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tv   Weekends With Alex Witt  MSNBC  August 16, 2015 9:00am-11:01am PDT

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minates odors you've gone noseblind to break out the febreze, and breathe happy i'm really good at looking at a contract and finding things in a contract that are bad. i would police that contract so tough, that they don't have a chance. >> donald trump talking tough today about how he would enforce the deal with iran. what he also said about immigration and jeb bush on "meet the press." state of emergency, wildfires across the west turning deadly. and triple-digit temperatures making it harder than ever for firefighters. and remember the civil rights legend, how julian bond made such an impact on so many. it's high noon in the east,
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9:00 out west. welcome to "weekends with alex witt." donald trump is ratcheting up his position on immigration. >> the executive order gets re sippeded. one good thing -- >> you'll rescind that one, too? >> you have to. we have to make a whole new set of standards. and when people come in, they have to -- >> you'll split up families, deport children? >> no, we'll keep the families together. >> but you're going to keep them out? >> they have to go. >> what if they have no place to go? >> we'll work with them. they have to go. we either have a country or we don't have a country. >> trump offered a grave prognosis for the iran nuclear deal, but it will be nearly impossible for the next president to break the agreement. >> i would have told them up front you'll never get your $150 billion back. they are going to be such a wealthy, such a powerful nation,
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they're going to have nuclear weapons. they are going to take over parts of the world that you wouldn't believe. i think it's going to lead to nuclear holocaust. >> and of course, trump's fellow republican candidates were targets as well. >> when jeb bush raises $114 million, i know those people who gave him the money. i used to be one of them. i used to one of them. he's like a puppet for those people. >> well, the donald trump show was one of the top attractions at the iowa state fair, on the ground and in the air above. joining me from the fair, kasey hunt at her post for a second day. i wanted to ask you about the fried food you've eaten, but i'll save that. >> reporter: i appreciate that, alex. >> it's hardly a quiet state fair on any election weekend. this weekend, little different. really ratcheting it up. >> reporter: you can't make it up, alex. it was unprecedented in many ways. you had on the one hand hillary
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clinton who is a global celebrity in her own right. and who commanded a large crowd of people as she made her way through the fair. she has secret service protection, so they were a little more efficient at moving her from place to place. but even that was nothing compared to trump. and she and those of her supporters who were there got a glimpse of him because that helicopter flew right over top of her on the way to the landing pad not that far away. of course, you had trump landing here, taking kids for a ride in the helicopter. it was really unprecedented. the only thing i could think ahead of it is when sarah palin came here in 2011 and was also mobbed. this was just so much bigger than that. it's impossible to overstate the thousands of people who thronged him. he tried to drive his golf cart through. the golf cart was quickly mobbed. he had to get off the golf cart. they planned to take him to see the butter cow, but there were packed in the agriculture building where the butter cow is
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refrigerated. they decided it was basically unsafe to take him in there because the crowd would be so large. so they went to the pork chop tent instead. there's been so much discussion whether this is going to be something that flames out. there are a lot of republicans who say there's no way this can possibly last, he can never be the republican nominee. there is no sign on the ground that donald trump is anywhere near flaming out. who knows what will happen in the next couple of months, but others in the campaign are saying, what are we going to do with donald trump if he's still in the race on caucus night? >> the question today, how packed is it? yesterday, huge crowds, just from our camera vantage points with hillary clinton, donald trump known to be there. is it the same attendance today? >> reporter: well, saturday at the fair is kind of a unique day. it is sunday. sunday in iowa, a lot of people are in church this morning. but it's entirely possible by the end of the afternoon we'll
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still see lots of large crowds. the fair is always crowded regardless of the political candidates. there are fewer big name draws here. we'll have ben carson on the soapbox later on. later in the week you've got scott walker and marco rubio and john kasich. at the end of the day, nothing compares to donald trump. >> the cocktail debate, carly fiorina shows up tomorrow. good to see you, kasie. we'll talk about hillary clinton's campaign and new concerns that some of the backers have about it. that's coming your way about 15 minutes from now. breaking news out of southeast asia. the wreckage of an indonesian airliner with 54 people aboard reportedly has been found. it was missing earlier in the day from jay a pure a going to the city of oksibil.
