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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 22, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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a deeply personal topic for the hard charging journalist who died yesterday at the age of fae. good morning, everyone. welcome to we have nicole wallace with us co-host of "the view." and democratic national committee howard dean. good to have you both on board
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with joe and me this morning. >> the new york times this morning are quoting somebody said that ben bradlee was the last of the lion king newspaper editors. he could be classy or approach fame, an energetic figure with a boxer's nose and almost invarably dressed in a white collar bold stripe. >> and very salty language all the time. >> he was, it's described elsewhere, a lot of tom brokaw remembers ben in a few minutes here with us and was, it was said that he drove the washington post too fast around corners. >> he drove it to its greatness, really. >> only four pulitzers before he got there. i guess 16, 17 after he was there. a remarkable flg in the history of person media.
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>> i think it's bradlee the for washington post executor who led the coverage of the watergate and the pentagon papers died tuesday at his home in washington, d.c. tom brokaw has more on bradlee's life and incredible legacy. >> reporter: benjamin bradlee, boston harvard man. heavy action during world war ii. he made "news week" into a power journalism and palled around with another man jfk. bradlee became the most famous newspaper editor in the world him he guided two rookie reporters through watergate. the him. nixon is involved, wiretapping. lives at steak. this is going the distance. his question was, what the hell
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do we do now? which is the question of somebody who realizes we are in totally uncharted water. >> we asked ours a lot of questions. you could all of the be true? how could somebody with all that much to lose put it at risk every day? >> bradlee, woodward and bernstein had help, but they were the team that nailed the nixon coverup. and ben was in charge. >> he had daring, he had -- let's call it by its proper name -- he had balls. he was willing to be dangerous. >> he wanted to be first with the story. but he never wanted to be wrong. >> reporter: the legendary editor and young fighters became rich and famous on and on the big screen in "all the president's men." . >> god dam it when is somebody going on record on this story. >> reporter: the fourth member of the team was katherine graham, former editor of the
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washington post, kay as she was known stood fast by ben when nixon's allies were threatening to take down the newspaper. >> hold it. haldeman only happens to be the second most important man in this country, conducting a conspiracy from inside the white house. it would be nice if we were right. >> reporter: bradlee and his third wife, samly quinn, shorthand for power couple. he was known for his charm, star power and profanity. >> jesus, what kind could have a [ bleep ] story is this? >> he was the epitome of newsman charisma. even when he walked across the newsroom, which he would do a couple times a day, he had this effect that made you want to do better. >> reporter: bradlee stumbled after watergate, publishing a prize series on an 8-year-old heroin addict. it was a hoax. that salty have have been a larry, a dashing journalist off the front page. >> it's my kind of hard.
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i lithat. if you are right, it isn't hard. >> joining us from washington, contributing writer for the fork times magazine jeff hymnmelman. he spent four years working with ben bradlee writing his biography, "yours in truth. "a personal portrait of ben bradlee, a man in search of the truth, really, jeff? >> absolutely. absolutely. thank you for having me here. it's a sad day for all the obvious reasons. >> jeff, so it's interesting the question it was a asked that woodward said that he asked, after finding out that richard nixon, the president of the united states, was involved in a conspiracy, what the hell do we do now might be a question that any editor ask, what made that question so pressing for a guy like ben bradlee is ben came from the old school. >> right. >> he was really good friends with presidents.
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he was really close to jfk. he pal 'ed around on presidents, reported on them. watergate changed all of that, for ben bradlee to go from the insider's insider to be the guy that blew up the white house had to be remarkably vertigennous for him let's say. >> at a time like this you tend to think about what someone's legacy is. with ben the legacy is it's so enormous. i think one of the things that can be safely said about ben is he safely walked that track. i think when he took over the walk post, he became the managing editor and took the reigns in 1968. one of the first things he did was to try to separate the post-interests from the interests of the establishment. there was a famous case the mayor of the city of washington, for the one wanted the post to leak it. the post decided to leak it
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because they decide we're not the mouthpiece for the governor area. it was a stance that ben really took from the very beginning of his time at the "post." he had "newsweek" when he was pal'ing in around with jfk. i think it put a stamp on it in a way nobody will forget. >> howard dean, chime in on what you see. >> i would love to know this guy was the giant in my lifetime. they won't make anybody like him anymore. the reason is the media has changed so much. i wondered when you interviewed him as you did for four years, what did he think of the new media? what did he think of the new standards, get it fast and not so much get it right? >> you know, it's interesting. i think ben would have been the first to say, he didn't want to say much about new media, blocks and things like that were something that never interested him. what struck me when he would go
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to panels and people asked that very question. what he would always say he never knew what form it was going to take, he was optimistic that this pursuit of the truth and this need for people to know the truth to find the truth that rely that somebody out there digging. i think he alwaysed a faith somebody would carry on that work, whatever form it took. i think he was right. he's not very comfortable with computers and things like that. i think he was right and that optimistic struck me. >> it's called gut instinct. thank you so much. we have a lot of politics to get to there is a personal side to this they had ben and samly, one of our first book parties at their home, they were so kind to do that and just think one other side to this is their personal story and if you check out the c span interview that they did on ben's final days and how they shared them together, it is extremely beautiful the way she
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helped him leave this world. >> i remember you telling, calling me after in tears. >> beautiful. >> your comments. my god. >> the most important part of his life. >> they loved each other so much. we got a ton of politics. a ton of new polls. i just have to ask you, though, nicole wallace, obviously, somebody at the center of things at the white house, some people might ask, what's worse? a system where the press pal 'ed around with presidents like ben bradlee pal 'ed around with jfk or a situation we have now where the white house hates the press so much and not just this white house, but white houses hate the press so much that there is absolutely no access him so at the end of the day you never get close to the president. >> i think that anyone in journalism and 97 politics would agree what we have now in far
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worse. i went to journalism school because of ben bradlee, i went to forth western. the person that everyone wanted to grow up and work for was ben bradlee. that was the fantasy. so, you know, that he sort of birthed at least two generations of aspiring truth seekers is part of his legacy that he may not even have known about in life. and i think that what he reigned over was a washington that everybody misses. chris matthews on his show talks a lot. he wrote a book about it. reagan and tip o'neill, it was a washington where after they were done punping each other, they had a beer or a cigar or drink. it is a washington that everybody in journalism and everybody in politics misses. >> all right. we'll have much more on this ahead. let's get to politics now a. lot of fee, last night t. candidates for u.s. senate seat in new hampshire both came out swinging if their first televised debate. polls show jean shaheen and
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former for scott brown running neck and neck in a race that could clash obamacare and why brown was even running at all. >> you had two chances to run for the u.s. senate in massachusetts in 2013 and 2014. why not take those? >> because i live here. i mean i live here. i live here. i was born at the portsmouth faithful ship yard. my mom was a waitress at hampton beach. i have long and strong ties. i am running because i care about new hampshire and restoreing america. that's why i'm running. >> when he lost his race, he didn't move to new hampshire and say i want to get lost in this state. he ran for massachusetts and went out to iowa and said he was thinking about running for president. well, i don't think new hampshire is a cons lakes prides. i think we feed a senator, we need a senator who is going to put new hampshire first. >> imagine you are at home wearing your new hampshire
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citizen hat and you get a call from a pollster asking the following question, do you approve of the job president obama is doing? now, there will be a chance to follow up. this is a yes or no answer. do you approve, yes or no? >> in some ways aapprove and some things i don't approve. so, you know. like most questions, that we deal with as policy makers, there aren't simple answers yes or no. >> democratic senator elizabeth warren will head to new hampshire to campaign for senator shaheen this saturday almost two years sense she won in massachusetts. it's within 3% of the margin of error. >> this race is so tight. there are so many races that can go either way. you wonder whether states like colorado and new hampshire that usually break democratic are going to break democratic the
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time and states like kansas that usually and georgia that usually break republican are going to break republican. >> there are a lot of really, really close races. this i think is not one of them. i know what the polls say. at the end of the day, since i come from the sister state of new hampshire and i'm in the sister state of nortch now, there is a strong feeling in northern new england that carpet bagging is not okay and i don't care if scott brown's mother worked for the portsmouth whatever it was dairy queen or whatever as a waitress. >> i agree with you that from 30,000 feet you would think this would be a bicker problem. why is this race so close against an established physical like jean shaheen? >> because, because of president obama's approval ratings. that's, you look, the republican versus done a terrific job in this way. they've nationalized the election, first of all, which is a good thing in a sixth year of
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the president. more importantly, they've made the issue the president. so they can avoid all this controversial stuff that they've gotten if trouble with in the past you know too much abandoning abortion entirely, being anti-gay, anti-immigrant, the crazy stuff of ebola coming across the border from mexico. most of that has been drowned out. the other races are close. the reason i think this one isn't is when you go into the both as you know well, there is a sort of a little switch that goes on. those that are under tide is sided, something flips them over. the something is scott brown close to race and decided not to. >> a lot of mid-term fireworks to get to coming up. i wanted to show you one other piece of video, chris christie talking about the minimum wage at a chamber of commerce event yesterday in walk. take a look. >> to tell you the truth, i'm tired of hearing about the minimum wage. i really am. i don't think will is a mother
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or a father sitting around a kitchen table tonight in america saying, you know, honey, if our son or daughter could just make a higher minimum wage, my god, all our dreams will be realized. is that what parents aspire to for their children? they aspire to a greater growing america where their children have the ability to make much more money and have much greater success than they've had and that's not about a higher minimum wage, everybody. >> what do you think of that, mica? >> i would counter what elizabeth warren said earlier this week, her mother had to step in after her father became ill and get a job that she went to go work at sears and had a minimum wage job that paid for the family and got them through hard times. we think that in a big way. >> i think to christie's point, he gave us a speech. i remember we talked about it here. it was the republican response to income and equality. he talks about income and
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equality. i think we should be cautious not to take his comments of minimum wage out of isolation from his larger message about opportunity and equality. >> did you think those comments were taken out of -- >> i think his larger point about minimum wage, which he's made many times in battleground states, he should be more careful. >> he wouldn't be sitting back stage clinching a bit if. >> i have heard him make these comments about minimum wage shining the light on the wrong side of the economy. he has a larger message that is very powerful. i wish more republicans would adapt about opportunity to equality and aspiring to a minimum wage job. >> i says you all foe as we all know the sense coming out of this is i'm tired of hearing about the minimum wage. >> it's not a good one. >> i hate to say this is the kind of stuff i used to do on the campaign trail. you can't do it. your press people boat into you, you do not say sentences like
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that. >> there are also some issues, the republicans have to get smart on. >> give up. >> on the cane trail. can i sit and have an economic debate about the minimum wage. >> sewer, you could. you could win the debate if you want. >> i was against raising the minimum wage when i was in congress. but this is an issue the republicans need to wake unto it's fallen far behind where it should be. if you believe in the minimum wage and most americans believe in the minimum wage, yes, a republican can go on the campaign trail and say minimum wage is really about taking money out of the pockets of some poor people and giving it to other poor people. republicans have lost the debate by that point. they've lost the debate by that point. you are never going to be able to give people a living wage on minimum wage by jumping up to $15 to $20 an hour. but republicans need to get smart on this issue before the 2016 race because right now it needs to be raised.
