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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  October 30, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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>> the 2-2. popped up. sandoval in foul territory. giants win! a world series win for the san francisco giants for the third time in the last five years and they're hero m. >> welcome to "morning joe." we have john heilemann and on capitol hill, christina is here and willie and me here. that looked like a fun game. >> it was incredible. it was more than a fun game.
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it was game seven of the world series. >> that looked like a good time for everyone. >> john heilemann is our resident giants fan. the incredible starting pitcher who won twice in the world series comes in out of the bull pen. here he comes and gives them five innings of two hit scoreless relief on two days rest. this guy is now officially a season legend. >> not just two days rest but two days after finishing a complete game shutout on sunday night where he threw 120 pitches. before this game he said i don't care about pitch counts. he's old fashioned. i'll go in and get it done. dominant throughout the series and throughout the entire post season. extraordinary postseason run for him putting himself in ranks of one of the truly greatest postseason pitchers in the history of the game. >> career world series e.r.a. is .25. he's a starting pitcher. >> he really is -- you can
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overstate a lot of things about sports but in this instance he's the greatest postseason pitcher of all times. >> and he's 25 years old. he's a big man. >> 6'5". >> i said he's got a name that would be a great biline if he was a journalist. >> that's true. >> for men like us, he's 6'5" and you have to like a guy that tall. >> and tip your cap to the kansas city royals. haven't been to the playoffs in 27 years. that stadium was rocking. they played well. they ran into a buzz saw and lost by one run. >> at the end of the night they were 90 feet away. tying run at third base. >> you know what we need here? if you could sit and shut up that would be good. >> it was a late game. >> where do giants sit in terms
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of great teams. you have the a's and the big red machine. >> and yankees. i know you don't like to acknowledge that. this is three in five years. they're right there. they're still young. >> i would say if you think about the new millennium, it's the giants in the national league. >> may we go to maine? >> the best organization right now, the giants. giants and cardinals are incredible. that's all i have to say. >> thank you very much. we'll get to that one. sit down and shut up. >> joe knows how to get it done in the postseason too. >> i don't know what that means but i like it. >> and you honor their colors. >> showdown is looming in maine between state officials and a nurse who recently returned from
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sierra leone. governor paul lapage is an interesting character. that's all i'm going to say. >> interesting cat. >> he's trying to force hickox to observe a quarantine. state police were sent to her home. she says she has no symptoms of ebola and will only stay in her home through today. >> i don't want to hurt anyone in the public, but i don't think this is an acceptable line to be drawn. when we let stigmaization win, my friends have to stay three feet away from me. i'm not symptomatic. you tell me i can't hug my friend after fighting a tough battle for four weeks in west africa. it's painful and emotionally
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draining. >> and without naming names, president obama criticized lawmakers who are supporting quarantines and travel bans for people returning from ebola affected countries. >> when i hear people talking about american leadership and then are promoting policies that would avoid leadership and have us running in the opposite direction and hiding under the covers, it makes me frustrated. i put those on notice who think that we should hide from these problems. that's not who we are. that's not who i am. that's not who these folks are. this is america. we do things differently. >> this is america. and we do things differently.
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unless it's barack obama's overseeing the military. t it's the inconsistency coming from this government that has fueled fears and some would say irrational fears. i don't know if fear is so much of ebola as it is of the government's ability to have a consistent policy and guidelines which the president himself does not have. i get to say it's a very bold move. as they say in "top gun" bold move, maverick. for the president to act that self-righteous while his own military that he runs, that he's the commander in chief of, that he's the head of, is putting a mandatory 21-day quarantine on troops that don't even treat
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ebola patients. it is absurd that the president would act that self-righteous when his own government, his own administration, is conducting the very policies that he's acting so self-righteous to condemn. this is a jim and tammy faye bakker moment for the president. i know there are people that like to feel superior to others and say american people are just idiots. i tell you what, an amazing poll came out yesterday from "the washington post" that i will say again, i think it goes more to the bungling of this operation from the world health organization over the past year and the cdc and the dallas hospital and the states that had inconsistent policies, i think it speaks more to that than --
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the nurse is right up in maine. you can hug her. she's not stomaympto symptomati. healthcare workers get ebola when they treat people in the final stages of ebola. when they really are symptomatic. she's not symptomatic right now. this bigger fear, it doesn't come from the disease, it comes from the competence and the president going out there and being inconsistent again, that's a real problem. >> look at the cbs news poll. i know you alluded to "the washington post" one. it finds that 80% of americans support quarantines for u.s. citizens returning from west africa. that's the result of inconsistency out there. >> i said this a couple days ago when we saw the tent. that's horrible. >> it was. >> i talked to -- >> i think it was horrible. i talked to my liberal friends, tent, that's fine. that's cool.
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>> it's not fine. >> mika, please. >> i know what you're saying. >> let's not debate around this table in midtown manhattan and feel elite. i'm telling you that i was stunned that even progressives and independents and everyone was saying quarantine 21 days that sounds good to me. you look at these numbers. 80%. what do you see in that number? why is it so high? >> there is still a lot of -- the biggest failure to your point has been not just the way in which individual cases have or have not been handled but lack of clarity in terms of how this has been communicated on the part of the administration and public health officials and everybody. we've said this many times. there was not a singular voice who is explaining consistency throughout the way people can understand how it should be done, the dimensions of the problem, how it should be done and then in a way that also
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matched up with what the facts were on the ground. people have been -- for most people the thing is i don't understand. there are things that trouble me and frighten me and if a quarantine will keep me safe -- i don't think most of them think of quarantine as guantanamo-like environment. they think quarantine in their home and stay out of the public. >> it is silly. don't hug somebody that doesn't have a symptom and doesn't have a fever. >> if you look at that poll, most people implicitly trust nurses and doctors but after a doctor that was showing signs of ebola still went out in public but don't you think it's a good idea for 21 days to stay in. >> to not go bowling. >> i salute the doctor for what he did but that doctor is responsible in large part -- put the poll number up again.
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that doctor in large part is responsible for that. he comes and he treats. he runs all over the place. i joke about him sweating and huffing and puffing but doing a lot of things that again just didn't seem to make sense. governor cuomo said let's face it. he didn't do what he should have done. i think if a guy had done that in kansas city or a guy had done that charlotte, it would be one thing. the guy was doing it in new york city in the densest population in america. >> he wasn't symptomatic and there wasn't an overarching set of principles that were supposed to be followed. >> within 21 days i would say this. i would have common sense -- i'm dead serious -- to not go to a bowling alley after i went running. you wouldn't have done it. you guys wouldn't have done it either. again, it's so hard -- i'm not judging him at all. he'll be able to speak for himself in some time.
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i'm just explaining that 80% number. so much of what we have seen came from that one news story. >> so i think also the lack of consistency and the real plan has led to governors being hand fisted and then leading to what chris christie did with the nurse in the bubble. and once again -- >> one other thing. one problem is -- i mean, the government has let us down. the health organizations have let us down. actually the disease itself has shown itself to be treatable. >> a lot has -- >> four people have survived. a lot have gone right. not by the government. don't say you're sorry. the government hasn't done anything. >> i'm just really trying to get to the news story. >> the government hasn't done anything right on this. they have bungled it from the very beginning. there have been great doctors who have treated patients with ebola. we've got four healthcare providers that have survived. and that itself i think will
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calm people down. who is not calm right now? chris christie. >> thank you. >> i think that guy may need to talk to an anger management professional right now. >> once again chris christie is in the news for taking on a heckler. >> don't do that. >> in a public forum. a former council person who is a former pro athlete. this is on hurricane sandy relief. the new jersey governor went on attack against a former city council member who held a sign that read stay in new jersey, finish the job. you all know me. if we'll get into a debate here today it will be interesting and fun. yeah. i understand. so i'll be more than happy to have a debate any time you like because you don't know a damn thing of what you're talking about. i've been here when cameras aren't here, buddy, and done the
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work. so i'm glad you had your day to show off but we're the ones who are here to actually do the work. turn around and get your 15 minutes of fame and then maybe take your jacket off, roll up your sleeves and do something for the people of this state. and there's been 23 months since then when all you've been doing is flapping your mouth and not doing anything. so listen, you want to have the conversation later, i'm happy to have it, buddy. until that time, sit down and shut up. any time. any time you like. it's wonderful. absolutely. i'll tell you, there's about 1,000 things i'll do tonight. going to dinner with you is 1,001. >> why? >> the heckler who tried to invite christie to din foner fo debate is drawing attention to a program that gets residents back
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in their home. >> what's going on? everybody loves a politician that fights back. you don't -- you ignore hecklers. you have fun with hecklers. i don't know. does he think this is a gateway to winning the iowa caucuses? >> what's going on here? >> i don't know. i just don't know. >> there's obviously -- we know that the youtube channel and his confrontations in various settings are part of what drove him to national prominence and gave him a certain kind of public profile. i just looked at that and he looked angry. i think anger just never comes across well on television. humor. you can deal with hecklers. you can be funny. that seemed angry to me. >> the guy was right in his face. i'm not sure -- shouldn't he have moved at some point?
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>> so? hecklers have been following politicians around for 4,000 years. >> they sure have. >> number one rule is ignore hecklers. >> think about this. all of the college students in iowa that like to really spend a lot of time going to presidential caucus events and talking to these candidates at their town halls, some of them get a little in your face and a little rowdy. if he does that more than once -- iowa nice does not like that no matter how many times you call them buddy. >> governor christie knows this is part of his mythology. these confrontations is part of hi brand and reputation. you can see how much he enjoys getting in,000. in this case the guy brings up a good point about what's happening in new jersey. >> there are people still not in their homes. >> two years this week since sandy and a lot of money to go to rebuild these towns hasn't been distributed. i don't know. maybe that's not the right way
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to go about it. maybe that's the only way he could get his message after two years. >> he has a right to do it. we talked about where he went after the teacher. it's one thing when you tell somebody, back off. these are my kids. it's none of your business. these are my kids. i think we all laughed and for good reason. don't get personal with somebody's kids and if they decide to send them to a christian school. it's quite another thing if somebody is bringing up a legitimate point and you're telling them to sit down and shut up. >> it's not like this guy was a 9/11 truther screaming from the back of the arena. maybe he should take it up another way. i don't know how else you get in front of the governor of the state of new jersey. his point is a legitimate point. >> where are you from ?