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what are officials saying about the details? they have found this plane? >> reporter: well, they're not verifying that, they're not confirming that just yet, alex, simply because they haven't had eyes on the wreckage. they said about 150 rescuers are actually heading to this remote part of indonesia, where villagers saw a plane flying very low and crashing into a mountain. they have not yet located this wreckage but they believe it may be in the area near the destination area of oksibil. it's a twin turboprop owned by trigana air service in indonesia. it's about 27 years old. it was reportedly 30 or so minutes into a 43-minute flight when airport officials lost contact. now, indonesian search and rescue officials tell nbc news that the pilot actually radioed
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in saying the visibility was too poor to land. and that was the last communication. no report of any sort of distress call. the plane was flying in very heavy rain, strong winds and fog into a mountainous area. with 44 adults, 5 children and 5 crew members onboard, all believed to be indonesian. alex, that search, it's the middle of the night right now in indonesia, so the search will begin at dawn, that's in about seven hours' time, alex. >> we were covering this as it was breaking news and developing earlier. you mentioned that there are plane crashes in history in the area that have never been found. i mean, that speaks to the dense jungle, right, in the area? >> reporter: yeah. it's an extremely remote area. so difficult in terms of terrain, that a lot of local people actually use these local flights, these commuter services because it's the only way to get from village to village, city to city. we're talking about steep
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cliffs, dense jungle, mountainous terrain in an area known for thick fog, alex. >> kelly, thanks so much. leading civil rights activist julian bond has died. he was 75 years old. bond's death was announced by the poverty law center. he was the co-founder back in 1971. he was a true champion, joy, for the rights of all. >> yeah. absolutely, alex. civil rights leaders are paying their respects to julian bond today. the naacp, the reverend jesse jackson and former attorney general eric holder, among those remembering the civil rights leader's legacy. julian bond first came to national prominence with snicc, emerging to a national movement. it moved towards militancy in the 1960s. here's how bond described the
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organization's change. >> we appeal to what they thought was a conscience in this country, and found it couldn't be appealed, that the whole movement tried to appeal to that conscience and got no response. and now they're interested through their rhetoric and their public pronouncements, and militantizing, if that's a word, militantizing the population in this country. >> he went on to local politics in georgia. he was elected to the georgia house of representatives in 1965. the body refused to seat him because of his opposition to the vietnam war. and his support of those who resisted the draft. the u.s. supreme court decision a year later forced the georgia house to finally seat bond. bond remained an outspoken voice while in office. he took on the carter administration over the lack of african-americans holding federal judgeships. >> only one black and two females sit on the federal bench today. the southern regional council says in spite of the president's
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preachments, the numbers of minority and female judges appointed in the future will remain low. united states senators have always insisted they have the right to nominate federal judges. this process resulted in a collection of white men. >> his political career peaked in the georgia legislature but not his activism. he became chairman of the naacp in 1998. he held that post for more than a decade, stepping down in 2010. he spoke about the road ahead two years ago on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. >> we're still being tested by hardships and diversity, from the elevation of stand your ground laws to the evisceration of voting rights acts. today we commit ourselves as we did 50 years ago to greater efforts and grander victories. >> president obama said in a statement a short time ago, quote, michelle and i have benefited from his example, his
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counsel, his friendship. julian bond helped change the country for the better, and what better way to be remembered than that. julian bond is survived by his wife, pamela horowitz, a former splc attorney, his five children and a brother and sister. very kind, just a good man. >> we have to add, he was a handsome man. he was a virtue -- >> he was a matinee idol. but yeah, you know, eloquent speaker, all of it. >> he will be missed. thank you so much, joy. let's bring in msnbc contributor james peterson, director of africana studies at lehigh university. with a welcome to you, can you describe the racial atmosphere in the u.s. that julian bond faced when he was a young activist? >> well, he was faced with the entire aftermath of the institution of slavery and grew up in sort of an american apartheid. had bore witness to the violence
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that was an everyday occurrence. obviously as a young person, coming from sort of a family that had risen to prominence through historically black colleges, his father was the president here at lincoln university in pennsylvania, he sort of had an eye and ear for activism in a moment where american apartheid was so powerful and pronounced that it affected the lives of african-americans. >> he was elected to the georgia house of representatives in 1965. kind of interesting here, as you know, he didn't actually get to sit in the legislature until 1966 because his fellow legislators said, look, you are disloyal, you are opposing the u.s. voflt involvement in vietn. it took the supreme court to say sit this elected official down. then he continues for like 20 years, further past then, but he never held political office in washington. do you think he may have been an even greater force for change outside of public office? >> that's difficult to sort of monday morning quarterback.