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it needs to be indecked. yes, i can have the philosophic am debate how states should decide what a minimum wage would be. in a perfect world that would be fine. if we want to go to teach xiblgs, we can do that. if we want to win presidential elections, we feed to understand there are single moms out there right now that aren't sick and tired about discussions about the minimum wage. >> at all. >> there are people struggling praying the minimum wage goes up a little bit. >> i think chris christie is one of them is my only point. >> why did he say that to the chamber? if he had said that in let's say a tough part of newark, nuvenlg i would respect him tan in the claim ber of commerce, where it's a very safe callous sounding thing to say. >> i don't disagree with you at all. we have to wait to see how he responds to this i have heard him say more similar things than you have said about the minimum
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wage. his only point, i believe is that the opportunity in equality is as grave and peril on the minimum wage as is the actual low wage in there i know you understand the, republicans need to understand the greatest threat to the republican party being a permanent minority, if we continue to be callous to working or sound callous. we have lost not only the working class, we have lost the middle class. we lose it by sounding overly -- and young people. >> still ahead on "morning joe," we are down to the home stretch to the election. the chairman of the democratic national committee. coming woman debbie waserman schultz joins us and valerie plame is here. we'll show you what happened after the singer got the officer to read the actual policy out loud. >> also, mcdonald's take big
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. >> i can't get over that fan thing, merve the pev. >> the new iphone 6. >> all right, it's time to take a look at the new york times, american jeffrey fowle, an american held in north korea, he was arrested after leaving a bible in a motel afternoon. a medical examination found him if good health. he is currently at his first
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stop if guam him the obama administration says they are working on the release of two other americans detained in north korea. saudi arabia stopped muslim clerics saying twitter is evil and nothing more than a source of lies. >> we agree, we go with him some days 26th being evil and a source of lies. >> it was for pe yesterday. on his spot, live tv broadcast sheikh abdul said if it were used correctly, it could be a benefit. >> i agree. >> it's exploitive. >> social media site is popular on both men and women in saudi arabia. his comments divided many users across the country. all right the new york daily feuds. >> this is all your fault, mica. >> no it's not coca-cola reported a large drop as global sales slow for both companies. coke says profits were down 14%
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from last 84 as sales continue to soften in the u.s. mcdonald's profits were down for a fourth consecutive quarter with profits dropping 30% t. largest restaurant chain faces increased pressure from competitors as well as higher operating costs. i don't know where those come from. both companies are making an effort to offer a lot of options in terms of healthy foods and drinks without as much sugar in them. i wonder if that's a tough transition. >> you know, it has to be. it is. i think they're going through a difficult time. 30% drop is pretty dramatic. >> it's dramatic. >> they are trying to provide healthier options. >> there is a c change. it's coming. >> i hope people want to go to it. >> let's take a look at this next story coming to us from the post standard. liss in new york are looking into the arrest of the subway musician. >> he looks like a nice guy. >> after the spect cam of hills
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arrest went viral. >> what happened? >> he was performing at a brooklyn subway station when an officer ordered him to leave because he didn't have a perm the singer refused and had him read aloud the mta rules that proved he was doing nothing illegal him when neither side backed down the officer called for backup. this is what happened next. ♪ ♪ >> stop. let's go ♪ how i wish you were here. >> hey. hey. you can't do. oh. >> he was arrested, charged withlightering. he is due in court on friday. >> was he doing something wrong? >> apparently not after having the mta rules read aloud. it proved he was not in violation of being there to sing. however this performer has gone on to file a complaint. yesterday local musicians and
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two at the council members rallied at a local station to show spoermt we have another picture of those gathered. >> that continues. yes, he was there capturing all that, the guy taking his guitar. all right, we have an update on cooper and mike jones works are they? they are speaking about -- >> i think this phrase, as long as it doesn't tais me bro. and we had don't touch me, girlfriend. >> that was the awkward moment it was a caught on camera while early voting in chicago on monday, the two happened to find themselves voting alongside president obama. it was then mike who decided to have some fun. here's a portion of their exchange.
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. >> cute. last night they spoke to chris hayes about what they were thinking as it all unfocused. >> why? why in why would do you this? and i was just nervous, super nervous. and i couldn't believe he said that another part of me was like shut up before i tackle you. shut up. >> it was an experience i wanted to give her. i knew she was nervous going up there in the booth next to him. she probably wasn't paying attention to her ballot. it wasn't anything the president did. i want to make that clear. it was just something that i always do to her.
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she knows very well, it's my personally. i am very spontaneous. i will put her out in the front of anyone in order to make her smile and laugh like she did there that is cute. i think she should marry him. >> i don't know. they should now. >> president obama can go to their wedding. >> he can officiate. >> wouldn't you think he would say, don't bother the president. don't touch him while he's voting, something like. and the president handled it so well. the president's response was perfect. that's what made it. other politicians would stiffen up. >> i like getting to pete mike. meek has a great personality. >> i can tell. >> okay. coming up. >> i like mike. >> using the internet as a weapon. new evidence points to isis recruiting american teenage girls to fight its war in syria. plus, today's top columnists are writing about. don't go away.
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we'll be right back with much more "morning joe."
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. >> that was a golden time for you, kid. >> joining us now -- >> he had served you wine. >> cheese sandwiches with the feet down. >> yeah. >> it was a rough morning. >> they call me bar. it's an accomplishment. >> he's scared of mica. >> i'm scared of many women, mica and mrs. bush are high on that list. >> on the opinion pages, a poll -- okay. we will look at two well written pieces on ben bradlee. this is out of the "new yorker" david remnick remembering ben bradlee. he was above all a driven newspaperman, a man of his time and of his institution and more
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alive than a mo jar weather system. he was a man of great principle and of great luck policed in the ownership that supported him and pressed him with a loveing wife that cared for him to the very end and that end was too quickly. salary quinn said about his final days as she was living with him through them and it's a beautiful story. it really is. he stayed pretty active until the very end. they stayed at home together. it's very nice. this is from the "daily beast" ben bradlee the last of the newspaper giants. when i first met him in the early '70s, having been hired as a cub reporter in the style section of the walk post, i expected him to be physically legendary, like maybe 7 feet tall. he was, in fact, of average height, but he had an aura like a pope or a head of state. that stash cure came so naturally to him that he never seemed conscious of it and, in
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fact, appeared a bit embarrassed when it was mentioned to him. but he had everything necessary, and more to star in the last great act of american journalism, who in his line of work ever walked taller? >> i can't think of anyone. >> no. he actually had a shirtless portrait of him taken when he was in his mid-80s. he looked better than 99. % of men walking there today. john meacham. we were asking the question before, you've studied presidents far more than we have, but, you know, most people in journalism school would be horrified by the close relationship that ben bradlee had with jfk. like today standards. but i'm sorry, didn't we find out more about the president and learn more about what the president was doing inside the white house when presidents and
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members of the press were close compared to what it's been like for the past 15, 20 years? were there bitter enemies and just don't talk, don't give any access. >> sometimes in moments of death and commemoration we're overly nostalgic. this is not one of those moments. you can't be too nostalgic. he was charmd, personified, he produced more man crushes than anyone has ever. i'm as boring a heterosexual as you will ever find, if bradlee said, all right, let's go, i'd say, all right, man. >> two thumbs up. >> i don't think i'm alone in that. you know, if ben had, he was very close to john kennedy, a neighbor in george town, if he had been comfortable with power in a way that had affected his coverage and made him pull punches, that would be one thing. he was comfortable with power. almost more than most presidents
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because he was going to be there, they were going to leave. but this was a man close to kennedy and toppled nixon. if anybody thinks that was partisan, they're wrong. he was an equal opportunity journalist in the sense that whoever was in power was treated with immense accideskepticism. i think if he was are a democrat, it wouldn't have mattered. he was about chasing the story. >> that has implications. >> that does have implications. we have been in the post-watergate world. are we better off? >> we got generation upon generation of people who said i went in journalism because of woodward and bernstein. it wouldn't have happened without the culture that bradlee created and he couldn't cleiate that culture without mrs. great. without being nostalgic, it was a remarkable golden era. >> stay with us.
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>> i love it. >> it's time to go. >> running against. >> okay, he has a wife name kate. you know. she didn't lock like bradlee. >> for the. >> right. up next, running against president obama, our next guest says it was the gop's only strategy to take the senate and according to her, it's failing. congress woman debbie waserman schultz joins us next. .
