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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 17, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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"morning joe ." a florida judge is set to sentence the man convicted in the murder of jordan davis after an argument over loud music. first degree murder carries a mandatory life sentence. and the candidates for wisconsin governor incumbent republican scott walker and sco and the democratic challenger will spend their friday night in a debate. we'll see if fan turns up. that will do it for "way too early." happy friday. what friday is it. payday friday. we can pay our mortgages. "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ >> travis hits one into right! the giants win the pennant! the giants win the pennant! the giants win the pennant! baseball fans will remember 1951, thompson's famous shot that sent the new york giants to
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the pennant. last night, late last night it was the giants going to the series and a similar blast, unbelievable story, sam stein, whether you like the giants or not. what a great story. what a great world series we have coming up. >> amazing world series. probably not going to be the most watched world series, not the two biggest media markets. these are two scrappy teams. the kansas city royals, they run a lot. they have an amazing bullpen. the giants, every two years seems like they are juggernauts. two teams on a hot streak. should be a lot of fun. >> mika, obviously, so much to be covering this morning. the stories continue to break out on ebola, and the poor response from international health organizations, american health organizations and a bumbling response from an
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administration who for years has been telling us come on, stop panicking, no panic, no drama. there are times, there are times where you should actually allow a little bit of drama to be inserted into the way you handle things. the urgency should play to more things than just get elected. the fierce urgency now applies to this terrible situation and this story. >> well, there's talk of a czar now. we have engineer me peters, carroll leigh and sam stein. we're in washington. lawmakers are increasing their pressure for travel bans amid growing questions about the government's response to ebola. members of both parties grilled cdc director thomas frieden and other top health officials at a congressional hearing on thursday. frieden says he remains confident there will not be a large scale outbreak in the u.s. but congress still had plenty of questions about why the
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government is allowing in people from the ebola affected regions. >> we do not have to leave the door open to all travel to and from hot zones in western africa while ebola is an unwelcomed and dangerous stowaway on these flights. why are we allowing folks to come over here. >> i don't understand. if we have a system in place that requires any airline passenger from coming in overseas with a date of birth to make sure they are not on the anti-terrorist list we can't look at one as travel history and say no you're not coming here. not until this situation, you're right, it needs to be solved in africa, but until it we shouldn't allow these folks in. >> perhaps this committee should consider forwarding to the full house a request we have a vote on travel restriction because people are asking us to do that and they are exactly correct to
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make that request. >> so if i remember correctly, joe, a couple of weeks back on "meet the press" and other places you were labelled a fear monger to raise this. now we're hearing this from both sides of the aisle. >> it's interesting three weeks ago when i was on "meet the press" i was mocked andry die culled, called dr. scarborough for quoting a "the washington post" sunday morning article and bringing up three points. and the first point was that the world health organization had bumbled this all along. so when everybody was saying on that panel and quite frankly a lot of official washington was saying no, we should just trust health care organizations and why are we panicking. somehow asking tough questions about the leadership in the world health organization and the cdc was akin to trying to stir up panic. i don't know if that's political correctness, i don't know if maybe that's some liberals naturally respond that way if you ask tough questions, if you
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act like a journalist and ask tough questions of health organizes that you're somehow fanning the flames. i've got to say -- i've been saying something else for three weeks consistently and that is there should be travel restrictions in place, the same types that worked in sierra leone. and i said there shouldn't be travel restrictions then give us a good reason why we shouldn't allow 70 to 100 people from infected countries to come in to jfk every day. every day. the cdc cannot give us a good answer. oh, that will stop us from being able to have relief efforts. no it won't. as fred upton said in the committee. you have a no-fly list, actually, for terrorists. you can have a fly list for health care workers. they can't answer basic questions and three weeks into this, i'm stunned. i'm also stunned by people that
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are still saying oh, you're trying to stir up panic by simply asking tough questions that everybody should have started asking when i started asking them three weeks ago. >> while other members push back against a travel ban nearly 60 representatives and 11 senators support the idea right now. chicago's o'hare and hartsfield jackson international airport in atlanta are airports conducting enhanced screenings on passengers for ebola. president obama says he does not believe travel restrictions are the way to go but he's considering an ebola czar to oversee the federal response to the crisis. >> i don't have a philosophical objection to a travel ban, necessarily, if that's the thing that will keep the american people safe. the problem is that in all the discussions i've had thus far with experts in the field, experts in infectious disease is that a travel ban is less effective than the measures that we are currently instituting.
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>> so, mika, this is not sort of a one on one disease. there's a multiplier. if one can conquer ten, two can conquer 10,000. in this case, i may not have had those biblical numbers right don't send me an e-mail. but in this case, you brought it up yesterday. because one man was allowed to come in to the united states with ebola, one man. we now have cruise ships that have people quarantined on them this morning. we have flights that have caused concerns. we, of course, have seen what's happened with the health care workers in dallas who are spread out. and one concern after another. again, it has a multiplier effect. let us hope six months from now we look back on this the same way we look back on other things and it's taken care of.
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but time runs out on these sort of diseases because there is the multiplier effect and, again, when you have a pathogen that lie question ifkwi liquefies your internal organs it's okay to be concerned upfront. it started with one patient. >> one patient who came in and created now what is literally something the president may have to appoint a czar for. the first person to be infected with the ebola virus in the u.s. is in a new hospital. nina pham arrived in maryland last night to be treated at a state-of-the-art facility run by the national institutes of health. she appears to be in good spirits in a video shot at the dallas hospital earlier.
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>> meanwhile the fiancee of thomas eric duncan said a top official from texas presbyterian hospital apologized for how his case was handled. there's a claim that the hospital had an ebola machine used by the military in west africa when duncan arrived you can make a diagnosis within an hour. fda guidelines prevented the facility from using it. fda has not yet responded. >> wow! >> officials monitor other nurses who cared for duncan, the new site mashable reports four u.s. hospitals designed to treat patients with ebola can only care for a total of nine patients at a time. joining us now from the national institute of health, wrc
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reporter meagan mcgrath. meagan? >> reporter: nina pham was brought here to nih, national institutes of health a little before midnight last night and said to be in good condition, stable condition and in goat spirits. now pham was flown from texas to maryland in a special charter plane. she was flown to fredrick municipal airport so she was not flown to any of the commercial airports in our area. she was wearing a special protective suit. she could be seen walking off the plane holding the hand of an escort. she walked off the plane under her own steam. she got in a waiting ambulance. she was driven through the streets in our area, motorcade brought to nih in bethesda. she's been taken to the special studies unit. a specialized isolation unit. it's episcopalian kwipd to deal with infectious diseases like ebola. it has space for two patients. she's being attended to toby dr.
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anthony fauci. dr. fauci said it's too early to say what her course of treatment will be. it's unclear whether or not she will be given any experimental drugs or not. just too early to tell. meagan, thank you. the head of the republican committee trying to retake the senate is vowing victory and in purple colorado there are signs it could be headed that way. congressmen cory gardner leads mark udall by six points according to a poll from quinnipiac university but in virginia ed gillispie's attempt to unseat mark warner appears to be sputtering. the former romney adviser has gone dark with no more ads booked but that could change. gillispie has been down double digits. chris christie spent thursday in georgia with republican incumbent where the governor's
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race is in a dead heat. dr. jill biden heads there today for michele nunn. and the campaigner in chief bill clinton will hold yet another rally in arkansas this weekend. this time in his home town of hope. but last night he was in new hampshire for incumbent senator jean shaheen arguing against trickle down economics and reflecting on his role for democrats. >> sometimes people -- i feel like an old racehorse. >> joe, i wonder also just looking ahead to the mid-terms if ebola will play a role if there's a real republican sweep? >> i think confidence play as role. obviously a lot of questions about fortunate's handling on isis, the president's handling on ebola. i don't think people will go in and say how is he responding in
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syria right now that's how i'll vote for my congressman or senator. but there's no doubt i'm hearing from democrats across the country that they have seen over the past several days on the campaign trail real concern. you can kind of site. i'll give josh talking points memo a plug. he has an amazing app called poll tracker. you go down and see a lot of these races that they seem to be -- most of them still in the margin of error but a lot of them breaking the republicans way. the louisiana senate up by four. i'm reading from the poll tracker. arkansas, cotton up by four. shaheen still tight in new hampshire. joni ernst up by three in iowa. scott walker by one in wisconsin. same in alaska, sullivan up by three. there are exceptions, though. in north carolina, kay hagan
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continues to hold on. but the most remarkable thing, mika, all of these races, almost all of them seem to be within the margin of error and how the white house is seen responding over the next week or so, two weeks over this ebola crisis, could have an impact, maybe one percentage point but in a lot of real estates one percentage point is enough. >> sam, go ahead. >> these races have been sort of stubbornly close the entire cycle. obviously some late breaks for republicans in some of these critical states. the one sort of weird bright star for the democrats at this juncture is georgia where michele nunn has had a lot of momentum in part because of david perdue's history or allegations of outsourcing. but i agree with joe. the perception of presidential leadership or lack thereof could play an obvious role down the stretch. these are critical few weeks. you don't want to make, necessarily see the ebola crisis
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be brought into the context of campaign politics, but it does get brought in. >> it could be a huge issue for republicans. >> absolutely. the whole issue whether you close access to the u.s. in the sense of having these individuals who could potentially carry the ebola virus be checked there as opposed to here matters and it will matter to a lot of folks going the poll. >> it's an unequivocal move. >> they were saying a few days ago they couldn't do a ban because it would stop health care workers getting access to get into west africa. yesterday you saw the press secretary and president shift that a little bit and instead say it would make things more dangerous for people if they did a flight ban because they couldn't track passengers in the same way and screen them and people might fly to another country and go under the radar and then fly into the u.s.
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>> carol, i heard that. what mika, what's remarkable to me is they act as if somebody can sneak into america by flying through denmark first. they still have to show their passport at the airport when they get to jfk or to dulles. it's remarkable -- >> there is that. >> that doesn't hold water either. they need to come up with a good excuse. carol is exactly right. they changed their logic, mika, but it's still dumb logic. i don't get it. again, we can track terrorists, we certainly can track people from their country of origin even if they go through denmark and then take a boat over to nova scotia and then hitchhike to montreal and then try to get in through that. sheer stupidity. no matter how many places you go you got to end up showing your passport.
