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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  March 25, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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the scenes there really terrible. it looks from the helicopter almost like those white specs could be snow. they're not. they're the tiniest debris from that plane. nothing bigger than a car was found. >> that was msnbc's bill feely from france. this morning there are so many unanswered questions. why would there be an
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eight-minute dissent straight into the alps? could this have been a pilot-suicide scenario? is the airbus considered a safe plane? why is flying at this point considered safer tan ever? we will do our best to answer all those pressing and perplexing questions all morning long here on "morning joe." with us on set we have msnbc contributor, mike barnacle. the news and finance contributor and pulitzer prize and columnist and associate editor of the new york post you jean robinson and an experienced pilot steve radner. good to have you all on board this morning. let's set the scene for everybody, 24 hours later. recovery crews in the french alps are resuming their search this morning. germany's prime minister is calling it a scene of horror. they expected an arrival if dusseldorf, this scattered debris is all that remains of german wings 9525.
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officials say the plane was pulverized and the biggest parts left are the size of a small car. investigators did find a black box. they say it's damaged but should still be able provide clues. 150 people were on board and officials at the crash site say there are no signs of life. most of the victims were from europe including 16 german high school students. two babies were also on board. the plane left barcelona at 10:00 a.m. local time and cruised to an altitude of 35,000 feet. minute later, officials say it fell thousands of feet per minute for roughly eight minutes. the pilots did not send a distress signal which was initially reported in the hour or so after the crash. flight radar 24 says it lost contact with the plane which plunged more than 30,000 feet by 10:40. it took crews hours to reach the crash site because of its remote
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location. authorities are warning of a long road ahead. at this time officials say they do not suspect terrorism and believe the crash is a tragic accident. joining us from france near the crash site nbc news correspondent keir simmons, what exactly can they be looking for at this point? >> reporter: well mica they are looking for evidence. i'm afraid they are looking for bodies. let me show you what's happening behind you here. if i step out of the way, can you see helicopters are parked in the field behind me here. we understand that they are a ferrying search and search of the investigators are two at the crash site on regular intervals. these helicopters are taking off, heading up to the crash site, because it is so difficult to get there. it is not possible to get there by road. you can try to make the very very treacherous trek to the
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crash site. but the best way to get there is with these helicopters. bad weather has hampered that weather. they are managing to get there. what as you mentioned, they are finding there, the german foreign minister described as a picture of horror. the parts of the plane scattered around as you say no bigger those parts or each individual part than a car. some witnesses say, and we've actually spoken, mica to one man who lives in the last village before the crash site. and he describes hearing a kind of low rumble very unexpected for a plane, which he says mostly kind of going to fly over here at a very high altitude and then he says he heard nothing, not an explosion. no sound and he assumed that nothing had happened if you like, until he discovered that the plane had, indeed crashed into the mountainside and just
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on the other side of the mountain, from where he lives. >> nbc's keir simmons, thank you. as keir was saying the investigation is now under way to determine what exactly caused this crash. for that let's bring in nbc's tom costello. tom, what are the most pressing questions at this point? >> reporter: yeah, mica good morning. and this morning still just as many questions as we had yesterday, but i think the key questions as relates to the investigation really are why did this plane descend rather rapidly, a controlled descend, programmed descent from 30,000 to 6,000 feet and why did the crew members not talk at all to air traffic control t. disaster now strewn over the french alps may have started at or near 38,000 feet. the plane only spent one-to-three minutes before beginning what appears to be a programmed descent, unusually steep, but fought extreme.
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what puzzles veteran crash investigators is why the crew never radioed a mayday. >> they didn't provide a stress call. they didn't indicate in anyway shape or form a problem with the aircraft. that's very unusual, given the fact that they were 38,000 feet. they would have been in complete communication with air track control. >> reporter: among the scenarios verdicts will have to consider, was there an emergency to force a rapid descent, if that was the problem the pilot should have levelled the plane out at 10,000 feet where there is plenty of oxygen. instead, it kept descending. so were the pilots and passengers somehow incapacitated perhaps from lack of oxygen? captain john cox once flew the a-320. >> something obviously occurred within just a few minutes at 38,000 they needed to come down and xa exactly that is i don't know. >> reporter: the airbus a-320 is among the world's most heavily used planes more than 6,000
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flying. a computerized plane with a good safety record. in december an airasia a-320 crashed into the java sea killing 162 on board. the cause is still under investigation. in 2009 the miracle on the hudson in new york caused by a bird strike everyone survived thanks to some expert piloting. this particular plane was 24 years old, it had just gone through a maintenance check the day before. we can tell you the priority for french investigators is to actually listen to the cockpit voice recorder and analyze flight data recorder. the hundreds of pieces of data on the flight data recorder and only then will they be able to say what happened to this plane. there clearly is not much in the way of evidence on the ground. on the cockpit voice recorder they will hear the pilots talking to each other. it will tell them an awful lot t. flight data recorder will give them the specifics of every piece of how that aircraft was operating, every flight
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parameterer over the entire course of its flight. mica, back to you. >> tom costello thank you very much. two of the experts from las vegas former ntsb investigator greg fife and tampa, florida, aviation analyst john cox. greg if i can start with you, then i'm going to open it up to the table. with so many perplexing questions still, why is terrorism being ruled out so early, it seems? >> reporter: that's an interesting question because they haven't really gotten any information that would rule it in or rule it out. and you really don't want to to take that out of the picture, if you will until off auditioned at least the cockpit voice recorder. because that will tell you what was happening during that period of silence, where radio communication went what they called no radio communication. and atc tried to call them. once they get the cvr, they are able audition it. that's when you can start ruling
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things in and out. i think it was premature if there was any intentional event that was taking place, they may have misspoken until they find that information off the vcr. >> i agree, it is too early to rule anything in or out. there are none of the obvious signs of terrorism here in this plane. it doesn't appear the plane exploded in midair there was some kind of bomb on it. it would not have had the descent it had. it appeared somebody or some thing was in control of this plane as it mulligan its descent. it was a controlled descent. >> that's where i think there is a possibility where you can't rule it out. am i wrong? >> you can't rule anything out at this moment. you can't rule anything out at this moment. i am giving you the sign posts. remember that in the post-9-11 world, pilots are trained not to open that cabin for anything.
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>> there is the remote possibility that this was a controlled flight, a delayed flight what they call that the pilot essentially flew the plane into the terrain. >> that could be it. mike barnacle. >> john is it possible, as remote as it might seem is it possible that the pilots were not aware of their surroundings? were not aware that they were in the middle of the mountains? >> i wouldn't think so. i think what you are going to find is the pilots were either incapacitated. there's warning systems that will give you a one-minute and a 30-second warning if you are going to impact the ground and pilots are trained to respond to that very quickly. so if there was, in fact a warning that went off. the pilots will react to it if they k. that's one of the mysteries. as it stands right now, everything is still on the table and i understand a few people have ruled some things in or
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out. but as far as i'm concerned, everything is still on the table, the evidence is coming in and we're going to have to evaluate that to find out what happened. >> hey, greg what do you make of the maintenance check just the day before? could there be a possibly that something nefarious happened. are they going to be speaking with the investigators, too, in this investigation? >> absolutely. you can't, when you look at the maintenance, a lot of people look at maintenance prior to the flight. every airplane goes through inspections. the pilots do a pre-flight inspection. if there was a mechanical issue, they try to address it. >> that may have accounted for that 20 or 30-minute delay at the get a the mechanics had to come on. they check the system. they have to sign the logbook. they have to give the crew a release. so that may account for delay and departure. could something nefarious have happened during that period of time? absolutely. again, that's what investigators will have to do as far as interviewing the folks that actually touched that aircraft and released it.
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>> you know we are looking a lot at the plane, itself the a-320 jet model first entered service in 1988. just days ago, the company christened its 9,000th jet and delivered about 600 a year to carriers world wide. the companies says there are more than 3,000 of that model in use. the entire fleet has logged about 150 million flight hours. more than 85 million flights. airbus maintains that the number of fatal commercial flights has remained stable. while the number of overall flights and passengers have skyrocketed. in its 2013 report airbus claims six fatal accidents translateing into a rate of less than 1 per million flights, jean. >> right. so it's safe but something like this happens and, of course it gets everybody's attention in a tragic way. a question for greg what are they, what specific things are they going to be looking for in the flight data recorder data?
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>> what can they get out of it? >> once they get it what are the top things they're going to be looking for? ? >> one of the things about the flight data recorder it will indicate to the investigators exactly what was transpiring with the airplane. it will give you system indication, whether the auto pilot was engaged or disengaged. it will give you the general parameters of the operation air speed, altitude rates of descent. it will actually show what you the crew had programmed as far as some of the equipment on board the aircraft what systems were on what systems were off. so it will tell you what was happening with the aircraft in space, if you will. but it won't tell you why. and that's where you used the cockpit voice recorder to try and fill in those voids or those gaps. if the crew had been talking about an issue, then they'll look at the flight data record tore verify or validate if in fact, there was a problem with a particular system a hydraulic system or something to that effect. so it's a combination. but you can put the story line
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together. either from the cvr or the fdr. it's always helpful, of course, to have both. because that will give us a better picture as to what actually was taking place and when with that airplane. >> okay. mike barnacle. >> john 25 years old that plane has been used commercially. old plane? normal? what's the deal? >> that's what i would call a medium-aged airplane. the fleet, the commercial fleet is maintained to a very very very high standards and consequently, age is fought really something that i'll look at a whole lot with much concern. i've flown airplanes a whole lot older than 24 hour years. so i think that the maintenance records are going to be one of the things that they look at. this airplane i would characterize as mid-life. in both its age chronologically and the number of flights that take off and landings and the flight time t. mavent nance, historically, for this airline has been very good. it also around it including the
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maintenance is all the infrastructure around the flight. the flight dispatch. the loading. all of the things that go into a flight. this airline has a good history with respect to all of those things. that's something the investigators are certainly going to look at to get the overall picture and understand all the components that went into this flight so they understand about it. >> that black box as steve is pointing out will reveal so much. greg, before we go the terrain that they are working on to try and bring together the pieces of the plane that harkens back to an experience you had back in 1985 when you were investigating an eastern airlines flight in the peruvian mountains. this is not going to be easy? >> it isn't. you know when you have geographic terrain like this when you have 60 70 80 degree slopes in some areas, it's very difficult for investigators. you are not going to recover the
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wreckage. they may with the cockpit voice recorder target certain aspects of the aircraft. but because of the total destruction, they may not recover the entire aircraft. their primary mission now is going to try and get the other flight data recorder that's still missing and, of course get victim remains. when i went down to bolivia, we left the airplane at 21,000 feet where it crashed. i brought back some of the parts of the airplane. but we couldn't because of the just the magnitude of recovering the aircraft and, of course victims, we didn't find any. so it was a very difficult situation and these folks will have a similar situation. >> all right. thank you so much for your coverage. we will break out the conversation coming up. because we have a lot more stories still to get to this morning. the latest on that bomb shell report from the wall street alleging that israel spied on the u.s.' nuclear talks with iran and then used that information to lobby u.s. lawmakers to oppose a deal. we'll hear what president obama and speaker boehner said about
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that report. president obama yesterday also announcing his plans to delay a withdrawal of u.s. troops in average. instead of maintaining troop forces there through the end of 2015. we'll speak with the long-time cia official who directed the 2001 invasion. also, a lot of interesting developments if 2016 politics. it looks like ted cruz was against obamacare before he was on it. we'll hear him explain that. i like this one. plus barney frank's assessment of vice president biden is delicious. quote, he can't keep his mouth shut and his hands to himself. well, that might be true but we still love him, right? >> what's not to love? >> the story around that interesting sound byte. also ahead, all those stories plus film-maker ken burns joins us with his latest document u documentary on a topic that affects millions of americans and katie couric stops by to address the constantly changing
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media landscape, plus we'll ask the former of the ntse how another airliner drops from the sky with no distress call and no information. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. .