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i want to hear what you have to say. bring someone over and talk to him personally after. >> exactly. listen, i would love to talk to you. can you talk to louis. >> that's not what you -- you would want to hear what they have to say. i don't know. let's let it be for now. >> the guy is trying to get attention. we understand the guy is getting attention. chris christie, don't give him attention. you just gave him attention. he was on all of the nightly news broadcasts last night and they went over and interviewed the guy. >> do you think chris christie for a second regrets that this morning as he watches it? >> he's very combative. i think he is seeing the polls that i knew were coming that people probably support his decision to quarantine this nurse so maybe he's feeling feisty. it's a balancing act and he went over the line there. that may work in jersey. i don't even know that that
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works in jersey. it's not going to work in new hampshire. it's not going to work in iowa. it's not going to work in south carolina. it's not going to work in the early primary states. >> happy warrior is what you want. not a lot of happy in that image. >> i can't believe -- we have a lot of politics to get to. still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> i can't believe how many political stories we have. >> am i going to have to say it to you. sit down -- david axelrod will be on set and bernie sanders. and jon huntsman sr. will be here to explain how he went from bare feet to billions. >> i want to do that. >> a denver broncos fans goes missing for days and then shows up 130 miles away? we'll tell you what happened there. wasting time on the
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internet. we'll tell you which ivy league school is offering that as a college class. that's good stuff. we'll be right back. (boys screaming) totino's pizza rolls... ready so fast, ...it's scary! transit fares! as in the 37 billion transit fares
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>> "the wall street journal" reports president obama is planning to cut the number of u.s. deportations of undocumented workers through an executive action. the white house is considering two criteria that will determine who gets to stay and who has to leave. individuals will have to spend a minimum amount of time in the u.s. their ties to family members already in the u.s. will also be considered. the new criteria could protect between 1 and 4 million undocumented immigrants. >> how interesting the president decided to stop deporting as many hispanics as he has in the past. coincidence. who would believe one week before the election after being criticized by hispanic leaders. >> aren't you full of critiques this morning? >> i'm not full of critiques. it's funny how things happen. >> "the wall street journal" apple reportedly in talks to sell the iphone in iran if western sanctions to were ease
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in the near future. they are looking to work with provides but it will not come until heavier economic sanctions are lifted. they make it possible to transfer payments into or out of the country. >> you can listen to your favorite rap mixes. did you see that? >> the broncos fan that disappeared -- >> where did this guy? >> he was found safe after walking and hitchhiking 130 miles to pueblo, colorado. >> i would go to pueblo or boulder. >> he was found in a kmart parking lot. he was in good condition. he told authorities he "had his fill" of football and decided to
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go for a walk. he was unaffair people were even searching for him. >> something else going on. >> you have your fill of football. the game didn't go as well as you expected, i'm going to go walk 180 miles. >> he said he had very little cash. no cell phone and just walked 130 miles. something else is going on. >> i'm jealous. >> we need a follow-up on this story. a new study out of australia is casting doubt on the theory of the so-called 27 club. that's the age when rock musicians are at the highest risk of an untimely death. researchers say that number 27 thing is a myth. >> thank you. >> a review of music industry deaths shows that while musicians do live shorter lives than fans, they are still along well into their 50s. the average female musician is into her 60s compared to 80 for
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average american women. >> who decided to do this study? >> "the washington post" creative writing students will be able to earn credit for surfing the web. the class called wasting time on the internet will force students to be distracted in order to see how it impacts their writing. >> dear god. >> that's kind of interesting. the professor says the goal is to have students produce a strong story at the end of the semester and hopes the course will prove that internet and digital distraction is making society -- >> it's not, professor. let me help you out. it's rewiring the brain. they get distracted every 12 or 13 seconds. there are older people in their 40s and 50s. >> i'm very distracted. >> facebook and their twitter and they are just constant. put it down.
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i'm starting to put mine down. are you doing that? >> it's hard. you click on a link on twitter and you're down a rabbit hole for an hour. >> i have especially over the past month, i get my cell phones and i get home and put them in a drawer. it drives a lot of people crazy who are trying to get in touch with me. they can call me in the morning. >> coming up, betting on atlantic city. the city's mayor joins us on set to explain why numerous casino closings are not news of the city's demise. first david axelrod will be here for today's must read opinions. >> doctor, can you help me. >> back to this. she inspires you.
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32 past the hour. join us for must read opinion pages, director of the university of chicago's institute of politics and msnbc contributor, david axelrod. so good to see you. >> you know he's a grandfather now? >> hard to believe with someone as youthful as me. can we show a picture?
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>> i have a picture on my phone here. >> give it to me. i'll send it in. she's so beautiful. >> it was really fantastic. very warm feeling. very emotional. every time people get together who have been impacted by epilepsy, it's an emotional event. you guys have all been. it was great. >> very emotional. i would think the emotions are broken up by donnie in a black t-shirt. >> there she is. look at this baby. he's coming in. she's absolutely perfect. >> eight days old now. >> so beautiful. >> let's go to must read op-eds. >> she's so cute. >> democrats crash land the planet. >> these are whistling past the
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graveyard if they think they can deny shared responsibility for the world on president obama's watch. his is the foreign policy espoused by democratic party's leaders for a generation. one is vice president. another is secretary of state. leaders in moscow, tehran and beijing get up every day and do one thing. think about how to diminish or destabilize the u.s. our leadership got up for six years and thought about wind farms. senate democrats as is their habit chose not to see. >> i'll go on a limb and say you probably disagree with the assessment there. >> it's balanced and fair analysis. anybody can see that. >> what about the president has inherited as all presidents do, a world that's completely unpredictable and things that have come up whether libya, syria, iraq, afghanistan, how has he faced those challenges in the last year?
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>> let's go back to the beginning. i was with him in 2002 when he was a state senator and he stood up and his concern about iraq was that it would unleash sectarian warfare and make the u.s. a target of extremism around the world. and we're dealing with ramifications of that and is the answer to intervene with american troops everywhere there's problems or do you try to build international coalitions and try to involve people in that region to help solve their own problems? that takes patience and determination. there is a long-term payoff on those things but i think he's done the right things. i said before on syria, i think there was some missteps and those have been talked. i think the whole red line issue
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was a mistake. i love these folks that say if you had done what i said two years ago everything would have been different. there were 1,500 different militias there. you didn't know who was what and where weapons would end up. we are facing american weapons from isis so the question is was it a wise thing to arm people when you weren't sure how they vetted. i think his concern was legitimate. >> when you see as we have seen since we decided to escalate the war against isis in the last few weeks, month and a half, you have seen a lot of stories where you have seen people from the pentagon and people being critical of the president in various ways. talk about your vantage point having been inside, when president and people in the white house see those kind of quotes, how do they read that?
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it feels people are trying to undermine the president publicly. >> one of the most interesting things you learn when you're there is president of the united states constitutionally civilian control the military and when the president gives an order, the military responds. as anyone that covered washington knows, they are also the most manipulators of the scene in terms of lobbying and well placed leak and call to a friendly congressman in terms of testimony they give on the hill and they do a lot of maneuvering the president on their own and so i became accustomed to that when i was in the white house and i'm sure they are now too. >> let's talk midterms. roll call out with an updated look on who has the momentum in key senate battlegrounds. in colorado, the previous rating
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was a tour tossup between mark udall and congressman cory gardner. today that race is considered a tossup tilting republican. let's go to georgia where the republican candidate david perdue was seen as having the e edge and now the contest with michelle nunn has a poll suggesting it will go to a runoff in january and kay hagan was thought to have an early edge but now the race against thom tillis looks too close to call and in south dakota, the race is breaking to mike rounds. >> except for the last race, we talked about, all these races are tightening up. you have democrats that are tightening up republican leaning
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races and republicans in north carolina tightening up democratic leaning races. this is fascinating. i'll say it. less than a week out now. we have no idea who is going to win this. >> there is virtually not. if you look at senate races that are contested, there isn't a single one i feel confident calling the winner in those races. on any given day i can say it will be if you put a gun to my head but there's not one where i feel like it's trending in some way that gives you a sense of confidence. >> and that's the same thing. you look at colorado and i think, okay, republican may squeak that out. republican may seek out iowa. kay hagan may squeak out north carolina. you can go down the list. i can't think of a single race where i would wake up the next morning and go oh my gosh. >> the only guarantees is roll call reporters are preparing for
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recount scenarios in places like north carolina. that will be very, very close. kay hagan barely won her seat in 2008 as it was. they are really looking at that and colorado is the most interesting state. this is the wisconsin from 2010 when russ feingold lost. this is an incumbent. makes sense that iowa is trending toward republicans given the national landscape but colorado. democratic senator seemed pretty strong but really strong candidate against him and these late breaking movements, there's not a lot to change things over the next five days. democrats are very, very nervous for good reason. >> in 2012, i would hear the same thing from republicans that i heard from democrats and hear the same thing from romney's top people i would hear from you. you said it with a bit more confidence and you can just kind of -- i can read in your voice a week out. you were consistent.