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it's an amazing piece of history that he was branded as sort of an outcast for being anti-war. he took so many progressive positions across the pantheon of political ideology, it's hard to categorize him in terms of being one issue. so the anti-war piece is what got him on the outs with the georgia state legislature. he had a hard-fought battle for the same seat john lewis has. you can always ask the what-if, but if you look at his legacy outside of politics, it's so powerful, leadership in naacp and really addressing every political issue of import over the course of his lifetime through his activism and presence, we would be hard pressed to find a political career that matches up in terms of equality, in terms of power, in terms of impact as the activist career of julian bond. >> it was a tough race he ran against his friend, john lewis, when he lost. it was a pretty rough race there. i do want to quote here morris
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december w dees. he said the nation has lost a champion and a hero. what do you think julian bond's legacy is going to be? >> for all my english majors out there, he majored in literary studi studies. opened up the world for him in a lot of different ways. his legacy will be that he kept his eyes on the prize over the course of his whole life. his work was sustained, and he worked on multiple issues across multiple platforms in multiple ways. he hosted poetry, hosted tv shows, he did everything across a broad swath of issues in the history of america. this is what makes him so vital and so important to so many political leaders and so many activists today, alex. >> james, thank you for weighing in on his passing. i do want you to not go too far, though, because we'll talk about the compton hit film this
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weekend. it's going into the history books. a biopick. we'll look what is behind the film's appeal. more of donald trump's appearance on "meet the press." >> are we all part of a show? you know some of the criticisms, are we in a reality show? >> this is not a reality show, this is the real deal. >> you did smile when i read the show stopper. >> my life has been an interesting life. it's more than the cloud. it's security -
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let's head out west where dry weather is fueling wildfires across the northern rocky mountains and pacific northwest. 9,000 people are out of their homes.
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godi schwartz is there for us right now. this is just getting worse. >> reporter: yes, alex, incredible destruction out here. people's homes destroyed, people's livelihoods destroyed. this supply company has been completely gutted. the town of shelan is completely surrounded by fire right now. overnight, hundreds of firefighters working to beat back the flames that threatened to consume this popular tourist destination in central washington. the fire stretches 15 miles in some places, closing roads, and knocking out power. fire officials say it all started friday, sparked by bursts of dry lightning. >> this fire started in an area where there's fine flashing fuels. when the wind gets going and heats up, it just rages through. >> reporter: smoke rising over lake shelan where water sports have been replaced by water drops. at least 25 structures destroyed, including this fruit warehouse, while residents could only stand by and watch them burn.
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>> it was heartbreaking. i mean, i'm standing in my backyard, i'm looking at this whole hillside. i'm getting phone calls from people saying, can you see if my house is on fire? >> reporter: a little further south, a similar scene where more than 150,000 acres are on fire in oregon. so far, at least 50 homes burned, as the fast-moving flames got too close for comfort. >> within five minutes, the fire was in our backyard. we barely got out of there. >> reporter: meanwhile in southern california, soaring temperatures pose another challenge for firefighters. >> with the heat around you, depending on the flame length and what's burning, maybe 130-plus. >> reporter: the situation all too familiar for some, trying to protect themselves from fire danger for the last several years. >> this is the third time that we've gotten threatened by a fire. >> reporter: many back in washington have seen those fears realized. the question now is, how much worse will it get.