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. it is 21 past the hour. we have so much news to get to. israel is strongly denying it spied on nuclear talks with iron to get classified information to urge u.s. lawmakers to oppose a deal. prime minister benjamin netanyahu's office called it false and accused the u.s. officials sourced in the story of trying to undermine ties between the two countries. several members of congress also denied any involvement, including house speaker john
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boehner, who said he was quote shocked and baffled by the report. president obama said he would not address intelligence matters with reporters but defended how talks with iran have been conducted. >> we have not just briefed congress about the progress or lack thereof that's being made but we also briefed the israelis. and our other partners in the region and around the world. and if in fact an agreement is arrived at that we feel confident will prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon it's going to be there for everybody to see. and people are going to be able to lift up the hood and see what's in there. >> president obama said the hopes are dim for peace in the middle east because netanyahu said he opposed a two-state solution and their differences are over policy and not personal. >> i have a very business-like
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relationship with the prime minister. i've met with him more than any other world leader. i talked to him all the time. you know he is representing his country's interests the way he thinks he needs to and i'm doing the same. this can't be reduced to a matter of somehow let's all, you know hold hands and sing kumbaya. this is a matter of figuring out how do we get through a real naughty policy difference that has great consequences for both countries and for the region. >> all right. is relationship gene business-like in. >> i love that description. it means i can't stand him. he can't stand me. >> but he didn't say that. >> right. he said business-like. >> he is being very cordial. >> of course that's what one is when one is an allie. >> he's not described that way by critics. >> you know this is a relationship between two countries that have their own national interests and, you know it's not a buddy-buddy
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kind of thing, especially now. and so it's pretty tough. >> but what do you think? between the lines, isn't the really the united states seeing how far they can go in pushing bb to shut up around iran? we will keep dropping these things on you the "wall street journal" piece until you shut up about iran. >> though it may be backfiring on iran. there is an article in the "new york times" how it is galvanizing those opposed to him who think it's gone to tear and not a relationship between two men who may or may not like each other. >> i think backfiring on the get-go from the white house. it seems to me no matter what netanyahu does whatever move he makes, it somehow is the white house's response that the microscope is put on and criticized. it seems to me i don't know steve radner. >> well, i don't know. i think the revelation yesterday about the israeli spying fit badly on the israelis. i don't think that made them
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look like our closest allies behaving the way we want them to. it seems to me what the president is saying for all practical purposes a middle east solution is dead probably for the rest of this term or the foreseeable future. now the eggs are in the iranian deal basket and we'll see if something can come of that. >> so what do you think this has done, gene to the republicans? have they helped themselves or hurt themselves in this process of this sort of drawn out -- >> you know i'm not sure. they're trying to project an your aura of strength and a close relationship with our democratic allie in the middle east against the surrounding forces of terrorism and chaos. and so you know does that actually put any points on the board in terms of 2016 for them? i kind of doubt it. i'm not, because i don't see a huge ground swell of person opinion for something other than
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what president obama is doing. in other words i don't see a huge ground swell for war with iran, for example, or abandoning the idea of the two-state solution. >> what does it say, though, about, you know a region that is a cauldron of unrest and failed states from one end to the other, from libya all the way up to syria and iraq. gone, those states are gone. what does it say about our role in the middle east and israel's role in the middle east that we are now down to the united states and israel saying well you started it. you know. >> child's play. >> exactly. >> while that's going on though, there is a whole relationship beneath that level that continues in and, in fact if you talk to israeli officials, they will tell you it's in better shape than it's been in many years. >> financing wise. >> exactly. so the actual bond the substance of the bond is not
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threatened by this. i don't think there is any real effect on that. it's just obama and bb really don't like each other. >> to throw one thing out. obama has said time and time again, this is more than just a relationship between two men. it's a relationship between two countries. i would call it history. that may be the case. having said that we could be at a precipice we are responsibility to eastern we haven't seen in previous administrations. it does go beyond that point. >> we are waiting to see how that deal pans out, given the twists and turns and undermining factions going on here. let's move on to one thing i want to show you, but you only will be able see a little bit. secret service director joseph clancy was back in the hot seat on capitol hill. we got our first look at the latest incident, involving agents to come under scrutiny. police video showed the agents slowly entering the investigation. clancy says the video shows the
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agents driving at a slow speed and brushing against a plastic barrel without any damage. but law makers grilled the agency's director for saying he could not release the secret service for review until an internal investigation is complete. >> why can't congress investigate what's in its jurisdiction while the ig knows what's in its jurisdiction? >> congressman, i am sure after the oig's investigation -- >> i don't want to wait until after because that makes me think that you believe that congress's constitutional responsibility to provide oversight is subservient to the ig and surely to the law you can't believe that. my question is how will providing that to mr. cummings and mr. chavitz jeopardize an investigation. >> again -- >> with specificity. >> i am happy to show that video and be available at all hours of the night. at this point we can fought
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release that. >> clancy says the secret service will keep video for seven days after it was criticized for possibly deleteing some footage after 72 hours. >> that, you know that's not good. i have to say, i think he has a point here. does anyone disagree? >> they have the point when they cut the appropriations. >> do they not do a breathalyzer either? >> that's really the point. the central allegations, we will probably never know the answer to. were they drunk? they were not breathlized. we will never know. >> would anybody else in that situation, a couple teens drove into a barrier during a bomb investigation, wouldn't they get a breathalyzer? >> if they were not shot they would get a breathalyzer. >> what alarms me most is it took 30 minutes to respond to that. >> the two agent -- onu one agent and one minister in the car were on the verge of getting lucked by uniform secret service
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and a call from above came no, let them go, send them home. >> that's the question. >> the investigation seems to me okay your paper has been amazing on this, by the way. coming up, ted cruz takes a shot at one of the wall street banks, which happens to employ his wife. mark hal per in's interview with the candidate next on "morning joe." . i love my mileageplus® explorer card. we're saving our united miles... ...for a trip to hawaii. we love free checked bags. i've saved $75 in checked bag fees. no foreign transaction fees means real savings. we can go to any country and spend money the way we would in the u.s. one of the best things about priority boarding is you can just get on the plane and relax. i put everything on the explorer card. i really want my united miles.
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talented and lacks discipline. joe is his own worst enemy. he's a very bright guy, very good valuesful early on he said correctly, people dismissed him, we ought to divide iraq into three section, a sunni section, a shia section and a kurdish section. people said, no no no that was the best idea. they should do it still. it's happened defacto. he just can't keep his mouth shut or his hands to himself. >> and what's not to love? i'm sorry, barney frank, joining the table, managing editor of bloomberg politic, mark halperin. you know what i've always said
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don't underestimate ted cruz. i mean that in terms of his impact on the republican field. i say don't underestimate joe biden. >> there you go. >> i'm just saying it. i'm just saying it. so fresh off his announcement, senator ted cruz is making an astonishing mission. his wife is signing up for obamacare. cruz is going on the market. >> we're transitioning. we'll be getting few health insurance. we will presumably do it through my job in the senate. so we'll be on the federal exchange like millions of others. >> so you will be getting obamacare, effectively in. >> it is one of the good things about obamacare is that the statute provided that members of congress would be on the exchanges without subsidies just like millions of americans, so there wouldn't be a double standard. >> mark halperin you sat down with ted cruz he made news about his wife i guess about
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his wife's employer, when you asked him about wall street's influence. let's get to that first. >> are they a force, a positive or negative force on balance? >> oh like any institution there is some of both. >> so what's the negative? >> you know my view of wall street or big business in general. >> i want you to respond by goldman sachs. >> goldman is one of the biggest banks on wall street and my criticism with washington is they engage if crony capitalism. they give favors to wall street and big business and that's why i have been an outspoken opponent of crony capitalism. >> why is goldman a negative force? >> because like many other players on wall street and big business, they seek out and get special favors from government. i think they're entitled to practice their business but without subsidies or special benefits. >> you did a lovely job of talking about your wife heidi's job as a baker, you never mentioned what she did for goldman? are you unabashedly proud of
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what she did? >> i am unabashedly proud of everything about heidi. i imagine she had a successful business career. >> he navigated nicely. >> he likes heidi. >> i like that. mike barnacle has an interesting piece. >> ted cruz is going to new hampshire. >> yes this is nice. this is a good set-up. >> the boston globe covers southern new hampshire very well. this is in today "globe" ted cruz is so melo dramatic about his warning, so histrionic about hit exertations that cruz seems more like a soap ap ra actor audition about a piece in walk. put all the puzzle pieces together the picture that takes shape is an art fis in artificiality. it is possible cruz could emerge as a force in the nation's contest. but cruz is the kind of candidate who usually falls flat when the campaign comes to new hampshire.
