Skip to main content

tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 23, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

3:00 am
my fellow canadians, for the second time this week, there's been a brutal and violent attack on our soil. but this week's events are a grim reminder that canada is not immune to the types of terrorist attacks we have seen elsewhere around the world. but we will not be intimidated. canada will never be intimidated. >> good morning, it is thursday, october 23rd, welcome to "morning joe." we have senior political editor sam stein. and in washington, washington
3:01 am
anchor for bbc world news america catty cay. and joe with me this morning. a lot of politics to kbet to but we have big news out of canada to start with this morning. >> yeah, big news out of canada. it was unfortunately, rem any sent of what happened in the u.s. capital in 1998 when a a deranged man shot and killed a guard at the u.s. capital. . so the question is whether this is part of a larger plot, which right now it doesn't look like this is. whether it was just a random act. we'll see. >> the prime minister is vowing the country will not be intimidated after a gunman shot and killed a soldier guarding its war memorial. sources say the gunman has been identified as 32-year-old as michael joseph hall. he was a convert to islam.
3:02 am
the gunman was later killed in a shootout at the canadian equivalent and this hour officials are investigating possible ties to terror groups. pete williams has more on a terrifying day in ottawa. >> out of the way! >> reporter: police in ottawa frantically searched for armed men for most of the day in the fourth largest city just before 10:00 a.m. eastern time. a soldier standing guard was shot and seriously wounded by a man with a rifle, a shocking scene witnessed by many by standers. . >>. i was just passing over here and heard a shot, turned around and there was a a guy with a rifle just around on the back corner. just pow, pow. >> i thought it was just fire crackers going off. i look across the street and there's a man with a rifle shooting at a bunch of people.
3:03 am
>> the gunman then hijacked a car. >> then took off towards the back here and headed in that direction. >> reporter: the gunman went a third of the mile to the building housing parliament in session at the time. as officers inside responded, dozens of shots rang out inside the building's or nat halls. members of parliament inside meeting rooms reacted by piling furniture against the doors. outside members were hustled away by police and security. canadian authorities say the gunman was shot and killed in parliament's central hall of honor. >> police also went door to door after witnesses reported there were other armed men in the streets, but officials say they found no evidence of other gunmen. we're looking for people who were there who can talk about this. look who we found. former u.s. managing editor of
3:04 am
financial times now member of the canadian parliament, used to be on "morning joe" a lot, you were there locked down in parliament yesterday until 8:00 last night. tell us what the scene was like. >> well, it was a very, very frightening time. i was walking towards our caucus meeting yesterday morning. it was a time when there's a large number of members of parliament in the building. there's a time they have their weekly caucus meeting. i was walking towards my caucus meeting and i heard in the stairwell above me shots, chi recognized as shots. i ran into a nearby room and i hid there. it turned out to be the lunchroom of the security guard. 's of the house of common, so that was a lucky choice for me and i was soon joined by a lot of security staff who were really helpful and i spent the
3:05 am
rest of the day being shuffled around from room to room in the house of commons as they tried to clear the building. i would like to say one thing, which is i, like all canadians today, is thinking of captain nathan and his family, the soldier shot and killed yesterday. and is the most important casualty of yesterday's tragic events. >> sam stien? >> just a quick question, i'm glad to see you're okay. thoughts obviously go. to the officer. what is the latest that we know about the motivation of the shooter? >> we still don't know. it's less than 24 hours since all this happened. it's being investigated. i u think that we have to be really careful about speculating too much before we have full details. what i'm really pleased about is the house, our parliament will be in session today at 10:00 in
3:06 am
the morning. we are determined that we're not going to be intimidated by this and canada is not going to change. >> okay thank you so much, good to see you. hope to see you under better circumstances. thank you. we're going to turn to the battle for the senate. a new polling says we're in for an exciting nail biter. have you seen some numbers? in iowa, joni ernst, she's leading bruce braley 47 to 46%. she had the nickname the castration candidate. she may live up to that. you never know. scott brown holding on to a one-point lead over jeanne shaheen. and in colorado challenger congressman cory gardener opened up a 7-point lead over mark udall.
3:07 am
he leads that race 46% to 3%. joe s there any way to describe what's going on here? >> i mean, if you take those three polls, things are break the republicans way. democrats believe the race in colorado is much closer. those are the same democrats that say certain races they have already lost. maybe an outliar in colorado. the one that's stick out to me right now is new hampshire. let's put that back up. in new hampshire debates matter. i had a democratic u opera ty that said jeanne shaheen looked angry on stage and they were worried about her performance in the debate. this is only one point. all the polls are one point. a last swing could shift control of congress one direction or another. this certainly is a surprise. scott brown, one point ahead
3:08 am
with a week or so to go. >> that's a big surprise. new hampshire being tight. people said they expected her to win by a couple points. if it gets down to that tightness, democrats are in for a long night. with colorado, that 7-point spread is larger than anything else. people are going to say it's closer. i think it is, but every trend line is pointing cory gardener's way. those people who are data advantage list evangelists should recognize that cory has a growing lead. things are clearly trending towards the republican direction there. >> sam, you have to look. somebody asked me the other day, do i think editorials still matter? they certainly do in a state like colorado where you have "the denver post" who is left of
3:09 am
center who delivers a blistering attack on the democratic candidate mark udall. on top of that, you have the fact he's saying he's trying to get away from barack obama and he's going to be tough against barack obama when he's voted with him 96% of the time. even "the new york times" yesterday was saying of these democrats that they were doing themselves a great disservice. i don't think senator udall looks to be the most straight forward guy right now in this race. >> there's only one sort of general theme that ties all these races together and that's the president. in some races, obama is clearly an anchor on the candidate. you saw it in kentucky where they couldn't state the obvious, which was barack obama. since then you have seen a cascading effect. every single candidate in this race has asked to express their
3:10 am
positions vis-a-vis the president. what did you think of the handling of the health care law? that's swamped the end of this election. it hasn't been the greatest of developments for democrats. there are some races it hasn't been as bad as others. but in colorado particularly, you can see it being a problem. >> it looks bad, but with almost all these races, it's a one-point race. i'm fascinated by what's happening in wisconsin. scott walker hanging on by one point in most polls. that's a close race, a lot closer than republicans would have thought it was going to be. this is going down to the wire. maybe there's a trend. line this way or that way for republicans, but that could all change. >> before we get to that, because i have something on that, i think for joni ernst it's the new hog ad. have you seen it? they have the squeal ad. she has a new one.
3:11 am
i'm going to show it to you later. she has typical politicians in washington that are full of, well, let's just say bad ideas. you have to look at the imagery she puts out there and it's pretty good. you mentioned scott walker. there are several closely contested gubernatorial races to keep an eye on. scott walker has a slight lead in wisconsin, 47% to 46%. that's tight. florida governor rick scott and chris christie, look at that. they are divided along gender lines. women favor crist by 6 points. in connecticut, it looks like 2010 all over again for governor dannel malloy. but the latest poll has malloy
3:12 am
leading foley in their rematch 43% to 42%. these governor races are as exciting. >> yeah, and especially that one in florida. when you look at florida and the race there and how bitter those debates have been, no wonder most floridians are turned off by what they have seen on stage. but particularly i think florida, colorado race, we'll be looking at the turn. out of women. how many turn out to vote? perhaps in colorado the thing that democrats are drawing some caution from is the idea that maybe hispanics are underrepresented in the polls. i think it's going to be woman in colorado and women in the race down in florida. >> all right -- >> sam stein, democrats don't have the same gender gap. advantage that they have had over republicans in the past this year. and in colorado especially,
3:13 am
udall is getting mocked for going to the women's issues one time too many and trying to paint as a cartoon figure. >> he was mocked by "the denver post". i would not overstate that though. that's an issue that motivates a lot of women voters. the question -- it goes state by state. some you see gender gaps bigger than others. in colorado the key question appears to be what percentage of the hispanic population is going to come out to vote and whether they are going to be angered with the president and senate democrats for punching on one of their biggest priorities which was immigration reform and deferred action. there are consequences to decisions made many months ago. one of those could be in colorado. >> now to this, she isn't naming any names, but elizabeth warren says she's been treating differently by colleagues on capitol hill because she's a woman. when the massachusetts democrat was asked if she wanted to
3:14 am
elaborate, she answered, simply, nope. she did say the different treatment wasn't surprising adding it's hard to change the big, male dominated institutions. what i'm happy about is there are now enough women in the united states senate to bring change to that place and i think that's just powerfully important. >> why is it that powerful women in the united states senate are talking about discrimination, gender discrimination, gender bias, being treated differently in the workplace, and yet when pressed to name the offenders refuse to say anything? this cone of silence to protect powerful men, i am sorry, i thought that's what the feminist movement was fighting against? powerful positions of authority
3:15 am
who sexually harassed would be called out. why won't they call them out? >> it brings to mind the conversation we had about senator gillibrand who wrote about in her book but chose not to publicly name the offenders. i met with her yesterday interviewing her for my book, and she's as impressive as they come. on this issue, the fear is the moment. and you are still in a position where you're not really on an equal level to say something back or you're powerful enough to move beyond it and make change on a bigger level. the context of the elizabeth warren story? i don't think it's fair to call on her to elaborate. she's asked on it out of the blue. but if she has something she wants to put out there, i u don't think that helps us. >> i was sort of in joe's mind
3:16 am
set beforehand. i talked to a bunch of people about this. one of the positions that they say is that if you go by naming names, it becomes simple and easy for the conversation to focus on that one individual who you accuse of being a harasser or someone angry or mean towards you or disrespectful. and what they wanted was a broader conversation about general culture of the institution. and that's one of the reasons why. i think there's something compelling to that. >> i'm all nor naming names. >> if you were working at the bbc and there were men going around and they are treating you differently and there's gender bias at the bbc or sexual harassment or people are grabbing you at the bbc and you're a reporter that goes around reporting against sexual harassment, you would call them out. you would have a responsibility to call them out. so why won't these powerful female senators do the same
3:17 am
thing? i really am confused. >> i think it depends -- you named the various degrees of offense. if there's gender bias, if there's sexual harassment and if somebody grabs you, those are potentially quite different thi things. if somebody actually physically does something to you, absolutely, you have to name names and call them out and do whatever is needed to have that person brought to some kind of justice, whatever it is. >> that's obvious in the case of senator gillibrand. >> if it's a gender bias, you have to look at it as a whole. i'm not saying that person treated me disrespectful, i don't know whether naming names is particularly helpful because you get into a kind of situation. i do think when it's egregious, you absolutely have to call it
3:18 am
out by name. when it's broader, you're trying to get to a broader problem, not an individual relationship. >> for elizabeth warren, she was asked about it. so the answer is yes. that's a little different. i'm sympathetic on kirsten's front. i still think we should name names. it's not worth it. >> you wrote a book about it. you blew the place up at msnbc and demanded fair treatment and you got fair treatment and you started a discussion and you brought in the president of msnbc who actually got engaged and participated in it. because you did that, other people are treated differently and better. >> i agree with that completely. >> why do the most powerful women in america sitting back saying if you're in the workplace and there's gender
3:19 am
bias, there's a war against women, so we want you to fight against it, unless there's bias against us because we were born female instead of male. >> when you looked at my situation, it had to be done. and i'm reading kirsten's book. when you're talking about her poked and being called chubby, it's totally, completely unacceptab unacceptable. but i will say, we women have to pick our battles. is it worth bringing down that person at that moment or working on a higher level making more change, which is what she's doing. >> i do understand the whole thing a about picking your pat battles. i carefully pick my battles. >> no, you don't. >> i pick that one. >> you pick aum of them. >> you need to read kirsten's book, it's really good. >> i'm in the middle of it. i read most to have last night. . >> she's coming on the show. >> speak of reading "the wall
3:20 am
street journal", i tried to e-mail this. "the wall street journal" digitally is in the 1940s. whoever running "the wall street journal," you guys deliberately make your website so pathetic that we have to buy the paper. they have an op-ed on hillary clinton and monica lewinsky and we're going to be getting to that. it is a barn burner. you can't read it online. >> i think they hear you. still ahead on "morning joe," some are calling it the biggest academic fraud in collegiate history. what investigators uncovered at the university of north carolina. you're not going to believe this. plus the widespread problem of cyber bullying. it's a bigger problem for one of the sexes. we'll have that for you later in the show. then how far would you go to avoid prosecution for a crime. one man pretended to be in a coma for two years. that story, when we come back.
