page or the catering left wing classes, some conservative talk shows we talked ability. republican leaders have told me if they do not win the senate, if they don't at least peck up one purple state to blue state into 2016, they are in big trouble and there is going to be a massive crisis within the ranks of republican leadership. >> according to split core it's not whether house democrats will suffer in the mid-terms, but rather by how much, cluck. house democrats are carrying out a painful retreat. the article says the party is now focusing on propping up teetering incumbents who instead of pouring cash into new recruits, it's a strategy to mitigate losses amid a wave of republican money. let me jump to michael steel. does that match what you are seeing? chuck then chime in. >> it does. i think that this wave of money that's coming in at the end is really, we talked about it before, you know, late money,
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it's not going after the that bigesque. it's really budgeting the kafrgs for the tv stations. at the end of the day, i think the voters are beginning to settle. the question i have for chuck is with respect to those independent voters does your poll find while they are not moving towards republicans because they are concerned about republicans governing the country? do we get more of the same only in spade, now they have the senate and the house. or are there some other reasons that aren't reflective yet in those voters? >> let me give you one poll result that tells you the difference. do you want your member of congress to stick to their positions or compromise? and a majority in 2010, it was, no, give the president some heck. the time a majority want their member to compromise.
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that right there and you don't see, that is what hax this cycle difference. all the democrating resources are going to senate race. >> here's water ominous for republicans going into 2016. the grandfather have out raised them 130 million to 90 million. in the most recent polls. if you can't raise money, two-third of the country continent saying we are going in the wrong direction, when are they going to be able to raise money? >> the reason it's that way. people go, oh, geeze, republicans are the party of wall street. both parties are the party of wall street. people are not going to give passive amounts to republicans because they want access. they can get access other ways. people that really, people believe so they wrote big checks. they were invested.
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if you are giving money to the republican party. who are you invested in? saying no to barak obama? i don't need to write a check for that. i know i will have the house already. so what compelling reason is there to way check to the republicans? what do they stand for other than being against barak obama? i'm saying this about my own party and i'll be dammed if i can answer that question, what is the big thing they're going to accomplish in the next two years if i write massive checks to a for? >> all right. >> stopping barak obama is just not enough anymore. >> i couldn't agree more. most of these guys will be there four years longer than he leaves. >> with an order five sentences long, thestream supreme court
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allowed abortion clinics, they blocked a number of a majority of clinics, all but eight to shut down. it follows a long legal fight over a 2013 law requiring upgrades at the facilities, many of which could not comply, justices samuel alito and clarence thomas said they would have ruled in favor of the law. the democrats, candidate for, yep, joe, did you chime in? >> i just want to say, really quickly, i think this is pretty stunning, a lot of people won't be paying attention to it. roberts courts, look what they have done over the past week the two most pressing social issues for the conservative base. they basically waved off challenges to bans on same-sex marriage and threat same-sex marriages go on in the lower courts by denying certain.
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then in this case, they have actually actively overruled at least in the short run what the fifth cirque has done, in effect, allowing a lot of abortion clinics if texas to reopen. the conservative base is waking up this morning, i'm sure on certainly issues an feeling like a quote republican supreme court betrayed them once again. i to the it was a pretty extraordinary ruling. >> the democrats governor for texas is defending her campaign's controversial ad targeting her opponent we talked about this on monday. wendy davis at the 32nd spot against republican greg abbott, which highlights his use of a wheelchair is fair game an not a personal attack. it accuse abbott for hypocrisy for not supporting other advocates. do you think the grabbing showing the empty wheelchair focusing on his being wheelchair bound crossed the line? >> andrea, this ad really is about one thing an one thing
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only. it is the fact that greg abbott was at the receiving end of a tragic accident and he was able to refuse jobs for himself when he sued a homeowner and a tree company after a tree fell on him. he received millions of dollars in the settlement and since then, in his entire public service career, he has been working to kick that ladder down denied that same opportunity for justice to other people. >> so she doubles down on the ad in terms of the issues, which i think is fair game and le get mat point and counterpoint issue, but, donny, was eight good ad? >> no, a mistake the left brain or right brain. at the end of the day. it looks like she is going after the we'll care. >> the ad made me cringe because it was a bad ad. it wasn't a smart political move to do that ad. it was very misunderstood. which is why you don't do that ad. >> you got to be clear.
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do you watch an ad. >> bad choice is there that was one of those ads that they want you to sound off, it was really not something that would make you. that, whoa. >> take away a single thought. >> go after the debate. >> she had his record. >> she is. this is the race that had gone to sleep. one thing she did do, talking about the race again. >> i have been very, very, quite frankly forthcoming abouttying that she's kind of an amazing story. but in terms of the branding and messaging. what works. >> all right. chuck todd, thank you very much. in a moment, we will go live to indicate snow in dallas where a second health care worker has been diamondback nosed with the ebola virus. we will be speaking with the director of the national institute of health. the president of the university of kentucky gives his staff a big raise and the way he's paying for it got a lot of attention, plus, president obama says his strategy against isis is sound. now he has to convince the rest
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of the world about that. we will go live to the pentagon. you are watching "morning joe." ♪ music ...the getaway vehicle! for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this. ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing good around ♪ ♪ turn around, barry ♪ i finally found the right snack ♪ [ female announcer ] fiber one.