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his rhetoric too human, thespianism to obvious to wear well in a state that likes to disagree well. >> scott lehigh is a student of history. this time it's going to be different. the rules are going to have the window. so if ted cruz does well in iowa and south carolina he can be the republican nominee. he's not a front runner but he's a strong second tier candidate if he performs well, he works hard and he's brilliant. he can do well. >> do you think from your obs sakess you following him and others, do you think he wears well? >> he's going to have to learn to be a broader figure than he is to wear it well. right now he wears it well with his core supporters. it announcement was aimed at his core supporters but people grow in the process for running for president. people who underestimate ted cruz's capacity to grow would be a mistake. >> it would be a great gift to the democratic party if they
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nominate ted cruz. >> i think he impacts the field in a lot of ways. all right. let's go to this potentially troubling story involving virginia governor terry mcauliffe. an internal review of homeland security shows mcauliffe received special treatment on behalf of the electric car company he co-founded before becoming governor. according to report, mcauliffe was among several politically influential figure including senator minority leader harry reid and hillary's brother, anthony rodham who sought to obtain special visas for foreign investors through dhs program. while the report found no evidence of illegal activity deputy dls secretary created an appearance of quote favoritism and special access for mcauliffe and others and his intervention on tear behalf was quote unprecedented.
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it's not the first his car company has come under scrutiny. it was investigated by the fcc in its conduct and in connection with the very same visa program. >> i seen a lot of those cars rolling around town. >> you will. >> if they need the help. >> it's rarer than a unicorn. i don't think they actually ever made any. what they're talking about. there was and may still be for that matter a special visa program where if you were a foreigner and you invest i think dwlr 500 in an american visa you could get a visa it was a way to give out visas. so you are seeing a lot of scrutiny of it. so as that sequence just showed nobody is really accused terry mcauliffe of doing anything wrong yet, simply taking advantage of a program that shouldn't be there in the first place. >> the guy playing at a high level gets special treatment. that happens in both parties. >> yeah. >> there was a company as mike suggested that was not particularly successful.
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so the special treatment stands out a little more. >> a lot more to get to. up next president obama slows the troops pullout from afghanistan, with no let-up in the insurgency there. is it delaying the inevitable. we will ask the station chief in i slamabad when "morning joe" comes right back. .
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control of a key airbase, they were stationed there and evacuated last week. there are growing fears yemen is on the verge of civil war, including taking control of the country's capital complete and utter chaos. meanwhile, yesterday, in washington, president obama announced plans to delay a withdrawal of u.s. troops in afghanistan. appearing alongside the afghan president, president obama said the u.s. will instead, maintain its troop forces in afghanistan through the end of 2015. >> afghanistan remains a very dangerous place and insurgents still launch attack, including cowardly suicide bombings against civilians. the president includes time lines, i consulted with general campbell in afghanistan, my national security team. i decided we will maintain our
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firm posture of 9800 troops through the end of this year. we want to make sure we have doing everything we can to help afghan security forces succeed so we don't have to go back. so we don't have to respond in an emergency because counterterrorists are, because terrorist activities are being launched out of afghanistan. >> joining us from walk former cia station chief in islamabad, robert grenier, the author of the book "88 days to kandahar a cia diary." so let's talk about this change are we draying the inevitable or is this something we just have to do? >> well i think both. i think that it's something we should do but in my humble opinion it should be sustained. i think you summed it up nicely. we are delaying the inevitable here. this is not a significant change. yes, it means, u.s. troops will be able remain in jalalabad and kandahar for a few months bhoern
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more than they otherwise would. they will be able to sustain so-called counterterrorism against field commanders again for a few you a ditional months tan would otherwise have been the case. but this doesn't change the overall time line with for the u.s. withdrawal. >> robert how much does the president's approval for this here domestically how big of a role does the fact that ghani seems to have more rhetoric as opposed to his predecessor? >> i think it doesn't make it a whole ought easier. i this i that president karzai in his latter days was actually getting under the president's skin. that's not supposed to have an impact on policy but in this case i think that it did. again, let's just remember that while the optics are a little better and while the president is showing a bit more flexible in his words, it really doesn't fundamentally change anything. by january of 2017 all american
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combat forces will be gone. >> mike barnacle. >> mr. grenier, the president's comments yesterday, isn't he saying look at the afghan regular army security force, they're nowhere up to the job. we have to continue to own the knife in afghanistan through our operations, special operations and we can't do it unless we stay for a while. >> well, i think that's true. but i don't think that anybody knowledgeable of the situation is going to tell you that the situation for the afghan army is going to be fundamentally different at the end of 2015 than it is right now. so again, i think we are kicking this can a little down the road. not to be too brutal about i. but, frankly, the greatest utility for these additional u.s. troops right now is as hostages. what the afghans need more than u.s. troops is u.s. money and ask anybody who is only inable of the situation on capitol hill and they will tell you as soon as the u.s. combat forces are gone so is the money. >> is there a scenario even five years down the road where the u.s. can prepare
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afghanistan, the afghan government for controlling afghan territory, essentially, and for dealing with the taliban? >>. and i think that's really the most serious problem here. i think that our overall strategy is flawed. we are trying to build up an unsustainably large afghan army. it takes between $4 and $6 billion a year to maintain this army. there is no way afghanistans will be able to do it in the outyears. we need to if cuss on as we have in the recent past on indigenous forces operating at local levels. so-called militias if you will. and without that i just don't think there is anyway you will be able to sustain or to solidify the situation on the ground vis-a-vis the taliban. i think five years from now if we remain on the current force. the taliban, if it chooses to
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will remain in substantial parts of afghan territory. >> mark halperin final question. >> is this war winnable by some measure for the united states? >> no, i don't think it's winnable by the united states; however, i do think a larger u.s. presence which is a deployed in the right manner that is focused not just on sustaining the afghan army but also building up militia forces in key parts of the country over time would convince the taliban that they cannot win on their own and it might make them far more amenable to negotiations. >> robert grenier, thank you so much for being on this morning, coming up, jen wings 9525 is the latest in a series of high profile plane crashes. it has many asking how safe is it to fly? we'll take a look at the numbers when we come back. helped perform 26.6 million surgeries deliver 3.7 million babies and treat 133 million e.r. patients. now congress is considering cuts which could increase wait times
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. yesterday's crash in the french alps brought back memories of several high profile incidents, malaysia airlines mh-370 disappeared from kuala lumpur to beijing sparking an international search and mystery. officials say the boeing 777 lost contact shortly after takeoff, flew on for hours before crashing into the indian ocean. on july 17th malaysia airlines
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flight 17 was shot down over war torn ukraine killing all 298 people on board also a boeing 777 t. plane was flying from amsterdam to kuala lumpur. less than a week later, a transasia flight off western taiwan went down in extreme weather killing 48. the next day, 116 people were killed in a crash in mali. a several storm was blamed for airasia flight 8101 which plunged into the ja sa sea killing passengers and crew. like the aircraft that crashed yesterday in france it was an airbus a-320 and 38 people died last month when a transasia flight plunged into a river in taiwan. that crash was captured on dash-cam video. despite a series of high profile crashes, the world's airline safety record is actually improving. according to international air
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transport association, 2014 had the lowest accident rate in history. there were 73 incidents last year compared to 81 in 2013. while fewer were deadly the overall number of fatalities jumped significantly, breaking down the numbers there is the equivalent of one accident for every 4.4 million flights. so with all that as a backdrop what could have caused german wings flight 9525 to plunge 9,000 feet without sending a distress call? debra hersman and tom costello will join us. we will look at ken burns' latest documentary and why katie couric is teaming up to raise awareness about it. we'll be right back. ♪ edith piaf "no regrets" ♪ plays throughout ♪ ♪
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welcome back to "morning joy." we got a packed two hours ahead, ken burns and katie couric are taking on one of america's deadliest health risks. what they learned about chancetary can help save lives an a lot more on that deadly airplane crash in the alps. we will go live to germany where a community has been promised by so many students. so let's set the scene at the top of the hour recovery crews in the french alps are resuming their search this morning. german's foreign minister is
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calling it quote a picture of horror. the airliner crashed less than an hour before its expected arrival if dusseldorf. this scattered debris appears to be all that remains. officials say the plane was pulverized and the biggest parts left are the size of a small car. a damaged black box has been recovered from the site. 150 people were on board that flight. officials at the crash site say there are no signs of life. most of the victims were from europe including 16 german high school students. two babies were also on board t. plane left barcelona at 10:00 a.m. local time. it climbed to a cruising altitude of 38,000 feet within a half hour. minutes later the plane mulligan an unexplainable descent. officials say it fell thousands of feet per minute for roughly eight minutes. the pilots did not send a distress signal and flight radar 24 says it lost contact with the
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plane which plunged more than 30,000 feet by 10:40 a.m. it took crews hours to reach the crash site because of its remote location and authorities are warning it's a long road ahead. at this time officials say they do not suspect terrorism and believe the crash is a tragic accident. steve radner jump in? >> i just want to amend one thing. it didn't actually fall out of the sky. it appears to have descend, a controlled descent for at least part of its time down. it took eight minutes to reach the ground. if you go back to the air france plane off brazil that did fall out of the sky, it was less than four minutes it hit the ground. so something else was going on here. >> that's why i wondered why they ruled out terrorism so early. >> i want to know could auto pilot do that descent? >> an auto pilot can do anything. if a plane landed on this table, why an auto pilot was suddenly commanded to do that and it is not overrided.