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as we gain on the mid-terms, which are two weeks away, everyone thinks they know who will take the senate. joining us congress woman debbie waserman schultz. good to have you on the show
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this morning. >> thank you so much for being with us. let's start with the house, obviously the republicans have been broadcasted for being too extreme in the house for several years now. are they going to lose control of the house? >> well, i think we are still really in a neck and neck situation in terms of whether or not we see pickups for democrats or pickup for republicans. this is an election where in every single competitive race it's coming down to the hour. in 2010 they let loose a whole lot of incumbents. there is not an incumbent today you would predict would be losing. >> is there a chance for democrats to peck up the house of representatives? >> i think the best thing that i could predict is we have an opportunity to pick up seats. beyond that i wouldn't make any other predictions.
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>> so why is that if the republicans have been so extreme him democrats and people in media have said why are republicans going to be rewarded with two more years of balancing the house of representatives? >> well, look at it another way, this is an election in which why are the republicans doing so badly? they're doing so badly if a second term mid-term with a democratic president where the democratic party loses on average 29 seats and you know there is even a question mark whether the republicans will pick up any seats at all. knack, they could still lose seats, because they are extreme. they've put suing the president for doing his job at the top of the agenda. they put investigating benghazi 13 times at the top of the agenda, democrats have put creating jobs, getting the economy turned around, fighting for the middle class, supporting a minimum wage. that's why the republicans are not trending with history and why there are still competitive races all over the country. the governments for the house
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and the senate. >> i read in the washington post republicans may peck up his story. kain is in the house of representatives. so if -- >> i would disagree with that. >> mica will ask you about the senate f. they, do i wonder if that means that americans want the republicans in the house to keep them doing what they have been doing. >> there will not be historic gains in the house. >> moving to the senate, because we've got so many different candidates, democrats who are giving at best wishy washy answers as it pertains to their support of president obama, you've said the president is not on the ballot. we will hold the senate. >> right. >> aren't democrats playing into exactly the negative antic the republican party has put on the silver platter for you all. instead of looking at the president's record and running on it. it fames three issues he's on the forefront of.
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i feel like you are all falling for the easiest trick in the book. >> no, not at all. look, we are running an environment where we've had 55 straight months of job growth. the longest sustained period of job growth in american history. americans have seen that under democratic leadership, we have moved forward. we pulled ourselves out tanks to his leadership out of the worst economic crisis since the great depression. we have a good economic story to tell. that's why our candidates are talking about the issues most important to their constituents, creating jobs, helping to make sure there are new challenges. they have thrown obstacles in their way. they're trying to make it about anything but their terrible record. >> under hess leadership. houb president obama's leadership. my 16-year-old daughter at dinner when i said what do you think president obama will be remembered for?
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she said, well, health care and saving the auto industry. she said it very, i mean, it came out. it wasn't that hard. i don't understand that. >> mica, the republicans are i trying. >> yeah. >> let me help you understand, what the republicans are trying to do is distract from their record of putting issues that aren't important to americans that that oppose at the top of the agenda. they want to make it anything but that terrible reported. democrats are focused on the issues when i travel the country are most important to americans. over the next 13 days, our voters will be asking temss win question, who has my back? who is on my side? >> so should voters know if they go out and vote for a democratic candidate, they will be voting for a continuation of barak obama's policies? >> voters should foe when they go out and vote for a democratic candidate, that they are voting for someone who has their back,
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who will focus on strengthening their economy. >> i'm asking about barak obama. this is a question a lot of people are asked. >> joe, barak obama was on the ballot if 2012 and 2008. the candidates on the ballot are democratic candidates for congress, the u.s. senate. >> this is a legitimate question, there is not a wrong answer and. >> no, no, it's a legitimate question. >> is. >> joe scombl if you vote for democrats, are you voting for a continuation of barak obama's policies? he said, yes, you are, do you agree with the president? >> if you vote for democrats, you are voting for candidates who are focused on creating jobs, getting the economy turned around and continuing to move us forward, creating more opportunities for people to succeed. if you vote for a republican, you are voting for someone embraced the tea party agenda, who would double down on obstruction and double down -- >> thank you is much, debbie
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waserman schultz. >> thank you. >> it's not hard. let say if i were running in 1986 and ronald reagan was the president and somebody asked me, is this a continuation, if i vote for you, will there be a continuation of ronald reagan's policy? i'd say, yep, you know, i don't agree with him 100% of the time. are you darn right, i am a reagan republican. if the republicans are as horrible and as extreme and vicious, this that, the other as we just heard. >> well, i think they r. i think we are playing into it. >> but then again, they're going to control the house of representatives. it looks like that will peck up the senate. so why can't you just say, not you, but why can't you just say, yes, barak obama has done a great job for six years. i look forward to being his partner another sex years. >> there are policies he has pushed forward, we want to continue. we want to make happen.
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we thank him for opening the door. we feed to increase the minimum wage. do you want me to make a list? >> it is so ridiculous. you have people that voted with the president 95, 96, 97, 98% of the time. >> who can't say his name. >> you send me up there, i will be a pain in his back side. it's a clown show. anyway, here in the u.s., mica, the propaganda, it's reaching teenage girls. >> yes, it has, and the recruitment. we found three now caught doing this. we'll have that story next. . zbrmpblthsz and only national is ranked highest in car rental customer satisfaction by j.d. power.
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story out of austria, two young girls joined isis. i think one or two are getting pregnant. one wanted to return home and can't. i guess it's happening in the united states too as far as reaching out. >> authorities say they stopped three american girls who had a chance to joan militant fighters in syria. the fbi says parents tipped off securities. the girls were stopped at a german airport. officials say they left friday
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from denver to frankfort. they were headed to syria to join isis or another group. meanwhile, supplies air dropped by the united states to help bresch fighters pay have fallen into the hands of isis. they say this group shows grenades and rpgs that went off course. they have one bundle but it was later destroyed in an air streak. >> teen age girls from denver. >> recruiting young people and women. god, it's so frightening. we'll have more on that coming up. why didn't we ask howard dean about jean shaheen, everybody, is the president doing a good job. >> it keeps happening, it keeps working, you know why, it's not a good plan. if you want to hear from howard, remembering a legend, our tribute to ben bradlee, a giant in present journalism who led the washington post to finding news coverage.
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former executive editor jill abramson joins us. an american held hostage in korea for six months is being on u.s. soil. more on that next.
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. >> welcome back to "morning joe" nicole wallace and howard dean are still with us. managing editor of bloomberg politics, how did you get here mark halperin?
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>> superman. >> i love the incredible hullk. >> superman. >> oh. >> well, like the clothes pop off. >> i got it. >> okay. howard, i have a question for you. are you will? >> i'm here. i'm laughing at the byplay, i miss it. >> byplay. >> new england words. >> we just did this interview with debbie waserman schultz who makes us think these candidates running, udall, voted with him, they seemed to be, they are, they can't say his fame. that happened in the last interview. she could not say his name. i wonder what it is they are running from except for trumped up vitriol playing into their game that is really baseless. >> i think you are on to something here.