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. >> oh, i don't know. i don't know tj, are you all right? oh. that's our first mistake. >> no new york post? >> no. >> let's take a look at the morning papers. the first lady of oregon cylvia hayes, she par first pated in a dell to buy lands in a remote area of washington state to grow marijuana if 1997. the revelation comes after a real estate agent claims to have found proof of marijuana growing on the property. he cla imse the project to the grow weed never materialized and she was in an abusive relationship and making poor
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decisions. there was recent revelations that she married a u.s. immigrant to obtain u.s. residency in the tune of $5,000. >> i don't think the woed hurts her. >> that's a plus. >> the courier journal the president of a kentucky state university is giving up $90,000 of his salary to give the lowest paid people on campus a raise. raymond burkes is his name. he says a raise to pay 24 employees from $7.25. he was brought on to help them climb out of a $7 million budget hole and bring leadership to the struggling university. >> could we please have him on the show. >> get him on. >> can we book him? is that a yes? >> okay. we got that down. >> i got a sure. >> we want him. >> you want to serve him in the walk times. bikeer gangs have been cleared to fight against the kurds if northern iraq. prosecutors in the netherlands
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say the bikers will not face prosecution because they are not on dutch soil. there are roughly about 70,000 kurds living in the netherlands who are refugees who fled from the middle east looking for work t. heaviest fighting between the kurds and isis is krurn currently centered around the city of kobani. isis forces have entered the city. they have reports that u.s. airstrikes have slowed the advance. president obama is trying to build his coalition to stop the spread of isis. let's bring in jim miklazewski with that. jim. >> reporter: mica, you know, just yesterday, the president met with 21 of the coalition members. not the political element of those coalition forces, but the military leaders. it was not to sit around the table and put together a cohesive effective long-term strategy but to size everybody up at that table to make sure
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that everybody was on board and its clear that while they're signed up for the coalition, there are so many competing differences among all these allies, that this meeting really did reveal the underlying challenge and that is to keep the coalition together, mica. >> mica, it's willie. nobody is more dialled into the pentagon that than you are. let me ask you about how this military operation is going a few weeks in? obviously, they have critics, it doesn't go far enough. how does the pittsburgh think the anti-military operation is going? >> reporter: you know, these military leaders here in the pittsburgh that i have talked to, they'll tell you that, look, our strategy is working. what we intended to do, we are doing. we are hitting the targets. we are aiming at. we are selecting the targets that we think need to be hit. but the problem is, there are serious questions being raised, if, in fact, in the long term, this will be effective.
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and again back to this idea that there are so many competing motives for these allies. take turkey, for example and the situation around kobani. this will tell you how complicated this is. because over the past couple of days, the u.s. military has launched dozens of airstrikes around the kobani area in an attempt to protect those kurdish rebels inside kobani. turkey, meanwhile, is sitting on the sidelines just across the border just watching this happen, and, in fact the very pkk kurds that the u.s. is trying to protect turkey attacked them in southeast turkey the day before yesterday now you can't get any any more unbelievably complicated than that. >> now you got ebola and isis. let's go to dallas, national correspondent kate snow is there. good morning. i know the cdc is sending in a
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rapid response team to help handle this latest case of ebola. >> reporter: right. actually, they say they're already here oak. they have been deployed over the past couple of weeks. just over the week, 16 more people arrived to help this hospital deal with any more potential cases. then this morning, we find just before 4:00 a.m. local time, one of the 76 health care work, they have been monitoring who came into contact with that first patient, thomas eric duncan, one of them is now sick. the hospital now says the health care worker reported a fever tuesday and was immediately isolated. health officials have interviewed the latest patient to quickly identify contacts or potential exposures. this new case comes as there are complaints about the hospital. a labor group headquartered in california held a conference call from reporters saying they heard from several nurses that worked at presbyterian hospital and had some on the line.
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the nurses are not in any union. the groups speaking on tear behalf wouldn't give details on what nurses they were representing or what roles they held at the hospital. they said the nurses wanted to remain anonymous. union officials read statements to reporters, which they said were from the anonymous workers describing what happened when thomas eric duncan arrived by ambulance. >> mr. duncan was left for hours not in isolation in an area where other patients were present. subsequently, a nurse supervisors arrived and demanded that he be moved to an isolation unit. yet, faced resistance from other hospital authorities. >> reporter: before he was isolated, they said, duncan came into contact with up to seven other patients for at least three days, they said, nurses did not wear full protective gear but flimsy generic gowns that exposed their necksing. according to anonymous nurses, as to have moved in and out
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without being decon tam fated. nurses had optional training. >> were the protocols breach ed? . the hospital did not respond to specific allegations, in a statement said, in part, patient and employee safety is our greatest priority. we take compliance very seriously. we have fume russ measures in place to provide a safe working environment, including mandatory annual training at a 24/7 hot line and other mechanisms that allow for anonymous reporting. it all came after a stark admission tuesday. the head of the centers for disease control said nurse pham might not have gotten sick if the cdc sent a rapid response team as soon as eric duncan tested positive 15 days ago. >> i wish we had put a team like this on the ground the day the patient, the first patient was diamondback foesed. >> that might have prevented this infection. >> reporter: in a statement, pham said she is doing well, and
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defended the hospital saying she blessed to be cared for by the best team of doctors and nurses in the world. meantime, this morning the cdc said it is investigating this hospital, looking at everything from personal protective gear to the decon tam nation and on. we know there is a rapid response team here already from the cdc. we are hearing just now, willie, that there are fire and police authorities from dallas who are at a local apartment complex near here about five minutes away and they're handing out flyers to residents there. that's where this newest patient lived. that i are trying to calm people and assure them they have things under control. >> kate snow in dallas. thanks so much. >> joining us from bethesda, maryland, dr. anthony fauci. thank you for being on. we are monitoring a news conference due in dlaechls let me ask you, as we look at all the different pieces of information coming in, as to how thomas eric duncan was dealt
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with, his exposure to other patients, perhaps 46 of getting him in ice lakes, was the overall message from the top down not strong enough about how much we should be worried and fear and deal with across the country potential cases of ebola coming into local hospitals? >> well, i don't know exactly what happened there. the cdc is there right now, as you mentioned, with their top team doing two things, trying to find out what went wrong and to make sure with very aggressive proactive training that there and elsewhere, this does not happen again, but what happened there, regardless of the reason is not acceptable. it is not acceptable that two nurses takeing care of a person because of their exposure there were infected. >> that should not have happened and what the cdc is trying very aggressively to do right now to find out how and what happened and to make sure it doesn't
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happen again. >> mike. >> doctor. where are we in terms of national protocols, a national set of protocols for hospitals big and small and equipment of available to hospitals big and small to handle potential ebola cases? >> well, there is being much more as i just mentioned a proactive training in general instead of there being passive training, go look at our website or here is a piece of paper, it's going to be very active. seminars, web farce, visits and the next time and i hope there is no next time that there is a hospital that has for the take care of an ebola patient the cdc team has inkwurd from dr. frieden will proactively go there right from the get go and make sure things are done properly at the level of the local hospital that happens to have gotten that patient. so rather than just seeing how they do, it is going to be very proactive. you will see as was described as a press conference and at put forth by the cdc, a much more
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involved role. >> all right. dr. fauci. thank you very much. tom brokaw joins us next for an exclusive sit-down interview with two former secretarys of state. also ahead, one of hollywood's best storytellers, now, he is telling the story of his life. producer, writer, norman lear joins us this hour. we'll be right back. .