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>> let's bring in tom costello who covers aviation and with us faa chief of staff michael gold if farm. tom, what are some of the most pressing questions, including ours facing investigators this morning? >> i think you hit the top ones. now with the cockpit recorder they might want to find the flight data recorder. it will tell them a whole list of items everything from altitude to air speed to a vertical acceleration heading, pitch, roll performs all of that. but this morning, they still have the same questions they had last night. a disaster now strewn over the french alps may have started at or near 38,000 feet t. plane only spent one to three minutes before beginning what appears to be a programmed descent 4,000 feet per minute. unusually steep, not extreme. what puzzles investigators is why the crew never radioed a mayday. >> they didn't provide a
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distress call or indicate in anyway, shape or form a problem with the aircraft. that's very unusual, given the fact that they were 38,000 feet. they would have been in complete communication with air traffic control. >> reporter: among the scenarios investigators will have to krks was there an emergency that forced the crew to program a rapid descent, a fire or smoke or sudden loss of cabin pressure. if that was the problem the pilots should have levelled the plane out at 20,000 fee. instead, it kept descending. so were the pilots and passengers incapacitated? captain john kax once flew the a-320. >> something obviously occurred that said as soon as they got to 38,000 within just a few minutes, they needed to come down and xa exactly that is i don't know. >> reporter: the airbus a-320 is among the world's most heavily used planes more than 6,000 flying a. computerized plane with a very good safety record. but they're having recent high
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profile accidents. in december an airasia crashed into the sea, killing 162 on board t. cause is still under investigation. in 2009, the miracle on the hudson in new york caused by a bird strike everyone survived thanks, to expert piloting. >> this particular airbus was 23-years-old, had just been through a maintenance check on monday. in january the faa warned a rare event in which airbus computer can put the plane into an uncommanded steep descent. we don't know if that played a role in yesterday's accident but here's what's critical. >> that is so rare and, in fact there is a remedy that airbus pilots have been taught and so most accident experts i've talked to really doubt that that particular problem might have crept up this time. >> tom costello let me bring in mike ral goldfarb and ask the question i have been asking all
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morning, michael, why is terrorism being ruled out so early? >> it shouldn't be ruled out, there is nothing to reveal if it's a terrorist or accident. let's go to your earlier segment and something tom alluded to. statistics may show it to be safe an airplane takes off or lands every two seconds, throw out the statistics. the high profile crashes that we have have people on edge and what has to happen is to make sure, a, there is no relationship between these crashes, certainly the ukrainian one is an anomaly out of that and, b, that there is nothing systemic across the a-320 or the boeing airplane. that's why it's trickal to get those black boxes. so terrorism or suicide where one of the crew intentionally brought the plane down. but, you know those probably aren't what happened. i tell you, it will be a unique set of things we may get 30%
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right. it will be a unique set of things that occurred between the pilot's reaction and the aircraft mechanical issues that brought this plane down. >> steve radner. >> i think that's absolutely right. mica asked the question why not terrorism? we can't rule out terrorism. it doesn't fit the protocols, it would be to be a rogue pilot, things like that. i think the pressurization loss a descent and some failure to recover may turn out to be a part of this. as eb has been saying those black boxes will tell us what's happened. >> given the top okayography we are -- topography the forensic evidence of gathering forensic evidence why the plane crashed as usually done at crash sites, what's the degree of difficulty involved here in. >> well, just going ba back quickly to the pressurization
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that steve mentioned, a more insidious things of gradual loss of pressurization, often undetected. if you remember the payne stewart situation the apoxia that overcame crews and passengers on that corporate jet t. plane composite is built mostly of composite. the angle that obliterated probably everything but engine parts. so i don't believe we will get very much from that. they will piece together and hopefully pretty quickly between the data recorder as tom suggested has an enormous number of parameters of how that plane flew and the why piece would be the cockpit voice recorder. those plus the air traffic control tapes will paint a pretty good picture of what occurred. >> what will take over this investigation the german airliner that crashed in france that was departing from spain? >> yeah it's a french investigation. the way the rules here are that the crash occurs let me start that again the rules are that the country in which the
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accident occurs generally is in charge of the accident. so you will have the french running this investigation. but clearly with cooperation from the germans and the spanish and i got to tell you, the french accident investigation board is a top notch very very good and thorough organization and it's also a french airplane. it's a french-built plane. so it stands to reason that they would take the lead on this and they would have a vested interest in insuring that they come to the right conclusion. i would just point out in my conversations yesterday with veteran safety experts, with pilot, with former investigators, the leading theory among them right now. we prefaced these comments by saying they want the flight data recorder, they don't have it yet t. lead theory is this may well be a hypoxia event, where they quite literally lost cabin pressure. that's very insidious as you heard. it can happen slowly. once it happens, you realize it
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at that point it can almost be too l.a. at 38,000 feet have you 15 to 30 seconds to get your oxygen on before you are unconscious. so if the crew had not reacted fast enough to put their masks on then you might have a scenario in which they were not conscious when this plane was on its programmed descent. >> that has people confused. why hasn't this plane made a programmed descent, it appears, a methodical rapid descent. not extreme. why did it make that programmed descent and then knew into a mountain? in the view of many that would adhere to the theory the crew at some point became incapacitated. >> gentleman stay with us. let's bring into the conversation france nbc news correspondent keir simmons with the latest on the scene. keir. >> reporter: mica, good morning. it's interesting hearing you guys talk about the investigation. because while i'm listening to you talk about that all of the time it's extraordinary really
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hearing and watching these helicopters behind me take off carrying air investigators are difficult to reach accident scene, mica what they are coming back with is are extraordinary stories about just how for one official described it as pulverized the plane is another official saying that he has never seen anything like it but in most cases of an air accident, you see the cockpit still are pretty much in shape. in this case he says there is just nothing, nothing that you can really recognize in any substantial spens sense and so that is going to make the investigation difficult. you mentioned the black fwhoox they have retrieved. >> that is now in paris. it has been damaged. reports say they think they can get clues from it. i think tom was mentioning there, they are urgently looking for that second black box, if they can find that. they are pretty robust. >> that should help them to try to establish what happens. by the way, just one little bit
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of witness evidence. we did speak to one man who lives in the last village before the accident site and what he describes is hearing this strange noise that he certainly never heard before from an aircraft and then nothing. no explosion. no sound of an accident until he realized the plane had, in fact gone down in the valley just next door to his village. >> keir, i'm looking at the debris up and down very steep crevices and mountainsides. give us a sense of where you are standing and how brief the debris field is. >> reporter: yeah, they are talking about it being three courses of a pile wide. you can see behind me here this is mountainous. well we are actually sitting in a valley here surrounded by mountains on every side. in that direction. that is where this a-320 such as it is, it is high up what you have to do according to locals that we have spoken to if you want to get there by foot is to
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move up to a peak and come down a very very difficult decline to the place where the aircraft debris now is and that is why they are having to go there in these helicopters. they have set up here by the way a make-shift morgue and another part of this process will be the gruesome process of bringing the bodies down for relatives to be able to identify and to get people back to their loved ones. so they are saying here that it is going to be a very very long process and, in fact the german chancellor angela merkel is expected here later today, coming here to pay her respects as part of germany's mourning because this is the place you have to come to. they are really not going to be able to move this accident scene the constituent parts of the debris and things very easily very quickly. we can see that just by watching these aircraft. >> in some places i can't imagine a chopper could even land. let's bring tom costello in from
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walk. jump into the conversation. >> keir i was taking note of what you said when you said the debris field was tight, which now seems very obvious the plane flew into a mountain instead of coming apart before it hit the mountain. i did want to ask you this what is the priority for the french jean darms and the fire rescue on the scene? is the priority to move the bodies and get the victims off the mountain and where does finding that second black box fit into that priority? >> i think it's both tom, honestly, because you have the two things here. one is that you want to find out what happened and, frankly, tom, you want to do that for the families. they more than anyone want to know what happened here and at the same time, they're clearly the important humanitarian if you like job of bringing people back and getting them back to their families. we are also, by the way, tom, you heard this too.
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we are hearing some reports of air crews refusing to fly in the region because they're so worried about this mystery. so there is an urgency to try and establish what went on here for all kind of other reasons, too. >> steve radner. >> just on that urgency question, going back to the hypoxia theory one is to ask either tom or michael if they understood how the auto pilot in in plane was configured. as i understand it most auto pilots will not command a descent even in a low altitude situation. >> tom? >> i'm sorry, you are asking how is it possible auto pilot could himself self engage? is that what you are asking? >> the question is the cabin altitude fell or rose rather above 10,000 feet. would that plane have auto pilot at the center of command or not? >> nom of the experts were giving this hypoxia theory you
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realize you have a problem, you program in we got to get this plane down because we have a cabin pressure issue. why wouldn't you program it to go to 10,000 feet? then you level off and everybody can breathe again. why wouldn't you communicate on the way down? listen. we are all in the realm of theory right now t. theory was, you know when i was talking to one of these pilots listen when you are hypoxic, it's almost as if you are double drunk. it's very difficult to make very good decisions and you simply can'ty straight. it's possible something might have dialled in descent, if you will, or let's get back down. >> right. >> but didn't program a target altitude. you know when you talk about payne stewart and there was a couple other examples when people they're hypoxic they can't think clearly and they make silly mistakes which you
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would never make if you were not starved of oxygen. >> does that seem like a legitimate possibility here? >> yes as everyone is saying it probably in the end may be partially what happened. let's go back to the human side of this. i only hope for passengers and crew they didn't experience that draw. >> that's what i'm saying. >> that they were knocked out much earlier than they have to go through that kind of horrific situation. >> i'm not sure of the decline, the descent would have been the passengers would have noticed it. 4,000 feet per minute. that's a rapid descent it would have felt like an aggressive landing. for example, few are on a plane, if you have ever been on a plane --
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. . particularly if you are flying over the
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by the way, they moved the media
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away from that area because you'll understand they are going to want to try to give families some prive ace at a time like this. >> cheer simmonskeir simmons in france thank you. at the top of the hour, katie couric when laquinta.com sends craig wilson a ready for you alert the second his room is ready, ya know what he becomes? great proposal! let'talk more over golf. great. how about over tennis? even better. a game changer! the ready for you alert, only at laquinta.com. yoplait has the only yogurt brands endorsed by weight watchers and your taste buds have always endorsed us.