3:21 am
yeah, dinner sounds good. i could come by your place. my place? uhh... um... hold on. introducing the all-new volkswagen golf. plenty of room for whatever life throws at you. when laquinta.com sends him a ready for you alert the second his room is ready, ya know what salesman alan ames becomes? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! a "selling machine!" ready for you alert, only at lq.com.
3:22 am
a single ember that escapes from a wildfire can travel more than a mile. that single ember can ignite and destroy your home or even your community you can't control where that ember will land only what happens when it does get fire adapted now at fireadapted.org
3:23 am
there are more reasons than ever why now is the best time to be on verizon. one: verizon's the largest, most reliable 4g lte network in the country. that's right america. with xlte in over 400 markets. two: and here's something for families to get excited about. our best ever pricing with double the data on select plans. and three: you can now get our best ever single line pricing starting at $45. so get all this now, on the network ranked #1 for data performance nationwide. verizon.
3:24 am
it is time to take a look at the morning papers at 24 past the hour. "the wall street journal," the university of north carolina is trying to move forward after an extensive investigation found more than 3,000 students took no-show classes for nearly two decades. many of the classes were in the african-american studies program and half of the students were athletes. nbc's tom costello has more. >> a premier university with top ranked athletes reeling tonight from what may be. the biggest academic fraud. an independent investigator revealed the full scope of the scandal. for two decades basketball and football players followed into
3:25 am
classes that required no class time, no professor and only a single term paper graded by an inadministrati inadministrative assistant yet they received a's and b's so they remained eligible. . there were 188 no-show classes through the 18 years. most in the african-american studies department where the chair u ran the program. >> is there any evidence anybody outside this department knew about this? >> no, and we looked very hard to see if anybody in the chain of command from the department up to the chancellor knew about the deficiencies of these classes and didn't find that knowledge. >> one has claimed that tutors wrote his papers and coaching staff knew of the bogus class, but he refused to cooperates, coach os denied it and investigators found no evidence they knew. students were stunned and
3:26 am
embarra embarrassed. >> especially right now the image is tainted. >> i can say that myself, i have had to bust my butt my entire time here. and just to hear that is a little discouraging. >> the university says the fraud ended in 2011. nine staffers were fired or disciplined and no current coaches were involved. do you buy it? >> no, no, i don't buy it. i'm certainly not equating what happened at penn state morally with what happened at unc. unc is such a great school, it's such a tragedy. but don't tell me there were only a handful of people that were somehow working together to make sure that athletes that made this university hundreds of millions of dollars through the years didn't know about this. it's the same thing as penn state. i don't buy it. and don't tell me it was just a handful of renegades doing this. thomas, i'm sure you agree with
3:27 am
me. that's just way too convenient. >> it is convenient. i think journalists will continue to look at the story with some healthy suspicion about the investigation. >> top level people don't know about this? that's unacceptable. >> this next story deals with coaches. the sexual hazing scandal and new legislation. so several lawmakers will sponsor a bill to legally require educators and coaches to report child abuse. new jersey is one of only two states in the nation that does not have a duty to report law. seven students have been arrested and five teachers and coaches suspended amid-allegations of sexual violence in the locker room. the baltimore sun, commissioner roger goodell has been ordered to testify at ray rice's appeal hearing.
3:28 am
he's expected to reveal the knowledge he had of the domestic dispute. rice's lawyers are expected to argue the nfl and ravens violated the collective bargaining agreement, which prevents players from being punished twice for the same incident. the hearing is set to begin on november 5th. >> that should be interesting. joe, wasn't it goodell who said ignorance wasn't an excuse for not knowing about the big hits campaign and paying out cash. it was in new orleans where they were giving more money for the bigger hits. >> right, he certainly did. he said that. we'll see what happens. i think it's really a dicey situation for the commissioner. things have quieted down, but his story still doesn't completely line up with what a lot of people are saying. so somebody doesn't appear to be
3:29 am
telling the total truth. if he's in a hearing, he's got to be careful with what he says and doesn't say. i don't know, mika, the nfl has skated by. . we'll see if they learned any lessons. >> one more note. the psa "no more." we showed it on "way too earl.". just some of the big stars in the nfl using their voice to talk about domestic violence. the male voices coming out to say the no more campaign, that we won't accept this. it's going to be shown during the games. we look at the kansas city star. let's talk about the world series. >> yeah baby! go royals? >> they are tied going into game three. we have a series, folks. the giants september out five different pitchers. capping off with a two-run homer. the scoring did not sit well with the san fran pitcher who got into a shouting match.
3:30 am
a tense moment that cleared the benches. i said it's good for ratings. the situation did not escalate any further. the royals upped this series with a 7-2 victory. the teams head west for game three coming up tomorrow night. >> i always liked the giants because i love the city of san francisco so much. but you just can't root against the royals. i don't know how you root against the royals. >> you could if you like the orioles. >> i really think -- >> you're so funny. >> this next story, joe, you might want to maybe take note. the daily mail, a man pretended to be a quadriplegic for two years to avoid prosecution for
3:31 am
stealing $64,000. alan knight took money out of a bank account of a neighbor who had alzheimer's and faked being in a vegetative state to avoid appearing in court. he was living off benefits after claiming he suffered a massive injury. he was caught driving and shopping and going on trips with his family. >> i actually tried that, mika, in all of july. about half of june and all of july. i had somebody call phil. >> i thought you were really in a coma. >> i kind of was but not the type of coma that he was talking about. >> it was a summertime kcoma. coming up, a high level graduate seminar. that's how some describe barack obama's crisis management. plus a look at the piece from the "wall street journal" that joe pointed out. the must-reads are ahead on "morning joe." turn the trips you have to take,
3:32 am
into one you'll never forget. earn points for every flight and every hotel. expedia plus rewards.
3:33 am
no question about that. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any allergic reactions like rash, hives, swelling of the lips, tongue or throat,
3:34 am
or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a free 30-tablet trial.
3:35 am
opinion pages, joshua green.
3:36 am
we're going to get to your cover story in a moment. great to have you on. but first, joe, you pointed this it out in the "wall street journal." it's so interesting. it's entitled "an affair to remember." monica lewinsky came out against cyber bullying, talked about being one of the first people to really have her name just splashed across the internet and forever changing her life. part of it say this is and i'll read what we have in a graphic. the problem is that monica lewinsky was the victim of the clinton lagoon. as white house operatives tried to destroy her reputation when the scandal broke. the real bullies weren't online. they were in the west wing. she's been described as a narcissistic looney tune. the clintons weren't above smearing a young woman not much older than their daughter as a blackmailer.
3:37 am
since she brought it up, we also wonder what the modern feminists applauding her address think about men in power publically shaming a female sub ordinate without her concept. >> this obviously would just be a rerun of an episode in our history that any of us care to relive. it was a very ugly time. except for the fact that hillary clinton is going to run for president of the united states. she's going to talk about a war on women and she was famously in charge of the eruptions and people in the west wing, very powerful men, it's their job to destroy any women that were victimized by bill clinton's behavior. and so bill clinton's behavior will not be at issue in 2016. what will be at issue every time
3:38 am
hillary clinton talks about a war on women, as "the wall street journal" points out, will be what she did to 22-year-old interns. we just wonder whether the women's movement will be as shamefully quiet or abusive in 2016 of monica lewinsky as they were. betty frein called her some little twerp. gloria stooi numb said she wasn't going to get involved. how does she talk about a war on women when she engaged in vicious wars on women just to maintain power in arkansas and at the white house? bill clinton's personal behavior will not be at issue. how hillary clinton responded to hold power, to maintain power, to increase power, crushing a
3:39 am
22-year-old woman as an overs oversexed bimbo, i don't know how she gets away from that. >> but i do think there's this cone of silence that might just answer to that, joe. when you said we don't really want to talk about this, sam stein, you said, thank you. why? >> i'm having nervous flashbacks. >> why are you nervous to talk about it? >> i'm not nervous to talk about the issues and what joe mentioned, it's just that this is one of those things that has gone through so many, you know, it rations and litigations and we have talked about it for well over a decade at this point. there's sort of this you get a little tired of it. i would say that joe's point, i u do, and a lot of people do
3:40 am
draw distinction, between now hillary clinton treated a personal family matter, which clearly i would say objectively she was, you know, they treated monica lewinsky terribly. i think the journal is right about that. on the flip side, you can separate that from how hillary clinton would approach policy matters that affect the vast majority of women in the country. those are two different things for people. >> if this were just a personal family matter, that would be one thing. the fact is that hillary clinton would get together with powerful men in arkansas in the governor's mansion and in the west wing and it wasn't to protect her family, it was to protect and increase her power and her husband's power. so it's not just a family issue. >> someone as a political operative at heart. that's a big criticism she has
3:41 am
to confront. >> i agree. she can have very complicated personal. relationship with the women that bill clinton were involved in and whatever she might have said, you could put in that context and separate from the policies she might enact when it comes to women's access to contraception and doing a perfectly good job on that. i'm not sure that we really have discussed this very much. i don't think that the egregious nature of bill clinton's behavior when it came to monica lewinsky or other young women has been at terror. i have a feeling he's had a pass on this. he got a pass on the way he behaved and it was appalling. i don't think he's been held accountable. >> monica lewinsky has not gotten a pass. her life has been -- >> it's been totally turned upside go upside down. >> it is such a pass that he's gotten. and again, we are going into
3:42 am
that swamp. we spoke to one of the most powerful people in washington, d.c. who was talking about this and talking about hillary's issues and the conversation wept around and the name wanita brodrisk came up at the table. that question right there tells you about the cone of silence that's enveloped bill clinton for well over a decade. go ahead, thomas. >> as we look at this and re-examine some of this, let's just decide that time has been served. and release these two women from the past. let's move forward from this. monica lewinsky admits suicidal thoughts. she's 41 years old. she can't be a prisoner to her past. she needs to move forward. it's a new. day in age. hillary clinton, she can move
3:43 am
forward. but t >> thomas, i think bill clinton has been tried and to talk about his character going into 2016, it's lialmost like double jeopardy. americans have decided that he was a bad actor. they like him. the question is we move forward. the question is about hillary clinton's behavior in a position of power and how she used that power and did she use that power improperly to crush young women that her husband took advantage of. i think -- >> as just the spouse of bill clinton? she wasn't an elected official. >> just a spouse? she ran domestic policy pr for the white house. al gore was enraged at how powerful she was because he
3:44 am
wanted to run domestic policy but he learned early on that it was hillary. if hillary had just retired to a farm in gettysburg, pennsylvania, after 2001, we wouldn't be talking about this it. >> what payrollfuls she on? what american payroll was she on? >> the farm sounds alluring. >> what payroll was she on using power to crush young women? >> what was she on trying to crush young women in the way of their power coupleness? >> i mean, first of all, i u don't even know that it's a question of her power. but if you want to talk about living in the arkansas governor's mansion for as long as she did and living in the
3:45 am
white house for as long as she did and being the most important -- the second most important at both of those places, then i don't think there's any question that she used -- i u already said it. i said it enough 15 years ago. it's not my job to talk about. don't cower in the corner. that's all i'm going to say about it. next block we're going to debate wmds. >> it requires an entire conversation. >> i'm going to take a shower now. >> stay with us. terror in ottawa was yesterday's attack the lone wolf. stay with us.