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first of all it is trumped up vitriol at election time is pretty effective. the republicans have done a good job, i don't approve of it. i think it's a mistake to run away from who you are in an election. i think allison lundgren-grimes is a great candidate. she has done very well. you can't embrace the president if kentucky. he lost by 25 or 30 points to mitt romney. but you can stand up for you who you are. you can say the president has done some things i like and some things i don't like. that's what i believe. that's what you got to do. if we don't win on next a week from tuesday, which i think we may still, i'm not giving up on that, if which don't, it will be because people didn't say who they were him you can't allow your race to be about president obama. you can't get out of that by saying, oh the president is not on the ballot t. president is on the ballot t. republicans have
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done a great job putting him on the ballot. you have to show backbone, that's what people want more than anything else? . howard, you are right, i want to say, republicans that run away from this person or that person, i say you give voters a chance to vote for a real democrat or a fake democrat, tail vote for the real democrat every time. it's the same thing. >> i hate to say that, harry truman said that first. >> did he really? this truman fellow is a part is guy. >> but it's -- >> i was saying it about republicans, though, i just love running against candidates away from bill clinton. because they're sitting easy targets. >> if 2006, republicans ran far away from problem and i do think there is a little reality to
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president obama's still simplging poll numbers. i think it's amusing to watch, how awkward they all get. i mean, not answering that they voted for him. that seems to me a real problem on so many levels that the national party candidates, i voted for him because i thought he was better tan mitt romney. they can't get that far out the date is amazing. >> it's politics 1001 say you voted for bush, he got the troop levels wrong, the deficit wrong, the spending wrong. you want to speak to the fire. but don't say oh, i pay have voted for him. >> well, they lost, it was a when fancy pelosi and the speaker of the house. there is proof it doesn't work. >> you have to accept, jean shaheen gets asked, do you approve the job the president is
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doing, yes or. i approve some things, not sought others, why not saying supporting the president means saveing the health care to x number of new hampshire voters. say what you believe and talk about the future and going forward. >> you are exactly right. you can make a democratic argument. i disagree with so many of his policies, did i vote with him? gentleman, against john mccain if i'm if famp. darn right, the economy is going off the cliff. we had whatever the talking point is. 50-plus weeks of economic growth seeing the car industry gain health care. do i agree with him on everything? no, i don't. >> send me back to walk. i'll make sure the president does this. to fix obamacare. say what you actually believe. not that complicated. >> but mica or john meacham,
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what a clown mark bagich looks like. what a clown mark udall when he says i'm going to be the guy again. mark udall seems like a nice guy. i think i like the guy. what a clownish thing to do when you voted for him 95, 96, 97% of the time. >> i think howard is right, you got ten days to go. you got numbers, you know, way below 50, right? so they're fighting for their lives and as you know, the political mindset is i'll do whatever i have to do and clean it up the day half-. >> you know what, though, they're not smart. this is day trading. if i'm a democrat and i'm sitting at home and i voted for mark udall, because i wanted him
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to forward barak obama's policies and he voted for him 97% of the time. now he says he's going back to washington from colorado to fight barak obama and be a pain if barak obama's side, just stay home. i say to both clowns. >> let's get to the fireworks and see if there was a fan in florida. this time, no drama. instead, they save their energy for the issues and personal attacks, including this exchange over who is more relatable to voters. look at this. >> i was not responsible for the global economic melt down any more than rick was responsible for the national recovery. if are you somebody who flies around in a private jet and you live on a mansion on the sea, it's hard to understand what the people are suffering from. >> i watch at parent lose the only family car. i went through that. charlie never went through that. he has never had to worry about
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money, he never had to worry about being laid off. >> charlie has done fine in life. >> you don't know me. you can't tell my story. i won't tell yours. i know you are worth $100 or $200 million. god bless you for that wealth. the way you got it is pretty unsavory. >> carley said i'm not going to tell you story. then he tells the story. >> well, sorry. we mentioned senator mark udall is trying to fight off a tough challenge from republican congressman cory gardner in colorado. hillary clinton fired out a crowd on behalf of the democratic incumbent. he has also been joined by for elizabeth warren. tomorrow, first lady michelle obama will join him on the trail a. pom shows gardner leading udall by a single point amodge likely voters. >> you know there are democrat and republican insiders that say they think at the end, i'm
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repeating what i hear, mark, that this goes democratic that the 2012 folds under roared for barak obama. they think like justice marshall said in kansas the muscle memory will have republicans pulling the lever for a republican in colorado, a lot of insiders think if this is close, udall wins it. >> if you call is within a point or two, the turn out the vote efforts will give him a chance to go over the top, but you can't be surprised if it entdz up being a blowout. you cannot be surprised in this examiner sides. in kansas, there is no democratic end game. so i think if the national sides and the kansas muscle memory kicks into play, they won't win that one. they have a chance, they have to do a difficult thing, which is use the obama methods in an
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unpresidential year. a new jersey school board upheld the suspensions of five high school football coaches whose team is facing shocking allegations of hazing and assault. sayreville board of education unanimously agreed suspend the head coach and foreassistants. the meeting saw position fat speeches on former and current students on both side of the issue. >> i'm telling you, the only reason i experienced success aside ofpy family is because of the coach in this community. >> for some kids in town, it's the only dream to run out in the entire community and play for the copy. it's ha ready to explain to those kids that may never happen for them. >> i never once had to be rescued and humiliated to be proud of my uniform, also as a united states army officer, if you are voting teamwork, when we
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had a weak member platooned in the field, he fell out, instead of kicking him, beating him, ridiculeing him, we picked up his weapons, his pack, his helmet and everything else. we carried it for him. >> wow, the there was also a heated exchange over whether the coaches received training about bullying. >> what kind of training was provided to the coaching staff? again, we are still undergoing an investigation process at this time. as soon as we have the conclusion of that investigation, we will be able share that. >> did you ever provide training? >> answer the question. >> yes or no, did you provide training? >> sir, i answered the question. >> yes or no? yes or no? >> excuse me, sir. >> yes or no? geeze, yes or no? >> this is public comment. excuse me, this is public comment. okay. i'm the board, this is public comment. we are eager to hear what you have to say. please don't become adversarial. >> i want a yes or no answer,
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has training been provided to the coaches, yes or no? >> sir, i have given you my answer, you may not appreciate it. i've given you my answer. >> there was no training, he was too embarrassed to say it. the suspensions of coach najar and his staff indefinite as the investigation continues, but they are with pay. you know i think it's a sort of a microcosm of the things we are seeing in this football world. these parents and kids will pay a price for a culture gone wild. >> the nfl has a lot of things that have happened since the nfl had its problems and it's blown over and the ratings will be great. they will make billions of dollars. everybody will end up watching the super bowl. at the end it will probably break record or two. but there is, i won't say quite
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an existential crisis tore football. football on levels if danger. i find it hard to believe that football as we know it is 20, 25 years from now will be anything compared to what it was. it's not now. not just in the deep south but across the mid-west, and the west coast. i mean. >> pop warner. >> it was friday nights. i mean, the whole towns across america, i mean, so much revolved around going to the high school games on friday nights. saturday games saturday afternoon, sitting with your tv set. >> that is a part of our culture, engrained in our culture. it's under attack by the very people that run the sport on all leve levels. >> a lot of the places don't leave the countries for a lot of
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things. between net flicks. >> and the amazon high school football game. >> high school football is one of those things. >> going down to the five and.com. >> costco's sales section. >> did you see this story? >> mark prior's campaign is responding to an article on the college thesis. it reads park prior desegregation and unwilling invasion. the authors obtained prior's college paper from fine 85 and the beacon's analysis reads in part this, for mark prior arced you it was an unwilling invasion
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that took a local problem out of line saying he was more or less pro segregation prior's campaign photoed he called the state official to ent great the quote/unquote embarrassing escapade. the campaign says he is speaking to the mindset of the people in arkansas who didn't want interference from washington. it is not the first time a college thesis paper has been injeblged into the arkansas senate race. recently they unearthed republican senior thesis at harvard that according to mollie defended the idea that the country must be led by a class of intellectually office holders whose ambitions sets them above other men. >> so i saw an interesting
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headline from bloomberg. >> mark halperin fell asleep. >> like in college. >> i never finished mine. >> the thesis didn't support segregation but it is one reason why he might lose. >> well, he's behind in the race. you have to figure out a way to come back. i don't think the way you wrote this college thesis is anyway. >> did stray his prom picture? >> that can do it. >> you feed a baseball scoreboard. >> how is that race looking? >> very tough for the democrats. president clinton has gone down and worked, he is registering people to vote exactically by hand. they are trying to get the african-american vote zbruty right now arkansas is trending republican? >> without a doubt. >> what about louisiana? >> it's been to a runoff. we're in a new world.
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we will see every national resource pour in. you don't know. i think she can save herself. that's against conventional wisdom. >> in georgia, if nun goes to a runoff. >> it will probably end republican. the thing about the louisiana runoff, it's on a saturday when there will be higher african-american turnout and a day of the sec championship, there will be lower republican turnoff. >> look at that. what about north carolina? >> if there is a national trend, the republicans will probably when it. but she's still in the race. she's not, she is ending strong. >> does scott walker hold on in wisconsin? >> i have to get out my magic ball to know for sure, i would say probably. >> still ahead, one of the greats, ben bradley leaves behind a legacy rivaled by few, if any. next with jill abramson and then a woman who knows a thing or two
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about covert operations, author and former cia officer valerie plame joins us with her latest thriller. an all out brawl involving the palen family. now we have the audio from that fight. yes. >> nicole wallace has been through that. >> she might have (receptionist) gunderman group. gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics.
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. >> i don't think we have ever been as loving with each other as we are now and, you know, we spend a lot of time together. we hold hands, he knows me. he loves having me there and it's just extremely rewarding to be able to be there for him now to try to make him happy and give him as much love as i can
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until he dies. >> it was a sally quinn last month talking about her husband's final days, ben bradlee the washington post former executive editor who led watergate and the pentagon papers died on tuesday at his home in washington, d.c. joining us now the former executive editor of the fork times jill abramson, editor of the walk post, mary jordan, hired by ben bradlee in 1984. it's good to have you both. >> it's great to have you both here. jim, you start, beautiful "time" magazine piece. >> thank you. >> by talking about the one word that describes ben bradlee best. why? >> yes, because he was shining and his journal imwas palpable coming off of his skin. that i think made him luminous.
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>> he adsed from every journalism pore. >> i have met longer tan life figures. i put him up with johnny apple, peter jennings. they were larger than life covering the story, they dominated. but they loved a great story and they cared about journalism. this guy ran a newspaper big splashy things. held powerful interests accountable. >> so we have been talking about. you talk in your piece, how bradlee some criticize him for being too chummy with jfk. we had an had annicole wallace. >> we had friendships and they
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were very close. i think that friendship was for the benefit of the country. ben grew up in a different time of our profession the echoes of the progressive era were still there when teddy roosevelt and the press worked hand if glove to pass his agenda and things got done. now we have a snapping turtle's press core, no access to the white house and nothing getting done. >> pare jordan, bring us back to what 1984. did he actually personally hire you, what was it like? what were you your memories working for ben bradlee? >> i was a young intern. he hired me. right after i wrote this story. it was a story about what he loved to say were talkers. something people would talk about. i found out faye dun away had a
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lawyer and a sister in maryland and walter momdale had a history professor at george washington. at the end of the interview, mondale, i said, by the way, is your brother going to win? and clarence said, for the way. so that's the story t.mondale people were really ticked. what is this kid doing? you didn't say she was covering politics. bradlee came over laughing, he said, great story, you know, they always underestimate the young ones. and he was just infectious to work with him. he loved his job. he used to say, i have the best job in the world. we felt lucky to be with them.
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>> john meacham, he bent history. he did. we worked in the paris embassy. the american embassy in france. he was with "newsweek." . i think in one of the great job interview leans ever he was talking to mrs. graham about whether he would come over to the post, he said he would give his left one to be the managing editor of the post and nothing was ever the same, really. joe, i'm wondering. >> it was such a fabulous partnership and it was said when mrs. graham was around ben walked out jauntier. his voice got a little rasp year i love that. >> bradlee was the john milton of profanity, poetry, what he could do with certain words, dazzled. mrs. graham liked that.