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purchase any new verizon wireless smartphone or tablet from comcast. visit comcast.com/wireless to learn more. . >> israel is strongly denying it
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spied to urge u.s. lawmakers to oppose a possible deal. prime minister benjamin netanyahu's office called the wall street allegations quote utterly false and accused a u.s. official sourced in the story of trying to under mine ties between the two countries. several members of council denied the allegations. president obama said he would not address intelligent matters with reporters but defended how talks with iran have been conducted. >> we have not just briefed congress about the progress or lack thereof that's being made. we also briefed the israelis and our other part
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deal? >> well, i mean, you know. >> they acted like they did. >> they said, well, there is what i read. there were press reports about where the negotiations stood. >> it happened, exactly. i assume that everybody spies on everybody. i just assume that.
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>> controlling the zpugs. >> you of course remember yetia huh basically endorsing his opponent romney in the last election. i think old blood, bad blood, there is nothing can you do about it. >> so my question then would be what is it that the white house or president obama, himself, has done that
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. >> that was a portion of a new docu-series. it got me right there. cancer the emperor of all
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maldis joining me film-maker ken burns who produced this series and director and katie courics who advocacy group collaborated on the project. good to have you all on board i will start with ken, i know you haven't done this before. >> thank you, let me warm up. it sounds like i'm listening. >> so you have taken on such big issues, ken, massive portions of history. >> nothing like this. my mom died of cancer when i was 11-years-old. and there wasn't a moment growing up where i wasn't watching this slow motion crash. so when this came up as a possibility to produce, you couldn't say no but i had a day job with lots of other pronltsz i turned to a really great film-maker day-to-day and we co-wrote it with jeff ward our normal collaborator. we worked withstand up to cancer and we got this hybrid of a kind
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of limited history as a story, great science and it should be central to every person on the planet and then the incredibly human stories that are the glue the anything or that holds it together. three episodes next monday tuesday and wednesday. >>py gosh do we move forward in terms of hope in sample very much so. >> go ahead. >> this is an incredible moment in the history of cancer. we have completely one revolution of understanding the disease. everyone that spoke unanimously told us we were on the brink of the second revolution which is a elf lucian of treatment and therapy. so it's a perfect time for the series to come out. >> i want to interject and say this is a breath taking documentary. can i say that because i had little to do with the editorial content. but i think ken and their entire team did such a mag 95 sent job. one of the reasons in that clip
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you saw, many of these families allowed the crew from the do you meanary to be a fly on the wall during moments of such anguish and such trauma and being so overwhelmed by a diagnosis, yet the emotion you experience watching this documentary. i have seen it many tiles. every time i see it it really takes my breath away because there is something so raw and so compelling and real about these families and their situations and i have been there, so i know. >> do you think the clip that we showed the continuedally riveting mystery about this disease and a part from the young man we saw in that clip before he says my daughter my daughter, the word cancer. i mean it's a terrifying word still, in our lives.
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>> this is the thing that we have to do. we have to remove the stigma and have a conversation and we are at a stage we can quickly go into a place to begin to talk about what we wanted to do here was make an executive summary where we have been. it has been with us for as long as we have been alive. in order to have our conversation right now, our cells have to divide. when they don't divide well that's cancer. >> you have to realize all of you, you have been living there, is that the word doesn't have the stigma it once had and the book "the emperor of all maldis," he talks about the late '50s. in the "new york times," there was a group that wanted to get a breast cancer support group. the "new york times" wouldn't allow the group. i think it was the hospital that couldn't say breast cancer. they had to say disease of the chest carvety. when you look at what happened then. people didn't say breast breast cancer is a part of the lex son,
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colon cancer people are much more opened as we saw with angelina jolie and other celebrities. >> and your personal story and also, quite frankly, what you did with your platform. >> i thought you were going to say what you did with your colon. >> oh of course. what a promo. >> yeah. if that doesn't make people tune in. >> i think actually it's amazing. you know how many people get colonoscopys because of what you did because we need to main stream these not only treatments but preventative testing that we can go through when you live it an breathe it and actually try to move it forward like katie has and this documentary. go ahead, mike. >> tell me about your trip making this film. i mean on occasion i go not because i have to go there, but one of the more interesting
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places is the dana farber in boston which has become over the years to your point a miracle factory with cures. tell me about your personal trip making this documentary. >> i was amazed. it was an amazing experience. one of the things we decided early on was to embed crews at two different hospitals. one at john hopkins' baltimore, cutting edge amazing place. kind of a more standard very fine hospital more normal hospital that people go to in west virginia and the charles town medical center. we were there every they for over a year. so our crews, our producer became a part of the furniture. we got to know the doctors, nurses, oncologist and it was an amazing experience and through them, the amazing notations, you saw some of them earlier. that was a way to get in close, get in deep. it was a really life changing experience for us. >> dana farber one of the things
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the documentary does is it talks who sidney farber was and his approach and huh he wrestled with the ethics of that. i think one of the many wonderful things about this documentary, it spot lights the. >> you take childhood leukemia 100% failed. he says why don't we poison these children? completely counterintuitive. we go into remission for a little bit. it goes off again. somebody else picks it up and says why don't we poison them with two different kind of poisons, and all of a sudden that 100% fatality rate is 90% cureage. >> right. >> he then pulls back. because he just can't ethically
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ask two therapeutic agents to be dyeing children. you can't do it. also, like okay this is so well known in boston. people really know the genesis of the jenny fund. do they know who jenny was? >> jenny lived. >> it's so great. i'm so enthusiastic because it's so well done. such high quality. >> you went to johns hop kin, my husband and i went there. he dealt with prostate cancer. >> that place is incredible. >> if i ever get sick. >> no on literally going straight there. cancer. the emperor of all maldis appears on cbs and runs through april 1st. ken burns, say no more. you have to watch it because of. that it looks incredible. >> i never said anything about standing up to cancer. can i say my friends over there will kill me really quickly,
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botd the tv rights of this book "the emperor of all pal dis." she was a co-founder with me and seven other women "stand up to cancer." that is our involvement. we help raise the money so this can be done. i am not involved editorially to bask in their aura and talk about this project. i want to that's my connection. >> katie couric. it's always good to have you on. will you come back? >> i love hanging out with you. >> you have never done this before? >> i'm a little shy. i don't speak out enough. >> god, sort of let it go. >> okay. >> thank you all so much. up next experts say airline travel has never been safer. so why do we keep hearing about these family crashes? the president of the national safety council joins the conversation. and we will take a look at
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german wings flight 9525 why the mayor of one germantown says it's the darkest day of the history of his town. we'll be right back. the future of the market is never clear. but at t. rowe price we can help guide your retirement savings. our experience is one reason 100% of our retirement funds beat their 10-year lipper averages. so wherever your long-term goals take you we can help you feel confident. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. call us or your advisor. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. [ male announcer ] marie callender's knows you may not have time to roll out a perfectly flaky crust that's made from scratch. or mix vegetables with all white meat chicken and homemade gravy. but marie callender's does. just sit down and savor. marie callender's. it's time to savor. ♪ edith piaf "no regrets" ♪ plays throughout ♪
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sure. ♪ ♪ as long as people drive cars carmax will be the best way to buy them. members were aboard the crashed german wings flight that went down in the french alps. 16th 10th graders were returning home from a trip from barcelona. a school and community are in a state of shock. >> reporter: as candles lined the area silence befell the
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town. an entire spanish class feared dead two teachers and 16 students coming back from a week-long exchange in barcelona. a cousin was one of them. >> she looked forward to meet the others again. but on the other side i think she was really happy to go home. >> reporter: she showed me the last selfie the 16-year-old texted her, just a few days ago, news of the crash is overwhelming just about everybody here, including the mayor who called it the worst thing anyone could imagine. hundreds of candles burned in memory. >> we hurt so much. >> reporter: while these teenagers huck each other for support. >> how is the school feeling right now? >> empty. >> reporter: and try to come to grips with such a huge loss. >> nobody could believe it
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really. it's true but you don't want to understand it. >> joining us now from chicago president and ceo of the national safety council deborah hersman a former chair of the ntse joining us national news correspondent peter alexander. >> first question if i can, very simply we heard the cockpit voice recorder was said to be damaged but presumably usable and your time at the ntsb what success did you have when they refer to these voice recorders as being damaged? what can you listen for beyond just voices? >> you know it's no surprise they are saying the recorder is damaged. it has a case outside intended to protect the data, so given the catastrophic of this case that case is probably damaged. what's important is the damage inside that recorder is protected. so if they can pull information off of it they are likely to get not just the conversations
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between the crew and air track control, but any conversations in the cockpit, but more importantly in a situation like this if the crew is getting incapacitated, if they're sluring their words or if there is a struggle or anything that they hear that can give them clues, they can hear sounds ambient noise in the cockpit. they can also hear things that are occurring in the airplane as well. >> steve radner. >> deborah, i think we heard some conflicting reports, if you can confirm whether they found the data recorder if your experience, if we find one are we likely to find the other? >> so i think that early on in the investigation there is a lot of conflicting information. we heard yesterday that it was a flight data recorder and it was a cockpit voice recorder. today what we're hearing is that it's a cockpit voice recorder. i think the they located one it's very likely they will
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locate the other in the debris field, but certainly if they targeted one, they want to get that back to the lab as soon as possible. the french authorities have a lot of experience with the recorders and they should be able to download that information and audition it within a few hours of getting it into their labs. >> obviously, the central history, debra, on this is why there would be eight minutes seemingly sort of steady deskrent that took place into the alps right now and no december call. can you give us some understanding of what could happen to allow that to take place? is there still work in progress? >> i think it's still so early. we don't have a good sense of what went on. i think the thing that everyone is trying to understand is why you have an aircraft that was at its crew altitude to descend mountainous terrain and to some extent the lack oftune indication is even more confounding. it's not just outbound when they are getting pinged by air traffic control, they're not responding. we could be looking at a failure
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of system we could be looking at crew incompasstation. it's so early. we don't know what happened. as soon as they weed out one of those recorders, we will get a lot of information and connect the dots. >> deborah hersman, thank you very much for your insight. still ahead, what senator ted cruz and former budget whus director have in common. we will explain that when peter joins us in our next hour. plus, why taylor swift is far from happy from the princeton review this morning. that story and more when "morning joe" comes right back. hey, how's the college visit? you remembered. it's good. does it make the short list? you remembered that too. yea, i'm afraid so. knowing our clients personally is what we do. it's okay. this is what we've been planning for. thanks, bye. and with over 13,000 financial advisors we do it a lot. it's why edward jones is the big company
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peter, as long as we have you here stories involving taylor swift and the assets.a.t.s. >> talking about this in the break. doing antonyms in the next half hour. >> you remember the dreaded s.a.t. tests. row posted the cracks session inkreectly uses her lyrics as an example of bad grammar adding on tumblr not the right lyrics at all -- pssssht. one job, for their part the test
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people reached out offering a lyrical correction and asking the pop star to pick a grammar-loving fan to score tickets to her next show. >> let me tell you something, test people it's not all about you. there's other ways to get into college. like artistically extracurricular and improvement. when you have improvement in your grade. >> as said by a parent of a college student. >> that's my experience. fine. coming up at the top of the hour, the key questions for officials investigating the crash of germanwings flight 9525y, why did the airliner plunge 30,000 feet without sending a distress call and will the black box now have clues now that officials admit it's damaged. plus president obama and benjamin netanyahu will explain why they're not on the same page. you, my friend, recognize when a trend has reached critical mass.