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. >> joining us now, a man, a legend. a person that needs no introduction. >> no, he does not. >> thus he will get none. >> because there isn't one. >> you are here because you have another fascinating trip in your fascinating life to germany with henry kissinger and jim baker. >> we have known each other 102 years the idea that you are introducing -- really. >> it's right here. >> this morning we are talking about ebola, the stockmarket not doing well, what is missing from this picture? >> i was with jim baker, two formering iss secretarys of
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state. we had a long conversation, including putin and what he is up to. right now he has cover. we are preoccupied with ebola and i sat the two down. we talked about missed opportunities and water ahead. here's some of what they had to say. >> what i think is really regrettable is that for 15 years after the implosion of the soviet union after the fall of the wall, the end of the cold war in 1991 you had a russia that leaned towards the west and in the initial statements of putin's presidency that he was leaning towards the west. that's gone now. the behavior we have seen on the part of russia recently is totally inconsistent with any concept of a stable world order. we simply cannot accept it. i don't think we will accept it. i was encouraged, frankly to see
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how european allies come along on economic sanctions. >> putin is in this. putinties it was a tragedy that the soviet unions have indicated. but it's a rising allegiance like asia and hitler. so he fell into wanting him, he found himself in a better relations. if he does it, we should be opened to it. if he doesn't, there will be a major political conflict of the cold war which will end like the last cold war because russia doesn't have to reach to challenge. >> you served your country not just as a diplomat also as a political figure in the white house, a couple white houses, what about the political will of
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the country and the congress and the senate of the united states to try to find common ground? we now live in an era of social media. >> it's gotten quite ugly in washington. it's sort of the zero sum game and that's really unfortunate and very regrettable in terms of the interests of the country. i don't know how we get back to where we were, the center, which used to be the place where we make our decisions about govern fans has to some extent disappeared. >> dr. kissinger and jim baker talking about the reality of dealing with the soviet union right now. ween the two of them, there are a little more optimistic than a one of time friends of mine, dr. legled bo, one of our russian scholars. he was in russia for a month this sum early. he said it's somewhat worse tan what they characterize it because he was on the ground.
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he said at whatever the people he talked to would say the same thing. you are trying to remove putin and that's an attack on our state and in effect putin has become a state of warfare at this point. there is for the easy way to see where that gets eased in the next couple of years. so you got to put that on the agenda as well. my friend said we are already in a cold war with them. it's like the cold war we had with eastern. it's not a shooting cold war, but there is no communication going on, no common goals that are going to be achieved. >> are you surprised in the coverage of everything going on in the middle east the march of isis, the collapse of sir why and iraq, russia's role is a pivotal allie of syria is not receiveling more attention than the american media? >> i am surprised. it's always complex, not just for those of us journalists, but especially for our audiences and the readership, wait a minute, russia and syria get together.
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what is our relationship with israeli and putin is playing this candidly at the moment. he is moving troops across the border, at the same time, he is keeping his pivotal player. -he is a guy that went when the berlin wall came down. he thought it was a great tragedy that the soviet union had lost communist rule i have been looking and i have almost to see the smile. he is one tough kgb guy. he has a track he wants to follow now. >> thank you. >> speaking of 25 years ago, you were in berlin when the wall came down. how do you think looking back hows that world developed? has it surprised you? >> i tell awe surprised me immediately, everybody said, thank god, let's move on with our business. nato drifted apart, lost its spirit if you will. i think that was a missed opportunity.
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if you go to berlin now, a few generation is much more interested in what happened. they can't believetary parents were divided by that wall, in effect, they were on one half, the other half, they were free and prosperous. so there is a kind of a renewed interest in what happened at that time. my own judgment is we didn't do enough to keep nato intact, politically, culturally and economically. because these problems will be coming. how you stitch it back together is tricky. you see that whole list of people and countries lined up what are they given? a name on a billboard, when they're not putting troops on the ground, germany is more concerned about hamburg has been a hotbed of islamic rage.
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boots on the ground, not going to go there. >> when you say the united states won't accept it or will accept it, i think americans are fair to wonder what does that mean? is it diplomatic, military? what is that response? >> he is saying, we are sort of addressing this, maybe we should think about putting troops in poland, you know, the nato or the united states unilaterally. i think what he means is that i don't want to speak for him. we're not engaged. we don't have the kind of open lines we used to haved in the old days. in the worst days of the war, people knew how to get there or kennone, who could give you the view of what's going on. we are so preoccupied with isis
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and ebola and the american political system doesn't help. they talked about that. the presidents for it. there is for the gathering of the wise people at the end of the day saying this is a problem. it's a big, big issue. on the other hand, as kissinger said, you cannot just isolate russia that stretched to 11 time zones, all the natural resources in the world do you make it worse for us or them? so there has to be more. >> during the debate, tom brokaw, thank you so much. thank you for being on. still ahead, challenging the conventional notions, of what it means to be black. the director and writer of the
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very provocative people. they will be our guests. we'll be right back. want to know how hard it can be... ...to breathe with copd? it can feel like this. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva is a once-daily inhaled... ...copd maintenance treatment... ...that helps open my airways for a full 24 hours. you know, spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace rescue inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells,... you can get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. sfx: blowing sound. does breathing with copd... ...weigh you down? don't wait ask your doctor about
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loaded with vegetables. packed with taste. . >> all right. don't you care anything about the constitution of the united states? >> don't hit me. >> it's the constitution. it doesn't have anything to do with constitution imor americanism. a man has a right to join all the things he likes to keep out all the things he doesn't like. >> you have that right. liking a man, why should that have anything to do whether a man is a black, a jew or a puerto rican, that's discrimination. >> no it ain't. it's just being particular. >> they have created the "all in the family," the hit maker norman lear joins us next. .