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>> he doesn't trust government. >> no. i just want, jeremy, a logical explanation. and they change stories and it doesn't work. >> i don't think -- i do think that's part of the problem is nobody has really thought out or plotted out what this travel ban would look like. how you could implement it without making health workers not subject to it, getting supplies over there that need to be brought over there. it's very complicated. i will say one issue that's come up recently that's being floated news republic had a really interesting article written by an infectious disease specialist advocating for are a quarantine which would be -- it wouldn't be as abrupt as cutting travel off from all these countries but quarantining people and checking them, making sure they don't have the disease. >> well, joe? >> mika, i want to be really clear here because there are a lot of dumb people in their
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mother's basement eating cheetohs blowing igging. if a quarantine is a bad idea that's awesome. i just want somebody to give me a logical reason why we don't severely limit people from these countries. i am not advocating a quarantine. i am just asking -- okay take a crack sam because you tried last week and you were wrong. >> terrible. go ahead. >> all right. >> go, sam. >> the nexus of the problem with ebola is not in america it's in west africa. until you get the situation in west africa under control we will never be actually out of the woods with respect to ebola. so when you look at a travel ban you have to look at it holistically. what does it mean for america and west africa. basically every health official maybe with a few exceptions said
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if you do a travel ban it may, in fact, help america but make the situation in west africa a whole lot more complex and a whole lot worse. if you do a travel ban in that country people in that country will panic. there will be political panic, there will be social panic. in addition people in that country will still try to get out of that country even though there's a travel ban. you can prevent them from trying to get out of the country even if do you have a travel ban. then it becomes a question say somebody with ebola got out of the country and went to europe and we stopped them in europe. we still then have to trace who their contacts were up to that point and if you have a travel ban, if they were going underground it's harder to trace their contabts. you might help the situation in america but the situation in west africa is exacerbated and made worse. >> sam, i want to thank you -- >> i tried my best. >> you tried your best.
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at the end of the day you were the poor st. louis cardinal pitcher that threw a fat pitch down the middle that i will take out of the park. mika, you'll remember in the past three weeks, you'll recall i said we needed to do two things at once. we need to limit travel here. at the same time we need to send a strong message to west africa and i chided conservatives on this, this is not a west africa crisis, this is an international crisis and the united states of america remains the indispensable country and we need to go in there and throw ourselves at it and declare war on ebola. that will prevent panic when they see we're not going in a half ass way we're throwing everything we have at ebola. as far as tracing people through europe, we're pretty good at that. we're pretty good at tracing terrorists. i think we can trace six civilians that are trying to get into the united states. intercept them and then do everything we can to help them.
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it has to be a two tiered approach. yes stop the flights or stop the travel from over here or restrict it as much as possible. at the same time, double, triple our efforts in west africa and yes spend a lot of money, a lot of taxpayer money if we have to the make sure that this disease is stamped out in west africa and across the world. we're wasting time. we're losing time. >> joe, i'm getting emails and texts as we speak from the medical community about this because this is really the debate of the issue that has been brewing for weeks now and your frustration is well heard here because i've been sitting next to you for weeks listening you to say what they are saying on capitol hill now. there are complications to it at the same time it's now being proposed as a serious issue, and you've been saying this for weeks and people have been mocking you. and wondering why we're not doing it.
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>> all i want is an answer as to why we didn't start talk about this seriously three weeks ago. president has carol leigh has reported is president is moving on the logic. after we had three or four patients like mr. duncan who died, three or four weeks from now i'm sorry we're going to implement the travel ban now it will be too late. there's a multiplier effect. six months from now, maybe six months from now we look back on this as last, you know last year's story and much ado about nothing. let us pray that's the case. but you talk about the fierce urgency of now, now is the time we have to move aggressively. >> let me go to break. we have fangate which we have to get to because i need to cool down a little bit here on "morning joe." the queen of soul, joe, aretha franklin. >> this is big.
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this is great. >> see, i better not be here. also ahead the medical official examining joan rivers has revealed her official cause of death. and a controversy is brewing in south carolina over the state's use of the confederate flag. here why governor economhaley i saying okay. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. neering and. neering and. advanced safety systems & technology. shipping and manufacturing. across the united states, bp supports more than a quarter million jobs. when we set up operation in one part of the country, people in other parts go to work. that's not a coincidence. it's one more part of our commitment to america. i found a better deal on prescriptions. we found lower co-pays... ...and a free wellness visit. new plan...same doctor. i'm happy. it's medicare open enrollment.
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okay. time to -- oh, my gosh. joe, you need to talk to thomas. he's instagraming us. >> what? >> he texted it to me like late hours. we just need to talk. >> this is creepy. i mean, listen, i mean unless it's for educational purposes, t.j. you know -- what you got? >> let's start with -- >> what are you doing? >> oh, lord.
quote
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>> mika looking fantastic. >> so he texted this to me and i haven't saved thomas' number yet and it just came up as a number. oh, my god. what is this. i almost called security. >> he texted you that at 2:00 in the morning. >> it was weird. i was confused. anyhow let's start with the papers now. oh, my god. we'll start with the "new york times" and get back to that at a later date. all right. this is about the details surrounding the death of legendary comedian joan rivers. the city's medical examiner says the 81-year-old died because of brain-damage due to a lack of oxygen. the official cause of death is listed as quote therapeutic
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conditions. rivers went into cardiac arrest to examine stomach reflection and her vocal chords. >> we'll turn to salon.com. during a debate in south carolina where governor nikki haley defended the placement of the confederate flag on the state capitol grounds. she said i can honestly say i have had a conversation with a single ceo about the confederate flag. she said the state showed its first inclusiveness by electing its first african-american senator and indian governor, referring to herself. >> the "wall street journal" a day after hbo went with plans to offer streaming service, cbs offered their own for 5.99 a mop. cbs will also live stream its broadcast network. it's just the latest shift away
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from traditional cable and satellite tv as more and more people look to cut the cord with their monthly tv bills. >> we get this from the nbc affiliate in southern california. a black bear and her cub created a standoff after the cub got stuck in a trash bin. bears like this are coming down from nearby mountains looking for food and water. with more on that here's joe. >> reporter: game wardens could hear the mother crying and knew they had to help. they fired a bean bag at mom to scare her away. then safely coax the cub out of the dumpster. the little one shinnies you a tree safely and calling out for mom and before long they are back together. >> how sweet is that. it's in great contrast, mika, to this thomas roberts instagram thing that i just did.
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this is really, really creepy. i mean, whoa. >> look, you have mika and a fan and a charlie crist conversation i'm telling you that's tv gold. >> we still haven't shown the most fascinating part of that debate which we will coming up later. >> oh, my gosh. we'll have an update on that. that story is incredible. it's incredible. coming up senator rand paul explains how republicans will make big gains in the 2016 elections. mike allen joins us with his interview with the kentucky senator. . to be more powerful... and, miraculously, unleash 46 mpg highway. an extravagance reserved for the privileged few. until now. hey josh! new jetta? yeah. introducing lots of new. the new volkswagen jetta tdi clean diesel.
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get fire adapted now at fireadapted.org [ roars ] ♪ joe, i'm not going to let you answer this, but what's going on with the candidates in your state. that's all i have to say. what's going on. florida's candidates for governor are in full spin mode after a small fan on stage overshadowed the first seven minutes of their debate. >> as you can see, the two candidates who were invited to take part in this debate right now are not stepping up on the stage. [ laughter ] ladies and gentlemen, we have an extremely peculiar situation right now. we have governor charlie is
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we have been told that governor scott will not be participating in this debate. governor crist has asked to have a fan, a small fan placed underneath his podium. the rules of the debate that i was shown by the scott campaign say that there should be no fan, somehow there is a fan there and for that reason, ladies and gentlemen, i am being told that governor scott will not join us for this debate. >> democratic candidate charlie crist brought a small fan on stage as you saw, his camp said there was an addendum to the rules allowing him to do so but republican incumbent rick scott didn't emerge until seven minutes into the debate when it was supposed to start. >> governor crist, why did you insist on bringing a fan here when your campaign knew this
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would be a contentious issue. >> why not? you know, is there anything wrong with being comfortable. i don't think there. >> governor scott why the delay coming out over a fan. designee said he would come to the debate. so why not until he's ready. >> it's pretty strange. and, you know, i think what people really care about -- this is kind of a trivial issue let's be honest about it. what's really important are issues like jaeducation, ethics. >> i was surprised he didn't bring dry ice. he worried so much that he lost 832,000 jobs. >> what was the big deal. if he needs a fan what's the big deal. let him have a fan. why is this even an issue going into the debate between your staff and his staff. >> i have no idea.
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i was told he wasn't going to show up. i was sitting back there waiting for them to tell us to come out. they didn't tell us to come out. >> your alleging crist broke the rules? >> i don't know why he did what he did. >> you don't want to make an accusation he broke the rules. >> he clearly broke the rules but that's not the point. >> both candidates remain dead locked as the race enters the final stretch. joe, i don't even know -- >> well, listen. here is the serious part of this. michael steele you have rick scott who has been in the 30s in his approval rating, even when he was sworn in he was in the 30s. he's fought and scratched and clawed to get his way back in the 40s and make this race competitive. he's a likeable man. he's not a likeable politician. he's just not. >> right.
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>> and something like this is a nightmare scenario. you are not leaving the guy who ladies the state of florida waiting for you. >> i have to agree. it's really embarrassing to the extent that's why you didn't come out. you be the bigger man because you are the sitting governor. and you do want to talk about jobs. you do want to focus on the economy of your state and what you've done and accomplish. you don't distract from that message particularly as you said you come out of the gate with a deficit where you've not been very popular with the people. there's some concerns about, you know, whether or not you can pull this election off. you take advantage of the moment and show you're the bigger man. he didn't here. it hurts. it hurts with a lot of voters. >> i see some chuckles to my right. you want to take a stab at this. >> i don't know what to make of any of this. the fact it's gone viral it makes sense because people can't
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believe that at the beginning of a substantive debate you had this issue. rick scott could have been more sportsman like. did he want a fan too? >> are we really arguing over this? >> like two children fighting over a toy that one of them wants or doesn't want. i covered charlie crist when i was a reporter in florida and he was governor, a republican. >> a republican or democrat. >> and he was republican. he's always had a fan. it's his thing. >> he's had a fan and a tan. you got a problem with being comfortable? >> no. >> give governor scott enough credit. he's done something very difficult. >> what? >> he's made charlie crist look like a statesman. >> oh, my god. >> oh, my gosh. >> if there was an issue about it, it also, i think, makes charlie crist look even sneakier
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than some people think he is by being slippery and changing everything and putting fans out there when you're not supposed to. i don't really care. >> does he need a fan? >> he's sweating. that's what rick scotting ought to say, see i make him sweat. >> this is not something that is unusual for folks in florida. everyone knows that governor, going back to when and he was commissioner use ad fan. back 2000. this has been one of his props. this is not new. >> can we get a shot of the fan or is that a heater. >> joe where is your fan. >> mika, i got to say, i have campaigned in florida in august, and anybody who has not campaigned let he or she without sin cast the first stone. i'm wondering why i wasn't smart enough to carry a fan around with me at those campaign events because you're wearing a coat and tie.