3:46 am
ring ring!... progresso! it's ok that your soup tastes like my homemade. it's our slow simmered vegetables and tender white meat chicken. apology accepted. i'm watching you soup people. make it progresso or make it yourself
3:47 am
3:48 am
wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, shopping online is as easy as it gets. carpenters and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. start shopping online from a list of top-rated providers. visit angieslist.com today. over 12,000 financial advisors. so, how are things? good, good. nearly $800 billion dollars in assets under care. let me just put this away. how did edward jones get so big? could you teach our kids that trick? by not acting that way. ok, last quarter... it's how edward jones makes sense of investing. ♪
3:49 am
piece on the crisis management in this week's cover story. the administration veterans describe obama's crisis management process as a high level graduate seminar. what do you mean by u that? >> i think in this case it's a bad thing. what we did in the story was go back and talk to white house officials, people around the white house and try to understand obama's decision making process when he confronts things like ebola. things seem to go briefly hay ware. the way they did in the first two or three weeks of the obama scandal. part of the answer to that question is obama approaches things like a law professor trying to work out a logical conundrum. it's often led obama astray in
3:50 am
the case of ebola listening to experts at the cdc who with respect. prepared to tackle this kind of public health crisis so we saw a couple nurses get infected, the hysteria surrounding the disease skyrocketed. you have two-thirds of americans last week in a poll fearful of a widespread outbreak. it's an example of how not to respond to a crisis u. >> josh green, the cover story. thank you so much. coming up it was a palin family brawl. the more we learn about what happened, it's clear that it's not that funny. the daily callers ask why people weren't more outraged. he joins us next with details.
3:51 am
your customers, our financing. your aspirations, our analytics. your goals, our technology. introducing synchrony financial, bringing new meaning to the word partnership. banking. loyalty. analytics. synchrony financial. enagage with us. when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting. and when alan gets all powered up, ya know what happens? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! he's a selling machine! put it there. and there, and there, and there.
3:52 am
la quinta inns & suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only a laquinta.com! la quinta! i'm sure you know what this meeting is about. yes, a raise. i'm letting you go. i knew that. you see, this is my amerivest managed... balances. no. portfolio. and if doesn't perform well for two consecutive gold. quarters. quarters...yup. then amerivest gives me back their advisory... stocks. fees. fees. fees for those quarters. yeah. so, i'm confident i'm in good hands.
3:53 am
for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this.
3:54 am
she just hit me. >> no one is going to touch my sister. we were in a limo. i walked back up, did you push my sister?
3:55 am
>> that was recently released rud owe of an emotional bristol palin giving her account of the fight. if this is true and we may never know for sure, but she sounds sin veer. then bristol palin was physically, verbally and possibly sexually assaulted by a man. shouldn't that be the lead? but instead of being outraged, this is being treated like some sort of joke. we're taking a closer look at things. i have to say, we covered it that way. looking at the headlines coming out, it looked like a family brawl that i don't know if harmless is the word, but it did
3:56 am
definitely have a humorous tone to it. when you hear the sound byte, you realize it's more than that. >> when i started reading about this, i started doing it like everybody else, to have a little fun at the palin's expense. i started reading this and listening to what she had to say, oh, my god, i can't believe how diskor adapt it is. the headlines are juicy scenes. it's as if it's a joke. when you actually listen to what bristol said. we don't know all the facts, but if she's telling the truth, what happened is horrific and i don't think we should be joking about it. >> what else do we know about what happened? >> there's a police report. nobody was arrested. according to police, everybody there was intoxicated. witnesses say that bristol started it, that she threw a
3:57 am
couple punches at this guy first. but i think when you put it in context where you have a situation -- when i started thinking about things like feminists say like she shouldn't have been drinking or they are white trash. she had it coming. it's blame iing the victim. if what she says is true, it's blame i blaming the victim. >> i just think the bottom line here is in all of us are guilty of this. the palin's are presumed guilty, are presumed to be a punch line, to be a joke. there's the real possibility that something terrible happened to them and todd palin was right. when things happen, some things happen where if your daughter is getting punched or pushed down or verbally or physically assaulted, you have to respond. and so, yeah, i think we all shot first and a lot of people
3:58 am
are guilty to that. >> played into stereotypes or maybe your out outlook. it's definitely more of a story than that. >> i agree with certain headlines have portrayed this. you didn't ask why bristol didn't press charges. should she? should you encourage that? >> i think if her account is true, i would encourage her to do so. there are some pictures of injuries. her legs are a little beaten up from apparently being dragged around. i say go for it. absolutely. get it on the record. >> i agree. >> stay with us, coming up at the top of the hour, a lone gunman strikes in the heart of canada. what this means for the war on terror. plus is colorado out of reach for democrats? the latest polls from that state and several other 2014 battleground states where things are neck and neck in the final days to the election. we'll be right back. (receptionist) gunderman group.
3:59 am
gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying.
4:00 am
goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics. an unprecedented program arting busithat partners businesses with universities across the state. for better access to talent, cutting edge research, and state of the art facilities. and you pay no taxes for ten years. from biotech in brooklyn, to next gen energy in binghamton, to manufacturing in buffalo... startup-ny has new businesses popping up across the state. see how startup-ny can help your business grow at startup.ny.gov transferred money from his before larry instantly bank of america savings account to his merrill edge
4:01 am
retirement account. before he opened his first hot chocolate stand calling winter an "underserved season". and before he quit his friend's leaf-raking business for "not offering a 401k." larry knew the importance of preparing for retirement. that's why when the time came he counted on merrill edge to streamline his investing and help him plan for the road ahead. that's the power of streamlined connections. that's merrill edge and bank of america. into one you'll never forget. earn points for every flight and every hotel. expedia plus rewards. mormal snap jebby rolbanma jebby deetle flosh. [laughter] eh.
4:02 am
now's the time to get in the loop. just look for our fall tv picks with xfinity on demand. quickly find the season's hottest shows, with a handpicked collection all in one place. only from xfinity. welcome back to "morning joe." look at that rainy morning shot of new york city. sam stein still with us. we have richard wolf joining us. it is a miserable morning here in new york city. we hope you're having a better morning wherever you are. joe, we'll start in ottawa. the canadian prime minister is vowing the country will not be intimidated after a gunman shot and killed a soldier guarding
4:03 am
their national war memorial. sources tell nbc the gunman has been identified as 32-year-old michael joseph hall. he was a convert to islam. so the gunman was later killed in a shootout at the canadian equivalent of capitol hill and at this hour officials are investigating possible ties to terror groups. police wept door to door after witnesses reported there were other armed men in the streets, but officials say they found no evidence of another gunman. parliament will be in session this morning at 10:00 a.m. as scheduled. joining us from washington, tom sanderson, a co-director and senior fellow at the center for strategic and international studies. tom, thanks for joining us. we're looking at so far the concern about terrorism versus an individual crime. what do we know? >> even if it's just an
4:04 am
individual, he can certainly ben gauged in terrorism. we need to find out more information, but given the targets, the parliament, the tomb of the unknown soldiers, this is clearly an effort to bring media eyes and the world's eyes on whatever issue this individual is pushing. now the police in canada are very likely to examine any messages that this person sent, his hard drive, any online activity to get an indication of what it was he was influenced by, who he was influenced by and what issues he was pushing. i think it's probably likely he was acting in furtherance of command from isis or goals by isis to attack those countries supporting the strikes on its fighters. >> big picture, what concerns do you have about this in relation to other things that have happened? >> two days out from another attack on soldiers that resulted
4:05 am
in the death of one of those soldiers, it's an indicator there are individuals out there, at least two of them in canada, who are radicalized by what they see going on, by the role played by their country and there's a clear potential parallel for the same thing happening in the united states. when you have a couple of hundred individuals from both canada and the u.s. who have gone to fight in syria, there's a very good possibility that a couple of those may be coming home. >> tom sanderson, thank you for your insight. we're going to continue to follow this story. we're going to turn to the midterms and the tight u.s. senate race in north carolina. polls show thom tillis and kay hagan are neck and neck. and the negative ads are d dominating the race. "the washington post" crunched the numbers. in fact, the republican candidate in that state is the most attacked contender of 2014 with more than $26 million being spent. against him. and of the top seven, five are republicans including cory
4:06 am
gardener, joni ernst, and tom cotton. outside groups are running 80% of the negative ads. the attacks on thom tillis -- >> i'm confused. because we all know the koch brothers, those two terrible men are the most negative influences on american politics. the national media tells us that and harry reid tells us that and the democratic party tells us that. so now they are giving money to democrats to attack republicans. there's no way this goes on on the other side. 5 out of the 7 top attacked candidates are republicans? why are the coke brothkoch brot this? >> richard, can you explain this? or the critics are at the
4:07 am
hospital for special surgery in other organizations that help people. >> i'm not going to go out there and support negative campaigning. both sides are trying to win ugly in this cycle. the net effects is you depress turnout. so you end up with two bases going after each other. i don't think either side is talking about -- i'm talking about the national parties, they are not trying to inspire people and drive more people into the political process. there's outside money on both sides. this is not a good election. look at the engagement you're seeing in the polls. it's miserable. >> it really is fascinating the media narrative. i read this in "the washington post" yesterday and i was stunned. thom tillis, it's a first time i have seen this poor tillis
4:08 am
character, who i don't even know, he's had $26 million dumped on him by harry reid and outside groups who spend all their time promoting big money and politics. >> and democrats raised early and spent early in this campaign. those outside groups did it in negative ways. and you're going to probably start seeing a pickup in response to that on negative spending from the other side as well. one of the most extraordinary figures is it's going to cost $4 billion, the most expensive midterms ever. probably the least amount of public engagement ever. so you have this election that really the american public is not interested in, don't want to think about politics, fed up with washington and outside groups are spending $4 billion on it. >> we sent casey to north carolina. we have more on that coming up. also sensing a tightening race, democrats are hoping to
4:09 am
give grimes a run in kentucky. they are going back on the air in a state with a $650,000 ad buy. the group went dark in kentucky fueling speculation that the race was a lost cause for the challenger. the reversal fronted one republican strategist to tweet back throwing spa gghetti at th wall again today, this time in kentucky. majority slipping away. the latest blue grass poll has senator mcconnell leading grimes by one point, 44% to 43%. but internal polling released yesterday has him up by 8 points. are there certain polls that lean to allison or what are we looking at here? >> we at "the huffington post" have a healthy skepticism of any internal poll regardless of who puts it out because you only put them out that are going to say
4:10 am
good things. so there's that. this is a tough race. there's a reason the dscc went off the air initially and that's because this is a tough race and democrats were telling us they thought it was at one point out of reach. maybe something magical happened in the past week. they have recalibrated and trying to make something of it. i wouldn't say this is the easiest pickup. i will say that the strategist that you mentioned is grateful for the twitter followers. >> one of the really interesting findings is mitch mcconnell is now winning among women against grimes according to the latest blue grass poll. he's been within 2 or 3 points and now he's winning among kentucky women. the gender gap is nonexistent. >> but you can't just take one polls. >> this is a trend.