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is another bradlee possible? was there something particular about the execs of the business the culture of the business in the '60s and '70s? in there certainly the years that he presided at the post were better economically. it was a more muscular period for newspapers, certainly. but, yes, i think the capacity of one do i phammic passion fat journalist to turn around the newsroom, we see that happening now. in fact, a lot of people think my friend met marty barron is doing that at the post as we speak. so, of course. >> so let's talk, mary, act his legacy. okay, we could fill up all three hours by having people come and talk to you about the extrord fare things that ben bradlee did. there could be others that say you have two generations of students going to journal
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imschool. maybe learned the wrong thing from woodward and bernstein and led to the very snapping turtle press core that we have in washington, d.c. right now. is that fair? >> i don't know it's fair. i think it's a good thing right now to rnl what we were about. ben used to say that. he had every reason to be a snob. he was friends with jack kennedy and doing yoga with paul mccartney until he was 90 in east hampton but he was so down to earth. that was the message, worry not any better tan anybody else and just remember what we're all about. he loved the impact. he loved when his phone rang. i think it's a good time to remember ben had access and certainly few everybody. but when he walked into the newspaper in the day, i feel he really fell he was one of the
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people and the up in was all about doing the right ting and turning over something that added to life. >> i love it. jill abramson, it's great to see you. are you going to come back and visit us? >> come back. bring maureen next time. >> you have no comment about that, do you? >> she's difficult. but that's her thing. >> i think we get andre and jill. >> maybe she will. you never know. coming up, a true story of redemption and a broken justice system. first, how audacious real estate tycoons go into the world's biggest deals. that story is next.
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we like the picture. >> you think you are yelling at us. >> it just gives the look. >> it's bretter than yelling. that's right. >> we have been following the story of the palen family brawl.
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now we have audio of the after math featuring an emotional bristol palen giving police her version of events. >> my sister comes up to me and says some old lady just [ bleep ] pushed me. she just hit me. owe [ bleep ] no one is going to touch my sister. >> where was this at? >> so we were in a limo, walked back up, did you push my sister? and some guy gets in my face, pushing me down in the grass, daks me across the grounltd i get back umm. he pushes me back down to the ground and pulse me by my [ bleep ] feet. they took my $300 sunglasses and my shoes and left here. >> all right. >> it sounds like someone attacked them. >> it sound that way. >> it sounds that way. >> it does. >> a man. >> a woman.
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>> it's not good. >> all right. wow. >> it never gets good when you look at the story. it was much better when it was the palen family brawl. >> it's not funny. this is terrible and more is going to come out of it. >> i think so, absolutely. >> let's talk now. let's take a hard turn from alaska to the apple store. >> from the brul to the liar's ball. fork city. >> it's the most expensive office tower in america. apple's iconic cube store him vicky ward the author of the liar's ball, the extraordinary saga of how one building broke the toughest tycoons. >> it is incredible. this one building, myelograms of people foe this building. they don't know the stories behind this building, donald
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trump to steve jobs. >> right. is there the story is extraordinary. >> it is the building is a vehicle to really expose these characters, these huge egoes. the nasty dog eat dog culture. >> say that again. >> it's really nasty. i came on here, last time the devil's brother, the bamplgers looked like milk toast compared to these real estate developers. >> how so? >> oh. >> this is what it says it's the story of capitalism, fighting bare knuckle. billions done on golf courses, back of napkins, ricked bids, off loaded debts and marriages destroyed. this is a soap opera waiting to
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happen. >> it's real. >> one guy drugging someone, looks inside the contents of the brophy case. >> how did you start. >> i like to write about people. nobody has ever looked at this world. it's very secretive. we don't get to see, we know the big names. we know trump, etc. we sudden foe what's really going on. it's quite elemental it's like children in sa sand pit. they will fight with each other. they're going for it. and women are treated. you know, it's a massage nistic world. there was a world once called the rough rider room in new
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york. >> oh, gosh. they were big fans of teddy roosevelt? >> no. no. >> they were big fans of money and greed. >> what happens in the rough rider movie? >> they would do a deal at one table, work the room. by the end of lunch, they traded whatever they had done and finished at the end. >> wow, donald trump fired back saying you did a lousy job. >> yes, it's a boring book. you read it. cover to cover. >> they ripped off taxpayers. >> a huge amount. >> how do we go from real estate deals failed marriages? >> they are all about ego. she's like the ultimate trophy
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wife so if a building is expected, sorry, people are expendsable. one man exits suicide because he realized buildings mattered more to him tan people. >> oh my god. >> marriages are not important. >> is this a story that's repeated all over the city or is this an isolated example of success? >> this is the extreme. i chose this building because it is the most expensive. this real estate is the biggest industry in america. in new york, it's the most competitive knockout. so you see it played out at its extremes. >> the rule is the lir's ball. you can read it on our site. vicky ward.
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thank you for being back on our show. >> i like how she says it makes the guys in casinos look like milk toast. >> still ahead, they are here with their latest project. two stories of love, loss, loyalty. all about man's best friend. up next, a look at our judicial system. history next.
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. >> in this country our courts are the great levellers and our courts all men are created
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equal. i am for the idealist to believe firmly in the integrity of our courts, not our jury system. that's for the ideal to me. that is a living working reality. >> joining us now, the real life at attica finch. he is the author of "just mercy." the book is batesed on walter mcmillan. who is he? >> an african-american who grew up in monroeville, alabama the community which harper lee wrote "to kill a mocking bird." i got involved because his family insisted he was innocent. it was a surreal case. he told me highway had actually been put on death row for 15 months before the trial began. he was actually convicted despite being with 20 people who are 11 miles away at the time of
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the crime and one of these really outrageous cases, the judge whose name is robert e. lee key told me i shouldn't represent him. we found out one outrageous thing after another. it was all juxt opposed. and yet there is this disconnect. they were comfortablewalk watching this incident african-american man be convicted and sentenced to death for a while i crime he didn't commit. >> the evidence was contrived, many knew about this? >> there was a horrific murder. they couldn't solve the crime. i think there was so much pressure on police and prosecutors. what seemed to get him in trouble, he was having an affair with desmon women. there were all kind of witnesses who could confirm he didn't commit this crime. he coerced a man to testify
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against him. he coerced these interviews. >> water your story? how did you become a lawyer? >> i grew up in the a poor rural community in the south. i remember when lawyers came into our community to open up the schools. >> that never left me. within i was in law school, i went to the deep south, found people literally dialing for assistance on death row and seeing the system was so insensitive to their challenges, really motivated me. i went back, started working on these cases. i have been engaged by this work ever since. >> you see the worse itself side of our criminal justice system. you do you stay inspired? >> i feel i am a part of a legacy of people calgarying the country to do better when it comes to the poor, when it co himself to people of color. you can't live in milwaukee, alabama and not be a wvenls you can't say i am bloody but my
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head is bowed. we get the people to see triumph. i've seen wonderful things happen. some difficult things and that's what inspires me. i think we have trying to make a system that treats you better tan if you are poor or fnt. i find that gratifying. >> you had 14 honorarydoctorate degrees. >> i never been referred to as america's young nelson mandela. >> i think he's got you all here. the book is "just mercy." bryan stephenson. thank you for everything you do. still ahead, outed cia to you a tore outed valerie plame joins us next. [ female announcer ] knows her way around a miniskirt.
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here with us now, former cia covert operations officer valerie plame who is the new author of the new novel "burn." look at that cover, it's awesome. how are you?
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it's great to see you. >> thank you, happy to be here. >> it is great to have you here. >> a long way from new mexico but -- >> at least for the warm weather, you know, the weather was great. >> i know, until this morning. >> until yesterday, yeah. tell us about the new novel. >> this is the second in hopefully a long series. i got so tired of sort of the paper doll cia girl that's always portrayed in popular culture and i wanted a strong realistic female protagonist. >> this one walks around the office spitting? >> no, no. >> yeah, you can still be tough -- >> i love this, i love this, my protagonist knows what a stakeout's like. you wear the same clothes for days. when she gets dressed for works, she dons flat boots that won't trip her up in a chase. >> don't you love that when they show the girl running. >> this is sandra bullock before
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she gets the makeover? >> no, retains her femininity and it's very realistic, dealing with how real intelligence is gathered. it's not necessarily with a gun. it's not necessarily in a sequined gown. but it's entertaining. >> for all of us that have been absorbing the way that things have been written and hollywood has been putting out, that's a different path. we're taking in carrie on "homeland." we're taking in a different perspective. this offers something fresh. >> the bond set the template, right, the bond girl. carrie in "homeland" is a little different but, again, it's not realistic. she is bipolar, which makes her very interesting, but not really a very good cia case officer.
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>> i guess it really depends how you look at it. >> such a good way to say it. >> notice she's actually an analyst on the show. which is very different as a former ops officer. we make that very clear. there's the analyst and there's the ops officers. >> tell us the title "burn." how it plays in without giving it away? >> the first one was "blow back." burned means an asset has just been outed. and so it feels through with the same villain who is -- boot who is inspired by a.q. khan who is in real life the pakistani black market nuclear entrepreneur. >> you're having fun, aren't you? >> way more fun than a few years ago. this is part of what i do. i do a lot other things. i'm working on nuclear proliferation. i do a lot of speaking. and i'm driving my 14-year-old
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kids around. >> you're dealing with joe. >> and that, my friend, is a full-time job. >> joe is so much fun. >> it is, it is. >> how's he doing? >> nuclear proliferation and 14-year-old kids driving around, speaking about bipolar. >> my kids are so underwhelmed by what mom does or dad. they're like, the game starts in ten minutes, can we get going? >> hear you on that. >> we talked yesterday about this is your real-life concern about the world we live in. nuclear weapons in the arms of a group like isis would be truly terri terrifying, right? >> it's catastrophic. they have blown through every sort of rules of war that may exist that are beheadings and so forth. if they acquire some sort of nuclear capability, which we know they are looking for, then they would not hesitate to use them. a dirty bomb is the easiest, but they can certainly purchase
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bombs, you know, nuclear capability on the black market. >> at the end the day, people talk about the isis threat and nobody thinks they're going to invade paris tomorrow but if they hold enough property, if they get enough money, if they buy -- i mean, you put it perfectly. if they had an opportunity to buy a bomb, then buy a bomb. if they had an opportunity to plant the bomb in times square, then plant the bomb in times square. that's not fearmongering. that really is a reality we have to face every day. >> right, wand do we -- >> the big question is how do we proceed? what do we do? is arming the syrian rebels the right way to go? who exactly are we giving arms to? what i find astonishing is that billions of dollars later in u.s. training and with the pentagon and they ripped off their uniforms and fled.