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the scenes there, really terrible. it looks, from the helicopter, almost like those white specks could be could be snow. they're not. they are the tiniest pieces of debris from that plane. apparently nothing bigger than a car was found. >> that was nbc's bill neely reporting from the scene of the deadliest plane crash in decades in france and this morning there are still so many unanswered questions. why would there be an eight-minute descent straight into the alps? why no distress call?
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who was the pilots and copilots could this have been a pilot suicide scenario. is the airbus considered a safe plane. why is flying now considered safer than better? we'll do our best to answer those ker plexing questions all morning lon on "morning joe"," with us pulitzer prize winning columnist and political analyst eugene robinson and former treasury official and experienced pilot steve rattner. good to have you all onboard this morning. set the scene for everybody now 24 hours later. recovery crews in the frenching a psalps are resumeing their soerch. calling it a picture of horror. the this scattered debris is all that appears to remain of germanwings flight 9525 officials say the plane was pulverized and that the biggest
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parts left are the size of a small car. investigators did find a black box and say it's damaged, but should still be able to provide clues. 150 people were onboard and officials at the crash site say there are no signs of life. most of the victims were from europe including 16 german high school students. two babies were also onboard. the plane left barcelona at 10:00 a.m. local time yesterday morning, climbed to a cruising altitude of 38,000 feet within a half hour. minutes later the plane began an unexplained descent. officials say it fell thousands of feet per minute for roughly eight minutes. the pilots did not send a distress signal which was initially reported in the hour or so after the crash, and flight radar 24 says it lost contact with the plane, which plunged more than 30,000 feet by 10:40. took crews hows to reach the crash site because of its remote
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location. and authorities are warning of a long road ahead. at this time officials say they do not expect terrorism and believe the crash is a tragic accident. joining us from near the crash site keir simmons with a latest. with search efforts resuming what exactly could they be looking for at this point? >> reporter: mika they are looking for ed and i'm afraid they are looking for bodies. let me show you what's happening behind me here. if i step out of the way, you can see helicopters parked in the field behind me here. we understand that they are ferrying search and search investigators to the crash site on regular intervals. these helicopters are taking off and heading up to the crash site, because it is so difficult to get there. it is not possible to get there by road. you can try to make the very, very treacherous trek to the crash site, but the best way to
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get there is with these helicopters. bad weather has hampered that effort. they are now managing to get there, and what as you mentioned, they are finding there, the german foreign minister described as a picture of horror. the parts of the plane scattered around, as you say, no bigger those parts, other each individual part, than a car, some witnesses say. and we've actually spoken mika to one man who lives in the last village before the crash site and he describes hearing a kind of low rumble very unexpected for a plane, which he says obviously mostly kind of fly over here at a very high altitude and then he says he heard nothing. not an explosion. no sound. and he assumed that nothing had happened, if you like until he discovered that the plane had, indeed crashed into the mountainside, just on the other
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side of a mountain from where he lives. >> nbc's keir simmons, thank you. and as keir was saying the investigation is now under way to determine what exactly caused this crash. for that let's bring in nbc's tom costello. tom, what are the most pressing questions at this point? >> reporter: yeah. hi mika. good morning. this morning still just as many questions as we had yesterday but i think the key questions as relates to the investigation really are, what did this plane descend rather rapidly, a controlled descent, programmed ascent why did it descend rapid rapidly from 30,000 do to 6,000 feet and why did the crew members not talk at all to air traffic control? the disaster stirring over the french alps may have started at our knee 38,000 feet. the plane spent one to three minutes at that altitude before beginning what appears to be a program descend, 4,000 feet per minute. unusually steep but not extreme.
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puzzling crash investigators is why the crew never radioed a mayday. >> they didn't provide a distress call indicate in any way, shape or form a problem with the aircraft unusual given they were at 38,000 feet. they would have been in complete communication with air traffic control. >> reporter: among the scenarios invest get a investigateors consider, a fire, or smoke, or sudden loss of cabin pressure but if that was the problem the pilots should have leveled the plane out at 10,000 feet where there's plenty of oxygen. instead it kept descending. so were the pilots and passengers somehow incapacitated, perhaps from lack of oxygen captain john cox once flew this plane. >> something obviously occurred that said as soon as they got to 38,000, within a few minutes, they needed to come down, and what exactly that is i don't know. >> reporter: the airbus a320 among the world's most heavily used planes more than 6,000 flying. a computerized plane with a good
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safety record but recent high-profile accidents. in december an air asia a320 crashed into the sea killing all onboard. the crash is still under investigation and the miracle on the hudson caused by a bird strike, everybody survived thanks to excellent piloting. it had just gone through a maintenance check the day before. the priority listen to the cockpit voice recorder and analyze flight data recorder. the hundreds of pieces of data on the flight data recorder and only then will they be able to say what happened to this plane. there clearly isn't enough evidence on the ground and they'll hear the pilots talking to each other or maybe not, will tell them a lot and the flight data recorder giving them the specifics of every piece of how that aircraft was operating every flight parameter over the
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entire course of its flight. back to you. >> tom costello. thank you. two of the experts you saw in the piece, investigators greg fyfe and tampa, florida, former commercial pilot and nbc news aviation analyst john cox. greg, if i can start with you and then open it up to the table, but with so many perplexing questions still, why is terrorism being ruled out so early, it seems? >> that's an interesting question because they haven't really gotten any information that would rule it in or rule it out, and you really don't want to take that out of the picture, if you will until you've auditioned at least the cockpit voice recorder because that will tell you, really what was happening in the cockpit during that period of silence where radio communication went what they call nordo, where there is no radio communication, and atc tried to call them. once they get the cvr, been able to audition it that's when you
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can rule things in and out but i think it was premature if there was any intentional event that has taken place they may have misspoken until they find that information off the vcr. >> there are none of the obvious signs of terrorism here in this plane. but i agree. it doesn't appear the plane exploded in mid-air, there was a bomb on it. wouldn't have had the descent it had. it appears somebody or something was in control of this plane as it began its descent. it wasn't an uncontrolled descent. it was a controlled descent. >> where i think there could -- i mean i don't -- that's where i think there's a possibility you can't rule it out? >> you really can't rule anything out at this moment. i've giving you the sign posts. and remember in the post-9/11 world, pilots are trained not to open that cabin door for anything, and so the idea terrorists got into the cabin is not impossible but unlikely. >> right. >> i mean, there's the remote possibility that this was a
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controlled flight what they call a cfit or whatever that the pilot flew the plane essentially into the terrain. >> that could be it. mike barnicle. >> is it possible, as remote as it might seem is it possible that the pilots were not aware of their surroundings? were not aware that they were in the middle of the mountains? >> i wouldn't think so. i think what you're going to find is the pilots were either incapacitated. there's warning systems called enhance proximity warning systems giving you a one minute and 30-second warning if you're going to impact the ground. and pilots are trained to respond to that very quickly. so if there was, in fact, a warning that went off, the pilots are going to react to it if they can. that's one of the mysteries. as it stands right now everything's still on the table. i understand a few people have ruled some things in or out, but as far as i'm concerned,
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everything is still on the table. the evidence is coming in and we're going to have to evaluate that to find out what happened. >> greg what do you make of the maintenance check just the day before? could there be a possibility that something nefarious happened? will they speak with inspection workers now, too, in this investigation? >> absolutely. when you look at the maintenance, a lot of people make issues out of this maintenance, you know, prior to the flight. every airplane goes through inspections by the pilots they do a pre-flight inspection. if there was a mechanical issue they try to address. they may have accounted for that 20 or 30-minute delay at the gate is that the mechanics to come on, check a system. they have to sign the log book have to give the crew a release. so that may account for the delay in departure. could something nefarious happen during that period of time? absolutely, but, again, that's what the investigators are going to have to do as far as interviewing the folks that actually touched that aircraft and released it. >> looking a lot at the plane
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itself. the a320 airbus jet model involved in the crash first entered service in 1988. days ago the company christened its 9,000th jet, and delivered about 600 a year to carriers worldwide. the company says there are more than 3,000 of that model in use and the entire fleet logged about 150 million flight hours more than 85 million flights. airbus maintains that the number of fatal commercial flights remained stable, while the number of overall commercial flights and passengers has skyrocketed. in its 2013 report airbus claims six fatal commercial accidents translating into a rate of less than one per 1 million flights, gene. >> right. it's safe but something like this happens and, of course it gets everybody's attention, in a tragic way. a question for greg. what specific things are they going to be looking for in the flight data recorder the
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information from there? once they get it what are the top things they're going to look for? >> one of the things about the flight data recorder it will indicate to the investigators exactly what was transpiring with the airplane. it will give you system indications, whether the autopilot was engaged or disengaged. it will give you the general parameters of the operation. air speed, altitude rates of descend. it will actually show you what the crew programmed as far as some of the equipment onboard the aircraft what systems were on, what systems were off. so it will tell you what was happening with the aircraft in space, if will you, but it won't tell you why. that's where you use the cockpit voice recorder to try to fill in the voids or gaps. if the crew had been talking about an issue, they'll look at the flight data recorder to verify or validate if in fact there was an actual problem with a particular system. hydraulic system or something to that affect. it's a combination, but you can put the story line together
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either from the cvr or from the fdr. it's always helpful, of course to have both because that will give us a better picture what actually was taking place and when with this airplane. >> 25 years old that plane used commercially. old plane? normal? what's the deal? >> that's what i would call a medium aged airplane. the fleet, the commercial fleet is maintained to a very very very high standard and consequently, age is not really something that i look at a whole lot with much concern. i've flown planes a whole lot older than 24 years. the maintenance records are one of the things they look at. this airplane i would characterize as mid-life. both in its age chronologically, also the number of flights the takeoffs and landings and flight time. the maintenance historically for this airline that been very good and also around it including
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the maintenance, is all the infrastructure around the flight. the fly dispatch. the loading. all of the things that go into a flight. this airline has a good history with respect to all of those things, but that's something that the investigators are certainly going to look at to get the overall picture and understand all the components that went into this flight so that they understand about this tragedy. >> that black box, as steve is pointing out is going to reveal so much. greg before we go, the terrain that they are working on to try and bring together the pieces of the plane, it sort of harkens back to an experience you had back in 1985 when you were investigating an eastern airlines flight in the peruvian mountains. this is not going to be easy. >> it isn't. when you have geographic terrain like this where you have 60 70 even 80-degree slopes in some areas, it's very difficult for investigators. you're not glog to recover a lot of the wreckage. they may, from the flight data
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recorder or cockpit voice recorder target certain aspects of the aircraft but because of the total destruction, they may not recover the entire aircraft. their primary mission now is going to try and get the other flight data recorder that's still missing and, of course try and get victim remains. when i went down to bolivia we left the airplane at 21,000 feet where it crashed, i brought back some of the parts of the airplane, but we couldn't because of the, just the magnitude of trying to recover aircraft and, of course victims, we didn't find any. so it was a very difficult situation, and these folks are going to have a similar situation. >> all right. greg feith and john cox, thank you so much for your coverage. still ahead on "morning joe," bianna is ready to grill our guests at 8:30. yes. she's gawk to rake him over the coals and he deserves it. right, bean in a? >> bianna. peter faces his better half. first bill with the forecast.