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as carol knows she followed me. it's 100 degrees. this seems like a pretty darn smart thing to do. >> okay. >> not smart for the governor. i think this fan may actually cost him a couple of points. he just looked silly. >> and therefore election. mike allen we'll check out your interview with rand paul on politico.com. thanks very much. still ahead on "morning joe," why kids -- this is tough, why kids south americat. plus we'll speak to congresswoman jen jankowski. she will tell us why she doesn't think the u.s. is in crisis mode yet. we'll be right back. for better access to talent, cutting edge research, and state of the art facilities. and you pay no taxes for ten years. from biotech in brooklyn, to next gen energy in binghamton,
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current one in west africa. there's zero doubt in my mind that barring a mutation which changes it, which we don't think is likely, it will not be a large outbreak in the u.s. cdc director thomas frieden at a house hearing yesterday on why he's confident there will not be an ebola outbreak here in the u.s. joining us now from chicago one of the lawmakers at that hearing representative jan jankowski. are you more confident after the hearing and where specifically do you stand on a travel ban? >> well, i do think that the leaders tom frieden and andrew fauci are among the best public health and epidemiologists in the world and they do feel confident and i feel confident as well that we're not going to have an outbreak. the crisis is in west africa. and i think sam stein said it pretty well.
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we need to address the crisis there. and doctors without borders have said already reduced flights have reduced the relief efforts that they are doing there and so i understand what joe has said that he hasn't had a really good explanation but i want to tell you that most of the public health officials, i haven't heard one that has said that actually we ought to put a quarantine around three countries in africa and not allow them to come here. by the way, we are doing, they are doing screening in those countries before people get on a plane and then airports like chicago, we just initiated a screening program, five airports are now doing that. >> joe? >> jan, i don't want to bring up right now the quarantine, that's the bright shiny object that everybody wants to talk about and debate about. i would like to take a step back and have you explain to americans why they should have confidence in the cdc? i'm impressed by a lot of the people there.
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i think they are some of the best and brightest. but we see these stories how the cdc gets a call from a nurse who asks whether running a fever she should get on a plane from cleveland down to dallas and they are told yes. we sit here and it just makes us think, is nobody competent running this operation? reassure americans that we need to ask tough questions of the cdc but reassure americans that they are up to the task of stopping this from spreading further in the united states. >> well, certainly there were serious missteps. no question about it. and hopefully that's going to be the alarm bell and learning. but the other thing is the president is now considering an ebola czar, somebody who will focus entirely on that. learn the lessons. but we have the most robust public health and health infrastructure in the world here in our country. i think we're going to do much
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better in terms of training and equ equipping. i want to say preparedness budget for hospitals have been cut 44% since 2006. >> good point. >> and francis collins who is head of the national institutes of health said if his budget hadn't been cut 20% in the last decade we likely would have had a vaccine. if we're going to do joe what you said double down on west africa, we're going to have to be prepared to spend the money and have the research and do the vaccines that are not eventually but hopefully sooner rather than later address the crisis. >> of course, i think americans would be much more willing to go ahead and spend more money and as i said earlier, spend more taxpayer money if they know there's competence in the health organizations that are running the operation and sam you look what happened at dallas, look
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what happened with the world health organization, the missteps the cdc has done over the past several weeks. that makes americans a lot more skeptical. >> it was one hospital in dallas. and i think it's fair to say that probably any hospital, i don't want to just, you know, criticize them that much, may not have been ready. now i believe that everybody is going to be ready, that the nurses are going to be part of the training and equipping. you know, the nurses -- go ahead. >> it was a critical issue when this person traveled here and sam stein i'll let you jump in because your point of view. >> i'll send you the check later on for complimenting my point. i think one of the things we have to recognize and when you talk to public health officials is that you can basically isolate an ebola patient in an isolation ward. that's fine. the big problem is training nurses. training them to handle someone
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who may have the ebola disease and how to handle someone with that deadly infectious disease. congresswoman, i'm wondering when you talk about appropriations and money for cdc and nih are you also talking about money to help train staff in these hospitals, money to help front line public health care workers who are doing all that hard work? >> exactly. that's the budget that's been cut the most. preparedness for hospitals was cut 44%. we saw that. that's only since 2006. the nurses themselves are demanding it. correctly. that they want to know that they have not only the righting training but that they are going to have the complete body covering that they actually need. it seems that the protocols may not have actually included. we're also seeing a cdc that's more flexible now. understanding the challenges. and even the mistakes and making some changes every day. >> all right. jan, thank you so much. always great to have you here.
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we really appreciate it. >> appreciate it. >> mika, again, i got no problem in increasing the budget. we do, though, have a real question of competence right now at the cdc, at the hospitals. i wish this was just one hospital that bungled operations, but it wasn't. it was the cdc that was on notice. they were known for weeks, for months how dangerous this situation was and they bungled it. so i understand what jan is a saying and i can agree with jan that we need to actually spend more money in some of these areas if there's confidence. this is like public education. we need more money for education, yes, but not if you don't reform education and if you don't have competent leaders. right now there's a big question mark over that and the problems that we're having right now have nothing to do with budgets, the problems have to do with confidence. >> our icitizen question asks should anyone who has been
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exposed to ebola be legally restricted from all domestic travel until medically cleared. download the icitizen app on your iphone to take part in this. coming up, congressman john duffy decides to make his campaign for re-election a family affair. seriously. they have so many kids. seven. they have a little tiny one that's coming on the show later today along with sean and his wife. sting shows us why he's one of the world's best singers. there's no song he can't handle including your phone's ringtones. [♪] great rates and safety working in harmony. open an optimizer +plus account from synchrony bank. visit myoptimizerplus.com to open an account. service. security. savings.
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♪ >> yeah! you got it. he did it. >> all right. coming up at the top of the hour, the state of the senate, the gop is declaring victory. the gop candidate in virginia is going dark. and is there a device that could have detected ebola within hours in a patient? a reporter who says that's the case joins us ahead to explain why the fda prohibits hospitals from using it. "morning joe" will be right back. this is jim. a man who doesn't stand still. but jim has afib, atrial fibrillation an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested.
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♪ live look at the white house as the sun comes up on this friday morning. it's going to be a beautiful day here in washington. welcome back to "morning joe." michael steele and jeremy peters are still with us. and joining the table we have nbc news -- you guys really? are you taking after joe? can i help with you the jacket, chris. let me help you out there. get yourself dressed and we'll -- yeah. right here. all right. have a seat here big daddy. come on, sit down. chuck todd is here, moderator of "meet the press." how are you, buddy. joe, they take after you. you're a bad example. you were a bad example.
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>> i think they are to blame for their own tardiness. i can take responsibility for many things but not that. >> great to have you, chris matthews and chuck todd. we got a lot of politics to get to that we didn't get in the last hour. at the top of the hour, lawmakers are increasing their pressure for travel bans amid growing questions about the government's response to ebola. members of both parties grilled cdc director thomas frieden and other top health officials at a congressional hearing on thursday. frieden says he remains confident there will not be a large outbreak in the u.s. but congress still had plenty of questions about why the government is allowing in people from ebola affected regions. >> we do not have to leave the door open to all travel to and from hot zones in western africa while ebola is an unwelcomed and dangerous stowaway on these flights. why are we still allowing folks
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to come over here. >> i just don't understand. if we have a system in place that requires any airline passenger from coming in overseas with a date of birth to make sure they are not on the anti-terrorist list and we can't say no you're not coming here not until this situation -- you're right it needs to be solved in africa but until it is we should not be allowing these folks in, period. >> perhaps this committee should consider forwarding to the full house a question we have a vote on travel restrict people are asking us to do that and i think it is, they are exactly correct to make that request. while other members pushed back against a travel ban, nearly 60 representatives and 11 senators support the idea. chris matthews, what's your gut on a travel ban? >> it's easy. it's the easiest argument in the world. in many ways it replicates the
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larger problem liberals have. it's more complicated to be liberal. to be a conservative you simply have to say common sense say segregate these people. l everyone per colony. we quarantine individuals why not quarantine countries. on the democratic side there's a sympathy. why do we want to do that to people. the way the doctors explain it, it's very complicated, i can't understand their argument. >> chuck todd, we've been hearing -- >> let me interrupt for a second, mika. chris matthews, that is the problem, isn't it? you can't understand their argument. it doesn't make sense. it's not logical. i said for three weeks if they would come forward with a logical reason on why travel restrictions really would stop us from sending people over, then the light bulb would go over my head and 70% of
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americans head okay that makes said. we haven't heard that explanation. >> that's why the president kept the door open last nigh on the issue when he had the briefing. he kept the door on the czar and a lot of things. it's a hard position to defend. american people are very intolerant right now of any casualties. we're talking about two people now in a country of 330 million people. we're very intolerant of any kind of pain. the country is very sensitive for all kinds of reasons. i don't understand why. we're not in a tough mode right now. we're not ready to tough this one out. we want to shut that darn door. >> it would prevent it from happening. if thomas eric duncan had not come here we would not be talking about this, chuck todd. is that not the case. >> except he lied. >> that's something you can't stop. >> describe what you think the fine line is that the president is walking here. >> he's getting a lot of pressure from democrats who are worried that this is having an impact on the campaign.
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and he's getting pressure like get control of this, show that you're in charge of the government. get a spokesperson, some call it a czar. get a spokesperson who is not you, mr. president. they don't necessarily want him to be the face of this right now because of the political problems he has already and the stuff he's accumulated. i think this travel ban is something that, you know, congress always needs to look like it's done something. >> right. >> so this feels like one of those give the politicians something that they quote-unquote have done. the medical community, the scientific community sit there's and says it doesn't do anything. they don't see the upside. it doesn't matter. i think this is one of those where sometimes when you are governing you do things to keep the public calm. that's part -- it's part of your job. doesn't matter what the scientific, what you can make a scientific argument here. it doesn't matter. you got to do those things.
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in this case congress wants to be the one to do something. >> but, chuck, this isn't fear versus logic. you have the director of the cdc who has been asked repeatedly why a travel ban wouldn't make sense. the head of the cdc, he cannot provide a cogent clear logical answer and so a lot of people go on tv and say gee the science community and the medical community says it wouldn't make any sense. okay, fine. chris matthews brought up the point that i brought up that i think 65%, 70% of americans agree with. we haven't seen somebody step forward and give a logical reason why we can't do two things at once. a travel ban would not stop us from working aggressively to stop the spread of ebola in west africa. it would only focus on stopping the spread of ebola in america.