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now, there is help on the way today. we understand that 250 firefighters are coming to reinforce the fire lines. but we're also told that resources are so scarce, that help has been requested from as far away as australia. alex? >> incredible story, godi, thanks for that. president obama's hope for the iran nuclear deal are all by completely dashed today as the only possible republican backer now announced he opposes the deal. the senator has been known to break party lines. just on friday he traveled to cuba with secretary kerry to open the u.s. embassy in havana which he has supported the normalization of the relations between the two countries. and joining me now, democratic congressman jan yarmouth. welcome, good to see you. >> thanks, alex. good to be here with you. >> let's talk about, if this is an agreement and it has this kind of significance, is it still valid if it only has one party support? and it doesn't even have the whole party at that.
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>> well, i think it is valid when you run through the arguments and you realize that if the united states wants to take the most effective step it can to keeping iran from getting a nuclear weapon, that this deal is the number one option, and there really isn't any other option. so, yes, it's the -- i think it's unfortunate there's no bipartisan support. jeff flake is a great guy, very thoughtful guy. but if you actually read his statement, it doesn't deal with this agreement. it basically says the shortcoming is that there isn't enough in it to deal with their terrorist activities in support of terrorism, which is specifically what this deal was not supposed to deal with. his arguments really don't deal with the substance of this. that is true of virtually every republican. >> i'm reading exactly his statement, and you're characterizing clearly what he said he opposes. kent mccarthy claimed this past week, there is still a real possibility that the opposition could get enough democratic votes to override the
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president's veto. how close do you see it right now? >> well, i'm part of the group that's whipping our democratic colleagues in support of the deal. i think we've only had maybe one or two defections from the 151 of us who signed the letter supporting diplomacy as the best alternative. and so i feel very confident that we're going to have enough to sustain a presidential veto. we only need 146. and i think we'll have significantly more than that. >> how about the democrats who oppose the deal, do you think they're going to face the wrath of the party and the white house when they're up for reelection next year? >> i'm not so sure. this is one of those votes that is very personal. there are a lot of kind of divided loyalties here. you have some of the members, particularly my fellow jewish members, who come from constituencies that are overwhelmingly opposed to the deal, large jewish populations. even though i might ad the polls show the majority of the
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american jews support this deal. but there's tough calls. and i think the president, the administration certainly recognizes that this is not one of those deals that, you know, he's going to say, you'll never get anything from me again. i think this is one that everybody respects the personal convictions of other members. >> you know, i'm certain you've seen "the new york times" report that big money donors on both side of this date have launched pretty significant lobbying efforts in congress. how much of this deal is being decided by money? >> again, i don't think this is one of those deals that is vulnerable to money, or sensitive to money. i think these are the votes that you really think that when you retire from the position, that this will be one of the votes that your legacy will be built on. and i haven't noticed anybody changing votes because of pressure. i think it's basically personal commitment, personal analysis. everybody is being very
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diligent, at least on our side of the aisle, reading the annex documents and coming to a conclusion. talking to, for instance, the ambassadors from the other five countries in the group that negotiated this deal. so i think that, again, this is more a personal decision. i don't think it's really that much affected by huge donors. >> okay. since i have you here, may i quickly ask you your thoughts on the potential joe biden entering the presidential race? where do you think he stands on that? >> i probably don't know anything more than what you do or anybody else is reading in the political press. i think clearly he seems to be making some tentative moves to kind of assess what the likelihood, or possibility of success in a primary would be. or maybe just setting himself up if in case hillary's campaign falters in some way. i really don't see him embarking
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on an all-out challenge to hillary clinton. i think the odds against that are pretty small. the odds for him to succeed are pretty small. and i don't think he'd want to divide the party that way. all that being said, joe biden is a wonderful public servant. i've known him for a long time. and he would make a great president. >> well, pretty much that's what people say. nobody has a bad thing to say about him on both sides of the aisle. he's very much beloved in washington. thank you so much, john. >> thanks, alex. we'll have more with chuck todd's discussion with donald trump on "meet the press." >> it will work out so well, you will be so happy. in four years you're going to be interviewing me and you're going to say, what a great job you've done, president trump. hi my name's josh. kelly. my name is raph. steve. my name is anne. tom. brian. krystal. and i am definitely not a robot.