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you were very confident and consistent about it and reading your body language, they know. they're in good shape. i'm hearing from almost every reporter on capitol hill now that it is the republicans that sort of have that confidence even though they're not cocky, they know they can lose it all and democrats who seem to be fretting a bit. >> i'm talking behind the scenes. is that what you're hearing? >> there are races not noted here. there are six races in very red states. three of which incumbent democrats are retiring and republicans have a very good chance to win that. they need six seats. they start with six and then they have to add to it in all of these other races. the odds very much favor them. i think the field -- this is 18 of the 24 states that voted against obama have senate race this is year. this is a very favorable field
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for the republicans. it would be a big loss if they didn't take over. >> it would be devastating to hear that from priebus who says not taking over the senate is a huge loss. >> think about georgia. michelle nunn has a lot of momentum. democrats are confident in gubernatorial races helping them a bit in places like kansas and georgia. >> david axelrod, stay with us if you can. one of the republican party's leading voices has harsh words for his party's brand. they were harsh. more than 80,000 teachers and parents signed a petition demanding an apology from "time" magazine for their rotten apples cover. nancy gibbs will be here with her reaction to that. we'll be right back. ameriprise asked people a simple question:
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senator rand paul -- >> heilemann is saying offensive comments. >> senator rand paul is not mincing words when it comes to his party's image problem or failings to attract minority voters. on wednesday the kentucky senator said his party brand sucks telling the crowd there remember domino's pizza. our pizza crust sucks. the republican party brand sucks and so people don't want to be republican and for 80 years african-americans have had nothing to do with republicans because of a perception. the problem is perception is nobody in the republican party cares.
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paul made his remarks at a gop field office in the strong hold of detroit. the senator returned after attending that opening last september. >> rand paul is doing god's work for going out and saying this. people would say republican policies are what african-americans need. that's not true. you can make the argument. you can make an ideological argument and explain why you believe what you believe. but if people don't think you have their best interest at heart, every time a young black man gets shot, the entire conservative universe seems to go in the other side immediately. i talked about this during the shooting of trayvon martin. it was an instaattack on trayvo
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martin's character. a problem when a kid walks through the neighborhood with skittles in his pocket and he gets gunned down and an entire party goes against the unarmed black youth shot dead in a suburban neighborhood or stays quiet and doesn't raise a single question. my point was this at the time. i was offended by what happened. i said we're not talking about housing assistance. we're not talking about something that would cost taxpayers money. we're just talking about sensitivity to the plight of young black men being treated differently in our criminal justice system and in this case in white suburbs in america as we are african-americans. >> rand paul figured this out. he's leading the way on sentencing reform, which is a huge issue in the african-american community. he went to ferguson when many others didn't.
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he's also done the math which is we have a country that's very diverse and getting more diverse. 28% of the vote was minority in 2012 it will be 32% in 2016. this is the trend line of the republican party writes off african-americans and writes off hispanics and asians voted 75% for president obama. >> which was the biggest one because they used to vote for republicans. we have african-americans every year voting 4%, 6%, 7% for republicans. you have to go back to '72. nixon might have got 31%. 32%. you're not going to win elections nationally. >> the question is will the republican party accept that message. this party since the '60s has been running the southern strategy. it's been effective. but with a changing demographics, you can't win national elections like this. rand paul is telling him that. will the republican party receive the message? >> the mayor of atlantic city is here.
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>> always good when the boss brings us in. joining us now, the mayor of atlantic city, new jersey.
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mr. mayor, good to see you. >> good morning. >> the problems with public city have been well documented over the last several years. four casinos closed in the last few months. you're relatively new to the job. talk about the challenges your facing right now. >> so proliferation of casinos over the northeast and more gaming halls has players that want to play and weakest guys get lost. we lost four. i think you'll see revel back in the spring stronger than ever. a new buyer. $200 billion in assets already running casinos in bahamas and in vegas. the other three properties we're going to reposition. the key is we put all our eggs in one basket with gaming. we need to diversify. >> we heard before casinos came to atlantic city it would take care of all of atlantic city's problems and it didn't. >> of course not. no one should have expected that it did.
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it gave us good paying jobs and paid taxes. we needed to use that money to develop the city. >> did it bring problems as well that have been hard to handle? >> sure. what happened is once he came into a casino, no one paid attention to clean and safe and that's what we're doing right now. we lost our entrepreneurships. so that's the reason now. you see diversification that's going on and construction. whether we're talking about the conference center or the bass pro that's being built in the middle of the city or expansion at tropicana, that's where atlantic city needs to go. >> that makes an awful lot of sense. you know, i've got my son and some of his friends who will go down on new year's eve or something like that and these are kids that hang out.
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i called them kids. in brooklyn or hang out downtown new york and if there's more of that fill there, that will be a magnet. >> it will be. there's a beautiful beach there. i don't think people realize that. i'm from new jersey. i told you i go down there a couple times a year. i'm absolutely rooting for atlantic city. it's a great place. it's true. you go down there and you spend the night and gamble on friday or saturday night and you wake up and you go home. how do you get people to stay and enjoy. look at that beach. it's a big, wide expanse of beach that isn't used very well it seems to me. >> you give them a reason to come to atlantic city that they don't have in their own cities. atlantic city always had the wow factor and things. we got casinos and we didn't worry about it. taking advantage of the beach. you realize this wasn't the grandmother's resort anymore. this was a cool place for you. you came back. we have the best nightclubs on the east coast and so the
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millenniums are coming to atlantic city. they have to make it their second home. if not their second home, their weekend retreat. >> you have your work cut out for you but you seem inspired. thank you very much. still ahead -- we'll be dropping by. >> we have contributed a lot to the economic prosperity of atlantic city over the years. >> drive fast it's less than two hours from new york city. >> coming up, we have a behind the scenes look at the science behind one of this year's most highly anticipated films. christopher nolan interstellar and why jeb bush said his son spoke too soon about his presidential run and president obama goes after lawmakers supporting quarantiness but is e going against public opinion? much more ahead.
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>> spooky. it's the day before halloween. >> arm's length away. >> that's a great shot. looks kind of like the cover. let's go back to the shot for a second. it looks like vampires in the city. it's great that david is here. when he yells and screams at me, i can look at it. >> talk about playing the victim. >> i learned about joe.
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you're much more sensitive than people think. >> i'm only sensitive to friends that take cheap shots and hit below the belt. >> a couple months ago now? >> it's like 1962. >> i'm still holding it from 1996 for getting a leak from a certain member of congress and then doing a glowing profile the next day. >> you mention it every time he comes on set. >> you only have 14 more years before the statute of limitation runs out. >> i hope i live that long. >> let's start with a big picture question here. i'm not asking obviously as somebody close to the president. i'm asking you as nbc news senior political adviser. score it right now. less than a week out. i've said all along, my republican friends would say they see a big trend breaking for republicans. i don't see it. i see most things tightening up. do i believe the republicans at
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the end of the day because like you said battlefield is being fought on republicans. it's like a charge for democrats running up the hill. i think republicans will pull it out but i wouldn't be shocked in democrats held serve. what are you thinking today? >> i think that if you believe that the six very red states are gone, then democrats are going to have to run the table on the rest of those races. that's going to be very tough to do. >> do you believe the six red states are gone? do you believe louisiana is gone? >> i think it's very tough. i think arkansas is very tough. i think the three where incumbents are retiring, south dakota, west virginia, montana, are gone. that's what i believe. >> on the other hand, kentucky. >> i have said this the other day here. >> kansas. georgia. >> i'm surprised at how much orman is hanging in there in texas. five up i heard the other day in a poll.
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i think -- i expected kansas to go native. i'm not sure that they will. >> i expected and we had somebody on last week talking about muscle memory. we've all seen it. i said pennsylvania is fools gold for republicans. they go in june we're going to win pennsylvania this year and then in october they finally pull up the stakes. muscle memory kicks in. i expected that to happen in kansas. >> kansas is hanging tough. part of it has to do with the governor's race there. there's a negative environment for republicans. >> i wonder if north carolina at the end of the day the reason we see that tighten up, again in an off year election when electorate is older and wider, i wonder whether that's what's happening. muscle memory. we've always voted republican. we don't like what the president is doing. we like kay hagan but not enough. >> it could be. they have run effective ads against her in the last week
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using her own quotes. >> but you look at the count of that is georgia where you think muscle memory would be in the republican direction but it moved in the other direction toward michelle nunn. >> georgia is not a true red state. >> everyone said north carolina is a purple state. i still think north carolina is a red state trending but georgia, that's a -- that is totally new territory. i think it's changing before our eyes and you had a guy that bragged about outsourcing against michelle nunn. you can look at good political athletes. nunn a good political athlete. more than anyone expected.
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>> part of it is her tenacity. >> i'll say at the end of the day, i do think -- kentucky is one state i would be shocked if it went democratic. i haven't said that before. i think mitch mcconnell will hold on. >> we have chuck standing by. let's start with chris christie who jumped into the news for going up against a heckler. take a look. >> you all know me so if we're going to get into a debate here today it's going to get very interesting and very fun. i understand. i'll be more than happy to have a debate any time you like because somebody like you doesn't know a damn thing about what you're talking about except to stand up and show off when the cameras are here. i've been here when the cameras aren't here and done the work. i'm glad you had your day to
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show off but we're the ones who are here to actually do the work. turn around and get your 15 minutes of fame and then maybe take your jacket off, roll up your sleeves and do something for the people of this state. and there's been 23 months since then when all you have done is flap your mouth and not do anything. you want to have the conversation later, i'm happy to have it, buddy. until that time sit down and shut up. any time. any time. any time you like. it's wonderful. absolutely. i'll tell you, there's about 1,000 things i'll do tonight. going to dinner with you is about number 1,001. >> in 1966, david axelrod, reagan had his close advisers around him. he was an actor. he lost his temper one time and all of them, i think stu spencer said if you do that again, we're leaving. people aren't going to vote for an angry ronald reagan.