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>> but i don't think a travel ban -- realistically there's a lot of u.s. personnel, lot of u.s. doctors that will be in west africa fighting this disease. >> right. >> the fact of the matter is we're going to see more ebola patients in the united states that all stem from maybe doing work on the ground. >> i don't understand. >> just like that. >> it's a nons is se kwumpb iter. we'll have a travel ban because of political pressure. what do the public think when we airlift a few doctors helping to fight this on the ground or a member of the military who has been helping to fight because of protocol and then are we not going bring that american back to an american hospital and treat them for ebola. >> of course, we are. >> i understand. >> hold on.
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of course that's what we're looking at. and that's fine. that is controlled. you know who the american health care workers are and you let them know before they go over that they are going to come back and because they are on the front lines in this fight against ebola, they are going to be treated special and taken care of, and we can fly them back and that is something that we can control. it's not an all or nothing proposition. and that's what -- the argument has been gee it's all or nothing. either have flights going to and from and we either 100% engaging travel back and forth or we have to shut the whole operation down. no. i expect health care workers to go over there and actually contract it. and when they do, they will come back and they will be taken care of in a very controlled setting. >> so i think all of this hangs over the mid-terms. joe, we hear you. the head of the republican committee. >> i still am waiting for a
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logical argument as to why we can't do two things at once. i'm still not hearing it. >> it's a fair question. it's a fair question. and i think it actually does hang over the mid-terms which jeremy has new reporting on. let me move to that. head of the republican committee trying to retake the senate is vowing victory in purple colorado. there are new signs it could be headed that way. congressman cory gardner leads mark udall by six points. according to a poll from quinnipiac university. but in virginia ed gillispie's attempt to unseat mark warner appears to be sputtering. politico reports the former romney adviser has gone dark on tv with no more ads booked though that could change. gillispie has consistently been down double digits in polling. surrogates are storming southern states. chris christie spent thursday in georgia with nathan deal where the governor's race sane dead heat. dr. jill biden heads there today for michele nunn the democrat
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running neck in neck in the senate race there. the campaigner in chief bill clinton will hold another rally in arkansas this weekend this time in his home town of hope. last night he was in new hampshire for incumbent senator jean shah hind arguing against trickle down economics and reflecting on his role for democrats. >> at election time sometimes people come get me and i feel like an old racehorse in a stable and people just take me out and put me on the track and slap me on the rear to see if i can run around one more time. [ laughter ] >> you know, chuck, you said earlier there were obviously concerns with democrats -- that guy is something. chuck you said earlier there are concern from some democrats about the ebola story, the isis story. things do in a lot of states seem to be trending maybe a point or two republicans way over the past week. there are bright spots in new hampshire for democrats. obviously the pennsylvania
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governor's race and other governor races, florida now because of the fangate and georgia. have you detected the past week a slight trend for republicans airline? candidates in some of these close races? >> i have. most of it has to do with something shifted when you talk to people involved on both sides. it's not a big shift but it was and nobody knows for sure, nobody wants to fully connect to it the second ebola patient, but it was sort of like the timing the president's approval rating had been ticking up the last couple of weeks as he was dropping bombs on terrorists, on bad guys in iraq and syria. and so his numbers had gone from say up two or three points depending on the state. just enough it was making democrats think okay it's not as heavy an anchor. nobody knows for sure if it's connected to the second ebola patient but sort of like the
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timing is a little bit more than coincidence his numbers are trending down again. it hasn't fully impacted the candidates themselves but they feel that drag, right. you can tell this week. the question is, is it temporary, or is this the beginning of a slow erosion of democrats. >> chris matthews, you never know, chris matthews, what impacts elections and i think chuck is exactly right. when terrorists were cutting off americans heads and the president was golfing, the numbers were plummeting. he starts dropping bombs on bad guys, the numbers go up. now he's seen as not hand technology ebola crisis. his numbers go down. even if that's a one or two point drag on democratic senate candidates, that could actually have a big impact on this election, right? >> well, you know, last night i agree with you about the difficulty of their having to make a case against any kind of ban from west africa. i thought there was something
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new in the president's presentation last night that gave me hope. i've always argued rudy giuliani's handing of 9/11 was a role model. you have to give people the information when you get it. you have to -- no disclosure or putting it out on a schedule. tell them when you know -- like a doctor. tell us what you know. last night he came out of a briefing with his people and trying to explain it as he had gotten the information. i think it's the beginning avenue approach. these aloof speeches with teleprompters don't work. he lost his contact. at least last night, he has two years left in his term. november is so precarious. in the state of florida when you're talking 44-44 after people have been yelling at each other for two years and we knew what the choice was. any little issue like the fact one guy comes off as a bit of an s.o.b. because he's worried about the other guy's fan.
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he's been using that fan since i met the guy. every time he comes in he asks for a plug space to put the fan in. we all knew this. it's his little oddity. but it's harmless. this doesn't hurt anybody. for that kind of jump on it has a certain bullying quality. anyway, i think the key to this election i'm giving it three points to the republicans. i think it will hurt them the whole atmospherics of people wanting to vote no. >> jeremy, jump in. >> if we go back to what chuck you were talking about in colorado, and the democratic candidate being stuck, part of the thing that worries republicans so much or worries democrats so much right now is the incumbents are stuck around 40, 42, 43%. that's a very dangerous place for them to be a few weeks before an election because usually the undecideds don't break for the incumbents they break for the challenger and
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that puts the republicans in a good position. republicans are making some pretty bold assertions about where they anticipate this election turning out. yesterday you had the head of the republican senatorial committee saying -- >> here's the wild card here that i talked with the republicans, the other wild card in this, we talked about ebola and democrats fearing the national response is hurting them. republicans aren't getting the benefit of the doubt from the angry electorate. there's this cranky electorate that, you know, in '06 they were ready to go with the democrats. in '08 they were ready to go with the democrats. in '10 the cranky folks were ready to go with the republicans. something is stopping them. that's the part of this -- that's why i think there's a
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little bit of bravado coming from republicans because they need to raise money. they are still looking for money. because there still is a something -- there's like, i think, i want to say "the weekly standard," they hit a wall and can't break through. >> part of it is the brand. >> what i heard little grassroots events here and there people are expecting what your going to do if we give the senate how will you governor. the party has not answered the question. that's why we're stuck. we'll be stuck. >> mitch mcconnell wouldn't allow it because he's been so focused on his own election he wouldn't allow a large message of what would republicans do if they had control of the senate because he was worried about defending that himself. >> joe, is that right? >> you know, chris matthews, the problem with republicans -- they got two problems right now. even though this thing could end up being a huge year for the republican party but in washington, d.c. every voter
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dmous elect troebs the senate what will they do? they will say no to barack obama. nothing will get done. they know that. i'm republicans. republicans you can kill me for saying. that's the message. they have not presented an alternative message. there's a second problem, though, chris. republicans usually do great in states. republican governors, hard edged, tough nerds, et cetera, et cetera. if this breaks the democrats way the last week or two, republicans could lose control of governorships in the biggest states in america, some of the biggest states in florida, in pennsylvania, in michigan, in wisconsin. this could be a split decision, republicans could win the senate, there could be a blood letting of the governorships. we just don't know. i haven't seen a mid-term like this in ages. >> massachusetts could be baker. wisconsin could go either way. but pennsylvania is definitely going against corbett. florida, you know it better than i do, looks like charlie has got it. here's the key stakes. in the middle of the night when
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richard nixon got re-elected and he called enjoying it listening to victory at sea nixon said i lost the house, i lost the subpoena power. i'm telling you look at the three presidents that had trouble, nixon, reagan and clinton. the voters gave them control of the subpoena to the other party and they were allowed to prosecute. if the senate goes republican which i think it will they will have the power to subpoena. guess who is sitting there on the permanent investigating subcommittee, john mccain. now i don't know how he'll use that power but i'm telling you if i'm watching this and i'm the president, my god if we lose the senate election night john mccain becomes joe maccarthy in effect -- he has the power. >> come on. >> i respect john mccain. he's not joe mccarthy. ted cruz is first of all. they have the power to subpoena. they can go after the president on benghazi, all the things they care about. the senate gets a lot more
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publicity than the house when they investigate. i'm telling u nobody talks about it the power of the subpoena is the big stake in this election. >> oh, my lord. okay. we'll leave it. >> it's true. >> great to have you guys on. chuck todd who do you have on "meet the press" this sunday. >> we'll have an ebola summit. presentative health care from hopkins. couple of senators. we'll have council on foreign relations their head of medical preventative -- it's an all hands on deck sort of myth from reality fears, what you should fear and what you shouldn't. >> perfect. we'll be watching. chris matthews congratulations into your induction into north carolina hall of fame. wonderful news. look at you. look at that. >> it was a great honor. we'll be watching "hardball" 7:00 eastern time on msnbc. still ahead on "morning joe," dallas now has no more ebola patients, but is the city in the
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clear? the mayor of dallas joins us ahead. plus, the controversial comments john grisham made that has the best selling author clarifying what he meant. also this morning the queen of soul, aretha franklin joins us. yes. aretha will be on the show. we'll be right back. get to the terminal across town. are all the green lights you? no. it's called grid iq. the 4:51 is leaving at 4:51. ♪ they cut the power. it'll fix itself. power's back on. quick thinking traffic lights and self correcting power grids make the world predictable. thrillingly predictable.
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♪ all right. it's time now to take a look at the morning papers. we'll start with the "wall street journal." one of vice president joe biden's sons says he's trying to move forward after being discharged from the navy reserve for cocaine use. hunter biden failed a drug test last year during a trial and received an administrative discharge. he said it's an honor to serve in the navy and embarrassed and deeply regrets his actions.