4:11 am
he's been within two or three points for months among women. >> hold on a second. i think we should stop here for a second. sam, you said we shouldn't just look at one poll that shows that mitch mcconnell is doing well. but we have had a larger discussion that for some reason republicans are doing better among women in 2014 than they have in some time. why is that? >> well, you know, it's an interesting question. we think of women as voting on strictly on issues of contraception, coverage, equal access, certainly that's a motivating factor. but there are other dynamics at play here. the economy, the president's leadership, things like that, ebola, immigration, all these things are an aggregate. it's hard to pin point one issue and say that's why they are
4:12 am
voting this way. >> i have a radical idea. why don't i ask the women on the panel why. >> hey, i can speak to these issues too. >> you're very sensitive. >> i am. >> katty, do you think they have overplayed their hands for contraception from the hands of female voters? what's going on? >> i don't know. if you look back to the virginia race, it was that issue of contraception and women's health issues that drove the race here a couple years ago. i think women vote on a range of issues. we vote on health to some extent and issues surrounding women's health are important and especially to single, younger women. we're interested in national security, we're interested in economics, women are earning
4:13 am
more than their husbands. they are interested in tax issues. we want a whole range of issues and perhaps this issue of leadership that has bubbled to the surface in a way many of us would not have anticipated. we thought this was going to be an election about health care reform, but ebola, what's happening in the middle east, women are looking at those too. >> and mika, maybe the national democratic party will take that to heart and not just run ads about contraception. >> i think women are interested in competence. they are interested in a range of issues. it's not 20 years ago, 30 years ago. and for kentucky, if that is true, and i think grimes is a pretty good candidate who is evolving and showing that she is sort of correcting along the way, but on the issue of aligning with the president, she stumbled in a big way. and people see through that.
4:14 am
they want competence before they want anything else. i hope she pulls through actually. authenticity as well. the things that men want, i don't think we can be put off in one category completely. do you agree, joe? >> i do. it's also very interesting in '94 when i first ran, i ran against a female candidate. i actually found that women seem to be a lot tougher on her than were male voters. and some of my -- some of the most aggressive supporters of mine were women who i think didn't like her because she was a woman running. it's a strange dynamic. young voters didn't want to vote for me. a 30-year-old guy, but senior citizens i got huge numbers. it's a weird thing. >> i think it's changing. >> it's just never that easy in
4:15 am
politics. >> there's personal appeal. your demographic in that time was older and more female, but it changes with time. it changes with a candidate. i think this cycle there's no question there's more between the candidates than two years ago. but republicans had a bigger advantage with women in 2010. and that speaks, i don't think to the politics of the sexes so much as the bigger trends going through national politics. there were strong republican favor in 2010. these races where you're in one or two points talking about the split of women in kentucky, the samples can be tiny in these polls. so you're segmenting down to levels that are so much within the margin of error. it's a knife edge. >> so in iowa, joni ernst is leading congressman bruce braley 47% to 46%. and she's put out a new ad that
4:16 am
has hogs in it. >> it's a mess. dirty, noisy, and it stinks. not this lot. i'm talking about the one in washington. too many typical politicians hogging, wasting and full of -- well, let's just say bad ideas. it's time to stop spending money we don't have and balance the budget. i'm joni ernst. i approve this message because cleaning up the mess in washington is going to take a whole lot of iowa common sense. >> so she's used to dealing with a lot of stuff, matt. why is this race so close? >> well, you know, i think it's really close because you have a democratic candidate who stumbled early and because joni ernst really just -- there's something about it her. that first ad she ran about castrating hogs, i have never seen an ad that propelled a
4:17 am
candidate so far so fast -- >> it was fantastic. >> she got the establishment and conservatives. everybody was supporting her. so the right is completely aligned behind her. there is no schism, no sort of internal tea party battle against her for. i think she ends up winning. >> yeah, i think women really like that first ad. matt, thank you very much. still ahead on "morning joe," a major warning. no front seat passengers until the air bags are fixed. the reason behind the urgent warning is alarming. then the internet exploded when renee zellweger dawned a new look on the red carpet earlier this week. everyone is talking about it. we'll explain that. you're watching "morning joe," we'll be right back. ring ring!.! it's ok that your soup tastes like my homemade. it's our slow simmered vegetables and tender white meat chicken.
4:18 am
apology accepted. i'm watching you soup people. make it progresso or make it yourself when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting. and when alan gets all powered up, ya know what happens? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! he's a selling machine! put it there. and there, and there, and there. la quinta inns & suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only a laquinta.com! la quinta!
4:19 am
a single ember that escapes from a wildfire can travel more than a mile. that single ember can ignite and destroy your home or even your community you can't control where that ember will land only what happens when it does get fire adapted now at fireadapted.org
4:20 am
let's take a look at the
4:21 am
morning papers. there's an important story for nearly 8 million car owners across the country. it involves an investigation into a deadly problem with their vehicles' air bags. several deaths are being blamed on defective parts that sends pieces of shrapnel flying when deployed. there are ten auto makers and toyota is saying not to allow someone to ride in their front passenger seat until the air bag is fixed. >> it's a big deal. we look at "the new york times," four former worldwide security guards have been convicted for their role in the deadly 2007 baghdad shootings. that resulted in the deaths of 17 iraqi citizens. remember this story? it was huge. these black water contractors say they were ambushed. prosecutors and witnesses say the shooting was unprovoked. blackwater guards were
4:22 am
contracted in baghdad. no sentencing date. boeing is working with the commercial corporation of china to convert used cooking oil into jet fuel. boeing says its china-based plant will change 240,000 liters of cooking oil into fuel every year. that's expected to help drive down the price of fuel production. i like it. we look at "the los angeles times." the maker of camel cigarettes is banning employees from smoking in the office. who knew you could still do that in the office? so beginning next year, workers will be able to light up only in designated indoor areas. still the company will allow the use of smokeless products such as e-cigarettes. it is looking to accommodate smokers and nonsmokers who work or visit the facility. >> joe, no smoking in the office. >> okay, thank you so much. i'll mark that off the list.
4:23 am
but we can still -- fireworks are still okay? >> you're good. this week's cover story reports how tech month gulls are making efforts to help the public education system and eliminate job protections to allow for more flexibility in hiring and firing. so look for that. also with us now from washington, we have the chief white house correspondent for politico mike allen here with the morning's playbook. you're looking at turnover in the white house. key players maybe making an exit soon? what are you hearing? >> after the midterms, maybe after the state of the union address, a couple top names may leave. dan fifer, he may head out. dennis mcdonough, the chief of staff. if the midterms are a disaster for democrats, his departure
4:24 am
might be a way for president to say i'm shaking things up. what we're told is that top aids have been asked, are you going to stay? and if you stay past summer, the idea is that you will stay until the ind. and for people who stay to the end, it can be hard to find jobs. your party might be out of power, but some people we know are staying. the press secretary will stay. jason fehr man will stay. the president will have some of his most comfortable aids around him, but people he's depended on for years, the communications director is someone else who either may head out or might move into another job. so the president who depends on a stable, comfortable, ecosystem may find it's chilly next year. >> thank you very much. appreciate it. look for that in politico. coming up, she's just back
4:25 am
from north carolina. casey hunt takes us through the super close north carolina senate race. we'll be right back. she inspires you.
4:26 am
no question about that. but your erectile dysfunction -
4:27 am
that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any allergic reactions like rash, hives, swelling of the lips, tongue or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a free 30-tablet trial.
4:28 am
4:29 am
do you think that president obama is a strong leader? >> you know, president obama. has a lot on his plate. it seems like whether it's the oil spill that took place a number of years ago in the gulf to this ebola crisis now to isis gaining strength, you look at all the combination of things like that. >> do you think he's acted as strong leader? >> there's definitely -- we have definitely been late to the table in making decisions. being sure that cdc understands and gets messages out to hospitals. >> so you don't think he showed strong leadership? >> there are issues -- >> there she goes again. >> there she goes again.
4:30 am
these are not hard questions to answer. casey asks them in such a nice way. >> sometimes the is simplest questions are the toughest. >> you're so mean. i can't even believe it. >> she's vicious. >> i'm -- i u can't even look at her. that was kay hagan trying to answer that question. here's casey hunt with more on her states at play. >> in north carolina both the barbecue and the politics come with vinegar. >> i think all of us have seen some of the most disastrous things taking place in north carolina since thom tillis has been speaker of the house. >> what's the nicest thing you have to say about senator hagan? >> i don't know senator hagan that well. what i do know is we have very different visions for america. >> this is poised to become the most expensive senate race in history. but nearly $100 million isn't
4:31 am
buying much in the way of inspiration. >> so please know when you look at his policies of adding your retirement income to be taxed, that's just wrong. that is just so wrong. >> senator hagan needs to be replaced and president obama needs to get into a mode where he's working with congress. >> reporter: north carolina could be critical to republican hopes of taking the senate. voters here backed president obama in 2008 but supported mitt romney in 2012. when conservatives also won control of the state legislature. >> speaker thom tillis froze teacher salariesalaries. >> reporter: deep cuts to education sparked mass protests called moral mondays. they set the backdrop for a senate race flooded with pig names and outside money.
4:32 am
>> suspect there a metric that it's the biggest -- that's amazing. i have never seening in like that where i come from. >> reporter: through it all hagan maintained a slight edge in the polls but anxious itty over isis and ebola is royaling the race in the final weeks. >> we need to make sure we have people at the top that are getting the situation under control and making americans feel like they are not making up the place as they go. >> reporter: hagan needs distance from the president, but she has to be careful. when president obama won here in 2008 african-americans turned out in droves. if she's going to win this year, she needs the obama coalition to stick together. >> there's no alternative to the african-american vote being out there. and on the ground, we're going to do everything we can to get the vote out. >> we have your back. >> early voting gets underway in north carolina today. casey joins us now. so it seems like she was struggling with that question.