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>> this has always been the fatal flaw of chris christie. >> what's happening? >> i've been through a few presidential races. every day is filled with aggravation and provocations and if that's the way he's going to react, he has no future in this. it may be charming to flip people off but some take it personally. i don't think he's going to make it. >> it's not like somebody was yelling out something about his wife or kids which people do on the campaign trail. the guy was talking about a very legitimate policy issue. whether it was a fair attack or not, it was about policies and he loses it over that? >> i think it marks him as an angry man. >> happy warrior is what you want. he's got warrior but not happy there. >> joining us now from louisiana, moderator of "meet
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the press," chuck todd. we'll get to what you're doing in louisiana in a second. what's your take on chris christie yesterday? >> look, what you guys just said. if that is the attitude he has while campaigning, he's never going to make it through iowa. he's never going to make it through new hampshire. he can't be that thin skinned. if you're that thin skinned on the trail and it's going to be a very short campaign for him. he's got to learn -- there's part of that i wouldn't be surprised if some in the republican base if that's the christie way of saying you know i'm not -- you don't think i'm conservative enough but maybe i'm angry enough for you for conservative base, maybe that's what he thinks would work there. overall, that will -- i think he's headed for a long campaign. >> you know how presidential campaigns go. if you blow your top in
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nashville, tennessee, on a saturday night as a presidential candidate, it makes the morning news shows. what do you hear on the ground in louisiana? >> a couple things. number one, i think the way to watch this first round of voting. nobody believes that this thing ends on november 4th and this will be a runoff. how big is the african-american vote? there's been some question whether the african-american vote is as big as it was pre-katrina. this is the first time mary landrieu has had to run in a midterm post-katrina. the first time she ran post-katrina after a lot of
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african-americans moved out of the state was a presidential year. barack obama on the ballot the first time. african-american turnout was maximized. first time without that. that's a question mark. landrieu campaign sits there and tells me, hey, at our early vote numbers. they are running ahead of 2010 and i'm thinking well everything runs ahead from 2010 for democrats considering how bad it was. i think what to watch for on election night, is she at 46%, 47%, 48% or at 42%, 43% or 44%. if she's below 46%, it will be an uphill battle. >> you spoke with jeb bush. what do you think is going on? his son seems to be jumping in. >> his son thought he would jump
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in. jeb bush was in colorado campaigning for slate of gop candidates and cory gardner is locked in a tight race and bush sounded like a presidential candidate going after hillary clinton for remarks she made on the campaign trail last week where he said businesses don't create jobs. when i asked him whether or not he was planning to run in 2016, he was more reluctant if you want to take a listen. >> are you going to run for president? >> i think he's still assessing it. >> more than 50% or less than 50%? >> i think it's more than likely that he's given this serious thought in moving forward. >> more than likely he'll run? >> he'll run. a few years back i would have said less likely. >> the family is behind him 100%? >> the family is behind him 100% if he decides to do it. >> can i ask you what your son said this weekend on abc. is that where your head is on running for president? >> he has an opinion. he didn't talk to me.
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you love them to death and they have their own opinions but i'll make up my mind just as i said at the end of the year. >> you said that to vanderbilt you would consider it with your family over the holidays, that's the plan? >> same as i've always said. nothing new here. >> as you can see, he was not eager to make news on this particular front. we should point out that jeb bush has been doing aggressive midterm campaigning even though it has flown under the radar. he's been to more than 13 states. he's focused on governor's races particularly governors that he helped in 2010 four years ago to originally get elected. there's no question that he's working hard to maintain his ties across the country all of which could help him should he decide to run. >> i thought jeb handled that very well actually. >> that's why he's potentially potent candidate. i feel sorry for the guy. his mother and his kids. everybody is getting him in trouble. >> they are all weighing in. he's very personable. >> that's part of his strength.
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>> that was jeb. very likable jeb there. >> a contrast with governor christie. >> a big contrast. >> in fairness, he did not seem to really be anxious to chat with me and he said as much but did decide he was going to talk there for a little while. >> how was he received with a crowd there? obviously he's got a couple of problems especially on common core, which is one of these issues. i want to go to chuck after this. it flies under the radar for a lot of people but means a lot in the republican primaries and also immigration where he's way out in front on immigration. >> it's interesting, joe. he actually was proceeded on stage by another congressional candidate here in colorado who went after common core. bush himself did mention education in his speech like i said. it was pretty brief. it is part of the reason why voters here should elect republicans to sort of help in getting republican education policies enacted. i will say the reaction was a
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little bit subdued. it wasn't a huge crowd. he spoke very quickly. he didn't do any sort of rope line campaigning at the end. his appeal has been to hispanic voters. this state really mirrors the general electorate. there's a sizable hispanic voting population and jeb bush cut spanish language ad for cory gardner and he hosted a roundtable with hispanic business leaders earlier in the day. >> chuck, i'm curious what your read is on governor bush? he also did a speech a couple nights ago where he was harsh in an attack on president obama with common core defense and immigration stuff, and stuff with his family. you read the tea leaves and it seems like it's more and more like he actually is going to be running but there's enough contradictory evidence out there to give you doubt. what's your thought about that? >> i feel like behind the scenes you feel like people around jeb bush are pushing, pushing pushing and when he gets out in
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front he pulls back a little bit with different things. i agree. it's very contradictory. if you have watched what he's done on the campaign trail this year, he does -- when he does any senate candidates, it's almost exclusively hispanics and fund-raising. he's much more comfortable talking bigger policy issues with the gubernatorial candidates and i know in talking to some of the senate campaigns that have brought jeb bush in, i had one strategist say, yeah, we brought him in real fast. helped raise money and said don't talk about immigration and don't talk about education. and this happened to be for a senate candidate running in a redder state. so that's the open question here. can he find space in a republican primary and people that i've talked to close to him say if he can't -- if he doesn't think conservative electorate will accept him in some form, accept him during the debate but attack him for those positions, he's probably going to take a
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pass. >> chuck todd, thank you. and joe, just back to jeb bush. what do you think his impact is on different demographics? >> i think it's exciting to have a guy that everybody calls in to talk to hispanics. republicans just did absolutely miserableaby in 2012. it was in miami. you would have sat there in wonderment. we were in miami and he was crushed. the crowd was half hispanic, half caucasian for the most part. someone would ask him a question in english and he'll answer in english. and then right over here someone will ask him a question in spanish and he will sit there and sit there and talk for two, three, four, five minutes. >> the question is when he talk to republicans?
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>> that's a problem. i think the problem is if his last name were smith, he would be in better shape. we all love 41. 43 will be more of a -- going to take longer for people to turn and love him. among conservatives, neither 41 or 43 is a hero in primaries. >> let me just say if he sticks to positions on immigration and education reform and gets past the nominating process, he'll be a potent candidate for president. if he collapses on those issues, he'll be like romney, like mccain and he'll have mortgaged himself to the base of the party and he won't win a general election. >> if he gets through, no doubt about it there are a lot of democrats that would fear facing that guy in the general election. >> all right. kasie hunt, thank you. tomorrow, we'll go inside the close senate race in colorado and still ahead this morning, it's been 25 years since michael lewis captured the wild ways of wall street in his book "liars
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poker" has anything changed? he joins us next. we'll be right back. ♪ the design of the ford escape is clearly intended to grab your eye. ♪ oh, and your foot. ain't that a kick? the ford escape with the foot-activated liftgate. ♪ go open up something interesting. go further. transferred money from his before larry instantly bank of america savings account to his merrill edge retirement account. before he opened his first hot chocolate stand calling winter an "underserved season". and before he quit his friend's leaf-raking business for "not offering a 401k." larry knew the importance of preparing for retirement.
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>> the point is, ladies and gentlemen, that greed for lack of a better word is good. >> tender age of 22, i headed to the only place that fit my ambition. >> greed is right. >> move money from your client's pocket into your pocket. >> greed works. and greed, you mark my words, will not only save our paper but other malfunctioning corporation called the usa. >> yeah. >> a lot of people hated that movie. i was not one of them.
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michael douglas and leonardo dicaprio captured wild ways of the 1980s. so did our next guest. he was actually there. michael lewis, "liars poker." michael joins us now along with michelle cabrera. the day after the world series, i have to ask you, everybody loved to say money ball, great. it worked one or two years. it worked again this year. the a's if they hadn't -- if a's had not taken jon lester out in the seventh inning, chances are good it wouldn't have been the royals playing last night. it would have been the a's. it's still working. >> it's more than that. the a's, yeah, they're the money ball team but all teams have big analytic departments. they have transformed baseball.
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and the idea that there's a money ball team and an anti-money ball team doesn't exist anymore. >> they are all money ball teams. >> he tells me, he says the stuff that you wrote about in money ball was public information. we were just using things you get off the web. >> how long will he stick around in baseball? >> a while i think. the analytics are so sophisticated he won't let me in to see it because there are secrets. there's r & d at every time. everyone is doing it differently. the idea has swept the sport. >> remember the initial question was posed to paul volcker. he was the original guy meant to answer the question, does money matter to baseball or not? it's the same guy who invoked the volcker rule. >> are you going to level the revenue field so everyone had
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the same amount? he didn't understand. it's the obvious question. how can a team with $40 million compete against a team with $120 million. the answer is, one you can learn things and find out things and market inefficiencies but there's randomness in baseball. people see giants win and they tell a story about how that was really going to happen but it could have gone either way. >> it's like the red sox from worst to first to worst and last year you had seven guys who had their best season ever and it was never going to happen again. sometimes lightning just strikes especially in playoffs. let's go back to this. 25 years later what's changed? >> what great productive positive moves have you made? >> you talked about wall street run by a bunch of people that made way too much money and played fast and loose with the rules. what's changed in 25 years? >> the era i described looks
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charming and innocent. you know, the book starts when this era of wall street starts. it's the death of the partnership. all of a sudden it's not their money they're speculating with. it's shareholder money. it's the creation of options which leads to derivatives which makes everything complicated and nobody understands it and the idea that investment banks weren't service operations but trading operations and that's become more and more and more true. the big changes are too big to fail. the notion of too big to fail because big firms went out of business back then. >> no more. >> and they're bigger. >> it's also the time of incredible innovation. deregulation that allowed for creation of mortgage back oil tg
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at that time and so much stuff happened back then. people who worked during that time period, when you meet them to this day, they look back on that time period with joy. they thought it was a great place to work. >> it was. it was terrific. >> you loved it. >> i loved the people. i still am in touch with a lot of people. i guess so there was a surface vulgari vulgarity. you would see a woman dancing naked on a desk and you would -- >> you would not. >> that happens in the "today" show newsroom but i didn't think it happened anywhere else. >> there was a surface vulgarity but beneath it there was a sense of financial propriety.