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this is really exciting for all of us. the man behind "all in the family," "maude," "good times," and "the jeffersons." >> and mary -- >> and the new book, "even this" i get to experience. norman lear. it is great to have you here. >> it's great being here. >> one of us was calling last
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night because you just had this experience. with whoopi goldberg, doing a talk with you. i couldn't be there because i get up way too early. but you had a good time, right? >> we had a wonderful time. >> this title, "even this, i get to experience." what are we going to find out? >> even this, look at it. got up early. look at all these pleasant faces. i'm here. even as i get -- >> is it a celebrate of your life, is that what you mean by the title? >> it's certainly a celebration of my life, but isn't at all what i intended. what i intended was, it's amazing how many fabulous this is occur to us over the course of time. i mean, i have a great time with any meal i enjoy. to pause and think about that meal. to pause and think about the
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relief when that meal is jetisent -- >> did he just say that? >> the man said that. >> these are lifetime highlights. >> i got to ask you, i grew up on "all in the family." i don't think kids today can appreciate how breakthrough it was. to the point where you couldn't air some of the stuff today you were airing. how did you get that through cbs at the time? >> these were the days of perry como and -- how did you get that on the air? >> it wasn't easy. it sounds so big now. like i fought wars. there was simple little battles over simple little lines. in the very first show, archie walks in, sees the kids going upstairs on a sunday morning to make love obviously and says, 11:15 on a sunday morning. they wanted that line out. why? because it was specific.
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it was clear what he was referring to. well, they're a married couple. they were going upstairs. they had the house alone. why not? that was simple. i had to win that. because if i didn't win that, i was about to lose everything else that followed. so they were simple little comments. >> given the scope and range of your life, brooklyn to hartford connecticut, to where you are today. with all of your achievements. all of the honors you receive. i imagine out in this country, there are people who could do a similar thing today. but the degree of difficulty, do you think it would be really much more difficult today to do what you did then? >> well, look, a number of the guys who run shows today whom i'm very friendly tell me they don't think "all in the family" could get on the air today. why that is, i can't imagine,
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given how brave television is and dramatic shows. there isn't nothing that can't be done, it would seem. >> are there shows you watch today that you admire, that you think are really hitting the vein -- >> are you watching any television? >> there are numbers of them. i mean, i can't keep up with the shows that good sensible friends i admire tell me, are you kidding, you're missing this, that or the other. there's a brand-new show that's just knocked me out altogether, "transparent." have you seen "transparent"? >> oxygen. >> may be one of the most brilliant performances ever. >> jeffrey tambore. >> michael steele is on location. he has a question for you. >> yes, given your impact on television, but even more broadly on society, do you think that in your story, you've made the difference you wanted to make, that you were able to capture not just the political moment but sort of set it as a
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benchmark for future generations? >> the only thing i can be sure of, because i have all the letters, years and years of them to prove it, is that when numbers of these episodes were over, families talked. first of all, families sat down be an watched them together. that was really interesting. and they talked. and anything that engenders talk in our country today in a -- in a society -- in a democracy that depends on an informed citizenry, talking is good. >> just looking at the scene we bumped in with, when the family is sitting down for dinner. any time a family sits down for dinner these days is a miracle. >> especially if they're sitting at dinner without doing this. >> exactly. we have a rule in our family. it's still hard. we have teenagers. norman lear, thank you. >> i have teenagers too. >> do you? >> yes, i do. 19. both in college in the east.
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>> oh, fantastic. congratulations for that. >> still working, paying the tuition. >> yeah, you might want to sell some books there. even this, we'll get to experience. we'll sell this for you. norman lear, thank you so much. >> thank you, all. coming up, how did a second health care worker test positive for ebola in dallas? we hope officials may have some answers, and also what the plans are ahead. we'll go to that live. and he's been compared to he j legendary director spike lee. the provocative film "dear white people," much more ahead. this is jim. a man who doesn't stand still. but jim has afib, atrial fibrillation an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but now, with once-a-day xarelto®, jim's on the move.
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jim's doctor recommended xarelto®. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce afib-related stroke risk. but xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require regular blood monitoring. so jim's not tied to that monitoring routine. gps: proceed to the designated route. not today. for patients currently well managed on warfarin, there is limited information on how xarelto® and warfarin compare in reducing the risk of stroke. xarelto® is just one pill a day taken with the evening meal. plus, with no known dietary restrictions, jim can eat the healthy foods he likes. don't stop taking xarelto®, rivaroxaban, unless your doctor tells you to. while taking xarelto®, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. xarelto® may increase your risk of bleeding if you take certain medicines. xarelto® can cause serious bleeding, and in rare cases, may be fatal. get help right away if you develop unexpected bleeding,
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welcome back to "morning joe." we're follow breaking news here. nbc news senior white house correspondent chris janising ha just rushed in. breaking news this morning. we should go to dallas. where at any moment, city health officials are expected to hold a news conference after a second health care worker who treated thomas eric duncan has tested positive for ebola. the latest patient reported a fever yesterday, was immediately isolated. officials say they identified potential contacts who are currently being monitored as well. just yesterday, the cdc announced it would immediately deploy a team of specialists when a hospital confirmed an ebola case. the change comes amid criticism over how it has handled the situation in dallas.
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nbc's kate snow has the latest on the new case from dallas. >> reporter: the hospital says the health care worker reported a fever tuesday and was isolated at the hospital. health officials have interviewed the latest patient to quickly identify any contacts or potential exposures and those people will be monitored. this new case comes as there are complaints about the hospital. late last night, a labor group that represents nurses, headquartered in california, held a conference call with reporters say they have heard from several nurses who work at presbyterian and had some of them on the line. the nurses at this hospital are not in any union. the group speaking on their behalf wouldn't give detail, about how many nurses they were representing or what roles they held at the hospital. they said the nurses wanted to remain anonymous for fear they might lose their jobs. union officials read statements to reporters which they said were from the anonymous nurses, describing what happened when thomas eric duncan arrived by ambulance. >> mr. duncan was left for several hours not in isolation
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in an area where other patients were present. subsequently, a nurse supervisor arrived and demanded that he be moved to an isolation unit. yet faced resistance from other hospital authorities. >> reporter: before he was isolated, they said, duncan came into contact with up to seven other patients, for at least three days, they said, nurses did not wear full protective gear but flimsy generic gowns that exposed their necks. >> from the dallas county commissioner's office, this is the official addressing the situation there. let's jump in. >> and we hope that and we prayer that, like nina, she will get on a good track. as you know, nina has moved from stable to good and the doctor may have some information on her health when he speaks this morning. so the fight against ebola in
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dallas is a two-front fight now. we have 48 disease contacts that we focused on in the community that were contacts with eric duncan. the good news about those 48 people is they are asymptomatic and have no fever and we're at the tail end of their monitoring period. sunday will mark the end of that monitoring period and the chance of those people becoming symptomatic at this point is extremely remote. however, at the hospital, we have a situation involving 77 people. two of which have tested positive for ebola. we are preparing contingencies for more and that is a very real possibility. you can imagine the anxiety of
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the families of these 77 people. you can imagine the gut shot this is to the family that is presbyterian hospital that has done a great job of taking care of this community for many, many years. i hope this community will rally around the human beings that are suffering and worrying now, even as they go about their calling of serving others. with me today, dr. var ga, the executive vice president, texas health presbyterian, who will speak next. mayor mike raulings will speak after dr. var ga and we'll take some very limited questions after that time. we're giving you the very limited information we have.