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airliner with 54 people aboard reportedly has been found, or at least pinpointed. it was reported missing earlier in the day from jayapura to oksibil. john, there were reports of terrible weather in the area. the fact is the pilot radioed the control tower saying, we can't land in this weather. is that then going to be the reason, is there anything to suspect that there would be anything else contributing to it? >> they're certainly going to look at the weather, but the fact that the weather would be below an acceptable level, that in and of itself is not a problem. professional pilots deal with that kind of condition on a regular basis. if they can't land at the destination airport, there are procedures that they fly to take the airplane to another airport. they can go hold. there's a variety of options that are available. so that's one of the things that you check early is, do you have the necessary visibility, and
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cloud height, to be able to land safely. if you don't, you take other alternatives. so the weather's going to be looked at, but it may or may not be actually the causal factor here. >> but john, how would that then be a problem? if you have all these options, is it a matter of -- do you fly only by sight at that level when you're at that level of approach? how many are you relying of plane instruments and that sort of technology? wouldn't they have been higher than flying in the mountain ranges themselves? >> certainly this is what the investigators are going to focus on. why was the airplane below the level of the mountains, without having adequate visual reference. and this is the procedures used to get in and out of mountain airports can be very challenging. and those procedures are going to come under close scrutiny. the fact that the visibility may have decreased suddenly, heavy rain shower or something like that, this would cause the
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pilots to fly a procedure using their instruments and navigation to position the airplane to climb and get away above the mountainous terrain. what happened here, we don't know. there is an accident type call that controls flight in terrain where the airplane, a perfectly good airplane does fly into terrain. that is a common accident type, and certainly one that they're going to look at in this investigation. >> and what do you know about this atr 42-300, the type of plane, and can it basically turn on a dime? does it have that capability? >> the atr-42 is a well-established veteran airplane that's been in service for many, many years. this particular aircraft was built in 1988, was in service in the united states for many, many years. and in 2005, was purchased by this operator. so the atr-42 enjoys a good reputation. i would consider it certainly a safe airplane. and it is designed to operate in and out of smaller airports.
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it is maneuverable. pilots i've talked to that have flown it, like it, and have a lot of respect for it. >> right now, it is a rescue and recovery operation. john cox, many thanks. dangerous heat wave is gripping much of the west. when will we see a break. everyone's raving!