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if what i'm doing useful? at that time it was be a opportunity for innovation to be useful. creation of the mortgage bond was a hugely beneficial thing. >> it sounds like it was a little bit like wolf of wall street back then. >> those people thought they were changing the world. >> that's true. >> they thought they were changing for the better. >> and indulging in surface vulgarity. >> a little? >> jfk did strip clubs. >> you can do both at the same time. so some of the scenes from wolf of wall street were not unfamiliar to me but some of that was martin's fantasy life. i don't think it had much to do with wall street. >> it was pure fraud. wall street firms presumably aren't built on fraud. >> everything he was doing was illegal. all of the business side of things were illegal.
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>> in the movie. >> i don't think it was a good description of the street. it was funny. >> let's not let facts get in the way of good movies. >> the point you're making is that things that were the same then and now is a lot of the best and brightest kids come out of college and flock to wall street for the obvious reason. >> used to be the bottom class of yale that went. nice young men who were presentable but they wouldn't cause trouble because they weren't bright enough to. >> it's remained the same ever since. we go through various cycles. it's the case because a lot of money is being made there. now your critique is that most of the stuff that goes on on wall street is socially and economically unproductive. >> a lot of it is. a lot of innovation is i think. >> is there any way to change -- this is big macro question. is there any way to change the incentive structure in our society so best and brightest college students no longer went into this field that is largely socially and economically
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unproductive? >> as a practical matter probably not. but the kind of things you could do, what really needs to happen is the incentives of the employees of the firms have to be realigned with the firm. they don't have that now. you see the rigging of foreign exchange markets and stock market which doesn't make a lot of sense from the point of the firm. they make some money but the risk for the firm -- but it makes sense at the level of employee because he's in his firm for few years trying to get a bonus at the end of the year and he's off. >> what about throwing people in jail? would that have a chilling effect? >> the problem is proving the case. that may do it. the carrot works better than the stick on wall street. >> 25 years ago this is when things started to get more
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complex and didn't we get to a point also -- that was the point 25 years ago where the s.e.c. could keep up with the firms. >> i don't know the s.e.c. ever kept up. ever. >> it has gotten worse now. they have no hope. >> more money and more money and they still don't, right? it's a perfect example of if only they had more money. >> it's hard for people making $75,000 to track down people that are making a billion. >> it's especially hard when the guy is making $75,000 a year and assume the next step is to make a million. nobody questions it. also, when the financial markets get as complicated as they've become, it's very easy for a smart wall street person to walk into an s.e.c. meeting and make it sound beyond their comprehension or at least so complicated you don't want to screw with it because you don't know consequences of what you're doing.
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it's a difficult environment for a regulator to operate in i think. >> almost impossible. 25th anniversary of liar's poker is out now. what are you working on now? >> i'm working on a pilot for showtime set on wall street in the 1920s. >> that's going to be good. >> it's one of the most controversial covers of time magazine in recent years. time's nancy gibbs responds to the huge reaction from her magazine's rotten apples story in just a few minutes. a remarkable scene in hawaii as the volcano's lava is making its way toward a large residential area. we'll be right back.
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"usa today," researchers believe a piece of metal found in the pacific ocean back in 1991 could belong to the plane flown by amelia earhart.
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another trip is planned for next june. earhart went missing in 1937 along with her navigator during an attempt to fly around the world. >> fascinating. >> it would be such a revelation to figure out the true facts of the mystery and what happened to her and the plane. this is coming to us from the "times" of trenton. i pitched this story. it's a new edition to the six flags great adventure park in new jersey. a baby giraffe. absolutely adorable. her name is mika. born on october 11th at 5'10" tall and started standing on her own after only an hour. >> she's 5'10". >> she's taller than you. >> she is. >> not by much. they chose a good name. cutie. >> let's go to hawaii's big island for the incredible flow of lava that's inching its way to a residential area.
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the national guard is going to be on the scene this morning to help block traffic and roads in the path of the lava flow. >> this is the flow from the volcano that looms toward one residential neighborhood. let's go to nbc's halle jackson. she has the story from above. >> reporter: we are at the tip of the sphere. this is the leading edge of the lava flow. 25 to 50 homes are in the direct path. this home looks like one of the lucky ones. the flow path within a few hundred yards of the house here. it doesn't look like it's moving at all. it's going five yards an hour to 20 yards an hour. this is so slow moving that the lava on top is hardening and blackening. there's still red hot lava underneath. right now it feels like we're in a furnace. we're close to the lava. you can see some of the
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breakouts and you can feel it. you can barely breathe. it's smoky and thick. this is what is feeding that lava flow that's heading over the town of pahoa. it's a bathtub full of lava. it's crusted over on top and acts as insulation keeping that lava underneath incredibly hot. that crust is like ice on a lake. underneath are tubes that funneling the lava right toward civilization. it's been about 17 weeks and this thing has traveled 12 miles it shows no signs of stopping just yet. it's nature at its most powerful. breath taking beautiful and devastating. >> can matthew mcconaughey continue his hot streak with his performance in "inner stellar." a look at the film when we come
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right back.
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but we went to summer camp together. summer camp is over. ♪ [ male announcer ] tomcat. [ cat meows ] [ male announcer ] engineered to kill. >> well, here she is. >> you're causing problems, nancy gibbs. "time" magazine, why do teachers hate you and why do you hate teachers? >> nancy gibbs has a look at the new issue which is cool and we'll get to that in just a moment. rotten apples? they're not happy with you on your last cover. she said it's an assault on teachers. >> i love a lively debate about an important issue as much as anyone. i'm concerned when our coverage of a debate is mischaracterized.
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we wrote about landmark california case that says keeping a bad teacher in a classroom is unconstitutional. the rotten apples are those bad teachers. >> you say that in your subtitle. >> yes. but somehow the protest is saying that it insults all teachers and so i'm a little puzzled by that. what's most poignant to me is people most upset by bad teachers are good teachers. if you're a great third grade teacher and you brought your class along and lit them on fire with the love of learning and you turn them over to an ineffective teacher and you watch that be lost, it's heartbreaking. >> it's like on the show where we have a great segment and we bring john heilemann and it's heartbreaking. >> this makes me crazy. this is such a strategy of enforcers of status quo. the only way to remain status quo is to turn every critique no matter how nuance as an attack on all teachers. they do this all the time.
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it undermines the credibility of those within the status quo who say they are open to reform because what they do is they just attack anyone who makes criticism whatsoever as being a hater of teachers. it makes me crazy. >> it misses larger point which is why we did the cover story in the first place. we're five days away from an election. a lot of people think our politics locally, nationally, are broken and some of them are now going to the courts to try to accomplish in courts what is not happening in legislaturlegi. you can agree with the ruling or disagree but it has huge implications and we ought to talk about is this the way we want to make policy. >> if words and images matter, which they totally do, do you think if you put a question mark behind the word apples that you would have a different conversation? >> or if you had 1,000 apples on your cover and then one rotten one. >> i'm not sure there is anything we could have done that would have forestalled this
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reaction. >> this is the way that -- the question is fantastic. they put a question mark after something. that's how they hedge. that's strategy in the headline. rotten apple question mark. >> you're not making a declarative statement. you're making a declarative statement on the cover rotten apples. >> the fact is that a judge has ruled that a bad teacher is unconstitutional. this is why this is an important case. the copycat cases are being filed in new york and elsewhere. again, is this the way we want to have this debate and make policy? >> it's silly. there are rotten apples. there are horrible teachers. there are horrible lawyers. there are horrible journalists. there are horrible tv hosts. in every field you can go, there are rotten apples in that field. someone who is not a rotten apple, christopher nolan who just may be one of the --
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>> segue. >> you're doing great today. incredible. >> one of the most remarkable directors that we have. mind bending how good he is. >> remarkable movie. it's very different than what he's done. this movie "interstellar" is about outer space but it's also about love and loss and sacrifice. it's about personal space and he's brought the two together in an extraordinary narrative. the special effects are incredible. performances are incredible. it's so ambitious in themes so when you take a director like nolan and have him set the bar as high as he did with this film of what he was trying to look at. >> how good is christopher nolan, man? >> christopher nolan is incredible. if you think about the entire body of work, there's almost no one who has been as ambitious in terms of the scale of the things he's done. >> that's the word. >> if you think about the "batman" movies, they're
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ambitious artistically, scale, technologically and the ambition has paid off so far in every movie. >> okay. nancy gibbs, thank you so much. >> everyone wants to see this movie. >> i want to see this movie. >> "time" is out right now. great to see you. >> i want to see bad teachers taken out of classrooms so 98% of great teachers can do their jobs. maybe i just love children too much. i don't know. maybe it's just america that i love. >> rotten tv hosts. >> i believe children are the future. >> is the u.s. on the verge of becoming a third world country? that's what senator bernie sanders says. he'll be on set to explain why. plus, her foundation has raised nearly $30 million for epilepsy research and she's not close to being done. no way. susan axelrod joins us. >> she did it despite the fact she's married to a guy named david. how did she do that? the exhilaration of a new engine.
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don't thank me. he's the one. he's the one -- >> that was fun -- >> i'll be over here. >> oh, probably won't even let you go there.