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we're continuing to get information and will be updating you throughout the day in a variety of ways. and we have some very important work that i need to get to, that the mayor and i need to get to at the conclusion of this. so, dr. var ga. >> thank you. good morning. i'm the chief clinical officer for texas health resources. i want to thank the mayor, the judge, cdc, state health officials and the dallas county health department for their continued partnership as we manage this unpress tented crisis. as others have said this morning, today's development is continued evidence our monitoring program is working. currently, as judge jenkins says, we continue to monitor 75 health care workers in con jurngs with the state. while i cannot discuss patient specifics, i can tell you this new patient was involved in the
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care of mr. duncan. the original patient whose passing we still mourn. our interest at this time first and foremost is making certain that both our current patients receive the care they need. that will remain our focus. the health and safety of our patients and employees remains our highest priority. we will continue to coordinate with officials at all level gs meet the challenge. a lot is being said about what may or may not have occurred to cause some of our colleague, to contract this disease. but it's clear there was an exposure somewhere some time in their treatment of mr. duncan. let's be clear. for a hospital that serves this community incredibly well. and we have for nearly half a century. we're a hospital that may have done some things different with the benefit of what we know today but make no mistake, no
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one wants to get this right more than our hospital, the first to diagnose and treat this insidious disease that's now attacked two of our own. after several weeks of great emotion and great effort, our team's spirit is tried and tested. and the support of so many is really helping everyone to rise to meet this challenge. thank you. >> good morning. another long evening and morning for many, many people. we rallied together and we decided that we needed to move quickly like we did sunday morning to make sure two things happen. one, that affective cleaning was done as soon as possible. and two, neighbors and the citizens were communicated. it is no odd thing that we decided to do this at 7:00 in
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the morning so when folks are getting up, they know what the facts are. it is a concerted effort not only with the county and the state and the city, but individuals out there. this morning, chief brown, chief bright, our city manager, were all working in coordination to accomplish our goals for this morning. dallas fire and rescue went to the 6,000 block of village bend drive where they began phase one of decontamination of the common areas and the areas outside the apartment. our patient lived alone and with no pets. state of texas has hired protect
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environmental for phase two. that inside the apartment and the cleaning of the car and the movement of the same, removing the same. that hopefully will be done early this afternoon. i personally was at the apartment complex this morning and talked to citizens as they were waking up and moving about. which leads us to the second part of our strategy, communication. we work closely with the apartment managers in creating a strategy that i think is working. each apartment in their complex was -- the door was knocked on and we talked to as many people that came to the door as possib possible. same time the apartment complex will be handing out flyers and
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information to apartment complexes nearby. so we cast the net a little wider. and then we had reverse 911 calls that went out at 6:15 this morning. meanwhile, we continue to not only monitor the 48 individuals that came in contact with mr. duncan but we take care of louise and her family who are still in isolation. they are asymptomatic. and they are doing well. and, as you know, we moved nina's pet yesterday and are making -- are making sure that that pet is well and taken care of at the same time. i think there are two things that i harken back to this. the only way that we are going
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to beat this is person by person, moment by moment, detail by detail. we have those protocols in place at the city and county. working closely with the cdc and the hospital. the second is we want to minimize rumors and maximize facts. we want to deal with facts not fear. and i continue to believe while dallas is anxious about this and with this news this morning, the anxiety level goes up a level. we are not fearful. and i'm pleased and proud of the citizens that i talk to day in and day out, knowing that the -- there is hope if we take care and do what is right in these details. it may get worse before it gets better. but it will get better.
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with that, we will take a few questions, all right. and -- but there are a lot questions we can't answer because either we don't know or because testimony and discussion is going to take place later this week. but we will try to give it a go and give you as much information as we can. we'll start on this side. go ahead. we'll take a couple questions here. >> hi, this is for dr. varga. kevin sack, "new york times." can you talk a little bit about the hospital's view of how this is happening now? i mean, obviously we're all empathetic with what you guys are going through. one case could be looked at as a possible breach. it seems like a second case might suggest some sort of institutional problem. >> i don't think we have an institutional problem. i think the biggest challenge we have right now is obviously
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first and foremost the care of two patients we have and the ongoing screening of folks in the community. our emergency department has continued to have folks come in. it's a tribute to the information that's been out there in the community. and handle folks through that very appropriately. think the case of this patient here shows the ability to intake those folks, get them into isolation and manage them has been very effective. our personal protective equipment and infection control inside the hospitals. we don't have an answer for this right now. >> thank you, right down here. >> was this person a nurse? >> that is private information. it was part of the health care group that helped. >> it is a woman?