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spokesperson for george w. bush. and who is that guy, morris reed? we haven't seen you in a month of sundays. good to see you, both of you. >> hi, alex. >> mercedes, you're a more regular here, we'll go ladies first here. when we think about the limited manpower of local and federal law enforcement agencies, they already have strained budgets. does donald trump's plan sound plausible? >> when you look at the plan that he laid out, you could call for tripling the i.c.e. officers as well as, you know, the mandatory deportation of criminal aliens, or illegal immigrants who are here. so, again, it would require a lot more federal funding. so he's going to have to make sure that if that is where he's going to go, he would need to negotiate with congress to ensure that they have the necessary federal funds to
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enforce the immigration laws. which is something that obviously we have not seen done in this country. >> can i ask you, any worries, mercedes, it's going to be trump's way or the highway in the art of negotiating? i know he's negotiated he said the zoning laws in new york city for his developments, much more difficult than he says he would have in negotiating with foreign countries. but what do you think? >> alex, he's got the trump style. this is -- for us folks who have been in politics for a long time, this is something very new for us. this is dealing with someone who is out of the box, who has his own way of dealing with businesses, with governments, and, you know, we don't know what to expect to a certain extent. he has this bold, brash talk. the question will be, how will he actually be -- if he were to become president, again, these are all hypotheticals, how would he serve as a president? will he be this bombastic, go after the nations, go after mexico, or will he actually be
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able to negotiate deals with congress and foreign governments? >> don't you want to see viable options? his plan details more than the brash talk before anyone considers pulling a lever and say i'm voting for this guy? mercedes? >> oh. yeah, i mean, i think that right now, obviously for the republican primary voters, they're looking at -- you know, they have so many options at this point. trump is coming in with the celebrity style campaigning, bringing down the helicopter to iowa, kids ride for free. there's something -- there's a novelty about him. there's something exciting about him. the thing is that, actually, this immigration paper which when you read it, a lot of the points actually make sense. what are we going to do with the illegal immigrants that are criminals here in the united states killing americans? what do we need to do with them? they need to be deport. he talks about everify. something that many republicans talk about.
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he talks about, what do we do with overstayed visas? he's trying to find solutions. i think this immigration paper was more along the lines of something that i think could actually work. when you hear his talk about saying we're going to deport all these illegal immigrants, i think that becomes a little more challenging. >> many people are comparing bernie sanders to donald trump. are you convinced that is what is really buoying both of these candidacies? >> well, listen, this is a frustration, and anti-establishment vote. the anti-establishment move around the world. this is the first we've seen it in this style in america. but we see it around the world. you see it from the discourse that you see in the middle east, to the discourse you see in africa, when people decide to stay over their mandates. this is sort of a protest and i would say anti-establishment vote. we'll see if this continues in the future. >> chuck todd asked donald trump about the seriousness of his
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campaign. let's all take a listen to that. >> you know that some of the criticisms, and we all feel like -- are we in a reality show? >> no, this is the real deal. i love this country and i want to make it great again. it's not going to be great if we keep going the way we're going. we'll be third world. we probably already are. >> so both you react to that. morris, he has a very commanding presence, a commanding authority. there's no wishy washiness there. what do you think of that in terms of his qualifications for commander in chief? >> just because you say something author tativeively doesn't mean you're right. he's a popular figure. i think he's trying to tap into a vein that people are upset that the failure, quite frankly, of some of the american politicians. so he's riding a wave. we will see where this goes, because at the end of the day, you cannot be all talk when you become president of the united
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states. the american people will go to that. >> mercedes, what does this say, the popularity about the type of republican voter out there right now? >> i think he's definitely, you know, striking a nerve with many of these republican voters who are very frustrated. again, this is about anti-washington. this is the fact that we've had two terms of an obama presidency that where we have seen failed policies from a domestic level to the foreign policy level. so what happens here is he's like this new voice. he's this nonpolitical rhetoric. he doesn't go by the script. he's pretty much like the straight shooter delivering a very straightforward message. it seems to be resonating with some republican voters. obviously he's doing well in the polls. look at iowa, for example, there's still 66% of republican primary voters in iowa who have not decided who they're going to vote for. we still have a long way to go in this process. obviously, we keep thinking, is trump going to implode? i'll tell you, he seems to be going strong and steady so far.
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>> this has nothing to do with the obama administration, this has to do with the lack of candidates resonating with your primary voters. this is about the republicans not having good candidates, not about democrats. we have a fine candidate -- >> i feel like our base right now, our field is very strong this time around. >> morris, i do want to ask you -- >> i think your base is frustrated. that's why he's doing so well in your primary. >> i do want to ask you about hillary clinton, because as i'm sure you were talking about, morris, you have this "washington post" report that some of her backers are worried about her past weaknesses, because they see more patterns emerging, the rigidity, a sense that the operation could be tone deaf to changes happening around it. what is your sense? and if that is the case, how does hillary clinton break out of these patterns? >> well, hillary clinton starts slow. she's a better candidate when she has a sparring partner, if i can use a boxing metaphor.