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>> -- citizens united for research in epilepsy, i'd like to say it uninterrupted, susan axelrod. very nice to see you. the baby is so beautiful. >> i know, we're so excited. there's nothing better. >> gorgeous. >> talk about progress, what progress is being made? >> you know, we are really growing the community of supports. we just had an event last night in new york. we've got one in boston. mike barnicle is involved with. our friend carole king is going to be performing. >> oh, wonderful. >> that's great. >> we're really excited about that. beyond that, what we're doing with all the money we raise with all the hard work of these supporters is to really invest in cutting edge science. we have a couple of really groundbreaking initiatives. >> because progress is being made. >> yes. so there's a lot of genetic discovery going on across the board and what we have just started is a database repository
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so patients can come and get themselves sequenced and researchers can access this data and make advances. patient's data will be stored with us in a confidential way so when discoveries are made we can go back to them, we think your child, your loved one, we may have found something. >> obviously, one of the greatest tragedies is unexpected sudden death among epilepsy patients. you are also rewarding grants in that area. >> that's an area of real importance to us. >> making progress on that? >> we are making progress. one of the things that's exciting about the small investment we've made in terms of dollars but really targeted research is the nih has now picked it up and is doing a huge project. so that's one of the things we like to do is give the seed grants out so people can take it and go forward for greater support. >> it's astounding to think there are 200,000 people a year
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will be diagnosed with this. you have a great website that shares these personal stories. that inspires. so when you're out there trying to raise money and bring attention to this, what are you trying to let people know? because there is inspiration. but there's also some hard reality. >> some of these stories are heart wrenching. >> they truly are. you want to give people hope. you don't want to be too despairing in the stories. but the fact is, we have stories of people and one of the things that keeps me motivated is 30 years ago we went through this with our daughter and i get a call or e-mail from a new patient would seems to be traveling the same path as my daughter. unacceptable. that's why the research is so critical. >> we talk about ebola. it's a concerning thing. up to 50,000 people a year lose
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their lives in epilepsy or seizure-related causes. that's a real public health crisis. it's something on which we should focus much more energy, much more attention. >> you devoted so much of your life to this. obviously because of your daughter. i will never forget reading the "parade" magazine piece where you describe some of the most unbelievably heart wrenching moments about treatments that didn't work and procedures. watching her suffer. how is she doing now? >> she's doing great. she's one of the stories that is important to share. because 14 years ago, she went on to a new medication and she hasn't had a seizure since. unfortunately, the barrage of medications and treatments and seizures we couldn't control for the first 18 years took a toll. but the brain is an amazing organ. we are seeing her make steady improvements. every day. she blows our mind with something new she's figured out.
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>> how much easier to face this now that you have a doctor in your family. dr. axelrod. >> you just can't stop it. >> you can't let go. >> susan -- an e-mail that said despite my husband, would you please -- >> -- psychiatry, try to figure this out. >> a lot of people have tried -- congratulations. >> thank you. >> this is really incredible. the progress you're making despite the fact also that she did this with donny deutsch this time. >> that's true, yes. we're coming -- in boston when we're -- >> november 13th. >> where's that going to be? >> boston. >> okay. >> carole king. >> we will be there. thank you for so many reasons. thank you. chris christie tells a heckler to sit down and shut up. >> don't do that. no, don't do that. >> when "morning joe" comes right back.
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welcome back to "morning
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joe." john heilman is back with us at the table. >> it was game seven of the world series. >> that looked like a good time for everyone. john heilman is our resident giants fan. five innings of two hits, sco scoreless relief. >> not just two days rest but two days after finishing a shutout where he threw 120 pitches. back up here last night before this game saying i don't really care about pitch counts. an old-fashioned kind of pitcher. was dominant just throughout the series. just an extraordinary postseason run for him. putting himself in the ranks of, you know, one of the truly greatest post pitchers. >> puts him in mariano rivera company. except he's a starting pitcher. >> he really is just -- you can
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overstate a lot of things about sports but in this instance he really is in the pantheon. >> and he's 25 years old. >> 25 years old. >> a really good height too. >> 6'5". >> christina, what was that? >> i said he's got a name that would be a great bye line if he was a journalist. >> and he's also 6'5". you got to like a guy that tall. >> absolutely. and tip your cap to the kansas city royals. hadn't been to the playoffs in 29 years. a generation of losing. they played incredibly well. >> where do the giants sit in the -- like at least the pan thr pantheon of great teams? you've got the a's in the early '70s. >> the yankees of the '90s. i know you don't like to acknowledge that. >> yankees won four and five years. they're right there. they're still young.
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>> i'd say if you think about the new millennium, the two great teams so far are the red sox in the american league and the giants in the national league. >> okay. to maine. >> the best organization right now, the giants. giants and the cardinals are incredible. that's all i have to say. i'll be quiet now. >> thank you very much. sit down and shut up. we'll get to that one. >> that hurts me. >> joe has a lot things in common with the giants. he knows how to get it done in the postseason. >> exactly. >> and you're honoring their colors. >> what can i say? >> a showdown is looming in maine. between state officials and a nurse who recently returned from sierra leone. governor paul le page. he's an interesting character. >> he's an interesting cat. >> he's an interesting cat. >> he's an interesting cat, man. >> he's trying to force hickox
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to observe a quarantine. hickox is vowing to fight any attempt by the state for mandatory isolation. she says she has no symptoms of ebola and will only agree to stay in her home through today. >> i don't want to hurt anyone in the public, but i don't think this is an acceptable line to be grown. when we let stigmaization win, we all lose. i think this is something we have to fight from the beginning. i have been told that if friends come to my house, they can't hug me. they have to stay three feet away from me. i'm not symptomatic. there's no way i could give someone ebola. you're telling me i can't hug my friend after i've been fighting a really tough battle for four weeks in west africa. it's painful. it's emotionally draining. >> and without naming names, president obama criticized lawmakers who are supporting quarantines and travel bans for people returning from ebola affected countries. >> when i hear people talking
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about american leadership, and then promoting policies that would avoid leadership, and have us running in the opposite direction. hiding under the covers. it makes me a little frustrated. i put those on notice who think that we should hide from these problems. that's not who we are. that's not who i am. that's not who these folks are. this is america. we do things differently. >> this is america. we do things differently. unless it's in barack obama's own government in the military. so anyway. the commander in chief of course i guess is he saying that he's hiding under the covers?
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again, it's the inconsistency. the constant inconsistency coming from this government that has fueled fears. some would say irrationale fears. i don't know if the fear's so much of ebola as it is of the government's ability to have a consistent policy. a consistent set of guidelines which the president himself does not have. i yet to say it's a very bold move. as we say in "top gun," bold move, maverick. for the president to go out there and act that self-righteous while his own military that he runs, that he's the ghand ecommander in chief o putting a mandatory 21-day quarantine on troops that don't even treat ebola patients. it is absurd that the president would act that self-righteous when his own government, his own administration, is conducting the very policies that he's
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acting so self-righteous to condemn. this is a jim and tammy faye bakker moment for the president on the ebola front. i won't call them dumb liberals. i know there are a lot of people who like to feel superior to others. and say oh, the american people they're just hucksters, they're just idiots. an amazing poll from the "washington post." i will say, again, goes more to the bungling of this operation from the world health organization over the past year and the cdc and the dallas hospital and the states that had inconsistent policies. i think it states more to that. you know what, the nurse is right up in maine. you can hug her. she's not symptomatic right now. the one thing we've learned over past month is health care workers get ebola when they treat people in the final stages of ebola.
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and when they're really symptomatic. she's not symptomatic right now. but this bigger fear, this doesn't come from the disease it comes from the incompetence. the president out there, inconsistent again, that's a real problem. >> this poll finds that 80% of americans support quarantines for u.s. citizens returning from west africa. that, again, as you say, the result of the inconsistency out there. >> the government hasn't done anything right on this. i mean, they have bungled it from the very beginning. but there have been great doctors who have treated patients with ebola. and that itself i think will calm people down. who's not calm right now, chris christie. >> thank you. >> i think that guy may need -- may need to talk to an anger management professional. >> well, once again, chris
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christie's in the news for taking on a heckler. >> don't do that. >> in a public forum. a former council person who's a former pro athlete as well. anyhow. this time it's on hurricane sandy relief. went on the attack against a former city council member who held a sign that read, state in new jers new jersey, stay in new jersey, finish the job. >> you know me. it's going to get very interesting and very fun. i understand. i'll be more than happy to have a debate with you anytime you like, guy. somebody like you who doesn't know a damn thing what he's talking about. i've been here when the cameras weren't here and did the work. i'm glad you had your day to show off. but we're the ones who are here to actually do the work. so turn around, get your 15 minutes of fame and then maybe take your jacket off, roll up your sleeves and do something
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for the people of this state. and there's been 23 months since then when all you've been doing is flapping your mouth and not doing anything. so listen, you want to have the conversation later, i'm happy to have it, buddy. but until that time, sit down and shut up. any time. any time. any time you like. wonderful. absolutely. yeah. i'll tell you. there's about 1,000 things i'll do tonight. going to dinner with you is about number 1,001. >> why? >> um -- >> why? >> the heckler who tried to invite christie to dinner to finish the debate was trying to draw attention to a $1 billion program that gets new jersey residents back in their homes following sandy. >> what's going on with him? i'm sorry. everybody loves, you know, politician that fights back. but you don't, you don't -- you ignore hecklers. you have fun with hecklers. i don't know. does he think this is, like, a gateway to winning the iowa
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caucuses? what's going on here? >> i don't know. look, there's obviously -- he had -- we know the youtube channel and his confrontations in various settings is part of what drove him to national prominence and gave him a sort of public profile. i think angerer in comes across well on television. as you said, joe humor. that just seemed angry to me. i don't think -- >> the guy was right in his face. and i'm not sure -- >> so? >> shouldn't he have moved at some point or -- >> so? i mean, you have hecklers. hecklers have been -- christina, hecklers have been following politicians around for like 4,000 years. >> they should have. the number one rule is ignore hecklers. >> like to really spend a lot of time going to presidential
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caucus events and talking to these candidates at their town halls. some of them get a little in your face and a little rowdy. like the iowa nice does not like that. no matter how many times you call someone buddy, it's clear they're not your buddy. >> we all know christie knows this is part of his own mythology. these confrontations. as part of his brand and reputation. you can see how much he enjoys -- the problem is the guy brings up fairly a really good point about what's happening in jersey. >> there are people still not in their homes. >> a lot of that money. this guy's from bellemare. just hasn't been distributed. i don't know. maybe that's the only way he could get his message out. >> he's got a right to go and carry a sign and -- you know, the thing is, we talked about -- he went after the teacher in --
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it's one thing when you're telling somebody, hey, back off, these are my kids. it's none of your business, these are my kids. i think we all laughed and for good reason. don't get personal with somebody's kids. if they decide to send them to a christian school. it's quite another thing if somebody's bringing up a legitimate point and you're telling them to sit down and shut up. it's just -- it's not like this guy was a 9/11 truther screaming from the back of the arena. maybe he should take it up another way, but i don't know how else you get in front of the governor of the state of new jersey. but his point is a legitimate point. >> could you say, listen, bellemare, okay, i want to hear what you have to say. >> let's take your name and number and get back to you. >> or bring someone over to -- and then go talk to him personally after. i don't know -- >> exactly. hey, listen, can you -- i'd love to talk to you, can you give lewis the name and number.