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>> this from the telegraph, be john grisham back tracking after making comments in an interview with the telegraph about sentencing guidelines for child porn graphy offenders. >> we have prisons filled now with guys my age, 60-year-old white men in prison who never harmed anybody, would never touch a child but they got online one night. started surfing around. probably had too much to drink or whatever. and pushed the wrong buttons and went too far and got into child porn or whatever. they haven't hurt anybody, okay. they deserve some type of punishment, whatever. but ten years in prison? we've gone nuts with this incarceration. i have no sympathy for a real pedophile. god, please lock those people up. but so many of these guys are not, do not deserve harsh prison sentences. >> all right so grisham pushed
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the wrong buttons. yesterday he said in part my comments were in no way intended to show sympathy for those convicted of sex crimes especially the sexual molestation of children. i cannot think of anything more despicable. i apologize to all. >> let's go the "san francisco chronicle." apple has unveiled its latest generation of ipads claiming the ipad air 2 is the faster and thinnest on the market. ceo tim cook introduced the latest version which will be available in gold. will have a touch i.d. fingerprint sensor. apple is rolling out its new operating system. it's the first time outside developers will be able to build in their own apps. >> pretty cool. >> still ahead, raising teenagers. >> you can almost hear mark halperin running over to the upper west side apple store. mark will have that by the end
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of the day. >> he just face timed me from the apple store. coming up, raising teenagers in the era of sexting. what every parent needs to know. it may get worse before it gets better. that's the words of dallas mayor as his city still grapples with the fallout from the ebola virus. he joins us next on "morning joe".
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♪ joining us now technology editor for defense one patrick tucker, he reports that the dallas hospital where thomas eric duncan was admitted has a machine that could have quickly determined whether he had ebola. but the hospital did not use it. patrick, why? hi. >> how are you? so it works like this. the machine is called a film array produced by a company called biofire defense. it's sitting in hospitals all across the country. it's very similar to what's been in use in the military in west africa to screen for ebola. now in order to use to it screen
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for ebola particularly you have to have what's called a kit. you have to have the biodefense kit. you stick that in the machine, stick in the sample from the person that you think may have ebola and then you get a one to one match. the hospital in dallas, because of fda guidelines, can't have access to this ebola kit at present not unless they fill out a bunch of paper work says they will only use their machine for research purpose that prohibits them from using to diagnose people who may have ebola. so, if they had this kit which you can get very easily they had the machine on hand as soon as they heard ebola, potential ebola person was in the hospital in dallas or as soon as, you know, news of ebola spread across the country, could you have been able to diagnose ebola in patients in about an hour. >> wow. >> okay. that's unbelievable. patrick tucker thank you for the
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reporting. let's bring it to the mayor of dallas. mr. mayor, thank you for being back on the show. it's been a rough week. let's start there. what do you make of this report from defense one about this machine that could have been used. is it just more of the same? sort of the right hand not knowing what the left hand is doing? >> yesterday was a lot better day than the day before and that was a tough day here in dallas, and we're holding up and we have taken action to move forward to isolate people and we're doing well. look, we got a lot of medicine out there, a lot of tests that the fda hasn't approved. that's a whole other discussion of how fast we need to get things through the fda. so i'll let that discussion for the congressmen. >> joe, take it. >> so, let's talk about the response. early on, mr. mayor, the dallas hospital and dallas officials were blamed for not responding more quickly to this.
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we find out now, of course, this is a much bigger problem, much bigger problem with the cdc's response inasmuch as they would like to blame one hospital, one city, one health care worker for not following the protocols, the same thing is happening in spain, the same thing is happening in france, the same thing is happening across the world right now. it's not -- doesn't it seem, mr. mayor, that everybody is -- they are comforted by talking about pilot error when actually there's a much bigger problem here that the cdc doesn't want to admit to? >> well, look, i've tried not to throw anybody under the bus through this process. we as a team haven't done as well as we need to do. i'm very upset about it. we lost one patient. we've got two other ones that came through dallas. we're focused in the next couple, three days. i will say that america expects perfection and we have not been
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performing at that level. if you get a b on the test that's not acceptable and you got to improve it. there's a whole question of preparedness in every hospital, we never expected this in the county and city of dallas. questions about should we have no-fly zones, no travel zones. we put those in yesterday. we put those in yesterday that they can't go to churches, they can't go to schools, they can't go to shopping centers. those are the things we've taken action now that, you know, maybe we should have taken early on. everybody wants to, is in a way learning about this and hopefully they can learn from dallas. >> all right, mr. mayor we thank you as always for being with us. hope to see you again very soon. >> thank you, joe. >> on happier news. michael steele, michael, maybe you can help me with something
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here. i'm growing increasingly concerned that people come on this show and they hold press conferences and when you talk about what 70% of americans support right now, which is increased travel restrictions, they just wave it off. >> yeah. >> you ask -- as chris matthews said we're not getting a good answer to this and it's one nonsequ everyone ter after another. as if stopping ebola in west africa is linked with stopping the spread of ebola in the united states. stopping ebola from coming here in a real way. what's going on here? why is the head of the cdc will say generally well a travel ban or limiting travel is bad for the bigger fight against ebola and yet they can't make a logical argument. is this political correctness? i don't understand. i want to understand. >> i'm with you, joe. it doesn't make any sense to me
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because i think the term was used before, you know. this is, you know, all or nothing. we need to do it all this way or can't do it at all. that's not what the situation presents. so there is a little bit of the politics here of getting caught flat footed. and i think at the end of the day that's the reality of the administration has been tap dance ago rounds for the last three to four weeks they have been caught flat footed with the president starts this conversation about, you don't have to worry about anything like that coming here because we got all this stuff in place and it won't happen. four, five days later boom here we are tarting this conversation because someone now is in the country presents a real problem. i think this is a little bit of that politics that is guiding the president right now as opposed to as you put it just giving a cogent clear direction and answer as to what this thing looks like. the american people aren't panicked by what they see happening with ebola. what they are panicked by is by the level of incompetence
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displayed by the administration and cdc in dealing with it. >> mika, that's what's so offensive to so many americans the suggestion you look at something logically and you look at it the way the businessman in sierra leone looked at it. ebola only gets transmitted by people who move across borders. we're not going to let people come in or out of our region unless there's a really clear specific reason why they are coming in there and they are healthy and one reason why in sierra leone there's no ebola whatsoever. if you were looking at this situation, you would say okay two tasks we have to take care of. first we have to stop the spread in west africa. that's the most important thing. and that requires one set of tasks and goals and guidelines to follow. and then there's another task and that's stopping the spread of ebola from west africa into the united states in a meaningful way. that requires a completely different set of goals.
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and methods. and tools. and the health officials keep blurring the lines, oh, if you try to stop it coming to america that will somehow hurt the fight against ebola in west africa. that's just not truth. i don't know why people keep coming on this show and just sort of reading politically correct talking points that actually i think stops us from working more aggressively on this. >> and i hear this question being asked every where i go. so you're saying what everyone is thinking and i completely agree with you and i think the white house has this problem that we've seen as systemic in this administration. they were on the forefront of getting into africa and dealing with this situation. and we were following them in covering this story. but as it pertains to here in america, the theatrics part of it, the messaging, the optics.
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it's not there. we're still waiting on a czar. i'm sorry it matters. communication, leadership saying listen we got this. here's our team, s.w.a.t. teams every where. we still may have the cases we have because it may be inevitable but i think there's that missing link. up next he vows to stay positive in his campaign for re-election. is that possible in the modern state of politics? congressman sean duffy and his wife and who is that? i'm holding that. he'll reveal the new ad that stars their adorable kids. we'll be right back. ir own game when you think aarp, you don't know "aarp." the aarp fraud watch network helps everyone protect themselves and their families against scams and identity theft. find more real possibilities at aarp.org/possibilities. [ male announcer ] when you see everyone in america almost every day, you notice a few things. like the fact that you're pretty attached to these.
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so ally bank really has no hidden fethat's right. accounts? it's just that i'm worried about you know "hidden things..." ok, why's that? no hidden fees, from the bank where no branches equals great rates. ♪ i'm rachel. >> joe. >> j.p. >> let us tell you a little bit about sean. >> that's me. >> dad tells us to -- >> respect other.
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>> work hard. >> tell truth. >> care for people. >> no log rolling in the bathtub. >> those are wisconsin ovals. >> got to start them when they are young. >> dad took those values to washington. >> our kids get it. why can't congress get it too? i'm sean duffy and i approve this message. >> oh, my gosh do you see how many kids they have? how old is she? >> 5 months. >> they have seven. that was the latest ad from congressman sean duffy featuring his entire family, the republican congressman from wisconsin joins us now along with his wife, spokesperson of libre initiative and rachel campo just had her seventh. got to keep them moving. >> mika has introduced the baby to torri birch. >> let's go for it. first of all it's a positive ad.
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where is the seedy grainy video attacking somebody. >> first you have to tell people who you are and why you're running. this is a positive ad that tells people who our family is. we have our governor's race. there's a lot of negative ads on both sides. to actually cut through the political noise to have a positive ad with kids, think drives a better message than going negative. >> the party needs a message. jeremy peters, go ahead. >> all that positiveness, of course, applies not to president obama whom you were on this show not that long ago saying he lacks the heart to defeat isis. >> i did say that. >> not to defeat isis or ebola. both of them you see a lack of leadership from the president. just because we're positive in who we are and why we're running doesn't mean we can't be honest about the leadership coming from the president. people are starting to reconcile with the problems that have come
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from a big fat bloated government that has been ineffective in protecting them from threats from isis or ebola. >> did you not think six was enough? >> we're good catholics. >> irish-catholic. i'm a hispanic catholic. >> you have one every two years. a four year break which is when you ran for congress. >> it's enough. >> you didn't think that putting margarita in a dark negative ad would work? >> we tried that. she kept on smiling. >> let me ask you an honest policy question. minimum wage. one of these recurring issues. obviously democrats think it's a winning issue. but what's the case for not having the minimum wage tied to inflation. if the cost of goods go up, cost of living goes up shouldn't your wage actually go up. >> absolutely. >> i think the conversation, what do we do on the minimum
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wage. it will costs hundreds of millions of jobs. if you raise the minimum wage, why don't we couple it with tax breaks for the small businesses that are actually employing so many different americans. why don't we have an energy policy that will drive down american energy. why don't we stream the line rules and regulations that drive up the cost for the small businesses. if you increase the cost on one side let's reduce it on the other side. democrats say no, no. i want an increase in minimum wage. i want increased energy prices. i want more taxes. i want more rules and regulation. you'll kill small business. >> your saying you would get behind a package deal with tax cuts for small businesses. >> i would consider that kind of package. we want people into the on-ramp of the workforce and into the middle class. we had to expand the middle class. we have to do it the right way. you have to have policies that set us up for success so
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people -- >> i'm holding your baby. >> gentle. don't throw her. >> congressman sean duffy, rachel campo duffy congratulations on your beautiful family. we'll debate this. up next, technology impacts us in many positive ways but the pitfalls are also pretty significant especially for parents. if you have teens, you don't want to miss our next segment. we'll cover marguerita's ears. we'll be right back. >> no sexting for ma grgarita. r. smarter grids and smarter phones. think up new ways to produce energy. ♪ be an engineer. solve problems the world needs solved. what are you waiting for? changing the world is part of the job description. [ male announcer ] join the scientists and engineers of exxonmobil
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okay, how cute was that family? this next topic is for adults. i'll give you this. >> mika. >> they left their pacifier. >> beneath you. >> i know. >> i'm not taking a pacifier. >> low blow. here with us now, editor of "the atlantic," hannah wrote the cover story for the latest issue on why kids sext. she writes about one recent scandal that may give insight into a much larger problem. it reads in part this, it was late on a school night so jennifer's kids were already asleep when she got a phone call from a friend of her 15-year-old daughter jasmine. jasmine is on a webpage and
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she's naked. jennifer woke jasmine and throughout the night the two of them kept getting texts from jasmine's friends with screen shots of the instagram account. it looked like a porn site. shot after shot of naked girls. only these were real teens, not grown women in pig tails. wow. this is an incredible cover story. i'm a mother of teens. we are at a loss as to how to sort of put the genie back in the bottle in terms of kids, sex and technology. why do they do this? >> i don't think you can put the genie back in the bottle. if you come up on their facebook page or cell phone, you have to almost look at that as an opportunity to find out what's going on. it's not that sex ting creates new dynamics, it reveals them.