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>> just melted away in weeks. >> i really would like to know the pentagon is doing a very good review of what just happened there. years and billions of dollars and this isn't a problem that is not going to go away quickly. >> the book is "burned." you can read an excerpt on our web page. >> by the way, if you have 14-year-old kid, that problem's not going to go away quickly either. >> that's a whole other set. >> it's a wonderful, wonderful problem, but it stays with you for a long time. >> congratulations. it's nice to see you. >> he said the same thing about me yesterday. >> next, he's known for his charm, his star power and his profanity. legendary "washington post" editor ben bradley passed away yesterday. tom brokaw takes us through bradley's extraordinary career. also ahead, democrats have made it a priority this election cycle but chris christie says he's tired of hearing about the minimum wage. we'll tell you why. we're back in just a moment.
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ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a free 30-tablet trial. mormal snap jebby rolbanma jebby deetle flosh. [laughter] eh. now's the time to get in the loop. just look for our fall tv picks with xfinity on demand. quickly find the season's hottest shows, with a handpicked collection all in one place. only from xfinity. why did you decide you needed to write this book? >> well, i owed the truth. >> i like this honesty. >> that seemed like -- that was a suggestion that i could handle, and to write something with your son is -- especially
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that son, is -- was just a delight and quinn had a rough start in his life and he's just at the top of his game and it was wonderful to do, wonderful to do. >> that was ben bradlee on the set of "morning joe" back in 2010 reflecting on his book, a life's work, co-authored with his son. a deeply personal topic for it is legendary hard charging journalist who died yesterday at the age of 93. good morn, yesterday. welcome to "morning joe." it's wednesday, october 22nd. we've got nicole wallace with us, co-host of "the view." and in burlington, vermont, former governor and chairman of the democratic national committee, howard dean. good to have you both on board. >> "the new york times" this morning quoting someone would said ben bradlee was the last of the lion king newspaper editors.
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he could be classy or profane, energetic figure with a boxer's nose and almost invariably dressed in a white collared bold stripe. >> very salty lang auage all th time. >> it's described elsewhere, and tom brokaw remembers ben in a few minutes here with us. he was -- it was said that he drove "the washington post" like little red sports car, just a little too fast around corners. but what a -- >> he drove it to its greatness. >> only four pulitzers before he got there and i guess 16, 17, after he was there. remarkable figure. history in the american media. >> i think it's safe to say journalism has lost one of its legends. ben bradlee who led the paper's coverage of water gate and the pentagon papers died tuesday at
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his home in washington, d.c. nbc's tom brokaw has more on bradlee's life and incredible legacy. >> benjamin cronin shield bradley. harvard man. heavy action during world war ii. he made "newsweek" into a power in washington journalism and palled around with another harvard man, jfk. bradlee became the most famous newspaper editor in the world. the man who guided two rookie reporters through watergate. the scandal that brought down an american president. >> what he said after we told nixon's involved, lives could be at stake, wiretapping, i mean, this is going the distance. his question was what the hell do we do now? which is the question of somebody who realizes we're in totally uncharted water. >> we asked ourselves a lot
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questions, how could all of this be true, how could somebody with all that much to lose put it at risk every day. >> bradlee, woodward and bernstein had help but they were the team that nailed the nixon cover-up and ben was in charge. >> he had daring. he had -- let's call it by its proper name, he had [ bleep ] he was willing to be dangerous. >> he wanted to be first with a story but he never wanted to be wrong. >> the legendary editor and his young tiger s became rich and famous and on the big screen in "all the president's men." a fourth member of the team was katharine graham, owner and publisher of "the washington post." kay, as she was known, stood fast beside ben, her friend and editor, when nixon's allies were threatening to take down the newspaper. >> hold it. we're about to accuse holderman
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who only happens to be the second most important man of this country, of conducting an criminal conspiracy from inside the white house. it would be nice if we were write. >> bradlee and his third wife, shorthand for power couple. known for his charm, his star power and his profanity. >> jess swhaushus, what kind a [ bleep ] story is this? >> the epitome of newsman charisma. even when he walked across the newsroom, he had this effect that just made you want to do better. >> bradlee stumbled after watergate, publishing a prize-winning series on an 8-year-old heroin addict. but it was a hoax. he recovered and remained a man with pedigree and that salty vocabulary. a dashing journalist right off the front page. >> it's my kind of hard, i like that. if you're right, it isn't hard. >> fearless and yet sentimental. >> wow, and joining us now from washington, contributing writer for "the new york times"
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magazine, jeff himleman. jeff spent four years working closely with ben bradlee while he was writing his biography, "yours in truth." a personal portrait of ben bradlee. a man in search of the truth really, jeff. >> absolutely. thank you for having me here. it's a sad day today for all the obvious reasons. >> you know, jeff it's so interesting the question that was asked, that woodward said, that bob woodward said after finding out that nixon was involved in the conspiracy, what the hell do we do now, would be a question that any editor might ask. what made that question so pressing for bradlee is ben came from the old school. he was really good friends with the president. he was really close to jfk. he palled around with presidents. still reported on them. but there was a different code. watergate changed all of that.
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for ben bradlee to go from being the insider's insider to the guy who blew up the white house had to be remarkably -- >> i think obviously at a time like this you tend to think about what someone's legacy is. i think one of the things that can be safely said is he really did walk that track. he took the reins in 1968. one of the first things he did was try to separate it from the establishment. there was a point, the mayor of the city of washington, no one wanted "the post" to leak it and they decided to leak it because they decided we're not the mouth piece for the government. it was a stance that ben really took from the very beginning of his time at the "post."
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i think ben really ushered in that new era. watergate put a stamp on that in a way nobody will ever forget. >> howard dean, chime in on how you see ben bradlee's legacy. >> i would love to know -- this guy was the giant in my lifetime and they won't make anybody like that. when you interviewed him, as you did for four years, what did he think of the new media? what did he think of the new standard, get it fast, not so much get it right? >> you know, it's interesting. i think ben would have been the first to say that he wouldn't -- he didn't want to really say much about new media. he would always say he didn't understand blogs and things like that were never something that interested him. what struck me when ben would go to these panels and people would ask that very question, what he would always say is he never know what form it was going to take but he was optimistic this pursuit of the truth and this need for people to know the
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truth, to be able to find the truth, that somebody is out there digging. i think he always had faith somebody would carry on that work, whatever form it took. i think he was right. he's not comfortable with computers and things like that. that optimism was what always struck me about him. >> it's called gut instinct. there's a personal side to this. they had, ben and sally, one of our first book parties at their home, they were so kind to do that. just think one other side to this is their personal story and if you check out the c-span interview that sally quinn did on ben's final days and how they shared them together, it is extremely beautiful. the way she helped him leave this world. >> i remember you calling me after seeing it in tears and your comment -- >> beautiful. at the most important part of his life. >> they loved each other so
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much. we've got a ton of politics. a ton of new polls. fascinating. i just have to ask you, though, nicole wallace obviously somebody that was at the center of things at the white house. some people might ask what's worse, a system where the press palled around with presidents like ben bradlee palled around with jfk or a situation we have now where the white house hates the press so much. there's absolutely no access. so at the end of the day, you have journalism -- >> i think everyone agrees what we have now is far worst. i went to journalism school because of ben bradlee. the person that everyone wanted to grow up and work for was ben
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bradlee. so he sort of birthed at least two generations of aspiring truth seekers is part of his legacy that he may not have even known about in life. chris matthews on his show talks a lot about those days. it wasn't a washington where reporters pulled their punches but it was a wlaug after they were done punching each other, they had a beer or cigar or drink. >> let's get to politics now. a lot of fireworks last night. the candidates for u.s. senate seat in new hampshire both came out swinging in their first televised debate. polls show democratic senator shaheen and brown running neck and neck in a battle. >> you had two chances to run
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for the u.s. senate in massachusetts in 2013 and 2014. why not take those? >> because i live here. i live here. i was born at the ports smith naval shipyard. my mom was a waitress at hampton beach. i'm running because i care about new hampshire and care about restoring america. >> when he lost his race, he didn't move to new hampshire and say, i want to get involved in the state. he thought about running for senate again in massachusetts. then governor in massachusetts. then he went out to iowa and said he was thinking about running for president. i don't think new hampshire's a consolation prize. i think we need a senator -- we need a senator who's going to put new hampshire first. >> imagine you are at home wearing your new hampshire citizen hat and you get a call from a pollster asking the following question. do you approve of the job president obama is doing? they'll be a chance to follow up, but this is a yes or no
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answer. do you approve, yes or not? >> in some ways, approve, in some ways i don't approve. so like most questions that we deal with as policymaker, there aren't simple answers, yes or no. >> democratic senator elizabeth warren will head to new hampshire. the latest poll shows senator shaheen up by three points within the margin of error. >> this race is so tight. it really is. howard dean, it would go either way. you just wonder though whether states like colorado and new hampshire that usually break democrat are going to break democrat this time and states like kansas and georgia that usually break republican are going to break republican. >> yes, there are a lot of really close races. this i think is not one of them. i know watt polls say.