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there is a worry that she doesn't have a sparring partner. she gets better over time. but time is not on her side. so there's some frustration. and i think people are worried. so this is why you see joe biden possibly getting in. i think it's a good thing. and bernie sanders doing quite well right now. >> all right, you guys, very good to see you both. don't be strangers. thank you. it has been a big moneymaker at the box office this weekend. i'm taking a closer look at the film "straight out of compton." every chip will crack. these friends were on a trip when their windshield got chipped. so they scheduled at safelite.com... they didn't have to change their plans, or worry about a thing. and i fixed it right away... ...with a strong repair they can trust. plus, with most insurance a safelite repair is no cost to you. really?! being there whenever you need us... that's another safelite advantage. safelite repair, safelite replace. to breathe with copd?ow hard it can be
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some economic headlines, the cost of renting a home in the u.s. has reached its lowest percent ever. the highest percentage ever. samsung trying to lure users away from apple's iphones. they released the galaxy note 5, and while the s-6 edged.
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"star wars" is getting its own theme land at walt disney world orlando, florida, and in california. the 14-acre attractions represent the largest theme park expansion ever. they're promising an experience out of this galaxy. let's go now to the weather, and the excessive heat warnings that remain in place for more than 14 millions across three states. reynolds wolf is here with the weather headlines. >> alex, my friend. things could get popping later today in the central plains, maybe moving into the west. some of these could be pretty destructive. we're not seeing severe weather outbreak, but at least a severe storm potential for the central plains for tomorrow. spotty damaging winds, heavy rain, hail. maybe some tornadoes. and these are going to make their way into parts of the central plains, and into portions of the midwest as we make our way over the next
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several days. the heat in chicago, cleveland, indianapolis, st. louis and des moines, and warm conditions in parts of the northeast. no whining. come on, guys, before you know it, winter is going to be here. enjoy this nice little bit of summer in new york. you want to talk about serious heat? try the desert southwest. it is going to be stifling in a lot of places. phoenix 113. las vegas 112. death valley, into the 120s. "aye-aye. >> that is hot. thank you. the most underrated cities, also, where pets can really thrive.
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"straight out of compton" opened to huge crowds.
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ice cube in the film is played by his son. >> glamourizing gangs and drugs. >> our art is a reflection of our reality. >> reporter: this isn't the crypts and bloods, this is a threat from the federal government. >> what up? i got something to say. >> the film's strong friday opening brought in more than $24 million. we should note it is produced by universal, which shares the parent company as us here at msnbc. let's bring in contributor james peterson, associate professor of english at lehigh university. welcome back to you. have you seen it? do you want to see it? >> i saw it last night, alex. listen, it's an amazing film. the direction by gray is great. the casting is amazing. particularly the young man who plays dr. dre and ice cube's son
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who plays ice cube in the film. there's a lot to -- it's a great film. but it's also an emotional experience to watch it, alex, because i was growing up on this music. i was a teenager, when "straight out of compton" came out. one, this is just how the conflict and police brutality was a part of the lived experience of black folks, not on just the west coast, but around the nation. we're still dealing with some of those things right now. to be honest with you, i was not surprised, but struck by the misogyny, by the disposability of women within the consuulture around them. we have to look at what are the roots of misogyny within hip-hop culture and why women are mistreated in a way through the music and by the music, and how do you root those things out. things that are persistent and haunting about the film that i
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saw last night. >> my weekend starts in a little over an hour and it's definitely on my list of to-do things in the next couple of days, to see that film. it's expected to gross $60 million by the end of the weekend. it has a huge crossover appeal. that's been a large contributor. is there a surprise to you that it's really crossed all walks of life? >> i'm actually surprised that people underestimated the film. the film cost under $30 million to make, so by all hollywood standards it's a huge success already. >> oh, yeah. >> if you go to the film, you'll see mixed audiences. i think people have to remember that gangster rap emerges at a particular point of hip-hop culture, it emerges really in the late '80s and is really responsible for the ways hip-hop culture crossed over into the mainstream. it's hard for people to get their heads around this right now. now when you think about it, but back then it was gangster rap that opened up the marketplace to middle americans.