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today the severe weather threat. winter weather into severe weather. yesterday 60 to 70 reports of large hail in missouri. not too bad of damage. today is actually a greater threat. we have a risk area. it's been a while since we've done this. yellow slight risk of severe storms meaning hit and miss stuff. orangish color, a new category called enhanced. additional threat here. then goes to moderate and then to high. we get into high we talk about big tornado outbreaks. not expecting that today. enhanced risk area includes oklahoma city, stillwater to tulsa, back hire to fayetteville and branson and harrison. as far at the timing of the storm, 7:00 p.m. strongest towards oklahoma city. when everyone is home from school most part people home from work. hats good. stillwater to tulsa, 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. the storms kick through yore and evening hours joplin fayetteville, a wind threat, 10:00 p.m. after dark. a lot of storm chasers out thereif we get tornadoes
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forming, shouldn't be on top of them. forecast for today warm out ahead of the storms why we'll get them today. 82 today. across the country looking nice. temperatures warming up everywhere. even chicago and boston today at 46. that warm weather and rain by the way, goes to the east coast tomorrow. so new york city enjoy what should about pretty night 24 hours before the warm temperatures and rain head your way. everyone's happy it will be in the 60s, even if you do need that umbrella tomorrow. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. when account lead craig wilson books at laquinta.com. he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can settle in and practice his big pitch. and when craig gets his pitch down pat, do you know what he becomes? great proposal! let's talk more over golf! great. better yet, how about over tennis? even better. a game changer! your 2 0'clock is here. oops, hold your horses. no problem. la quinta
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we have so much news to get to. israel is strongly denying it
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spied on nuclear talks with iran to gather classified information to urge u.s. lawmakers to oppose a possible deal. prime minister benjamin netanyahu's office called the "wall street journal's" allegations "utterly false" and accused the u.s. official sourced in the story of trying to undermine ties between the two countries. several members of congress also denied involvement, including house speaker john boehner, who said he was shocked and baffled by the report. president obama said he would not address intelligence matters with reporters but defended how talks with iran have been conducted. >> we have not just briefed congress about the progress or lack thereof that's being made but we also briefed the israelis. and our other partners in the region, and around the world. and if, in fact, an agreement is arrived at that we feel confident will prevent iran from
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obtaining a nuclear weapon, it's going to be there for everybody to see. and people are going to be able to lift up the hood and see what's in there. >> president obama said the hopes are dim for peace in the middle east, because netanyahu said he opposed a two-state solution and that their differences are over policy and not personal. >> i have a very business-like relationship with the prime minister. i've met with him more than any other world leader. i talk to him all the time. he is representing his country's interests the way he thinks he needs to and i'm doing the same. this can't be reduced to a matter of somehow let's all -- you know hold hands and sing kum ba yah. this is a matter of figuring out, how do we get through a real knotty policy difference that has great consequences for both countries and for the region?
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>> all right. is the relationship business-like? >> i love that description. it mean i can't stand him. he can't stand me. >> but he didn't say that. >> he didn't say that. he said it was business-like. >> being cordial. >> of course. that's what one is when ---ants but not described that way by critics. >> look, this is a relationship between two countries that have their own national interests and it's not a buddy-buddy kind of thing. especially now. so pretty tough. >> what do you think? between the lines, isn't this really the united states seeing how far they can go in pushing bebe to just shut up about iran? we'll keep dropping these things on you, the "wall street journal" piece, until you shut up about iran? >> though it may be backfiring on the u.s. there's an article "new york times" in the today talking how it's galvanizing israelis even though opposed think it's gone a bit too far when the focus should be on iran not between a
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relationship between two men who may not like each other. >> backfiring from the get-go on the white house. seems to me no matter what netanyahu does whatever move he makes, it somehow is the white house's response that the microscope is put on and criticized. it seems to me. i don't know. steve ratrattner? >> i think the revelation yesterday about israeli spying backfired on the israelis. i don't think made them look like our closest allies behaving the way we'd like them to. from what the president was saying, for all practical purposes some kind of middle east solution is dead for the foreseeable future and now the eggs are in the iranian deal basket. we'll see if something can come of that. >> what do you think this has done done gene to republicans? in they helped or hurt themselves in the process of this sort of drawn-out -- >> you know i'm not sure. i mean they're trying to
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project an aura of american strength and this close relationship with our democratic ally in the middle east against the surrounding forces of terrorism and chaos and so, you know -- does that actually put any points on the board in terms of 2016 for them? i kind of doubt it. i'm not -- because i don't see a huge ground swell of american opinion for something other than what president obama is doing. in other words i don't see a huge ground swell for war airan or abandoning the idea of a two-state solution. >> what does it say, though about, you know a reach than is a cauldron of unrest and failed states from one end to the other? from libya all the way up through syria and iraq? gone. those states of gone. what does it say about our role in the middle east and israel's role in the middle east that we're now down to the united states and israel saying, well you started it. you know? this tit for tat?
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>> exactly. >> child's play. >> yeah. >> yeah. >> while that's going on though, there is a whole relationship beneath that level that continues, and, in fact if you talk to israeli officials, they will tell you, it's in better shape than it's been in in many years. security cooperation -- >> financingwise. >> exactly. >> so the actual bond the substance of the bond, is not threatened by this and i don't think, you know there's any real affect on that. it's that obama and bebe really don't like each other. >> if i could throw one thing out. obama has said time and time again this is more than just a relationship between two men. it's a relationship between two countries with a solid history. that may be the case. having said that we could be at the precipice of a point with regards to a deal with iran we haven't seen in previous administrations. it does go just beyond two men here. coming up peter or zag, congressional panels and in answer to the president should,
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time now for business before the bell with cnbc many dominic chu. what are you looking at this morning? >> i mean mika the big deal here is the deals front here. ketchup and hot dogs teaming up
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what's going to happen when heinz inked a deal to buy kraft foods creating one of the world's biggest food companies. a deal north of $47 billion privately held heinz owned by brazilian investment company 3g and warren buffett's berkshire hathaway bringing together brands like heinz ketchup, oscar mayer hot dogs kraft mac and cheese or ida potatoes. publicly traded again and keep a headquarters in pittsburgh where heinz is and also the mortgage banker association says mortgage applications rose to the highest level since january as lower interest rates attracted some borrowers total applications rose by 9.5% for that weekend of march 20ble, however, refinancing activity drove much of the game. applications for purchasing a home rose a modest 5%. speaking of rising word oil prices on the mend for now.
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prices for u.s. based crude oil as well as global benchmarks on the ride here thanks to better than expected business confidence measures in both germany and france. those two countries are among the largest economies in all of europe better economy means better oil prices and more demand for it. mika, good news at least for oil prices although gas prices may be on the rise as well. back to you. >> dominic, the perfect backdrop for the next conversation. thank you very much. joining us nous former white house budget director now a vice chairman at citigroup and the columnist at bloomberg view peter orszag. nair, peter. you're in trouble. so in trouble. >> this is going to be fun. >> no it's not. actually. i don't think -- he is married to bianna she takes the first question. do not let him off easy and steve rattner and gene. bianna, go. >> all eyes on the fed. the topic of conversation every night in our household. >> sounds exciting.