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at the end of the day, since i come from the sister state of new hampshire and in the sister state of new hampshire now, this is a strong feeling in places like northern new england, carpetbagging is not okay. i don't care if scott brown's mother worked for the ports smith whatever it was dairy queen or whatever, waitress -- >> why is the race so close? from 30,000 feet, you would think this would be a bigger problem. why is this race so close against an established figure like jeanne shaheen? >> because of president obama's approval rating. republicans have done a terrific job in this way. they've nationalized the election, first of all, which is a good thing in the president. more importantly, they've made the issue the president. they could avoid all this controversial stuff they've got be in trouble with in the past, you know, too much -- abandoning abortion entirely, being
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anti-immigrant, this crazy stuff about ebola coming across the border from mexico, most of that stuff has been drowned out. the reason i think this one isn't is when you go into the booth, there's a, as you know well, there's a sort of a little switch that goes on, and those who really are undecided, something flips them over. i think the something is going to be that scott brown chose to run here after he looked at other races and decided not to. >> one other piece of video, christie, potential 2016 candidate. >> i'm tired of hearing about the minimum wage. i really am. i don't think there's a mother or father sitting around a kitchen table tonight in america who are saying, you know, honey, if our son or daughter could just make a higher minimum wage, all our dreams would be realized. is that what parents aspire to for their children? they aspire to a greater growing
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america where their children have the ability to be a much greater success. >> what do you think of that, mika? >> i would counter with elizabeth warren said earlier this week which is when her mother had to step in after her father became ill and get a job that she went to go work at sears and had a minimum wage job that paid for the family and got them through hard times. i would rethink that in a big way. >> i think to christie's point, he gave a speech about the republican response and the most articulate one i ever heard, he talks about opportunity, inequality. i think we should be cautious not to take his comments about minimum wage away from his larger message about opportunity and equality. >> did you think those comments were taken out context? >> his larger point about minimum wage, which he's made many times in battleground states but obviously he should be more careful before the
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election -- >> cringing a little bit as a strategist? >> i have heard him making these comments. obviously, minimum wage doesn't support a family like it used to but he has a larger message that is very powerful. about opportunity inequality. how aspiring to a minimum wage job isn't the way to lift a family out of poverty. >> howard dean. >> as you know, nicole, as you all know, the sentence that's coming out of this is i'm tired of hearing about the minimum wage. >> it's not a good one. >> this is the kind of stuff i used to do on the campaign trail. you can't do it. your press people have got to beat into you that you don't say sentences like that. >> there are also some issues that republicans just have to get smarter on on the campaign trail. i could sit and have the economic debate about the minimum wage. >> sure, you could win the debate. >> i've voted against raising the minimum wage when i was in congress. this is an issue republicans need to wake up to.
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it's fallen far behind where it should be. if you believe in the minimum wage, and most americans believe in the minimum wage, yes, a republican can go on the campaign trouble and say minimum wage is about taking the money out of the pockets of some poor people and giving it to other poor people. republicans have lost the debate by that point. they've lost the debate by that point. you're never going to be able to give people a living wage on minimum wage by jumping up to $15 an hour. but republicans need to get smart on this issue before the 2016 race because right now it needs to be raised. it needs to be indexed. yes, i can have the philosophical debate about how states should decide what the minimum wage should be. in a perfect world, that would be fine. if we want to go to universities for that, if we want to win presidential elections, we need to understand that there are
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single moms out there right now that aren't sick and tired of discussions about minimum wage. there are people struggling that are praying the minimum wage goes up just a little bit. >> i think chris christie is one of them, is my only paint. >> why did he say that to the chamber of commerce? >> if he had said that in, let's say, a tough part of newark, new jersey, i would respect him a lot more than if he had said that at the united states chamber of commerce, a very safe, callous sounding thing to say. >> listen, we'll have to wait and see how he responds to this. i'm heard him say things more similar to what you said about the minimum wage. his only point i believe his opportunity inequality is as great of a peril to a family who depends on the minimum wage. >> i know you understand this. other republicans, though, need to understand the gravest respect to the republican party being a permanent reality of the
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working class. we sound callas. we have not only the working class, we have lost the middle class, and we lose it by sounding overly ideological. >> how a simple piece of software, apple's sirri, has made a dramatic change in one young boy's life. plus, what possessed him to say it. but first -- >> hey, don't say it, be good. >> different ways i could segue to this guy. >> bill karin. wonderful meteorologist. >> just keeping his hands to himself. good morning, everyone. if you're at the airports in the northeast, it's not a pretty start to your early wednesday morning. we're watching two-hour delays right now at la guardia. two-hour delays at philadelphia. this is all associated with heavy rain and some winds with our nor'easter forming.
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one of our first nor'easters of our quote/unquote fall into winter season. this is all rain. the other thing we have to deal with, this band of rain comes down from new york. the band of rain sneaks right down i-95. so even in d.c. and baltimore, it's not exactly easy pretty morning to be driving around. as far as the heaviest rains go, we've been watching that. here's new york city and just south of new york city, a lot of lightning showing up too. areas right along the northern new jersey coast may have to deal with flooding problems. as far as how much rain, later today, into tonight, all the heavy rain shifts up into bangor, maine, portland, that's where the worst of the nor'easter will be felt. everyone today is cloudy and cool and wet. even into tomorrow, as the rain shifts north there are still showers and minor problems in new york and philadelphia but as far as d.c. goes, today is the worst of your two days. also in the northwest, you're getting drenched yourself. heaviest rain event of our wet
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season, 4 to 7 inches rain in the mountains, about 1 to 2 inches in seattle and portland. we leave you with a shot. it was beautiful last night weatherwise in kansas city. game was ugly if you're a royals fan. tonight, the weather looks fine. there could be showers early but it should clear out by game time. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. (receptionist) gunderman group. gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics. if it doesn't work fast...
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that's slow mo. >> i still can't get over that fan thing with mika's face going -- >> slow motion. >> dude, i'll tell you what.
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i played for the other team, i would call you merv the perv. >> i thought it was merv sending it to me. >> her new iphone 6. i've been blocked. >> the morning papers. "the new york times," american jeffrey fowle has been released by north korea after six months of captivity. he was arrested for leaving a bible in a hotel. the obama administration says they're working on the release of two other americans detained in north korea. >> we get this. saudi arabia's top muslim cleric said twitter is, quote, evil and nothing more than a source of lies. >> okay, so listen, we agree, right? everybody, we good with that on some base, about twitter being evil and a source of lies? >> was for me yesterday. on his blog cast he added,
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quote, if it was used correctly, it would be a lot of benefit. >> i agree with this. i'm going to this guy's mosque, what day, friday? >> his comments divided many users across the country. >> all right, the "new york daily news". >> this is all your fault,ca-co drop in profits. coke, the world's largest beverage company, said sales continue to soften in the u.s. mcdonald's profits were down for a fourth consecutive quarter. the world's largest restaurant chain faces increased pressure from competitors as well as higher operating costs. they are certainly -- both companies are making an effort to offer a lot of options in terms of healthy foods and drinks without as much sugar in them. i wonder if that's a very tough transition for them. >> you know, it has to be.
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but it also -- it is, i think they're going through a difficult time. 30% drop is pretty dramatic. they are trying to provide healthier options. >> there's a sea change. it's coming. >> you hope that people want to go to it. we have an update on aya cooper and her boyfriend mike jones. who are they? they're speaking out about -- >> i think this phrase is going to be, what was that, don't tase me, bro? we have don't tase me, bro, and don't touch my girlfriend. i love the president's response. wasn't planning on it. >> that was the awkward moment caught on camera. while early vote, the two happened to find themselves voting alongside president obama. it was then mike would decided to have some fun. here's a portion of their exchange. >> don't touch my girlfriend. >> i wasn't planning on it.
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>> i am sorry, please excuse him. >> there's an example of a -- this is embarrassing. just embarrassing. >> just for no reason whatsoever. >> i knew he was going to say something smart. >> now you'll be going back home and talking to your friends, trying -- ways his name? >> mike. >> i can't believe mike, he is such a fool. >> he really is. >> i was just mortified. >> he kind of is a fool. >> last night, they spoke to chris hays about what they were thinking as it all unfolded. >> why? why? why would you do this? i was just nervous, super nervous. i couldn't believe that he said that. another part of me was just like, shut up, they're going to tackle you, shut up. >> it was just an experience i wanted to give her. i knew she was just nervous going up there in the booth next to him, that she probably wasn't even paying attention to her ballot. but, i mean, it wasn't anything that the president did. i wanted to make that clear.
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it was just something that i always do to her and she knows very well it's my personality. i am very spontaneous. and i will just put her out in the front street of anyone in order to make her smile and laugh just like she did. >> i think that's cute. >> she should marry him. do you think they'll get married? >> i don't know, they should now. >> president obama can go to their wedding. >> he can officiate. would you think, though -- like he would say to his girlfriend, don't bother the president while he's voting. >> the president handled it so well. the president's response was perfect. that's what made it. other politicians would stiffen up. >> the great thing is, i like getting to meet mike because mike had a great personality. >> i can tell. still ahead, wall street has one of its best days of the year but will investors be able to repeat that performance today? business before the bell is still ahead. what else is ahead? >> a love letter to a machine.
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>> what? >> yes, i'm going to talk lovingly to my iphone. the story of how one 13-year-old boy and his life-changing relationship with apple's siri.y it might get a lot of parent's attention. that's next when "morning joe" returns. turn the trips you have to take, into one you'll never forget. earn points for every flight and every hotel. expedia plus rewards.