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>> sounds like you've done that before. >> you want to hear what they have to say. i don't know. >> no, the guy obviously -- yes, the guy's trying to get attention. we understand the guy's trying to get attention. so chris christie, don't give him attention. you just gave him attention. on all the nightly news broad casts last night and they they went over and interviewed the guy. >> do you think chris christie regrets that? >> he's gotten very combat im. i think he's seen the polls that i knew were coming that people probably support his decision to quarantine this nurse. >> the balancing act, i mean, he went over the line there. that may work in jersey. i don't even know that that works in jersey. it's not going to work in new hampshire. it's not going to work in iowa. it's not going to work in south carolina. it's not going to work in the early -- >> happy warrior is what you want. >> you've got to enjoy that.
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>> not a lot of happy in that image. still ahead on "morning joe," independent u.s. senator from vermont bernie sanders is here. and then, john hunt sr. will join us. janis joplin. >> holy cow, how did we do that? >> is 27 really the most likely age for rock royalty to have an untimely death? some researchers decide to take a look. was there a study found? >> wasn't jim morrison 27 also? >> but first our own, our very own janis joplin, bill karins. >> i'm safely past 27. the cold is on its way. we had a pretty good october across this country. and november is when we really take the plunge. it is on its way. right now, the cold blast is located up there in northern canada. it is heading due south. right now, it's about 25 in churchill. the blue shows you the cool air. the purple is the cold air.
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that drops down into on halloween friday, chicago, st. louis, kansas city, detroit and cleveland. then it dips to the south. that's going to be unusual for your saturday morning in the southeast. up through new england as we go through sunday, the nor'easter look, to miss us but some areas will get snow out of this. if you're in north carolina mountains or in maine, nova scotia, newfoundland, that's who gets the snow. we have winter watches up. 4 to 8 inches. for the mountains in north carolina. any leaves on the trees will be a problem. today's forecast, really no problems across the country. in talking about the halloween forecast, chicago, cleveland, kansas city, areas like that, make sure you bring your winter coats with you as you're out trick or treating a arrives for ghosts and goblins. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪
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see how startup-ny can help your business grow at startup.ny.gov it's a fresh approach on education-- superintendent of public instruction tom torlakson's blueprint for great schools. torlakson's blueprint outlines how investing in our schools will reduce class sizes, bring back music and art, and provide a well-rounded education. and torlakson's plan calls for more parental involvement. spending decisions about our education dollars should be made by parents and teachers, not by politicians. tell tom torlakson to keep
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fighting for a plan that invests in our public schools. a look at the morning papers. >> what happened? >> huh? >> all right. >> oh, wow. >> what is that? >> perry peopler plays his picker. >> pervy pepper plays his picker. fiddler on the roof. >> that's a horrible story. >> i'm not even going to read that. >> "the wall street journal." "the wall street journal" reports president obama's planning to cut the number of u.s. deportations of
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undocumented worker, through an executive action. the white house is considering two criteria that will determine who gets to stay and who has to leave. individuals will have to spend a minimum amount of time in the u.s. their ties to family members already in the u.s. will also be considered. the new criteria could protect between 1 million and 4 million -- >> how incredible, just one week before the election, the president's decided to stop deporting as many hispanics as he has in the past. just a coincidence. one week before the election. after being criticized by hispanic leaders. >> aren't you full of critique this morning? >> it's just so funny how things happen. >> oh, yes they do. >> serendipity. >> i love that movie, by the way. >> apple reportedly in talks to cell the iphone in iran if western sanctions were to ease in the near future. the tech giant is looking into working with cell phone distributors rather than stores
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directly operated by apple. the move will not come until heavier economic punishments against iranian financial institutions are lifted. those sanctions make it possible to transfer payments into or out of the country. >> you can listen to your favorite ayatollah khomeini raps like they got some party mixes of him. death to america. death, death, death. i mean, it's -- >> the unplugged album. acoustics. >> the fan who disappeared from the game -- >> where did this guy go? >> found safe after walking and hitchhiking 130 miles to the town of pueblo, colorado. >> if i were going to go somewhere, i would go to pueblo or boulder. >> found in a k-mart parking lot. despite extreme fatigue, was in good condition. he told authorities he, quote, had his fill of football and decided to go for a walk. >> it's happened to us all. 180-mile walk. >> he was not following media
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reports and was unaware people were searching for him. >> something else going on. >> the game didn't go as well as you expected. you're like, i'm going to go walk 180 miles. >> he said he got very little cash, no cell phone, and just walked 130 miles. something else is -- >> i'm kind of jealous. >> we need a follow-up on this story. >> "wall street journal." a new study out of australia catting doubt on the theory of the so-called 27 club. that's the age when rock musicians are said to be at the highest risk of an untimely death. you know the list. janis joplin, jimi hendrix, curt cobain. jim morrison. researchers say that number 27 thing is a myth. a review of music industry deaths shows while musicians generally do live shorter lives, they're still around well into their 50s. of course they are, on average. the average female musician lives into her 60s compared to 80 for average american woman. >> who in australia decided to do this study? >> i don't know.
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"the washington post." creative writing students can get credit for serving the web. the class called wasting time on the internet will force students to be districted in order to see how it impacts their writing. >> oh, dear god. >> that's actually kind of interesting. the professor says the goal is to have students produce a strong story at the end the semester. he hopes the curious will prove the internet and digital distraction is making society -- >> it's not, professor. it's actually rewiring -- >> the brain? >> it's rewiring millennial's brain. they get distracted every 11, 12, 13 seconds. there are a lot of older people too. like their 40s and 50s. that are just -- >> i'm very distracted. >> the facebook and -- >> trying to detach. >> it's constant. it's like distracted. put it down. >> the so-called brain fitness industry is booming. does the mind game actually work? we're going to talk to a
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researcher who suggest people should save their money. but first, you should definitely save your money. >> independent senator bernie sanders is standing by. we're going to talk to him about a lot straight ahead. on "morning joe." (boys screaming) totino's pizza rolls...
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joining us now, independence senator from vermont, senator bernie sanders. if to have you here. >> always great to have you with us. great to see you again. the rich keep getting richer it the poor keep getting poorer. it's happened to the obama administration. it's happened to the bush administration. you can keep going all the way back i guess, the nixon administration. you can't blame that on one president or one party. this is systemic. how do we break that cycle and rebuild the middle class?
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>> great question. i think first thought, we have to take a look at unfettered free trade, trade policies by the way which have been supported by republicans and democrats. which say that it's okay to shut down plants in america and move to china. we have lost some 60,000 factories, millions of decent paying jobs in the last 14 years. we have to stop the assault on trade unions and make it easier for workers to enjoy their constitutional right to organize. when you attack unions and prevent workers from collective bargaining, you're going to drive wages down. we've got to raise the minimum wage in this country to a living wage. at least $10 an hour. joe, we need, with our infrastructure crumbling, our roads and bridges, a massive federal jobs program to put people back to work. putting $1 trillion in rebuilding our infrastructure creates 13 million decorrect paying jobs. we need pay equity for women.
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not where women are getting 70 cents on the dollar for men. if you do those things, it's the -- >> is this a solely republican caused problem or is there also a problem with established d.c. democrats? >> it is both parties but i think it is more the republican party. as you well know, we have tried in the senate to pass legislation to the minimum wage. we tried pay equity. we tried to look b get rid of this disastrous citizens united decision which allows billionaires to buy elections. we were filibustered by the republicans. >> so what about the first couple of years, the president had an almost filibuster-proof senate? what happened then? was there a missed opportunity for these progressive problems? >> i think so. on the other hand, let's not forget where we were six years
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ago. we had a financial system which was on the verge of collapse. we were in two wars. we were losing troops in combat. so we've come some way. the situation that economically is better. clearly, we have a long way to go. >> assume for the sake of argument, assume republicans take control of the senate. more dysfunctional, or conceivably is there a way in which it might be less dysfunctional. >> the issue is what happens. in my view, let me lay it right out on the line. i'll tell you exactly what i think will happen. there will be a tax on social security. so-called chain cpi. an attempt to end medicare as we know it. massive cuts in medicaid, in nutrition programs, in education. we will not see action on rebuilding our infrastructure. there will be more tax breaks for the rich and large corporations. >> the president's not going to sign any of those bills, right?
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>> i would surely hope not. >> you would think republicans who understood that might think going into a presidential election there will be no benefit to passing a bunch of legislation the president was going to veto. >> some of our republican colleagues chose to shut down the united states government. we have engaged -- they have engaged in hundreds and hundreds of filibusters. one of the things i think people don't appreciate, there was once a time in american history where majority vote ruled in the united states senate. you got 51 votes, you passed something. you can't get through anything right now without 60 votes because the republicans have changed the rules. >> senator, specifically, when we look at what's going on, there was legislation, the fact that minimum wage payments are going to go up to minimal easing. by that point, it's going to be around 10.50. why can't you look at what's taking place in your home state?
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carry some of these ideas back to d.c. and say why don't we index minimum wage to inflation? >> that's the legislation we brought forth in the senate. and raise it to $10.10 and index it. >> why can't you get other people to come on board? when you can show successes that have happened. >> i don't want to break the bad news for you. i don't want to upset you or shock you. there are some people in the united states congress who could care less about working people. their job is to represent the wealthy and large corporations. a lot of people follow that lead. >> you know, it's interesting, we've started to notice, and we've noticed from mitt romney other -- other main street republicans. that are now saying, yeah, let's raise the minimum wage. he told us the other night we need to raise the minimum wage and index it to inflation. >> that's a good sign. >> it is a good sign.