4:33 am
she got through it. do people in north carolina want their candidates, democrats, to say bad things about the president? why is there this sort of fear that you see in their eyes if you ask a question about president obama. solely because of his approval ratings? >> it's a tough question because of the way she has to balance keeping this coalition together. the president has become more unpopular in north carolina with a certain segment of the elect rat, but she has to make sure she doesn't come across as too supportive of the president -- >> i don't hear anybody saying i need my candidate to be hateful toward the president. he's done some great things. he's pushing for equal pay. he's done this and this and this on his leadership overall there have been some gaps and that's why i want to go back o to washington. >> the fear is giving their opponents an easy sound byte to say this or that.
4:34 am
it's a delicate dance for them to walk. if you pull the lens back, it's an example of everything going on in the country nationally. you have the president's dropping approval rating, concern with ebola and isis. two candidates who are generic and all these outside groups flooding the zone with money. >> let's bring in moderator of "meet the press" chuck todd live from ames, iowa. we have a new poll out just this hour that has republican joni ernst up two points now over democratic congressman bruce braley, 46% to 48% what's going on there? >> today i'm spending most of my cay in iowa. yesterday i did kansas. i want to talk about that in a minute. for what it's worth, there's so many bad public polls and erratic public polls, that one, the two-point gap, that's about what both parties quietly will admit the race really is.
4:35 am
ernst has a slight lead between one and two points. some days it's as low as a tied race, but she has a slight lead. the question is does the iowa democratic party's turnout machine, which is come through through thick and thin for the democrats before, is it enough to overcome two or three-point gap that it does feel like right now ernst is holding. >>. >> chuck, you look at iowa, one or two point-lead is holding. i'm curious. two quick questions. one, do you see any trend lines out there nationally? and were you as surprised as i was yesterday when "the washington post" reported that 5 out of the 7 candidates that have been attacked the most by negative ads have been
4:36 am
republicans. and tillis has had $26 million dumped on him. democrats are beating republicans in the spinning wars. >> well, when you look at the full numbers, we show actually republicans if you look at the analysis are leaving out the 501 c 3s. you have to wait. the figures we show that the outside money is about dead even. but when you look at what you're talking about, joe, the fact is democrats spend more time between july and september almost focused like a laser beam on negative ads on these specific republican candidates. thom tillis is the prime example. if kay hagan wins, the assumption will be it's simply that democrats, their outside groups were smarter and more effective in north carolina than the republican outside groups.
4:37 am
the republican money in north carolina all came a lot earlier. kay hagan had her worse numbers nine months ago. there's going to be some questions. if they hold by a seat there's going to be some finger pointing saying, you know what, you wasted your money too early. you should have done what the democrats did is hoard and do it later and more compact and have more impact. as far as a trend line, one of the things that's happened is what we saw an erosion last week. a slight bounceback and democrats think it's because we haven't had another ebola victim. >> chuck todd, thank you so much. we greatly appreciate you being with us. casey hunt, so in connecticut, obviously, when so much money was spent by mcman, there was a backlash in her two senate races.
4:38 am
any backlash that you hear on the ground for $26 million being spent against this tillis guy, $26 million in attack ads. i'll say it again. $26 million of democratic outside groups are spending to attack this guy. is there a backlash there or is it working? >> i think there's a general backlash among all voters. the voters i ran into are sick of this race. tillis has spent an hour on local tv talking to himself. it was supposed to be a debate but senator hagan declined to attend. >> why did she decline to attend? >> the schedule was set in july. they agreed to three debates. but tillis was asked why he ran. and his answer was interesting to me because he said i kind of fell on the sword. we needed a candidate to step up
4:39 am
who was going to be strong and could potentially be kay hagan who would be willing to undergo millions of outside attacks. i could have gone back into business, but i'm going to step up and face this on slot. so i think he knew full well what he was getting into as did senator hagan. >> that's a valid point. you have all this money coming in and personal attacks on both sides. what you're going to have is a discouragement of good people discourage them from entering the arena. it's a bad by-product. >> we're in a discussion where voters want people that are going to speak to their issues. you see strains on both sides of the aisle. if you're not somebody that comes from wealth, it's hard. >> why didn't kay hagan come? >> the schedule was set in july. the three debates they did agree to are the same ones that he agreed to when he ran. >> casey hunt, thank you so much. scary. up next, panic in the heart of the canadian capital has
4:40 am
people asking if we're really ready for a lone wolf terror attack. turn the trips you have to take,
4:41 am
into one you'll never forget. earn points for every flight and every hotel. expedia plus rewards. (receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics. it's about getting to the finish line. in life, it's how you get there that matters most. like when i found out i had a blood clot in my leg. my doctor said that it could travel to my lungs and become an even bigger problem. so he talked to me about xarelto®. >>xarelto® is the first oral prescription blood thinner
4:42 am
proven to treat and help prevent dvt and pe that doesn't require regular blood monitoring or changes to your diet. for a prior dvt i took warfarin, which required routine blood testing and dietary restrictions. not this time. while i was taking xarelto®, i still had to stop racing, but i didn't have to deal with that blood monitoring routine. >>don't stop taking xarelto®, rivaroxaban, unless your doctor tells you to. while taking xarelto®, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. xarelto® may increase your risk of bleeding if you take certain medicines. xarelto® can cause serious bleeding, and in rare cases, may be fatal. get help right away if you develop unexpected bleeding, unusual bruising, or tingling. if you have had spinal anesthesia while on xarelto®, watch for back pain or any nerve or muscle related signs or symptoms. do not take xarelto® if you have an artificial heart valve or abnormal bleeding. tell your doctor before all planned medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any conditions such as kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. xarelto® is proven to reduce the risk of
4:43 am
dvt and pe, with no regular blood monitoring and no known dietary restrictions. treatment with xarelto® was the right move for me. ask your doctor about xarelto® today. joining us now congressman adam kinsinger of illinois. you are one of two congressmen who met with syrian rebels two weeks ago. definitely want to ask you about that. but first, let's talk about what happened in ottawa. how are we looking at this from our perspective in terms of connections o to terrorism and any other connections that we may draw from it. >> it's going to be interesting as we get to know this guy and how he was recruited. did he have direct contact with
4:44 am
isis or is he a lone wolf. the success of isis in the middle east i think is really inspiring a lot of people that are maybe it's a tendency towards jihadism or this lone wolf idea. people feel like they don't belong and they see something that draws them in. the leadership says if you can shoot a gun, take a gun into somewhere. it's tragic. this is something we're going to have to fight with for some time. >> congressman, we know that isis has said that once the bombings started in iraq then they saw an uptick in membership and people joining jihad. now that they expanded to syria, are we starting to see more of that? turkey has been trying to work on the flow. are we still seeing just as many westerners?
4:45 am
>> i think it's something we have to be very intense on both here with our european partners and now with canada. part of the reason you're seeing the uptick, i called for it a year ago. there was 2,000 of them. today there's 40,000. the more success they get is success in this. you see it expand, you're going to see a lot of people -- a tiny fraction is bent towards jihadism, that's still a lot of people. >> one of the things that katty was getting at, when we engage in these bombing attacks there's a backlash. it serves as a recruitment tool. to what extent is a counterterrorism operation dependent on us recruiting moderate muslims to say, no to
4:46 am
isis, but to take up part of the fight towards them. >> it's huge. that's part of the reason too i have been calling for a no fly zone in syria. but they have a toxic environment where you have the creation of isis and extremist groups because people feel alienated. there's a military option you have to do on those that are terrorists today, but we have to look at the next generation. it's job, education, economic development. if you look at west africa, if we allow that to degenerate into chaos, it's going to be a fertile breeding ground for terrorism. >> what about people who are like minded as yourself who think you reap what you sew. if you're looking for moderate muslims, to sam's point, who is thinking like you in washington, d.c. that wants to seek that out as well? >> there's a group of us. this would have been better to have -- especially when we're talking about the fsa specific.
4:47 am
now they are a battered group. in terms of the long-term, i think there's people that understand that you can't go to war with muslims. it's an idea of going to war against an extremist ideology, but recruiting folks. there's a great opportunity for the muslim community to come out and say what this guy did in the parliament does not represent our ideology. >> the rebel commanders you met with, what was your takeaway that you department know before or the bottom line walking away? >> they are happy we are hitting isis, but they see the bigger enemy as bashar al assad. they are disappointed we are not coordinating with them better. they have been promised a lot from the united states before. and i think there's a lot of misfaith or unfaith in our ability to follow through. it's very worrisome. the next few months is going to be telling. the fsa is fighting on two fronts. this is going to be a long-term
4:48 am
war if there are boots on the ground. >> congressman, thank you for being on the show this morning. still ahead, the world health organization has called violence against women a global health problem of ep pem demic promogs. the disturbing role that social media plays in that attack. we'll be right back.
4:49 am
4:50 am
. synchrony financial partners with over two hundred thousand businesses, from fashion retailers to healthcare providers, from jewelers to sporting good stores, to help their customers get what they want and need. banking. loyalty. analytics. synchrony financial. engage with us.
4:51 am
4:52 am
here with us now, editor and chief of "glamour," cindy levy. the magazine is out with a new survey on women and their body image. the renee zellweger story and women being targeted online, but this is interesting. tell us what you found. >> the first major body image of survey 30 years ago in 1984 and found at the time that 41% of women were unhappy in some way with the way they looked. we reprised the survey now in 2014 and found the number had actually gone up to 54%. 80% of the women we surveyed, women in their 20s, 30s and 40s said just looking in the mirror made them feel bad about themselves. >> what is behind that, do you think? >> a lot of different factors. we live in a more visual life.
4:53 am
the pressure is be slim but also be strong and muscular and fit and toned. that's a very hard balance for a lot of women to pull off. the one factor the experts who looked at our survey said made the biggest difference, particularly over the last two years, was the impact of social media. in general, women who spent more time scrolling through pictures of quote/unquote regular women on social media felt worse about their bodies than those who did not and it's pretty striking. it's not just being on the internet that's the factor here, it's really going down that rabbit hole of looking at pictures of other women and comparing themselves. >> so that would lead to decisions about changing their appearance and living up to the standards. we were talking about renee zeg weller renee zellweger, about
4:54 am
changes she has made to herself and is she not admitting to it or what's the deal? >> she's made comments about reaction to her appearance on the red carpet that there were issues with recognizing her. she's saying, i'm happy and i'm healthy. if you're happy and you're healthy, or that's what you're projecting, saying i'm happy and healthy, that's the bigger issue is your general happiness. >> listen, as far as i'm concerned, no good can come of criticizing how another woman looks, that is just bad karma. >> i think so too. i'm not sure why it's this huge. alex tells me this is flying around on the internet. i just don't care -- >> i mean, if we put these two images back up. are we seeing a big difference here, other than a woman who's naturally aged a bit? >> i think people are looking at these images and feeling they look different. i also feel like here we are on
4:55 am
a morning show dissecting how a woman looks. is that a good thing for the world, i don't think so. >> they look different but i agree, those statisticings were terrifyingly said. to have to go through life like that every day wondering if you look good has got to be the worst feeling. >> our survey looked at men too. they're not immune. about a third said they were not particularly with the way they looked. i think that's probably up from where it was 30 years ago but it doesn't affect men at their core. when we asked men what the number one priority was in their life, they said being successful. for women, i think this is sad, it was losing weight. there is some good news, when you looked at the women in our survey who had positive body image, number one, they didn't spend an endless amount of time on social media, important lesson there, and number two, almost all of them exercised. they were not all slim. the happiness that you could get at any weight.