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now you know something. now you got to find out some more things, like who's on the other side. why did your daughter and son send that text. some of the answers are very worrisome. some, it's part of the sexual life a teenager. >> before technology erupted in such a big way, teenagers had sex lives as well. now it's out there. >> really? >> so shocked. we're so shocked by what we're seeing and yet, you know, the numbers are amazing though in terms of how many kids have actually done this. i know you can't put the genie back in the bottle but you did talk about it being a discovery. something that you learn about your kids. i think the instant reaction of parents is, oh, my god, to start waving their arms and to punish them. >> not just parents but police. that's what happens. right now in this country, it's considered child pornography. it's a felony to have a picture
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even of yourself, if you're a minor, in your own cell phone. so i think we as a culture are confused. we really don't know what we want to do with these photos. >> something like this seems to scream out for the type of public service campaign in schools that i remember as a kid about when they were teaching us about the transmissibility of hiv or drugs or something. is anything like that happening around sexting? >> it is happening but they don't quite do it in the right way. they tell kids, if you sent a sext, it's going to be a disaster. the kids know that's not true. they know in the vast majority of cases nothing happens. nothing comes out of it. so what i say is you have to describe it like the seat belt analogy. we don't wear a seat belt because we think we're going to get into a fatal car crash every single time we get in the car but we wear a seat belt because we might get into a fatal car crash. know that's a possibility. it could end up public. >> it's not just tex iting, but
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it's instagram, facebook. there's this whole world that parents are locked out of completely. >> you should see it as, yes, partly locked out of it, but an opportunity to actually -- it's a reflection of what's going on, not necessarily a cause of it. it's an opportunity to monitor what your kids are doing. i think part of the message of hannah's piece, there are cases where there is coercion and girls who are ending up on public instagram pages or they've been coerced by somebody. those are situations that need to be -- if not actually policed by law enforcement, policed in other ways. but i think it's fair to say there's a little bit of -- part of your message is chillax a little bit because this is part of the complex of falling rates of teen pregnancy, other sorts
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of pathology so -- >> well, this is a really frightening frontier for parents and one for teenagers to navigate. thank you so much. we'll look for the latest issue of "the atlantic." thank you so much. up next, pressure to ban flights from west africa as the director of the cdc gets grilled on capitol hill. did he have a change of heart? plus, ed gillespie goes dark on tv goagain. it looks like republicans may be giving up in the state of virginia. later, the great aretha franklin will join the show. right here on "morning joe." they're still after me. get to the terminal across town. are all the green lights you? no. it's called grid iq. the 4:51 is leaving at 4:51. ♪ they cut the power. it'll fix itself.
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giants win the pennant. the giants win the pennant. baseball fans will remember 1951. the famous shot that sent the new york giants to the pennant. last night, late last night, it was the giants going to the series on a similar blast. unbelievable story, sam stein, whether you like the giants or not. what a great story. what a great world series we have coming up. >> amazing, amazing world series. probably not going to be the most watched world series. but these are scrappy teams. they're doing things in unconventional ways. the kansas city royals. they run a lot. they have an amazing bull pen. the giants every two years it seeps like they're just juggernauts. we have two teams on really
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great hot streaks going into the world series. it should be fun. >> yeah, it should be a lot of fun. mika, obviously, so much to be covering this morning. the stories just continue to break out on ebola and the poor response from international health organizations. american health organizations. and a bumbling response from an administration would for yeho fs been telling us, hey, come on, stop panicking, no panic, no drama. there are times, there are times, where you should actually allow a little bit of drama to be inserted into the way you handle things. the fierce urgency now should really apply to more things than just getting elected. i would suggest the fierce urgency of now applies to this terrible situation. >> there's talk of a czar now. we have jeremy peters, carol leigh alee and sam steele along with me in washington.
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lawmakers are increasing their pressure for travel bans amid growing questions about the government's response to ebola. members of both parties grilled. cdc director thomas frieden and other top officials at a congressional hearing on thursday. frieden says he remains confident there will not be a large-scale outbreak in the u.s. congress still has plenty of questions about why the government is allowing in people from the ebola-affected regions. >> we do not have to leave the door open to all travel to and from hot zones in western africa while ebola is an unwelcome and dangerous stowaway on these flights. why are we still allowing folks to come over here and why once they're over here is there no quarantine? >> i just don't understand, if we -- if we have a system in place that requires any airline passenger coming in overseas with a date birth to make sure they're not on the terrorist list, that we can't look at one's travel history and say no,
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you're not coming here. not until this situation -- you're right, it needs to be solved in africa, but until it is, we should not be allowing these folks in, period. >> perhaps this committee should consider forwarding to the full house a request that we have a vote on travel restriction, because people are asking us to do that and i think it is -- they are exactly correct to make that request. >> so if i remember correctly, joe, a couple weeks back on "meet the press" and other places, you were sort of labeled a frearmonger, but now you're hearing this from both sides. >> i was mocked and ridiculed, called dr. scarborough, for simply quoting a presecient "washington post" article. the first point is the world health organization fumbled this all along. when everybody was saying on that panel and, quite frankly, a lot of official washington was
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saying, we should just trust health care organizations and why are we panicking. to somehow asking tough questions about the leadership in the world health organization and the cdc was akin to trying to stir up panic. i don't know if that's political correctness. i don't know if that's maybe some liberals naturally respond that way. if you actually ask tough questions, if you actually act like a journalist and ask tough questions of health organizations that you're somehow fanning the flames. i have to say, i've been saying something else for three weeks consistently. and that is, that there should be travel restrictions in place. the same types that work in sierra leone. and i said it, there shouldn't be travel restrictions, then just give us a good reason why we shouldn't allow 70 to 100 people from infected countries to come into jfk every day. every day. the cdc cannot give us a good answer. they say, oh, that will stop us
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from being able to have relief efforts. no, no, it won't. as fred upton said in the committee, you have a no fly list actually for terrorists. you can have a fly list for health care workers. they can't answer basic questions. three weeks into this, i'm stunned. i'm stunned by people saying you're trying to stir up panic by asking big questions when everybody should have been asking them when i started asking them three weeks ago. >> nearly 60 represent times and 11 senators support the idea. chicago's o'hare and hartsfield-jackson in atlanta are now among airports c conducting enhanced screenings. president obama says he does not believe travel restrictions are the way to go but he is are coming an ebola czar to oversea the federal response to the
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crisis. >>cy i don't have a philosophical objection to a travel ban if that is the thing that is going to keep the american people safe. the problem is in all the discussions i've had thus far with experts in the field, experts in infectious disease, is that a travel ban is less effective than the measures that we are currently instituting. >> so mika, this is -- this is not a -- sort of a one-on-one disease. there's a multiplier effect. you know, in the bible, it says if one can conquer ten, two can conquer 10,000. i may not have had those biblical numbers right. please don't send me too many e-mails. in this case, you brought it up yesterday. because one man was allowed to come into the united states with ebola. one man. we now have cruise shipses th t have people quarantined on them this morning.