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do you have a name? >> yes, samantha. >> where did you get that name from? >> i gave it to myself actually. do you want to know how work? >> yeah, actually, how do you work? >> basically, i have intuition. i mean, the dna of who i am is based on the millions of personalities of all the programmers who wrote me but what makes me is my ability to grow through my experiences. so basically in every moment i'm evolving just like you. >> wow. that's really weird. >> the bond between man and machine like the one we saw in the movie "her" be a possibility? here with us now, judith newman who wrote a touching piece in "the new york times" about her son's relationship with siri and
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in it she writes, i watched my 13-year-old son deep in conversations with siri. gus has autism and siri, apple's intelligence personal assistant on the iphone is currently his bff. she doesn't let my communications impaired son get away with anything. indeed, many of us wanted an imaginary friend. now we have one. only she's not entirely imaginary. this is a love letter to a machine. also, the national journal's ron fornier joins us. what a great story. >> i want to focus on the line, she doesn't let him get away with anything. what do you mean by that? >> she doesn't. here's why. i mean, if you have a child who is autistic, one of the main problems is communication. and my son talks like he has marbles in his mouth. so, you know, people talk about siri being not very great at
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voice recognition, but for some of us, that's a feature, not a bug. because he has to enunciate in order to get what he wants. >> she'll say, i'm sorry, i don't understand what you're saying. >> yes, i don't understand. which may make him giggle. but also he has to go and do something about it. he has to be very, very clear. which i always found out, you know, in the midst of doing this, i was trying to get him to -- i was trying to get the machine to call him gus instead of calling me judith because it's my phone. i said, call him gus. she goes, you want me to call you goddess? like, yeah, i do, actactually, maybe that's not ideal right now it that's one of the wonderful things about it. >> ron, did you see the piece? >> i teared up reading it and spent most of the weekend passing it around, it was wonderful. i have a aspy son. one of the things that struck me
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is what are the attributes that siri has that these kids need and maybe i need as a parent. two struck me. one is unlimited patience. the other is no judgment. do you agree with those two? did you see any others in siri? >> i couldn't agree more. because, you know, kids who have communications problems, they are very nervous about -- there's a lot of anxiety in checking out their -- their back and forth with people. what does siri do? siri doesn't judge you. siri also enforces etiquette, which i think is very important. when my son is a little brusque, when he says something that isn't terribly nice, she'll say now now. or she'll say, well, that may be your opinion. but she will not say, oh, that's terrible. nothing like that. so it's -- >> we could learn from siri. parenting advice.
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oh, my god. >> how does that give you any direction when you look at how gus responds to that type of now now reaction when it comes to his annunciation or an agitation issue he may get if he's not getting his way with siri, if he's not getting his way with you as his mom? >> i'm very fortunate that he's not somebody who blows up, you know, i'm the one whose head explodes having to talk about some of the things i have to talk about with gus. but i do -- in a strange way, it makes me a little bit more patient too. more patient with him. more patient with listening through. when i don't understand what he's saying, i'm like, i don't -- she's like, gus, say that one more type, just like you'd say it to siri. and he will do it. i think that siri is -- siri being more patient than mommy is definitely rubbing off on mommy
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too in a strange way. >> fascinating, you have a son with asberger's who is now in his 20s, doing really well and thriving. i always have friends or acquaintances whose children just diagnosed and they always ask for advice. i say, i actually say, technology is the devil. the video games. you know, dvds. get him away from the computer. get him away from the ipad. because they sink into this world. this is an extraordinary example of how technology, smart phone, how all of these things that sometimes can suck a kid into -- video games, are instance. an easy copout for a -- >> sometimes siri can have that -- i can be using siri in that way too. if i don't want to discuss turtles for one more second or weather formations, i have somebody would will. >> but this does show the
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promise, especially for children withes an purchasi with s asberger's, how technolo can make a big difference. >> did you ban technology, how did you do it? >> i got him, forced him to actually go and be a bus boy at a local restaurant at the age of 15. and, you know, i would actually -- i would -- would show up at school, go, hey, andrew, how you doing? he'd be like, i like bagpipes. and, you know -- >> you didn't change his -- >> and then we would -- we would actually talk through it. and the most extraordinary thing, in a way, this is so hopeful, is because andrew has learned through the years. you know, there's a very sad time in middle school where there weren't kids showing up at birthday parties. and it was -- i don't think anything's hurt any more than that. and then in high school, he
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started learning, the kids started showing up. now he's got this will full life. and so much of it is learned. it's just learned. you know, the things that -- >> i would even argue that pain is useful because so many people who have autistic kid, kids, as my son is at this point, he's kind of oblivious. he doesn't really know -- he believes he has a lot friends and that's wonderful. he doesn't really know entirely what friendship is. but didn't you find that to be true? when your son had some pain, it helped him grow? >> it does, but at the same time, it helps him grow if there are ways for him to learn and become more socialized. i read something -- i talked about it a good bit with parents. who -- a math teacher at college said that she finally, after being hurt for year, learned to stand on the corner, in the corner during dances and just look at human behavior and she learned, as she said, human behavior. this is so exciting what we're learning with new studies is children can learn.
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and the patience you're talking about that siri provides and that communication skill that he gets from it and the nonjudgmentalness of it all is i think an important step forward. and the patience. and the patience. oh, my god . and the patience. i think we can all three say amen to that. >> do you like bagpipes now? >> and purple. >> no, i walk around going, i like purple. >> we'll be right back. nineteen years ago, we thought, "wow, how is there no way to tell the good from the bad?"
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...the getaway vehicle! our priority is...was... for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this. go ahead. >> what? >> take it. >> business before the bell. is a baby here? >> i was looking for the baby. >> six weeks old. he will not be tuning into "morning joe" yet. >> wait two months. >> yeah, i've got a
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6-year-old -- >> yeah, way too early. >> 3:30 he woke up this morning. i'm helping out, so doing the best i can. >> rapid fire. >> go, business. >> stocks had their best day of the year yesterday. all the concerns we had last week are gone in part because oil prices have stabilized and the european central bank have stepped in to help buy bonds. >> 30% of americans saying now is a good time to find a job. >> it's the highest level since the great recession. more people optimistic they can find a job. >> we just had the head of the dnc on and said that actually barack obama's broken records for the most months of consecutive job growth. true, false? >> that is true. a lot of them were coming in the oil space. some people say, oh, it's if go for consumers with gas and it is but you need the oil industry to grow and put in rigs because that contributed to job growth. >> does the street believe democrats or republicans are taking over the senate?
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>> depends on would you listen to. wall street, some cases, less optimistic about a gop trackover of the senate. guggenheim securities for one, 40% chance. >> "breaking bad" dolls, go? >> they're gone. >> changing a diaper? >> are you kidding? >> from the lap dogs to the troublemakers. their best stories about man's best friend. to help entertain some friends at the beach.
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(receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics.
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♪ they called it puppy love >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> good girl. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. >> i love you. good girl. >> that's really cute. here with us now, editor in chief of gardening gun, david. the magazine is out with their -- you should have seen it, the way they wrote it out for me. >> it's the biggest magazine -- >> it's out with their new comb
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p compilation. where do we begin? i love the dogs. >> our readers love dogs too. we've had a good dog column in every issue for the last seven years and it is an overwhelming reader favorite. the great thing about it, you can reach out to great writers and ask them, would you like ton write about your dog? they all love telling dog stories. it's really common ground for us. john me chum wrote one. it's in the book. >> you got more reaction from an article in -- than -- >> it's amazing. it's a totally devoted -- >> those are john me chum's dogs. >> the one on the right has got her shots. yeah, named for eleanor roosevelt. and churchill. dave's right. it's a fantastic assignment.
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because you just say what you want. and dogs -- i realize dogs are kind of like marriages. they're mysterious and necessary. and i will say, gardening gun itself, what he has done with it, phenomenal. >> why should people who love dogs pick up there book? >> i promise, any page you turn to, you start one of these stories, you're not going to stop. you may end up crying at the end because there are some tear jerkers. but just fabulous writing. it's funny, the different folks. john talks about moving to nashville and getting a dog. somehow works in thomas jefferson, henry kissinger and the louisiana purchase, but it all works. >> he does that when he goes to jumba juice. >> rick bragg writing about growing up -- >> what is it about drawinogs w connect to? >> dogs are a common ground for all of us. >> why? dude, get philosophical here. you can't just come here and
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bring moonshine. >> well, yes, you can. >> i wonder if it's not like siri in our last segment. dogs are not judgmental. dogs love. unconditional love. >> they're always there, you know. >> oh, that's riley, that's my dog, that's riley and roxie. >> oh, look at that. >> they're always happy to see you. >> dogs much different than cats that make you work for it. >> bears out in the book, we get a dog, looking for unconditional love, but we find them to be temperamental and that's what's interesting. >> yes, they're like us in a lot of ways. some dogs have issues. some dogs can't sleep through thunderstorms. they're not just this perfect being, you know, you need patience. you need -- it's like raising a kid. >> the book is "good dog," true stories of love, loss and loyalty. >> and again, they even have party trailer. somebody has a stuffed stand-up bear. >> the most critical moments
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from last night's key senate debate. stay with msnbc. "the daily rundown" straight ahead. begins with the cloud. this is "titanfall," the first multi-player game built and run on microsoft azure. empowering gamers around the world to interact in ways they never thought possible. this cloud turns data into excitement. this is the microsoft cloud.
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as the company that's all about printing. but did you know we also support hospitals using electronic health records for more than 30 million patients? or that our software helps over 20 million smartphone users remotely configure e-mail every month? or how about processing nearly $5 billion in electronic toll payments a year? in fact, today's xerox is working in surprising ways to help companies simplify the way work gets done and life gets lived. with xerox, you're ready for real business. rough and tumble. less than two weeks to the midterm vote and the debates tell the story. it's ugly. time is running out. and one candidate even takes to debating an empty chair. meantime, an unexpected homecoming for an american held captive in north korea. does his release suggest that two more americans m

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