4:56 am
it was just being able to do something with your body that made you feel powerful and exercise does that, rather than just evaluating yourself. >> you spend all your day in front of a computer looking at images of other women and you don't get out and exercise and feel good about yourself. >> on renee zellweger, she looks good before, she look, good after, i just don't care. sorry, that's the point i wanted to get when i was waving my arms like this. go ahead, cindy. >> if we want to send a message they're valued for things other than their looks -- >> and arguing over it, it's ridiculous. >> one of the interesting things about this social media factor is we all know that for years we've been looking at pictures of very slim celebrity, very slim models. i think a lot of women look and think, i expect beyonce to look fantastic. she's got an army of 200 people helping her eat right and exercise. >> whose job depends on her looking fantastic. >> the thing about social media
4:57 am
is you feel like you're looking at the door next door. you think, ooh, she's doing it, i ought to be able to do it too. >> isn't the same thing for renee zellweger, this is a woman who's chosen to go into the public eye, an oscar winner, someone who will audition for the rest of her life if she chooses to be in the role of an actress and going after parts and walking red carpets, she'll always be criticized. >> i think fundamentally, actress, nonactress, for any woman or man what you want to do is think about how do i want to be remembered at the end of my life. it sounds corny and profound but most of us want to be remembered for what we accomplished with our relationships and you don't want to be remembered for, thank god, i got down to size 2. >> everyone gets caught up in this incredible race and pressure, especially girls. i think that's something we need to try and drive home as much as we can. cindy levy, thank you.
4:58 am
up next, the canadian prime minister says the country will not be intimidated by yesterday's shooting. we'll go live to ottawa and speak with a member of parliament who was under lockdown until late last night. plus, elizabeth warren says she's been treated differently by people on capitol hill. also, some are calling it the biggest academic fraud in collegiate history. when "morning joe" comes right back. hi, are we still on for tomorrow? tomorrow. quick look at the weather. nice day, beautiful tomorrow. tomorrow is full of promise. we can come back tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way.
4:59 am
driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. if yand you're talking toevere rheumyour rheumatologiste me, about a biologic... this is humira. this is humira helping to relieve my pain and protect my joints from further damage. this is humira giving me new perspective. doctors have been prescribing humira for ten years. humira works for many adults. it targets and helps to block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to ra symptoms. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened, as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb,
5:00 am
hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you ve an infection. talk to your doctor and visit humira.com this is humira at work transferred money from his before larry instantly bank of america savings account to his merrill edge retirement account. before he opened his first hot chocolate stand calling winter an "underserved season". and before he quit his friend's leaf-raking business for "not offering a 401k." larry knew the importance of preparing for retirement. that's why when the time came he counted on merrill edge to streamline his investing and help him plan for the road ahead. that's the power of streamlined connections. that's merrill edge and bank of america.
5:01 am
mormal snap jebby rolbanma jebby deetle flosh. [laughter] eh. now's the time to get in the loop. just look for our fall tv picks with xfinity on demand. quickly find the season's hottest shows, with a handpicked collection all in one place. only from xfinity.
5:02 am
good morning. it is thursday, october 23rd. welcome to "morning joe." we have white house correspondent for the huffington post sam stein. in washington, anchor for bbc america, morning kay. a lot of politics to get to. big news out of canada to start with. it was unfortunately eerily reminiscent to what happened in the u.s. capitol in 1988, i think it was '88, shot and killed a guard at the u.s. capital. and so the question is whether this is a larger plot, which certainly right now doesn't look like it is, or a random act, but we'll see. >> the prime minister is vowing the country will not be
5:03 am
intimidated. sources tell nbc the gunman has been identified as 32-year-old michael joseph hall from quebec. he's also used another name and was a convert to islam. the gunman was killed in a shootout and at this hour officials are investigating possible ties to terror groups. nbc's pete williams has more on a terrifying day in ottawa. >> police frantically searched for armed men most of the day in the center off ottawa, canada's fourth largest city. a soldier standing guard at canada's national war memorial was shot and seriously wounded by a man with a rifle, a shocking scene, witnessed by many bystanders. >> just passing, just over here. just heard a shot, there was a guy with a rifle just around on
5:04 am
the back corner. and just pow, pow. >> i thought it was firecrackerings. i look across the street and there's a man with a rifle shooting at a bunch of people. >> witnesses say the gunman hijacked a car. >> didn't hurt the gentleman in the car. and took off towards the back here and headed in that direction. >> the gentleman went about a third of a mile. heading to the session. dozens of shots rang out inside the building's ornate halls. members of parliament inside meeting room also reacted by piling furniture against the doors. outside, members were hustled away by police and security. canadian authorities say the gunman was shot and killed in parliament central hall of honor by the sergeant at arms. >> police went door to door
5:05 am
after witnesses reported there were other armed men in the streets. officials say they found no evidence of other armed gunmen. we're joined from ottawa by the former editor of "the new york times," now member of the canadian parliament, used to be on "morning joe" a lot, christa freeland. you were there, lock down in parliament yesterday, until 8:00 last night. tell us what the scene was like. >> it was a very frightening time. i was walking towards our caucus meeting yesterday morning, as it happens, either by coincidence or design, when there's large members of congress in the building, it's a time when there's weekly caucus meetings. i was walking towards my caucus meeting. i heard in the stair well above me shots, which i recognized as shots.
5:06 am
i ran into a nearby room and i hid there. so that was a lucky choice for me. i was soon joined by a lot of security staff who were really helpful. i spent the rest of the day, as did the mps, being shuffled around from room to room as they tried to clear the building. i would like to say one thing which is i like all canadians today. he's the canadian soldier who was shot and killed at our war memorial yesterday, and is the most important casualty of yesterday's tragic events. >> sam stein. >> just a quick question, so i'm glad to see you're okay and thoughts obviously go to the officer who was killed. just a quick question. what is the latest we know about the motivation of the shooter? >> we still -- we still don't know. it's less than 24 hours since
5:07 am
all of this happened. it's being investigated. i think that we have to be really careful about speculating too much before we have full details. what i am really pleased about is the house. our parliament will be in session today at 10:00 in the morning. we are determined that we're not going to be intimidated by all this. and canada's not going to change. >> okay, christa freeland, thank you so much. good to see you. hope to see you under better circumstances and of course covering this story coming back to us. thank you. we're going to turn to the battle for the senate. a new polling suggesting we are in for an exciting nail biter. have you seen some of these numbers? in iowa, journey ernst, i'm telling you, she's leading congressman bruce brawly 47% to 46%. she had the nickname, she may live up to that, you don't know.
5:08 am
scott brown with a one-point lead over jeanne shaheen. in colorado, challenger congressman corey gardner, a seven-point lead over mark udall. he leads that race 46% to 39%. joe, is there any way to describe what's going on? >> if you just take those three polls, it looks like things are breaking the republican's way. democrats will tell you they believe the race in colorado is much closer. those are the same democrats also tell you off the record certain races that they believe they've already lost. so, boy, maybe an outlier in colorado. i'll tell you the one that's really sticking out to me right now is new hampshire. let's put that up back up. sam stein in new hampshire. debates matter. i had a democratic operative tell me that jeanne shaheen looked stiff and brittle and a little angry on stage the other night. they were very worried about her
5:09 am
performance in the debate. of course, this is only one point. all these polls are one point. last weekend swing could shift control one direction or another. scott brown, one point ahead with a week or so to go. >> that's a big surprise. new hampshire being tight. people said they expected her to win. democrats said they expected her to win by a couple points. if it gets down to that sort of tightness, then democrats are in for a long night. people are going to say it's closer. every trend line is pointing corey gardner's way at this juncture. they should recognize corey gardner does have a growing lead. i know the state has a mail-in ballot. things are clearly trending towards the republican direction there.
5:10 am
>> sam, you have to look. somebody asked me the other day, i think it was -- said, do i think editorials still matter, endorsements still matter. and delivers an absolutely blistering attack on the democratic candidate, mark udall, and then on top of that, you have the fact that he's saying he's trying to get away from barack obama and he's going to be tough. voted about 95% of the time. even "the new york times" yesterday was saying of these democrats that they were doing themselves a grave disservice. i just -- i don't think senator udall looks to be the most straight forward guy right now in this race. >> it's funny, there's only one sort of general theme that ties all these races together. that's the president. in some races, obama's clearly an anchor on the candidate.
5:11 am
you saw it in kentucky, where grimes was pressed on who she voted for and she couldn't just state the obvious, which is barack obama. since then, you've seen a cascading effect where every single candidate is asked to express their positions. what do you think of the handling of the health care law. it's really swamped the end of the election and it hasn't been the great of the for democrats. there are some races where it hasn't been as bad as others. in georgia, for instance, the democrat, michelle nunn is doing surprisingly well, but in colorado particularly you can see it being a problem. >> i'm fascinated by what's happening up in wisconsin. scott walker hanging on by one point in most polls. that's an extraordinarily close race, a lot closer than a lot of republicans would have thought it would be. this is going down to the wire. and maybe there's a trend line, a point or two this way or that
5:12 am
way for republicans, but that could all change. >> you mentioned scott walker. meanwhile, there are several closely contested gubernatorial races to keep an eye on. scott walker has a slight lead over mary burke in wisconsin. florida, governor rick scott, charlie crist, tied at 42%. 7% for adrian wily. they're essentially divided along gender lines. men favor scott by 8 points. in connecticut, 2010 all over again for governor dannel malloy who won the ray by republican foley by less than 10% but the latest quinnipiac poll has him leading malloy in their rematch. these governor races are as exciting. when you look at florida in the
5:13 am
race, how bitter those debates have been. fans or no fans, particularly, i think florida colorado race, we're going to looking at the women again, how many women turn out to vote, perhaps in colorado, the thing that democrats, drawing some caution or hispanics underrepresented. certainly in that gubernatorial race in florida. >> isn't it democrats don't have the same gender gap advantage that they've had in the past this year. colorado especially, udall's getting mocked for the issues, trying to paint his opponent as
5:14 am
a cartoon figure. >> i would not overstate that. this is an issue that motivates a lot of men voters. the question, some you see gender gaps. in colorado, the key question appears to be what percentage of the key hiss sppanic population going to come out. whether they're going to be angered for essentially punting on one of their biggest priorities which is immigration reform. there are consequences to decisions that were made many months ago to punt on this. one of those could be in colorado. >> now to this. she isn't naming names but senator warren says she has been treated differently by colleagues on capitol hill because she's a woman. when the massachusetts was asked if she wanted to elaborate, she answered simply no. she did say the different treatment wasn't surprising.