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we have flights that have caused concerns. we of course have seen what's happened with the health care workers in dallas who were spread out and one concern after another. again, it has a multiplier effect. let us hope that six months from now we look back on this the y same way we look back on other things and it's taken care of. but time runs out on these sort of diseasdiseases. because there is the multiplier effect. again, you have a pathogen that -- as "the wall street journal" says, liquefies your internal organs, it's all right to be a little concerned and be aggressive upfront. question yesterday, this all started with one patient? >> well, one patient who came in. created something that the president may have to create a czar for. nina pham arrived in maryland
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last night to be treated at a state of the art facility run by the national institutes health. she appears to be in good spirits. in a video shot inside the dallas hospital hours earlier. >> thanks for being here, taking care our first patient. it means a lot. this has been a huge effort by all of you guys. we're really proud of you. party. party in maryland. >> meanwhile, the fiance of thomas eric duncan says a top official from texas health presbyterian hospital has apologized for how his case was handled. there's also a new report that claim also the hospital had an ebola machine used by the military in west africa. when duncan arrived. you can make a diagnose within an hour. however, fda guidelines presented the facility from
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using it. the fda has not yet responded to the report. as officials monitor other nurses who cared for duncan, the news site mashable reports the four u.s. hospitals designed to treat patients with ebola can only hold a total of nine patients at a time. joining us now from the national institutes of health where nina is this morning, reporter megan growth. megan. >> nina was brought here to ni hi, the national institutes of health, a little before midnight. she was said to be in good condition, stable condition and in good spirits. flown in a special charter plane, flown to frederick municipal airport. not flown to any commercial airport. she was wearing a special protective suit. she could be seen walking off the plane holding the hand of an escort, but she walked off the plane under her own steeam. she was driven through the
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streets of our area in an ambulance motorcade. brought here to nih in bethesda. she's been taken to the special studies unit. it's a highly specialized isolation unit. it's equipped to deal with infectious diseases like ebola. it has space for two patients. so she's in one of two of the beds here. she's being attended to by a world renowned immunologist, dr. anthony fauci. he said it's too early to say what the course of treatment will be. they have to evaluate her. unclear whether or not she will be given any experimental drugs or not, just too early to tell. reporting live from nih, megan mcgrath, back to you in the studio. the head of the republican committee trying to retake the senate is vowing victory. in purple colorado there are signs it could be headed that way. congressman corey gardner leads mark udall by six points according to a poll from quinnipiac university. in virginia, ed gillespie's attempt to unseat the popular
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senator mark warner appears to be stuttering. he has gone dark with no more ads booked. but that could change. gillespie has consistently been down double digits in polling. chris christie spent thursday in georgia with incumbent nathan diehl where the government's race is in a dead heat. jill biden for michelle nunn. running neck and neck there. the campaigner in chief bill clinton will hold another rally in arkansas this weekend. this time in his hometown of hope. but last night, he was in new hampshire for incumbent senator gene shaheen, arguing against trickle-down economics and reflecting on his role for democrats. >> at election time, sometimes i feel like an old race horse in a stable. people just take me out, get me on the track and slap me on the rear and see if i can run
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around. >> joe, i wonder also just lo looking ahead to the midterms if ebola will play a role if there's a real republican sweep. >> obviously, a lot of questions about the president's handling on isis, the president's handling on ebola. i don't thing people are going to go in and say, how is he responding in syria right now, that's how i'm going to vote for my congressman or senator. but there's no doubt i'm hearing from democrats across the country that they have seen over the past several days on the campaign trail real concern. and you can kind of see it. i'm going to give josh marshal a talking points memo, a little plug here. he has an amazing app called poll tracker. you just go down and you see a lot of these races that they seem to be -- most of them still in the margin of error. but a lot of them breaking the republicans away, the louisiana senate, i'm just reading from
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tpm's poll tracker. arkansas, cotton up by four. these are the latest major polls. shaheen still tied in new hampshire. scott walker up by one in wisconsin. there are the same in alaska, sullivan up by three. there are exceptions though. in north carolina, kay hagan continues to hold on. but the most remarkable thing, mika, is all of these races seem to be in the margin of error. how the white house is seen responding oth ining over the nr so, two weeks until this ebola crisis, could have an impact. maybe one percentage point. in a lot of races, sam stein, one percentage point is going to be enough. >> yeah, no, these races have been sort of stubbornly close the entire cycle. obviously, there's been some late breaks for republicans in some of these critical states. the one sort of weird bright star for the democrats at this
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juncture is georgia where michelle nunn had a lot of momentum. in part because of david perdue's history of outsourcing. the president's leadership or lack thereof could play an obvious role down the stretch. you don't want to necessarily see the ebola crisis be brought into the context of, you know, campaign politic, but it does get brought in. >> i think trusting government is a huge issue for republicans, michael steele. >> absolutely, and i think the whole issue of whether or not you close access to the u.s. -- >> yeah. >> in the sense of having these individuals who could po pen ch potentially carry the ebola virus matters. >> certainly going to be an unequivocal move that people would be able to understand. carol lee, you've noticed there's been a shift in the white house's reasoning for not doing a ban. >> yeah, they were saying a few days ago they couldn't do a ban because it would stop health
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care workers from getting the access they need into west africa and yet you saw the press secretary and then the president shift that a little bit and instead say that it would actually make things more dangerous for people if they did a flight ban because they couldn't track passengers in the same way and screen them and people might fly to another country and go under the radar and fly into the u.s. >> carol, i heard that, carol. mika, what's remarkable to me is they act as if somebody can sneak into america by flying through denmark first. they still have to show their passport at the airport when they get to jfk or to dulles. it's remarkable. >> there's that. >> that doesn't hold water either. they need to come up with a good excuse. carol's exactly right. they changed. they changed their logic, mika. but it's still dumb logic. i don't get it. again, we can track terrorists.
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we certainly can track people from their country of origin even if they go through denmark and then take a boat other to nova scotia and then hitchhike to montreal and then try to get into niagara falls. it's just -- it's sheer stupidity, no matter how many places you go, you've got to end up showing your passport when you get to the border. >> he doesn't trust government. >> no, i just want, jeremy, a logical explanation and they change stories and it doesn't work. >> i don't think your -- i do think that's part of the problem is nobody has really thought out or plotted out what this travel ban would look like. how you could implement it without making health workers. so it's very complicated. i will say one issue that's come up recently, that's being floated, the new republican had an interesting article written by an infectious disease
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specialist advocating for a quarantine, which would be -- it wouldn't be as abrupt as cutting travel off from all these countries. but just quarantining people and checking them, making sure they don't have the disease. >> still ahead on "morning joe," aretha franklin is taking on some of the biggest songs of the last half century, including adele's hit "rolling in the deep." our interview in just a few minutes. up next, a mama bear and her cub are separated during a search for food. we're going to have that reunion for you. we'll be right back. ah! come on! let's hide in the attic. no. in the basement. why can't we just get in the running car? are you crazy? let's hide behind the chainsaws. smart.
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joe, you need to talk to thomas. >> why's that? >> he's instagraming slow-mo shots. then he texts it to me, like, late hours. just need a talk, that's all. >> this is creepy. i mean, listen, i mean, unless it's for educational purposes. as i say to t.j.'s wife. you know, because she -- t.j., you know, that's -- wait what do you got? what are you doing? >> oh, lord. >> mika looking fantastic. >> what? so he texts this to me and i'm like, i haven't saved thomas' number yet so it just comes up as a number. >> comes up as creepy stalker. >> like, what is this?
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i almost called security. anyhow -- >> he texts you that at 2:00 in the morning, mika? >> it was weird. i was confused. anyhow, let's start with the papers. >> i love you platonically, it's okay. >> this is about the detail surrounding the death of legendary comedian joan rivers. the examiner says she died because of brain damage due to a lack of oxygen. the official cause of death is therapeutic complications. she was sedated wi ed witd with, a powerful drug. >> there's so much more to come from that story. we're going to turn to salon.com. it was during a debate in south carolina where governor nikki haley defended the placement of
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the confederate flag on the state capitol grounds. she said, i can honestly say i've not had one conversation with a single ceo about the confederate flag. she added the flag has shown its inclusiveness by appointing its first african-american senator. her democratic opponent called for the flag's removal. >> all right. "the wall street journal," a day after hbo announced plans to offer screaming service, cbs rolled out its own platform for $5.99 a month. viewers can access classic and current programming. cbs will live stream its broadcast network. latest shift away from traditional cable and satellite tv. as more and more people look to cut the cord with their monthly tv bills, thomas. >> it's all about the cord cutters. we get this from the nbc affiliate in southern california. a mama black bear and her cub. after the cub got stuck in a trash bin in pasadena.
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increasingly bears like these are coming down. they're looking for food and they're looking for water. with more on that, here is nbc's joe fryer. >> reporter: game wardens could hear the mother crying and knew she had to help. >> got her. >> reporter: she fire a bean bag at mom to scare her away. >> oh, now you get out. look at that. >> reporter: then safely coax the cub out of the dumpster. little one shimmies up a tree for safety, calling out for mom and before long they're back together. >> ah, that's kind of cute. >> how sweet is that? up next, it's one of the most popular restaurants in new york and the go-to place for sushi. we're going to take you behind the scenes with the restaurant's owner. plus, we're going to talk to the congressman who will be introducing legislation for a travel ban to help control the spread of ebola. a former hhs secretary on what he thinks of the federal response so far. "morning joe" will be right back.
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welcome back. at 19 past the hour, let's bring in pulitzer prize winning columnist and msnbc political
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analyst eugene robinson. also with us from salt lake city, former health and human services secretary mike leavitt. and from tampa florida, republican congressman and senior deputy whip dennis roz who's set to introduce legislation to restrict flights from west africa. so why don't i start with you, secretary leavitt. are we doing enough. do we need to restrict flights? >> we're following a well-established game plan that's been refined over many years to first try to smother it, and that hasn't succeeded. the second is, try to contain it. and that's the phase we're in right now. and we need to do everything we can both internationally and domestically to contain this disease. that's much more efficient than having to fight it on a broad basis. >> you think that our -- you think we've been prepared and the events of the past ten days have reflected a country that was ready? >> the trouble with a pandemic influenza or disease like we're
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dealing with, ebola, is anything you say in advance seems a bit alarmist. anything you have done in advance after it occurs seems inadequate. that's where we are. this country is not without preparation. we've been working hard over the past eight years i think as a country. but we are vulnerable. we need to know that. we need to continue to prepare. i think we need to continue to put particular emphasis on state and local preparation, not just federal response. >> all right. eugene robinson. i'll let you take it. i know you're against banning flights. >> yeah, i do think though that it's a question worth discussing. i mean, i frankly wish we -- the question was engaged more by the epidemiologists who tell us it's a bad idea. but congressman ross, why do you think it's a good idea, the consensus of epidemiologists is
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a travel ban would, in their professional popinion, be counterproductive. >> we know the cdc has been absolutely inconsistent in its handling of the outbreak in the united states. that gives a great deal of concern. so let's back it up from there. let's go to where the source of this problem is. the president has the authority to ban these flights. yes, i believe we can nip this in the bud if you will at least by banning those flights temporarily until such time as the cdc believe, the epidemic is under control and also make sure we don't issue visas to travelers from over there. we have a good border patrol, believe it or not, and they can catch these people with fake passports and fake visas as they come across the border. it seems to me we ought to have the debate on this and flush this out and that's why i filed the bill to allow for the banning of these flights.
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>> congressman, just one quick question. just to clarify. what flights are you talking about? because they are not regularly scheduled commercial flights from the affected countries to the united states. >> there are no direct flights from west africa to the united states. >> so we are talking about -- we're talking about travelers, but we're not talking about flights because there aren't any. >> i believe there are some flights but be that as it may -- >> there are no flights, there are no direct flights that come to the united states from west africa. that is incorrect. >> then we don't have any problem,er's c everybody's cont right? they are traveling, they are traveling. >> they come through europe. need to do a better job of explaining the problem outright -- >> it will not solve the problem. it is a step in the right direction. we know where the source is. we know they're traveling here. once they come across into central and south america, we've got an even greater problem. yes, we can control this. again, by not issuing visas to
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these travelers that are making their way through a triang lated way to come through these affected areas through europe or through other countries. we're taking no initiative to do that. >> okay, sam stein to secretary leavitt. >> that was fun -- >> no, i think it's -- >> it's correct -- there is so much misinformation -- >> secretary leavitt, switching topics, i'm curious, a lot of people look at this and say ebola isn't a new epidemic. it's been around since the '70s. why hasn't the biomedical research community created a vaccine? i'm wondering if you can walk the viewers through the process and why it hasn't happened today. >> an enormous amount of research has been done over the last ten years of ebola. this isn't the first time it has appeared. it's appeared a number of times in africa. we actually have four candida
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candidates, caidate vaccines, working through the fda process to ensure they are safe. i'm told, in fact, we could see a vaccine ready for production that would be safe and efficient by 2015. it couldn't be done in the final stages before that because every time it appears the virus is a bit different, than it has to be -- it has to be done at the type the virus appears. i do think, by the way, i can shed just a little light on the travel ban. if you want to take that subject up again. >> go ahead. >> it will be more exciting than my question, so go ahead. >> i'm not an expert, but i can tell you when i was secretary, we did study this extensively in the context of h5n1. as you point out, a lot of the epidemiologists suggest it would be counterproductive. i will point out most of those studies were done in the context of a widespread very efficient, efficiently transmitted disease.