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>> she is a woman. >> over here. >> are you waiting test results on any employees? because obviously this woman was in the -- during the other press briefing -- >> that's the state's decision and i'll let them speak to that later today. there will be a discussion -- there will be a joint conference call as normal with the cdc and the state. >> about this case or another case? >> about this case. >> let me -- i'm not sure when -- what briefing you're referring to. >> cdc briefing -- >> which was at 1:00 in the afternoon -- >> this person coming forward -- >> 2:00. >> 2:00. so there was no test as far as i know that was pending at 2:00 yesterday. >> -- the person come forward? >> that's -- i don't have the medical records -- i've been up
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all night -- >> you must know, dr. varga. >> i don't believe there was a blood draw then -- >> so we can't speak about any of the details about the person's case because it's protected health information at this time. so i'll have to leave it at that. >> doctor -- >> right here on the end. >> the hospital was very transparent with employees, saying two staff members were admitted to the hospital and were being checked out a couple of days ago. is is this one of those two? >> pardon me? >> the hospital told employees there were two staff members that had been admitted a couple of days ago and were being checked out. was this one of those two? >> no. >> thank you. >> -- this person had and follow-up question, three isolation rooms at the hospital from what i understand. what's going to happen when there's more patients? >> you want me to take that last part? >> sure. >> that's something that --
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that's one of the reasons why we'll be leaving here pretty soon. that's something that the cdc and the state, public health commissioner and -- are looking at along with the hospital. and the cdc will -- and the hospital will answer those questions later after the data's looked at. >> let me just speak to your capacity question. we have at presbyterian a -- an emergency room isolation setup. we have an icu isolation setup where we've let folks in the community know we can manage up to three patients. we've opened a new area within the hospital to expand our capacity for e.d. screening. the biggest focus, in addition to care of patients in the hospital, is trying to keep our arms around the number of folks who come into the emergency
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department with concerns about whether or not they've been in contact with folks, et cetera, and then rapidly getting through a screening process for those folks. >> you're watching a news conference live in dallas where political leaders and health r care officials are holding a news conference. a second health care worker has been diagnosed with ebola. the mayor basically summing it up like this. it may get worse before it gets better, but it will get better. the only way to deal with this is person by person, moment by moment and detail by detail. the mayor went to the apartment building where this second patient now lives. and spoke to people personally. they're sanitizing the apartment, the car. they're trying to deal with anybody this person has been in contact with. chris jansing joins us at the table. of course you cover the white
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house. as to how this hospital handled it, but also how they have sent a message to hospitals across the country as to how to deal with ebola patients. there is a failure here. >> they think, the white house thinks, and we pushed hard on this at the briefing. they think they've got this under control. let's go back a little bit and remember that i think it was october 3rd. you have lisa monaco. she's the one they have essentially as the point person. she stood at the podium in the briefing room and said, we're prepared. we've got this under control. we've done this before. we will do it again. what we're seeing is, this could have been anticipated. none of these is exactly alike. this is not bird flu. this is not aids. it's different. it has to be handled differently. i think if you want to look at the narrative, part of the problem for the white house is they look like they're playing
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catch- catch-up. they look like the new problem has occurred so now we're going to send new teams down. we're going to step it up once we see what the problems are instead of giving the message we're being proactive. >> on the africa front of this for certain. mike barnicle, we were listening to different numbers. there are opportunities for ebola to sort of surface in other people, given the fact they are still waiting until sunday i think for 45 people that they are putting in isolation -- >> 48 people. >> and then there's 75 health care workers. >> right, 75 health care workers. mayor rawlings said a couple of things i think is important, especially to the media industry. he said, we've got to deal with facts, not fear. which they were trying to do in dallas. to your point, chris, i mean, they are playing catch-up
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nationally. the white house, the department of health. all playing catch-up. because this is so new, on us so quickly, in a scope i don't think anybody imagined five or six weeks ago. >> i think everyone had said this, we're prepared to handle this. there wasn't anticipation it would come to the united states. there really was that belief they could keep it under control. they have been very proactive. the united states has absolutely led the way in west africa. they absolutely -- we've got the department of defense who's involved in that. the question really becomes, and i think this is the serious question that's being asked now, who's coordinating this, who's in charge, do we really have an infrastructure. yes, it is absolutely a governmentwide response. but where's the flow chart and where -- >> how could we possibly -- i'm saying the opposite of criticism, been prepared? how is every emergency room set up -- go back six weeks ago, where someone comes in with
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these symptoms -- >> unrealistic expectations. >> it's impossible. i can't see criticism at this point because -- it's inconceivable that we could be set up to deal with it. >> everybody ought to pump the brakes on criticizing this operation. we had dr. fauci on. he indicated that the scope of this -- he didn't use the word overwhelming but in terms of hospital preparations, hospitals big and small in this country, equipment, equipment for health workers to wear. they're just now really getting up to speed on all of that. >> one of the things you talk about is doing these regional centers so you have major hospitals where we know if there's an ebola patient that comes in somewhere else, we can stabilize them, we can get them there. but this is a work in progress. there's no doubt about that. we have not dealt with this before. >> we can never be prepared because you don't know the person has ebola. for instance, in emergency rooms across the country, even fast
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forward eight weeks from now, somebody comes walking in with certain flu-like symptoms, nobody's showing up at this point initially when a patient walks into a hospital in protective gear. >> this is also -- i mean, chris alluded to this a couple of seconds ago. this is not a problem for dallas or the united states. this is a worldwide problem now. and the scope of this problem is such that the united states is now bearing the brunt of care in africa. we have 3,000 members of the american military in africa. helping to abate this crisis. trying to abate this crisis. there's a story in the wire today about a parisian nurse working in liberia who contracts ebola. it takes them 50 hours to get here from liberia to a clinic in paris. the only way they were able to get her from liberia to the clinic in paris is with an american chartered jet that true from georgia to liberia to pick
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her up and bring her to paris. where's the rest of the world? >> that's a question if you talk to white house officials. they will say. in fact, the president said this, they feel like they're getting more buy-in now, more help from other countries. countries large and small have not stepped up to the plate on this. it's the united states again leading the way. i do think it is worth pointing out. you've said it on the set before but we'll say it again. the people on the front lines of this are doing this at personal risk. and they're americans. a lot of them are americans. >> this on the news that we reported this morning. that in the next two months, in africa, 10,000 cases a week are -- a week are expected by september. which is absolutely frightening. also in dallas, i think one point to be made, as they look at the second case now of a health care worker being diagnosed with ebola. they expect possibly more. there are a certain number of people being monitored through sunday before their window becomes safer.
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did you get lost? >> i know. i'm actually supposed to eat there. yeah. this is the only dining hall you can actually get yourself some chicken and waffles.
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look, your "dear white people," right, it's funny. it's funny stuff. it really is. how have we not staffed you yet? >> oh, me, oh, what, on your uninspired human magazine? >> it's much more than a magazine, sweetheart. "snl" is half. same goes for network comedies. >> what gives you clubhouse kids the right to come to our dining hall? you don't live here. so you can't eat here. >> let the man eat. >> i got this. >> that was a scene from the new movie "dear white people." here with us now, director, writer and producer of the film justin simeon. great to have you on the show. >> nice to see you. >> so this looks good. this looks really good. >> i like that reaction. >> i'm taken in already. when can i say it? >> what is this about? >> it's called "dear white people" which is perhaps a bit of a cheeky title.