5:15 am
to change these big male dominated institutions. to bring change to that place. so i think that's just powerfully important. >> why is it -- mika, i'm just curious, why is it that women, powerful women in the united states senate, are talking about discrimination, gender discrimination, gender bias, being treated differently in the workplace. and yet when pressed to name the offenders, refused to say anything. i mean, this is -- this cone of silence, to protect powerful men, i'm sorry, i thought that's what the feminist movement was fighting against where men in powerful positions of authority who sexually harassed are com t
5:16 am
committed gender bias would be called out. why wouldn't they be called out? >> the conversation about senator gillibrand who wrote about it in her book but choose not to publicly name the defenders. i met with her yesterday, interviewing her for my book. she is as impressive as they come. on this issue, the fear is the moment and you are still in a position where you're not really on an equal level to say something back or you were powerful enough to move beyond it and make change on a bigger level which i think is kirsten's point. do you know the context? >> no, can you explain? >> she's asked about it. i don't think it's fair to ask her to elaborate. but if she has something she wants to put out there and not name names, i don't thing that he really helps. >> one of the positions they say is that, you know, if you go by napie i
5:17 am
naming name, it becomes easy for the conversation to focus on that one individual who you accuse of being a harasser. what they wanted was a broader conversation about general culture of the institution. and, you know, that's one of the reasons why. i think there's something compelling to that. >> i'm all for naming names. joe. >> i mean, catty, catty kay, if you were working at the bbc and there are men going around and they're treating you differently and there's gender bias at the bbc or there's sexual harassment or people are grabbing you at the bbc, and you're a reporter that goes around reporting again sexual harassment, you would call them out. a responsibility to call them out. you would. so why won't these powerful senators do the same thing? i'm really confused. >> i think it depends -- you named the various degrees of offense, right. if there's gender bias, if
5:18 am
there's sexual harassment. if somebody grabs you. those are potentially quite different things. if somebody actually physically does something to you, absolutely you have to name names and call them out. and do whatever is needed to have that person brought to some kind of justice whatever it is. if it's -- >> that's obviously in the case of gillibrand. >> if it's some kind of implicit gender bias, you have to highlight the problem as a whole and i'm not sure saying that person treated me disrespectfully in a meeting. i don't know if those cases whether naming names is particularly helpful because you get into a tit-for-tat situation where it becomes about the relationship between those two people. i do think when it's egregious you have to call it out by name. when it's broader, you are trying to get to a broader problem, not an individual relationship. >> for elizabeth warren, she was asked about it, so the answer's
5:19 am
yes. that's a little different. i'm sympathetic on kristin's front. i still think you should name names. i will say -- >> the thing is, mika, you wrote -- you wrote a book about it. you blew -- i mean, you blew the place up at msnbc and demanded fair treatment and you got fair treatment and you started a discussion and you brought in the president of msnbc who actually got engaged and participated in it and everybody did. and because you did that, other people are treated differently and better. >> i agree with that completely. >> why do you have the most powerful women in america sitting back, saying, if you're in the workplace and there's gender bias against you, there's a war against women, so we want you to fight against it, fight
5:20 am
again in the war against women. >> when you looked at my situation, it had to be done. when we talk -- and i'm reading kristin's book, when you talk about her get poked and called chubby, it's totally completely unacceptable. but i will say, we women have to pick our battles. is it worth taking on and bringing down that person at that moment or working on a higher level, making more change, what she's doing. >> i do understand the whole thing about picking your battles. i carefully pick my battles -- >> no, you don't. you just go through like a bulldozer. >> i pick them. that one, that one, that one, that would be. >> you need to read kirsten's book. it's really good. age may be nothing but a number but it turns out it's just a mind-set too. the fascinating study that suggests all you need to do to act younger is to think younger. plus, a man in a coma for two years or so people thought as he was attempting to avoid prosecution. his story is next.
5:21 am
i wish he would avoid us. bill karins has the forecast. >> this nor'easter, imagine if it was december, we would talk about 1 to 2 feet of snow. instead, it's all been rain. it's left its mark. this is plum island. we also saw about 100,000 people lose power in areas of new england from the winds, especially gusty overnight. the power should be going back on today. the storm is not done. we have significant impacts from new york city northwards with this storm. there's still some bands rotating all the way back into new york city, where la guardia, once between -- yesterday was bad. today, we're starting out with an hour and a half delays. logan right now, they're not reporting any delays. heavy band of rain right through boston, right along interstate 90. the mass pike, all the way back to the berkshires. even a thunderstorm off the coast trying to come on shore. so you could see areas from
5:22 am
portland, maine, northwards. other areas will see an improvement, including d.c., philly, new york city, during the day. this is why it's called the nor'easter. winds out of the north-northeast now up to 40 miles per hour. if you're not in the northeast and you're everywhere else in the country where you have clear skies and nice weather, there's a partial solar eclipse this afternoon. it will be about 60% in the pacific northwest. the southern half, you'll see about a 40% eclipse. the next time that will happen, not until 2017. when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting. and when alan gets all powered up, ya know what happens? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! he's a selling machine!
5:23 am
put it there. and there, and there, and there. la quinta inns & suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only a laquinta.com! la quinta! in life there are things you want to touch and some you just don't. introducing the kohler touchless toilet. ♪ ♪
5:24 am
♪ "here i am. rock you like a hurricane." ♪ fiber one now makes cookies. find them in the cookie aisle. (vo)solver of the slice.pro. teacher of the un-teachable. you lower handicaps... and raise hopes. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (pro) nice drive. (vo) well played, business pro. well played. go national. go like a pro.
5:25 am
5:26 am
"the wall street journal," the university of north carolina is trying to move forward after an extensive investigation found more than 3,000 students took no show classes for nearly two decades. many of the classes were in the african-american studies program. about half of the students were athletes. nbc's tom costello has more. >> reporter: the university of north carolina, a premier university, with top-ranked athletes, reeling tonight, from what may be the biggest academic fraud in collegiate history. >> this never should have been allowed to happen. >> reporter: an independent investigator revealed the full scope of the scandal. for two decades, basketball and football players funneled into classes that required no class time, no professor and only a single term paper graded by an administrative assistant. the athletes received as and bs so they could play sports. more than 3,100 students took
5:27 am
188 no show classes over 18 years. most through the african-american studies department. where the administrative assistant and department chair ran the program. former federal prosecutor ken waynestein. is there any evidence anybody outside this department knew about this? >> no. we looked very hard to see if anybody in the chain of command from the department up to the chancellor knew and we didn't find that knowledge. >> reporter: this person, who played on the championship basketball team, has claimed tutors wrote his papers. but he refused to cooperate. the coaches denied it. investigators found no evidence they knew. unc students were stunned and embarrassed. >> especially right now, the image is tainted. >> i can say, myself, i've had to bust my butt my entire time here. just to hear that is a little discouraging. it is. >> the university, joe, said the
5:28 am
fraud ended in 2011. nine staffers were fired or disciplined. no current copes were involved. do you buy it? how does that -- >> no, no, i don't buy it. i don't buy it. i'm certainly not equating what happened at penn state morally with what happened at unc. it's such a tragedy. but don't tell me that there were only a handful of people that were somehow working together to make sure that athletes that made this university hundreds of millions of dollars through the years didn't know about this. it's the same thing as penn state. i don't buy it. don't tell me that it was just a handful of renegades doing this. thomas, i'm sure you agree with me, that's just way too convenient. >> it is convenient. i think they'll look at unc with healthy suspicion. >> decades, really? and top level people don't know?
5:29 am
that's unacceptable. completely. >> this next story also deals with coaches, one that we've been following. the fallout over the sexual hazing scandal at war memorial high school may lead to new legislation in the state of new jersey. several lawmakers there, democrats, will sponsor a bill to legally require educators and coaches to report child abuse. new jersey is one of only two states in the nation that does not have a duty to report law. seven students have been arrested. five coaches and teachers suspended amid allegations of sexual violence in the school's locker room. >> "the baltimore sun." nfl commissioner roger goodell has been ordered to testify as a witness at ray rice's appeal hearing. goodell is expected to reveal what knowledge he had of the domestic dispute between the former ravens running back and his then fiance. expected to argue the nfl and rave bes violated the collective
5:30 am
bargaining agreement which prevents players from being punished twice for the same incident. the hearing is said to begin on november 5th. >> that will be really interesting. wasn't it goodell who said ignorance wasn't an excuse for not knowing about the big hits campaign, paying out cash? i think it was in new orleans where the coaches will say we'll give you more money for the bigger hits you have. ignorance wasn't an excuse for that. >> right, he certainly did. he said that we'll see what happens. i think -- i think it's going to be a dicey situation for the commissioner. things have quieted down. but his story still doesn't completely line up with what ray rice and a lot of people around ray rice are saying. if he's in a hearing, he's got to be very careful with what he says and what he doesn't say. i don't know, mika. the nfl has skated by. we'll see if they learned any
5:31 am
lessons. >> yeah, one more note on the psa. the no more campaign. we showed it on way too early. some of the big stars in the nfl. the male voices that are coming out. which is very cool and that's going to be shown during the games. >> the daily mail. a british man pretended to be a quadriplegic and comatose for two years to avoid prosecution for stealing $64,000. allen knight took money out of the bank account of a neighbor who had alzheimer's and then faked being in a vegetative state to avoid appearing in court. he was living off benefits after claiming he suffered a massive injury. knight was busted when authorities caught him shopping, driving and going on trips with his family. >> you know, i actually tried that, mika, in half of july -- well, actually, all of july, half of june, all of july. i had somebody call phil and tell him but -- >> i thought you were really in
5:32 am
a coma. >> darn that twitter. >> not the type of coma he was talking about. it was a -- yeah. >> it was a summertime coma. >> coming up, google takes another stab at e-mail in case g-mail wasn't good enough for you. we'll explain why some critics are calling the app a total reinvasion of e-mail. our next guest explains how technology is actually explaining the way our minds work. i agree with that. now it's big business, to the tune of $1.3 billion a year. more "morning joe" next. ♪ there's confidence... then there's trusting your vehicle maintenance to ford service confidence.
5:33 am
our expertise, technology, and high quality parts means your peace of mind. it's no wonder last year we sold over three million tires. and during the big tire event, get up to $140 in mail-in rebates on four select tires. ♪ captain obvious: this is a creepy room. man: oh hey, captain obvious. captain obvious: you should have used hotels.com. their genuine guest reviews are written by guests who have genuinely stayed there. instead of people who lie on the internet. captain: here's a review, it's worse in person.
5:34 am
if it doesn't work fast... you're on to the next thing. clinically proven neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair. it targets fine lines and wrinkles with the fastest retinol formula available. you'll see younger looking skin in just one week. one week? this one's a keeper. rapid wrinkle repair. and for dark spots rapid tone repair. from neutrogena®.