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this is a disease that is not as easily passed from person to person. it's more localized right now. so i do think it's a legitimate debate. i think other and over, public health officials have concluded that it's difficult. the main problem is that -- as pointed out, if a person wants to get to the united states and they fly to barcelona and wait a few days and they're on a flight from barcelona. i agree we can track them. as pointed out, this may be a unique situation. but i think most of the study that's been done on travel ban has been done in the context of a widespread epidemic as opposed to a very narrowly confined one. >> okay. former secretary mike leavitt, thank you. congressman dennis ross, thank you as well. we'll be look for the legislation you plan to introduce today. eugene, stay with us. still ahead, if you're a fan of sushi, then there's a good chance you've heard of the new
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york city restaurant nobu. we'll hear how the world-renowned sushi chef went from thoughts of suicide to being one of the most successful restaurant owners in the world. and why he says he's better than robert de niro. >> he doesn't cook. great actor. i cook, do movie too. >> then, the queen of soul, aretha flank lyranklin, joins u. we're back in a moment. they challenge us. they take us to worlds full of heroes and titans. for respawn, building the best interactive entertainment begins with the cloud. this is "titanfall," the first multi-player game built and run on microsoft azure. empowering gamers around the world to interact in ways they never thought possible. this cloud turns data into excitement. this is the microsoft cloud.
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...the getaway vehicle! for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this. joining us now, michelle caruso cabrera. are the markets calming down? >> yes, absolutely.
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we see a strong rally in europe which had gotten more pummeled compared to the united states over the last couple weeks. we have good earnings from ge and morgan stanley, those stocks are rising. so far, haven't been derailed by janet yellen, the head of the u.s. federal reserve. we're waiting to see comments, whether she would say anything about monetary policy that would help or hurt the markets. her speech is focused on income inequality. but nothing related to the markets. and the price of oil is rebounding just a little bit today. but not so much that drivers shouldn't expect over the coming weeks that their gasoline prices are going to get cheaper. >> all right, michelle caruso-cabrera, have a great weekend. so do we have any sushi fans? >> oh, is that a rhetorical question. >> really, come on. >> it was my dinner last night. >> do you not like sushi? >> if you're a sushi fab, you know the name nobu.
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lewis spent time with the world-reworld renowned chef. >> nobu is celebrating its 20th anniversary. the man behind the empire of 30 restaurants knows his story is an unlikely one. there's sushi and then there's this. a melding of japanese culinary bliss 20 years in the making. >> amazing. it feel like my family. >> reporter: two decades ago, chef nobu brought with him an entirely new way of thinking about sushi and its flavor to new york city. a style he developed and honed in south america. >> i started chef -- like i was 18 years old. then after several years, i moved to peru. its taste, different cultures.
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basically, japanese style of food, started cooking, plus per ruvian influence. >> reporter: his first restaurant took him to alaska but his business burned down shattering his dreams. >> i almost tried to, you know, kill myself. this voice came to my brain. i have to try one more time. >> reporter: nobu rebuilt in los angeles. but it was the vision of one of hollywood's most famous actors that ultimately brought him to new york. >> robert de niro saying, come to new york. i want your food in new york. tell me about that. >> i love him because he knows good food. he doesn't talk too much. but understand he appreciate my food. so he asked me to, nobu, i want to make restaurants, new restaurants in new york city. >> reporter: two decades later, nobu will still tell you his business partner can act but can't cook. he on the other hand can do both. >> bob invited me to play in the movie "casino."
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>> got him back, a whole floor of rooms himself. but i knew the trick with him was they can't bet small for long. >> he doesn't cook. great actor. i'm cook. i do movie too. so i win. >> reporter: there are essential elements to a good piece of sushi. the cut and quality of the fish. the technique and touch of the chef. for nobou, these are all secondary to heart. >> as people eat good food understand the chef's heart. this is my way. >> what a remarkable story. he's been doing this for over 40 years. he says he's still learning about his craft. back to you, mika. >> all right, lewis, thank you. up next, from midnight train to georgia to a mash-up with destiny's child survivor, aretha franklin proves she hasn't lost a step with her 41st studio
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album. she joins us next when "morning joe" returns. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7 it's just i'm a little reluctant to try new things. what's wrong with trying new things? feel that in your muscles? yeah... i do... try a new way to bank, where no branches equals great rates. woman: everyone in the nicu -- all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment.
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a new study says raising the
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minimum wage would save the federal government billions of dollars. according to the economic institute. if the nation's minimum wage was raised from $7.10 to $10.10, it would create $7 billion in savings for the federal government. those savings, the study says, would be the result of the millions of americans that would no longer have to rely on benefits from the federal government. something to keep in mind when you're doing the math here. a new study finds, by the way, when push comes to shove, men will choose sex over food. scientists focused their research on a pair of neurons in worms but say there's findings are accurate throughout the animal kingdom. they say males can ignore and even suppress their hunger to find a sexual partner. >> i wonder how they conducted those tests. >> with worms. >> how long do you have to go
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without food? >> the research will help explain why men are so fit. no, why the different sexes are susceptible to different neuro logical disorders. really, from this to aretha? okay. aretha franklin is turning to the divas of today in her new album. aretha franklin sings the great diva classics include adele's rolling in the deep. here she is performing the song on the late show with david letterman. ♪ i can't help feeling ♪ we almost had it all ♪ i can't help feeling ♪ we almost had it all >> oh, my gosh. she's so amazing. the 18-time grammy-award winning, the queen of soul, aretha franklin. it is such an honor to have you
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on the show this morning. >> it's my pleasure, thank you so much for having me. >> i don't know how you would choose a favorite these songs. at least. rolling in the deep. midnight train to georgia. i will survive. is it possible to have a favorite in this set? >> i like all of them really. to tell you the truth, i like them all. love them all. >> i do too. i do too. we are also excited -- okay, gene, go. >> your majesty, this is gene robinson. i'm never star struck on the show. i am star struck right now. why did you decide to do this to these poor other singers, right, because you are -- your versions of these songs obviously will be the aretha franklin versions. how do the other singers feel about this, having their songs covered by the queen of soul? >> i don't know. the album won't drop in the
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street until the 21st. but you can order it online. preorders now. but i haven't spoke to anybody. but many of the artists i know and i'm friends with. chaka khan and i are very good fr friends. barbra streisand and i came along together as young singers. gladys and i cape along together as young singers. working places like the peacock down in atlanta. so i should hear from them i guess in about a week. i hope they like it. >> we have thomas roberts in new york who has a question for you. thomas. >> miss franklin, little do you know that your music and you are a lifesaver to so many people who have followed and been inspired by your career for year, me included especially. but mika mentioned the fact that you have this mash-up of a song between destiny's child of survivor and gloria gaynors "i
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will survive." you are the ultimate survivor in the music and entertainment industry. do you still love getting out there to perform? we see you on david letterman. you're still working so hard. do you still love it as much as you used to? >> i absolutely do. i absolutely do. it's what i do. it's what i love. it's what i'm going to be doing. >> i like that. jeremy peters has a question about one of our favorite cities that we go to a lot on "morning joe," detroit. >> good morning. as a fellow detroiter, i wonder what your take is on the city's ups and downs. you've seen it go through a lot. it does seem to be on a bit of resurgence right now. are you seeing that? >> it is. it is. you're absolutely right. we are turning the corner. and they expect a decision i think today or tomorrow on the bankruptcy. and things are very quickly falling into place and i think if you're an investor, you
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should hurry back to detroit. >> i got that. that's true. >> everybody, everybody is coming to the city now. everybody. we have a new mayor. a lot of money. this is a great time to invest in detroit. get in on the ground floor. >> there you go. sam stein. >> last question, what is your definition of a diva and where do you cut off the line? are there great divas, medium divas? where do you establish that? >> yeah, you could say there are different levels of divas. but the word diva coming from classical, the classical realm, is usually associated with the principal singer who is usually female of course. and that has translated over into the secular field of music. to the very well-known and more popular female vocalist and it's usually associated with a
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temperamental person. but in fact, and the truth i think, the person, the singer, is trying to give the audience the best. and the people that they are performing for. they're really trying to give you the best. it's not their temperament or temper. that is not about that at all really. and then i think, finally, a well-rounded diva. because it takes more than music just to be a diva or a popularity. being a real diva is giving back to the community, giving to charities and giving to others. >> well said. >> i love it. the album is aretha franklin sings the great diva classics. aretha franklin, thank you so much. >> thank you. up next, what, if anything, did we learn today? they're still after me. get to the terminal across town.
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i lochecked bag.free everything. with my united mileageplus explorer card. i have saved $75 in checked bag fees. priority boarding is really important to us. you can just get on the plane and relax. i love to travel, no foreign transaction fees means real savings. we can go to any country and spend money the way we would in the us. when i spend money on this card i can see brazil in my future. i use the explorer card to earn miles in order to go visit my family which means a lot to me. ♪ twhat do i do?. you need to catch the 4:10 huh? the equipment tracking system
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will get you to the loading dock. ♪ there should be a truck leaving now. i got it. now jump off the bridge. what? in 3...2...1... are you kidding me? go. right on time. right now, over 20,000 trains are running reliably. we call that predictable. thrillingly predictable. time for what have we learned today. i learned mika did not have my telephone number saved in her phone. so my name should be in her phone, hopefully not under creepy stalker. >> we'll let you know. jeremy? >> i learned as big of a diva as aretha may be, she still does not need a fan in front of her for her interview. >> she needs no fan. so cool.
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eugene, star struck? >> i learned the people who are saying stop the flights really ought to check the flight schedule. they really odd to do a little research. >> i learned i did save thomas' number under merv in m. >> merv? >> merv the perv. >> i'll just say i learned something, men will choose sex over food. i think i -- >> on that note, everybody, thank you so much. have a great weekend. if it's way too early, it's time for "morning joe." now it's time for "the daily rundown." many moving parth his as one person arrives at nih. and fearing there are still flaws in the system and calling for president obama to name a czar to steer the response. in liberia, the

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