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it's about these four black kids that go to a mostly white ivy league and are kind of navigating the world of self-identity in a place that doesn't reflect them. we're out this friday and we -- it's been a long journey but we're coming to theaters. >> how much of you is in this film? >> i think there's certainly some auto bio graphical threads behind the project. the attention is to attack the idea of identity versus self from four different points of views of what it means to be black. as the tag line says, to be a black face in a white place. >> what are the four different points of view? >> we have a character named lionel who is gay and black and sort of -- kind of feeling in the middle, kind of doesn't see a place for himself anywhere within the culture on this campus. we have samantha white who we saw in this clip who is a revolutionary figure on this campus, championing for black causes in a place that feels like it's post-racial and beyond
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racism. we also have troy fairbanks living in the shadow of his father's homes and dreams for him. and cocoa connors who is perhaps kind of modulating her class level up and down depending on what people expect of her. >> this lines up with a new hit show on abc called "blackish." the parents are concerned they're losing their heritage. so it's just kind of open interesting discussion now on kind of the graying of america if you will. that's the good news here. >> also, just sort of what it means to be anything, you know, especially in this country. >> are we getting -- i just wanted to ask when we get to a point when we talk about a show like blackish and we see what you're doing with this great piece of artwork and this film. >> thank you. >> we're getting to a point where there is going to be a generation that believes we are a post-racial america. >> well, you know, i'd like to think that but i don't know if it's coming any time soon to be
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honest. what the definitions of what it means to be this or be that are becoming more broad. we're more complicated. we're more complex. we're often portrayed. a lot of times being a part of any marginalized community, you're bobbing and weaving other people's kind of lazy presumptions about you. what this movie does is sort of say we're actually a lot of things. and, you know, being black isn't something that can sort of be put in this little box -- >> is it okay to laugh at these things, to find the humor in these qualities? >> i think that's the only way to talk about it. forgive the pun. it's not black or white it it's sort of a gray area. we can only really have a conversation when it's safe. >> so we've been talking about having this national conversation, national dialogue on race for, like, 600 years. we've not had it yet. what's your thought? what do you think the reaction would be among white members of the audience just to that clip? >> i loved it.
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>> thanks. >> there you go, that's the reaction. >> i loved it. i think also people think we're farther along than we really are. >> yeah. >> and i think you're touching on some educational things here through some humor and some really kind of tense awkward moments. i was taken right in. >> thank you so much. the other thing the movie tries to do, everyone is sort of taken to task. the black characters are really the focus of the narrative. they're also struggling and dealing with ways perhaps they're not being as authentic as they'd like it to be. >> great news for the future, my 7-year-old daughter, her best friend in school is a young african-american girl. i've never heard either one of them address -- it completely -- color blind, greatest thing in the world. >> dear white people is in theaters this friday. justin simeon, thank you so much. come back. >> i will. still ahead on "morning joe," work or family. it's a choice some women have to make at one point in their career. why two companies are telling
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their female employees they can have both and they'll help them pay for it. plus, why they may be in the league to win least liked. okay. we'll be right back. when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting. and when alan gets all powered up, ya know what happens? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! he's a selling machine! put it there. and there, and there, and there. la quinta inns & suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only a laquinta.com! la quinta!
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they had to change their yogurt. because they had too much sugar in it? all right, joining us now, u.s. representative from ohio, congressman tim rigwright. author of "the real food revelation." the return of the american family farm. also with us, for bloomberg view, margaret coleson. we talk about food a lot here and culture. the revolution you're talking about is what? >> trying to get more healthy food into our food system and make sure that it's affordable for people. a lot of folks today can't afford it. and what we have is a generation of americans who are not going to live as long as their parents. and they're going to live a much sicker life than their parents lived. we're going to have in the next few years half the country that's going to have either diabetes or prediabetes. if you want to talk about bending the cost curve on health care, if you want to talk about having money to reinvest back
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into the country, we can't do it. that process, that trajectory is really unsustainable. >> your goal, you know, to get more fresh food, home grown food, into grocery stores, you're from ohio. so if you go inner city cleveland, you're going to see a far less representative sampling of really healthy food than you would 15 miles south of cleveland in the suburbs. how do we fix that? >> that's part of the real food revolution. how do we retool the farm bill to have these investments being made in urban centers? so in youngstown, ohio, where i represent, we used to 150,000 people. we're now 70,000. public investments coming in saying we're going to take out dilapidated homes and start a serious urban agricultural urban farming initiative. you get investments in the inner cities. you can create summer jobs for young people. and really year round. hoop houses. extend the season. then you get healthy food in
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these food deserts. most people who are poor live in areas where they're not even within a mile or two of a grocery store. they thing a tomato comes from the grocery store. these investments could not only make us healthy but turn areas and neighborhoods of consumption into areas of production. >> when we look at the obesity crisis, we're talking in the break, the argument is eat less. but it's not that simple. when it comes to what is available to people. >> right, you can't eat less of bad food and really cure the problem. you know, what strikes me is the biggest food desert is in schools. who thought putting vending machines in schools, which is just main lining sugar, is a good idea? and yet when you try to confront problem, you come up against school boards and other parents and you'll be called a nanny, i'm sure, for trying to do it. do you address that in the book? >> we definitely talk about it. think you have to build it out. the problem is the schools lack money. so if the corporation comes in and say, i'll build the score
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board at the football field for you, they take it and let the vending machines come into school. >> don't we call this a kick back? >> it's unfortunately where we are today. i think we need a garden in either schoolyard. we need a kitchen in either school house. we need a salad bar in every school cafeteria. and build out a food system that our young kids learn in school and tie it into the curriculum. that they learn how to plant, grow, cook and eat real good whole food. so they're ready to go and learn. these kids have fruit rollups, doritos and a pop and then we sit down and say, hey, can you learn algebra. >> before 7:30 in the morning. >> now can you sit down and learn algebra because we're not being competitive in the global economy. >> what happens to you in youngstown when you talk about this kind of stuff? youngstown isn't exactly pleasantville. >> well, i mean, it's an issue. where i come from, we appreciate our food. we have some of the best italian food in the world. i'll put it up against new york
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city. but we have an appreciation for food. i talk in the book a lot about my italian grandparents and the life they led. they had a garden. i could tell what we were going to have for dinner by what my grandmother picked out of her garden. that culture is still there. that ethnic culture. so i think we need to reengage that. people in washington think we have this really complicated problem. it's so complex. if we come up with a more complicated solution, we may be able to fix that. this is about getting back to the fundamentals. getting back to, in esance what our country is about. >> the book is called "the real food revolution." congressman, thank you. margaret, i want to point to your article about the race for governor florida. i'll read it. the only race charlie crist and rick scott are winning is the one to be the least liked pair of candidates for governor in the country. find out why in her piece. also look at the latest polls there.