5:35 am
5:36 am
rise up like lazarus. i said rise up. yes. come on. say hallelujah. walk. walk on. >> that was a scene from the 2008 movie "the curious case of
5:37 am
benjamin button" where a man got younger as he grew older. it turns out that people can get younger as they get older if they just think that way. is that possible? "new york times" magazine writes about a groundbreaking 1981 study where eight men in their 70s were told to think and act like they did when they were 22 years younger. they did things like listening to perry como. reading magazines from 1959. they were treated like they were younger men as well. at the end of the study, they were sitting taller and showing more dexterity. the researchers said the supple's minds went back to an early time in their lives when their bodies went along for their ride. this spring, a similar study will be done. this type, involving women with stage four breast cancer. the women will be told to behave like it's 2003 when they were healthy. dvds from movies like "the titanic" will be available, as will books and magazines from
5:38 am
the start of the millennium. the researchers want to see if there will be an effect on the size of their tumors and energy and pain levels. this is kind of amazing but it is a little bit about the mind. perhaps having an impact on the state of the body. "the new york times" magazine is also looking at technology's effects on aging. in this weekend's new issue, contributing writer clive thompson writes about the brain training games that may help reverse some of the effects of aging and the big business those games have become. and clive joins us now. i could use a few of those. i'm getting forgetful. tell us about your piece in terms of how it pertains to everything we've been talking about here. because that study is fascinating. >> what i'm writing about is the brain training game. these little games you play on the phone or on the computer. they can be like a concentration game. or a memory game. and the goal is, the theory is,
5:39 am
if you play them, it will sort of give your brain exercise that will improve its ability to concentrate, ability to focus. i was trying to figure out in that story whether that's really true, whether the science supports that. >> thomas. >> well, there is -- >> he can't remember his question. sam was playing his brain game. i'm looking act how there are certain groups that have come out in support of brain training apps and then, like stanford center on longevity came out this week on the 20th against the app, saying there really is no consensus on this data. they said at the end of their statement we encourage continued careful research and validation in this field. so they're fun, but we don't have enough time and investment in the research yet, do we, clyde? >> the stanford folks are basically correct. there's been a bunch of work but not enough to confirm what's going on. the big question with these games, if you play one for a little while, you'll get better at that game. but do you get better at
5:40 am
everyday tasks? right. >> can you find your keys? >> exactly. joe, do you have your glasses, did you find them? >> yeah, i found my keys. bill clinton a couple of years ago was talking about how he does mind games. he does in the morning, he would start out and he'd do some of these games. soduku for instance. after a very long day of reasoning i working, he would do them again and measure how he did. he keeps a running tally of how he keeps his mind active. i mean, i don't see how keeping your mind active with these sort of brainteaser games can't be seen as a benefit for everybody. >> it makes sense to me. it's like any muscle in your body, if you work it out, you're going to get more muscular. >> it's just like going to the gym. you can go to the triceps. you can have a great tricep but will that help you be better in sports? it's the same thing with your brain. if you get better at one of these games, that's great, but
5:41 am
you know -- >> we're talking about two different things. one is working out your brain. the second thing is understanding what the brain does for you. the whole, you know, concept of studying the brain obviously something that's been pushed by this administration, it could completely exploit our medical understanding. if we just understood in a better way how the brain affects your body. >> you're getting better science come along. they studied it a little bit but there's much more serious stuff coming along. you could say the industry's maturing a little bit. very, very patient work on a game. they actually did seem to find and really document for the first time the transfer of abilities from the game to other parts of your game. >> it's big money. joe, jump in. >> i agree. you can talk about, you can go and train your muscles and you may not be able to do certain
5:42 am
tasks but you certainly keep your muscles engaged. there's a reason why supreme court justices are still on the bench at 90, 91, because their keep their minds active. you see that time and time again. are there any games in particular that seem to do a better job than others? >> the one that has an interesting effect is what's called a test of your speed of processing, how fast you react to something. this is one that's being studied. ten years ago, they had some people play it. they played it for about 10 or 20 hours. ten years later, they had lower rates of auto collisions. the idea that somehow if you can get your speed of processing, your ability to react to situations, up a little bit, that helps you when you're older. now, your point about the supreme court justices is interesting, because one of the things that all the brain scientists will tell you is apart from the game, one thing that does help your brain be nimble is constantly master new
5:43 am
skills and new situations. that's probably really what the justices are doing. they're always having to grapple with new stuff, come to new conclusions. >> create new brain pathways. >> yeah, there you go. >> my grandmother did exactly that. she spoke 11 languages. >> whoa. >> uh-huh. okay, clive thompson, thank you so much. we'll be reading your piece. this sunday, "new york times" magazine. >> the brain, the final frontier. >> coming up, we've been focus ed on the threat of isis. and that terror group's use of social media. it turns out there's another group using twitter in a frightening way. the shocking and disturbing story of what mexican narco traffickers did to one woman who tried to stand up to him. cnbc's sara eisen has the numbers and how the market will likely react. that's next.
5:44 am
your goals, our experience. your shoppers, our technology. your data, our insights. introducing synchrony financial, bringing new meaning to the word partnership. banking. loyalty. analytics. synchrony financial. engage with us.
5:45 am
(receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics.
5:46 am
...the getaway vehicle! for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this.
5:47 am
there is violence over drugs in mexico and drug cartels are posting their crimes on twitter. a young journalist turned to social media to share information about organized crime. she was filling the void left by traditional media whose outlets are too scared of the gangs to publish. the narco traffickers offered cash rewards for the names of people posting anonymously online. a short time later, she wrote a message to her friends saying the cartels are, quote, closer to us than you think. than an image of a young woman was posted on her twitter feed. the next image showed that same woman with a bullet in her head.
5:48 am
the circumstances surrounding her death and how the identity was exposed are still cloudy. her colleagues are vowing to continue posting information despite the threats to their lives. it is an incredibly horrific story. >> awful. >> we're going to move now to business before the bell with cnbc's sara eisen. sar sara, what do you have? >> we're in earnings season here. general motors out this morning with results. it turns out their profit fell less than analysts were expecting. people were most surprised about the strength in north america. in fact, general motors had its best third quarter for global sales since 1980. given the fact that general motors in a year had to recall 30 million vehicles and had to pay a fine of $35 million for that slow response to faulty ignition switch. recall that ended up killing
5:49 am
people. united continental for instance coming out and saying profits surged 134%. southwest came out with better earnings and so did american airlines. jet fuel, a huge cost, has come way down in price on those lower oil prices. so the airlines are more effective at managing their costs. it's been a beaten up group lately. as fear spread over ebola it the idea that people would not want to fly. so they've been sort of beaten up in the stock market. these results show the airlines were not really managing their cost very effectively. on that oil note, $80 a barrel is what the price of crude oil is here and that means that the price at the pump continues to go lower. the national average right now is about $3 a gallon. in places like st. louis, missouri, i was looking this up, $2.65. wow, that is going to be a huge help for people this summer as they maybe take a road trip. >> and also google has g-mail
5:50 am
news, right? >> right, they're launching a new app. anything to get me more organized. it's basically your g-mail in an app and it's supposed to help you sort through the important e-mails so you don't lose some. also you can set reminders. of course all the tech logs are mixed about it. is this going to replace your g-mail, do we really need this. other more savvy apps like mailbox already exist. as a g-mail user, someone who never erases their mail, i'm kind of excited about it. >> yeah, i get so much. it just sits there. thousands and thousands. thank you very much, sara. up next, imagine you're in your local drugstore and you find yourself shopping alongside a little bear cub. >> just greeting card shopping. >> apparently he went to a fast food joint and didn't like it so he ended up there. we'll have more straight ahead.
5:51 am
discover card. how can i help you? oh, you're real? you know i'm real! at discover, we're always here to talk. good, 'cause i don't have time for machines. some companies just don't appreciate the power of conversation! you know, i like you! i like you too! at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card and talk to a real person. when you think aarp, then you don't know "aarp." life reimagined gives you tools and support
5:52 am
to get the career you'll love. find more real possibilities at aarp.org/possibilities. there was no question she reminds you every day. love. but your erectile dysfunction-that could be a question of blood flow. cialis for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment is right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is also the only daily ed tablet approved to treat symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently.
5:53 am
tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long-term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any symptoms of an allergic reaction, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a free 30-tablet trial.
5:54 am
remember that? that was when joe said don't do anything for my birthday. so we didn't. >> just put lewis in a bear outfit. >> all right, so look at this little bear.
5:55 am
it's unclear what -- the bear cub wandered into an oregon drugstore. apparently it's a 1-month-old bear caught on video. he was first spotted at a local motel. he hopped out of a window, walked into the rite-aid like he owned the joint. police eventually scooped him up in a shopping basket. >> well, that looks a little too small for the bear. >> it was like a little recycling bin. the little guy is now in the care of this rehab center with the care of releasing him into the wild next year. >> cute until he mauls someone to death. >> stop it, sam. very cute video. tomorrow on "morning joe," the great neil diamond will join us. not bad, huh? >> coming to america. >> up next, well, wait a minute, what, if anything --
5:56 am
i'm meteorologist bill karins. all eyes on the nor'easter that continues to batter especially northern new england. yesterday, large waves near plum island, massachusetts. at one point, almost 100,000 people without power from the strong gusty winds. so that will linger during the day today. especially northern new england. also, some rain in south florida. more rain for our friends in the southwest. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. and only national is ranked highest in car rental customer satisfaction by j.d. power. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro.
5:57 am
wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, shopping online is as easy as it gets. carpenters and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. start shopping online from a list of top-rated providers. visit angieslist.com today.
5:58 am
when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting. and when alan gets all powered up, ya know what happens? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! he's a selling machine! put it there. and there, and there, and there. la quinta inns & suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only a laquinta.com! la quinta! if it doesn't work fast... you're on to the next thing. clinically proven neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair. it targets fine lines and wrinkles with the fastest retinol formula available.
5:59 am
you'll see younger looking skin in just one week. one week? this one's a keeper. rapid wrinkle repair. and for dark spots rapid tone repair. from neutrogena®. welcome back to "morning joe." it's time to talk about what we learned today. mika, what have you learned? >> well, the hogs are back. they're squealing. in joni ernst's commercials. >> i learned if you close your eyes you can't tell the difference between thomas roberts and neil diamond. basically the same voice. >> similar back story as well. brain apps.
6:00 am
based on your playing brain apps in the commercial breaks. >> this isn't natural. >> i'm going to download some because i want to be smart like sam. >> joe, learn anything today? where are your glasses? did you find them? >> you know, i learned actually that this new g-mail inbox app, which is supposed to make your life he's yes requieasier, requ invitation. a really stupid thing for professionals. i just wasted my time downloading the app and now they say have a friend or wait for us to invite you. no thank you. if it's way too early for "morning joe." stick around, it's time for "the daily rundown." we'll see you tomorrow. attack in ottawa. one parliament leader says it's a day when canada lost its innocence and prime minister harper calls the gunman a terrorist. meanwhile, back in washington, another man jumps the white house fence just as new details emerge about another secret service lapse from a few

135 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on