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you talked about the government shutdown. i noticed from my republican friends that that was almost an icebreaker. almost a wake-up call for a lot of republicans to say, hey, wait a second, we're not just going to fight absolutely everything. have you noticed over the past year any movement at all? >> i hope you're right, but to be honest with you, i hadn't noticed. working with john mccain, with republican, we actually got a decent bill through. that's very much the exception to the rule. >> okay. bernie, thank you so much. >> senator bernie sanders. >> you're running for president, right? >> giving thought to it. thought to it. >> okay, very -- >> well, what's your current thinking about it? >> my current thinking is, can you run a successful campaign, taking on the billionaire class and the enormous sums of money that would be thrown against somebody once they stand up for working families. >> you would only run in you
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thought there was a reasonable chance of winning? >> yes. >> okay. >> jon huntsman sr. explains how he went from barefoot to billionaire and how that led him to the promise of curing cancer. we'll be right back. wethey were a littlehorizons to mbit skeptical.ss, what they do actually is rocket science. but at ge capital we also bring expertise from across ge, like lean process engineers we asked who does what, when, where, and why that step first? ideas for improvement started pouring out. with a little help from us, they actually doubled their output speed. if you just need a loan, just call a bank. at ge capital, we're builders. and what we know... can help you grow. they take us to worlds full of heroes and titans.
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it works how you want to work. with a fidelity investment professional... or managing your investments on your own. helping you find new ways to plan for retirement. and save on taxes where you can. so you can invest in the life that you want today. tap into the full power of your fidelity greenline. call or come in today for a free one-on-one review. here with us now, executive chairman and founder of huntsman corporation john huntn huntsman. out with a new book. "barefoot to billionaire." >> i just found out mr. huntsman has a heck of a lot of connections with pensacola, florida. >> my hometown, absolutely.
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>> you've invested in my hometown. it's very excite. obviously, barefoot to billionaire, very intriguing title. talk about the arc of your life and -- i'm just going to say it unabashedly, the american dream and how it's played out in your life. >> my father was a rural school teacher in idaho and we lived in a small town that no longer exists and he taught school at $99 a month and we had a little farm in idaho. world war ii came along and my father went in the navy. we ended up in pensacola, your hometown. it was the first view outside of rural idaho. and he came back and decided to go to college at age 40. so we lived in student housing which was a step down from our little home with two rooms and outside plumbing. we put him through college. he graduated college when i got out of high school. my upbringing was one of work, work, work. >> he was also tough at home.
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you talk about an abusive father but a long suffering mother. >> it shaped it immensely because -- the book is dedicated to my mother and she died cancer being as did my father. my mother was terribly abused in the sense in today's world she wasn't permitted to drive, she went permitted to go to church. my father was a very strict disciplinarian. you know, we didn't have anything. so you just had to fend for yourself. >> by fifth grade, you and your brother were actually responsible for your clothing, your food, everything. >> i received my social security card at age 10 and i've been using it ever since. for what good the future brings. no, it was -- you know, it was a typical upbringing for a depression-born type of an individual. but my belief in writing this book was that there is still great opportunities for young men and women in the world.
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i began with this book 30 years ago because i wanted the facts and figures -- >> you started there. you've gone to where your company makes over $10 billion a year, and yet you keep talking about how you had to keep climbing back. you almost flunked out of college. >> right. >> you were this close to declaring bankruptcy three separate times. you suffered bouts with cancer. what kept you going? >> it's hard to know. i think each of us inside us have this great determination and will power to succeed. when your name's on the door, it's a very powerful influence to move ahead and to keep charge. i was never going to let our name be soiled. the worst thing i think we can do in life is have a name that's not honorable. winston churchill said without integrity, nothing else counts. with ining at the gret, nothing else counts. it meant so much to me. i listened to the lawyers but
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not very much. i listened to the consultants but not very much. the bankers, i tossed them out of the office and we made a go. >> how does your mother cope. did any of her influence stay with you in life? >> it did. she was the sweetest woman i ever knew in my life. she died young of breast cancer. i knew when she died in my arms that some day i was going to devote everything i had to helping this great cause. and she was -- she was my hero. >> i'm going to ask you a political question. >> sure. >> you served for a little while in the nixon administration. so talk about richard nixon. you talked about integrity. talk about your experiences with richard nixon. >> we all know that richard nixon had a dual personality. my job was the methodology of managing the white house internally.
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briefing him for all his meetings. also trying to summarize all the material going to him on one page. which is almost impossible. but i met with him either day at 8:15 and 4:15. i found him to be very, very accommodating to the children. he loved to have the children john jr. and peter and others come into the office. he felt very comfortable with kids. people don't realize that side of richard nixon. but, again, he had this other side of getting with chuck -- >> sir, you talk about keeping the huntsman name strong. you have a son named jon. would you like to see him do it again? >> i would. i'm not sure he would. i know of no man literally who has the integrity and the three-time ambassadorship. when he ran for governor, it was really unforeseen, his second term. he received over 80% of the republican vote. and almost 80% of the democratic
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vote. you know, for -- that's almost unheard of in politics. >> so if he doesn't do it, do you have a republican favorite? is it mitt romney? >> i think if i can't convince -- i'm not making any progress right now to be honest with you. he's a terrific son. i liked his father. i always thought the world of bush 41. >> the book is jon huntsman sr. thank you so much. it's great to see you. >> we think the world of you. thank you so much, mr. hunt. great honor. up next, are so-called brain games worth it? a new study reveals if they keep your mind sharp or they just prey on people's fears of getting old. keep it right here on "morning joe." >> working on me. >> definitely works on me. if it doesn't work fast... you're on to the next thing. clinically proven neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair.
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all right. so the business of keeping aging minds agile and alert is booming. it was highlighted in this week's issue of "the new york times" magazine. americans spend more than $1 billion a year on brain games. but a group of scientists is warning that claims made by makers of computer-based brain games are frequently exaggerated and at times, who knew, misleading.
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here with us now, lara cartonson. great to have you here. we were talking about brain apps last week. it is big business. a lot of people get drawn in because of course we want to be agile and stay alert late into life. >> does it work? >> stanford came out against us. saying the science isn't there. >> she's laughing at me. >> tell us about it. >> there's not a lot of evidence for enduring changes to the brain as a function of playing these brain games. >> so what would stanford support as good evidence for making our brains better as we age? >> here's the issue. the issue with the brain games and the claims is that if you play these games, you're going to be doing better in daily life. if you play the games, there's a lot of evidence you get better at the games and there's not a lot of evidence -- >> you still can't find your keys. >> oh, my gosh. but you say there are some things you can do. make sure -- physical exercise. socialize with friends.
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read. continue pursuing hobbies. and do work that you love. >> yes. >> that does keep your brain engaged? >> there's no question that brains are modifiable. and that goes on as long as we're alive. so you can learn new things. you can change your neural activity. we're doing that right now as we're having a conversation. there are a lot of ways to do that. there's no question about it. the question is about the most effective and efficient way to do it. >> what is the most effective way to do it? i'm saying this as somebody who forgets the names of my children. so what is the most effective way? >> we don't know the answer to that question. >> one of them. >> so one of them, it would be exercise. i like exercise as an alternative because it does so much good for other aspects of your life. another one is volunteering. engagement and helping other people is really good. >> stay engaged. >> are we going to have generations of people sitting by their pools playing games on
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their apps. >> learning a new language, even in the 40s or 50s. picking up piano. doing things that really bend your mind. >> you're on to something that's essential. that is new learning. >> new learning. >> what tends to happen as we get older is we do more and more of things we're really good at. we have a lot of expertise in. that's good but it's not helping us, you know, sort of stimulate -- >> we need to create new brain neural pathways by challenging ourselves. >> all these things seem like an awful lot of work. is there not a pill i can take? >> is there an app? >> i'm not kidding. fix this with a pill? >> there is. >> i would really like that. >> depends what you think as close. there's some very interesting work going on. i would guess one day we will have a pill. >> will it come to fruition before i'm dead? >> this is the question. >> do you focus on dementia or alzheimer's, both? >> this is an important point.
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there's no evidence that playing brain games can ward off alzheimer's disease, zero. >> what about dementia? >> none that it would ward off dementia. >> i ask that question because maybe what we're looking at isn't dementia. i had a grandmother who lived to be 93. she stayed engaged and active. we kept her busy with little tasks around the house. she stopped at 92. and fell off a cliff, died at 93. i mean, just basically stopped using her mind. and i'll just -- my mom and actually my dad, when they retired and stopped working and stopped using their mind actively, i've noticed a precipitous decline. i talked about judges last week. federal judges. they stay active and stimulated in their late 80s. >> work seems to have benefits for cognitive furngsing. there's some interesting studies where they compare cognitive
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functioning in older people, people say age 60 to 64. according to the generosity of the pension policies of the country. and those countries with the least generous policies, that is, the ones where people continue to work, are functioning better cogniti cognitively -- >> chocolate, help with brain function, memory, yes? >> i wish i could say yes. >> darn it. >> you're a buzz kill. okay, laura, thank you so much. you're wonderful. what if anything have we learned today. i'm meteorologist bill karins continuing to watch cold air coming down from canada. today it's going to show up in north dakota and northern minnesota and then the plunge through the great lakes and ohio valley for your hall week.
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welcome back, kids. it's time to talk about what we learned today. >> thomas has something to share with us. >> apple ceo tim cook made news this morning by posting on bloomberg business week an editorial that he confirms. he write, i don't consider myself an activist but i realize how much i've benefitted from the sacrifice of others. so if hearing that the ceo of apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is, then it's worth the tradeoff with my own privacy. >> all right. >> that's a big deal. >> that is a big deal. and i am also -- right now, today, i am also going to acknowledge my sexuallity. what have you learned today?
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>> i learned we're making a sharp turn from baseball to basketball. now tonight lebron james back to cleveland. >> everybody was rooting against the giants, it seems. man, you got to give the giants credit. 3 of 5. that puts him on par -- >> if it's way too early -- >> don't keep us on pins and needles. >> we're all waiting. >> if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." stick around, it's "the daily rundown" with craig melvin. is that a shot? main event. kp hickox speaks out again and president obama says it's time to focus on the science. christie storming the midterm trail with dozens of stops between now and election day. a very

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