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thank you very much. still ahead, latest perk that is coming to two companies in silicon valley and why it's being praised as a major milestone for female employees. we'll be right back.
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with online exercises by the top minds in brain science. find more real possibilities at aarp.org/possibilities. yes. two major companies in silicon valley are generating headlines this morning thanks to their newest employee benefit. apple and facebook are offering up to $20,000 for women freezing their eggs. each round of treatment costs about $10,000 and storage is about $500 a year. >> i just want to make a point. mike barnicle just left the set. i don't know if that's a statement of what he feels about the story. >> no, i told him. >> we didn't want him here. >> you're our alpha male here. >> joining us now, the executive editor of "harper's bazaar," laura brown.
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have you heard this story before i read it? >> yes. >> what's your gut? >> about the -- >> freezing of the eggs. >> i think it's a benefit. it's almost a right to be able to have a child. and while you're working, to have your employee provide that benefit. after all, most insurance companies provide a viagra benefit so please -- >> whoa, whoa, can i -- >> yes. >> donny, come to work at nbc -- >> yeah, what options, or what doors does this open do you thing? >> firstly, my sentiment echoes -- when it was the fertility doctor got an e-mail that said, omg, with tons of exclamation marks. was my reaction too. i think it opens the door for women to finally have this opportunity. a lot of women in -- i'm in magazines, in my profession, may come to the age where they go, well, that's great, but it's $15,000 and i don't have that money. and then if it doesn't take the
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first time, it's $30,000. so i'm so for this. i think every -- i know this is sort of undercurrent of is this orwellian, is it -- i don't think in its sentiment, i don't think that necessarily gives women that much credit. so manipulated by my company, i'm a puppet girl, i think that it give us choice and life is about choice. >> it does, but -- i applaud it. but i don't know if it's solves the problem because a woman is still going to be forced -- not maybe at 35 but at 43 with the same question. do i leave the workforce to have a child? do i take a few years off. >> at 43, she's maybe more established. >> the counterpoint, it's harder to get back in at 47 than at 39. i'm not punching holes in it, but it's a valiant effort, but unfortunately for women, they have that crossroads. >> i guess i feel like women should feel less forced on the overall. and i feel when you have more options, you're less forced to do anything.
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i frankly -- i'm not about to go and do that but i think that if giving me that option and being -- i'm 40 and to be like, wow, maybe i could do that and i could go and be mobile in the world with my career a little longer and when i'm ready or when i have a partner, i think people are forgetting that too. you put up that survey before. a lot of women don't necessarily put off having a baby because of their career, they often put off a baby because -- >> 88% -- >> yeah, and this is about paying for it. and it shouldn't be -- >> it's finance. >> -- elites that have that much money saved up. >> yeah, it's so expensive and so time consuming. you're saving all this money because the majority of women don't have that money just kicking around to try twice. and finally some companies are giving them an option. i think it's fantastic. i think more will and should do it. i've actually heard there's companies doing it in a low key fashion. >> these are very rich companies giving fooseball and sushi at lunch.
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>> if i get fooseball, i want to freeze my eggs. >> viagra is covered, donny. >> this is world coming into the show. >> everybody's -- >> we're both winning, donny. >> this is a moment. >> don't make it take ten phone calls this time, thank you. we'll be right back with much more. le announcer ] we help make secure financial tomorrows a reality for over 19 million people. [ mom ] with life insurance, we're not just insuring our lives... we're helping protect his. [ female announcer ] everyone has a moment when tomorrow becomes real. transamerica. transform tomorrow.
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tomorrow on "morning joe," texas governor rick perry will join us. we'll ask him about the ebola virus. plus, why he's in poland. what's he doing in my country? >> he's seeing your brother. >> oh. he'll be joining us live from warsaw. up next, what, if anything, did we learn today. the big storm system that brought us the severe weather over the last couple of days is shifting to the northeast. airport delays will be a problem.
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the ready for you alert, only a laquinta.com! la quinta! it's time now to talk about what we learned today. >> the mayor, his honesty out of dallas, talking about the fact that it may get worse before it gets better. they seem to be on top of it now that they have a better protocol. >> mike barnicle. >> mayor again, when he talk, about the ebola crisis, minimize rumor, maximize facts. >> the great norman lear, talking about you have to enjoy everything in life, including moving your bowels. >> he did say it. >> thank you, thank you. donny deutsch, everybody. can we see the picture of maisie? she makes me want to support hillary clinton for president.
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look how excited she is. >> general enthusiasm. >> hillary clinton nice enough to do a picture, a selfie with the family. that was a cute moment. amidst so much hard news that we are reporting, difficult news to report. anyhow, that does it for us today. if it's way too early, it's time for "morning joe." now, peter alexander. >> he's great. >> love peter. another ebola case in texas and new information just moments ago from officials in dallas. we will have the late esst on containment and concerns about how well health care workers are prepared there. bringing international leaders together again to figure out who can be done to stop isis in iraq and syria. and the president will hit the trail today. just 20 days left until the midterm vote. much more on where he and other
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a-listers are heading in a homestretch to try to help their candidates out. good morning to you from washington. i'm peter alexander. it is wednesday, october 15th, 2014. this is "the daily rundown." a wet one in washington today. we begin with breaking news about we are learning more about the second health care worker who tested positive for ebola. just moments ago, officials there revealed the newest ebola patient is a woman, that she helped treat thomas eric duncan before he died last week. she reported having a fever on tuesday, was quickly isolated. it took about 90 minutes, they say, and questioned about contacts to find out if anyone else needs to be monitored. >> a lot is being said about what may or may not have occurred to cause some of our colleague, to contract this disease, but it's clear there was an exposure somewhere so

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