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>> that's hot. >> do you think we've come to a a point where the we're relying too much on transparency from the fed? >> we're at a point where people are so focused on whether the fed's going to start raising rates in june or september that they're looking for transparency toy deliver an answer that is not deliverable. i don't even think the fed knows yet what it will be raising. it's a little misplaced. it's actually looking for a decision as opposed to anything else and that decision's not yet been made. >> so are people waiting to do something specific? because when the rates are -- by an infantecimal amount. >> after liftoff, kind of what is the trajectory, that's
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matters three moss earlier or later for the first increment yet that's what everyone is focused on. but the flip side is growth and growth is the dominant issue of our tommy inand u.s. and -- do we have policies in place to achieve a growth rate and if not what shoal we be doing? >> could be doing better but it's important to realize the numbers we'd gotten used to in the '80s and '90s are not obtainable because the workforce is growing at a much slower rate. the post-war era, 1960s until 20085, the workforce growing at 1.5% boosting top line growth and now it's zero. >> basically gdp. average incomes after inflation are not growing at the moment. >> barely. >> maybe barely. what do we do to fix that problem? >> what we need to do is several things. first, we need more continued center out of washington. we've had a few years where
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we've avoided crises. at a minimum do that and there is some risk later this year we'll have furser crises. that's a negative. go beyond just digging the hole deeper. what else could we do? all the tradition things talked about but we're not actually doing. could be investing more in infrastructure when interest rates are so low. are making some progress although too slow on improving education. there has been great news on health care but we need to continue to double down on low growth in health care costs freeing up more room for take-home pay. all of the above bp not one snell magic bullet let's to this. >> and here's the thing. corporate tax reform is a great topic, sounds great on a bumper sticker. everyone's in favor of broaden the tax base and low are the tax rate. no one can be against that. the problem is the details. what democrats mean by that what republicans mean by that are often the opposite of one another. so everyone's in favor of corporate tax reform but differ
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on what they mean by t. talked about the three things. infrastructure and education, i remember two. what do you make what is happening with major companies at least moving a little on the minimum wage and how does that actually relate to wages in general that have been flat or does it not? >> it can help a little. evidence on the minimum wage raise it with no great harm to employment. that's the traditional concern that if you raise the minimum wage people would lose their jobs? >> a big art. a lot of people are ig didding in because of that. >> suggest at today the minimum wage raise them without an affect basically a zero effect. >> do you agree, bianna? >> i do. i would like to have higher wage. who wouldn't like higher wage all the time? >> i would say that. >> i'm in favor of having high wage. >> exactly. >> yes. >> going back -- >> it's progressive. >> going back to steve's point, people while they have jobs aren't feeling it in their
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pockets is that why it's harder for this administration to tout the that can't that unemployment is where it is right now? steadily creating jobs each month? >> this has ban multidecade stagnation in income where the middle class basically la not benefited significantly from economic growth for 20 to 30 years. that causes frustration. i think it's one of the key reasons why we've seen on both the left and right, more fringe party activity because people get frustrated and want more radical solutions. >> in terms of wages, i thought this story was interesting. nursing as profession that you would not expect to have a pay gap between women and men, but a new study released tuesday shows that male nurse doss in fact earn substantially more than female counterpart. about $5,000 more than fee neal
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nurse female counterparts. it that's inconceivable. it's got to be the negotiation, right? how is that possible? >> because after the great recession, we were at a point where where nurses and health care seemed to be more dominated by women in general, too, and that's where a lot of the new jobs are coming from. >> definitely dominated by women. we have to go. anything annoying you want to tell us about peter? >> do you remember that tease what he has in common with ted cruz? >> yes. what does -- oh oh. our tease. >> what do we -- >> has in common with ted cruz. >> oh, yeah. oh boy. we both went to princeton. no? okay. coming up -- >> not that? >> oh no. not that. [ laughter ] >> all right. we have a tough turn here. coming up, breaking news on the crash of the german passenger plane. the airline confirms two americans were among the 150 people onboard. the latest information next on "morning joe."
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it's 42 past the hour. we want to update you on the latest in the crash of germanwings flight 9525. moments ago confirmation two americans were onboard when the airliner crashed in the french alps. at this hour the airline says the 150 passengers and crew also included 72 germans and 35 people from spain. officials say there are no signs of life at the crash site. and these are the first images we have of the black box that was recovered, officials say it is damaged but still hope it can help answer some of the many questions that exist. those include what caused the plane to plunge more than 30,000 feet, and why were the pilots unable to make a distress call and let's clarify it didn't plunge in rapid descent. it went down in a controlled, measure, but rapid pace. up next are up looking for a job? maybe a career change?
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one need is seeing explosive job growth. that and the answer to the question, what peter orszag has in common with ted cruz. we'll be right back.
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so we tease what peter has in common with senator ted cruz. here's the hint --
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>> as the country music singer toby keith once put it there ain't no right way to do the wrong thing and this budget reflects that notion. >> okay. at least you weren't reading "dr. seuss." quoting toby keith on capitol hill. >> i like toby keith. >> that's okay. back in 2009 he and ted cruz apparently share a love for country music. could be worse. is that okay? >> harmless, right. were you nervous? >> there's more. >> we're talking jobs and the economy. >> classic. >> our next guest is perfect. the job market is still recovering. there's one area in particular that's seeing explosive growth. jobs and big data booming. here with us now the ceo of s.a.p., one of the world's largest business software dpi companies bill mcdermott author of the book "winner's dream." great to have you back. >> thank you mika. >> these are where the jobs are and young people need to focus
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towards this you say? >> yeah. >> how? how can -- specializes? taking coding courses, what is it? >> first, my heart goes out to the families of this plane. this is just a tragedy beyond compare. we have 20,000 people in germany, about 40,000 across europe and thank it god we haven't had any tragedies within our company as we still investigate the situation, but it's so sad, and so broken-hearted over it. on the jobs front, you know the winner's dream from the corner store to the corner office is an authentic story how you can make it if you're willing to want it more register your ambition, kind of the things around know your value. but in the world today, there's no longer a business to consumer economy. there's a consumer to business economy. so everything is digital. and everything is based on how much you know about that consumer. and how you can relate to that consumer in any channel on any device in realtime.
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the second big thing is data itself, as it doubles in the world every 12 months there's just an explosion of information. >> wow. >> so the question is how do you manage all of that information? and in the world of data science as one example, jobs are exploding. will have more than 40% year over year job growth in that one category. when i go princeton today i'm going to feature the areas of the economy that are absolutely exploding. huge opportunity for young people to get jobs and be successful. >> all right. we're looking at the top hiring industries here that we've put up. manufacturing, retail trade, sustainability. information technologies and professional scientific tech services as well. so what is it that students can do, though because when you go and get a college education there are options here. >> yeah. >> is there specific advice that you're going to give students at princeton today? >> yeah. i'm going to give them specific advice to learn these business
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systems, these big data systems, this data-base world that we live in because if you know the technology, you're familiar with the technology there's tremendous application for it in jobs. >> peter? >> i think what we need to be doing in addition to that is even before kids get to college they need to take computer coding and probability and statistics. we don't need trigonometry. >> the big thing was mandarin. remember? to you successful at this point there's a huge disconnect between my generation and millennials and younger where they are completely in that world. >> right. >> but they need to be able to use it in a more useful way than socializing. >> and specifically for women and young girls, too when talking about math and sciences and coding what have you. a good example is the new cfo of google. the woman hired from wall street. >> yes. >> but there are not enough women in that field and if that's where the jobs of the future of it's a concern for young girls in school right now.
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>> have to prepare. >> as the quantity of data grows exponentially, doesn't the problem of not getting lost in that data grow and how do you get information out of this ever increasing mass? >> a new generation architecture. look at most companies whether in the public or private sector today 98% of the data never gets looked at. we call this dark data. that's the reason. the reason is it's trapped in discs. disc-based databased system very departmentalize pd and is everybody inner studied. huge amounts of people looking for information and running reports. that is over. the new generation architecture is called s.a.p.hana. mobile information, all on one database. so you can completely run everything on one database with infinite scale and realtime speed. at least -- at least -- 100,000
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times faster than anything today. >> until it becomes search it and senchit and kills us all. >> up next did we learn anything today? we'll be right back. ♪ its effects on society really came about because, not because i was selfish and wanted one for myself, which i did. its because i had, had a passion. my whole life i wanted to teach myself to build
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so good! the big political story right now is senator ted cruz. the first republican candidate to announce he is running for president. and during his speech cruz seemed really focused on getting the crowd to use their imaginations. >> imagine a young married couple. imagine a teenage boy. imagine young people. imagine another teenage boy. imagine it's 1775. imagine it's 1776. imagine it was 1777. imagine it's 1933. match's it's 1979. imagine in 2017. imagine -- michin imagine. that would have seen unimaginable. >> something tells me ted cruz will just have to imagine what the oval office looks like.
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i just thinks -- time to talk about what we learned. that's your guy, peter. so, what i learned today is kind of uncomfortable, because i learned about the pillow talk. >> oh yeah. we all learned a bit about that. >> oh the interest rates at the fed. >> the fed. janet yellen. >> oh. >> whew? >> yelling about yellen. >> yeah. making fun of us. >> what did you learn today? >> i learned that barack obama and bebe netanyahu don't like each other. imagine that? >> no. it's a business-like relationship. >> i learned what you learned but also when you go to princeton you learn the word imagine. right? >> oh, is that what you have in common? bianna? >> on a serious note i learned that even in this day and age there's still so much when it comes to airplanes and crashes that we don't know. >> what a mystery. hopefully the black boxless reveal something if it's not too damaged. peter? >> that it's fun to go on tv with your wife. >> ah! >> interest rates. oh, my god, get a room.
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>> it's hot. [ laughter ] >> i don't know what just happened. >> i apologize. >> patience. the key word is patience. right? okay. that does it for us today. i think we're done. okay? i think we should end this. "the rundown" is straight ahead on msnbc. have a good one. and good morning, i'm jose diaz-balart. first on "the rundown" this morning, breaking news. you're looking at live pictures near the scene of tuesday's plane crash that killed 150 people. we're expecting to hear from french president hollande german chancellor merkel and spanish prime minister any minute now. the leaders are scheduled to visit the emergency center set up near the crash site. these are the first pictures, by the way, of the black boxes from the germanwings passenger jet that crashed in the french alps more than just over 24 hours ago. the french transport minister
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says they're working to find crucial information from the black box recorder that suffered damage in the crash. also new this morning. the ceo of germanwings says two americans were onboard the airbus a bsh 320 that went down along with 72 germans and 49 spaniards according to the spanish interior ministry. a total of 150 people were on that flight from several different countries in europe the mideast, australia, latin america and asia some of those victims held dual citizenships. helicopters back at the site right now while ground crews slowly return to the debris field. germany's foreign minister calls the crash site "a picture of horror." meantime a moment of silence observed at the airport in barcelona this morning to honor the 144 passengers and 6 crew member whose were onboard. the plane took off from barcelona tuesday morning. flight 9525 was on its way to dusseldorf when after reaching cruising

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