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there were young white men who were interested in looking vicariously at the experiences of the young black men in the inner cities. and other gangster rappers provided them with this rebellious spirit that young people like to associate with anyway. i'm not surprised at all by the success of the film. >> do you think this rap music era of the 1980s, is this fodder now for nostalgia? the music of the '60s became that. >> there's great reporting that hip-hop music is really one of the most popular, one of the most dominant popular music america has ever produced. that moment talking about, the late '80s, into the mid to late-'90s, biggie smalls is there, and also these west coast folks, a lot of music being made that's really popular and prominent. we feel a lot of nostalgia about this era, like my age, we were teenagers at that time, so these
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movies are attracting a certain kind of demographic. again, not surprised by the broad appeal of the movie, because when you look at the history, that's the history of that music in that time. >> james peterson, even more so looking forward to seeing the film right now. >> you'll enjoy it, alex. >> i will. thanks. drone sightings and near misses by pilots. it's more than a network and the cloud. it's reliable uptime. and multi-layered security. it's how you stay connected to each other and to your customers. with centurylink you get advanced technology solutions, including an industry leading broadband network, and cloud and hosting services - all with dedicated, responsive support. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you're free to focus on growing your business. centurylink. your link to what's next. plaque psoriasis. moderate to severe isn't it time to let the real you shine through?
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hey, everyone, welcome to "weekends with alex witt." it is 1:00 in the east, 10:00 a.m. out west. donald trump said he's going to make america great again. today he's laying out how he plans to do that. he sat down with chuck todd on "meet the press" for a wide-ranging interview that touched on everything from immigration to the iran deal. >> the executive order gets rescinded. >> you'll rescind that one, too? >> one good thing -- >> you realize -- >> we have to make a whole new set of standards. and when people come in, they have to -- >> you'll split up families? >> chuck, no, we'll keep the families together. we have to keep the families together. >> but you're going to -- >> they have to go. >> what if they have no place to go? >> we'll work with them. they have to go. chuck, either have a country or we don't have a country. you'll never get your $150 billion back. they are going to be such a wealthy, such a powerful nation,
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they're going to have nuclear weapons, they are going to take over parts of the world that you wouldn't believe. and i think it's going to lead to nuclear holocaust. >> we're going to make america great again. when was the last time america was great? >> i would say during the administration of ronald reagan. you felt proud to be an american. you felt really proud. i don't think since then to any great extent people were proud. it will work out so well, you will be so happy. in four years you're going to be interviewing me and you're going to say, what a great job you've done president trump. >> wh it gets to that point is still to be seen. but he brought out the crowds certainly at the iowa state fair yesterday. and there at the fair is kasie hunt. welcome to you again, my fripd. did you get a sense that the thousands who came out to see trump, do they like him as a candidate or were they there for the celebrity, or can you really separate that? >> reporter: i'm not sure that you can separate it, alex.
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it's a little of both, all of the above. there were definitely people i ran into, that said they would never vote for him, but wanted to take a selfie with him. but there are those who are saying, he's talking about things that i really care about. he's not politically correct and this is the kind of thing we need to hear from politicians. there was a lot of both. i think you saw the same with hillary clinton. she's also a celebrity in her own right. and she had a sizeable crowd following her around at the fair. there were many people who plan to vote for her, wanted to see her for that reasons. there were others who said she's not my person, but that doesn't mean i don't want to shake her hand or see her at the state fair. quite a scene yesterday with these two mobs. especially in the case of trump who essentially shut down this whole grand concourse up the road behind me as he tried to make his way through here. >> do you think it's fair to say that trump eclipsed clinton in
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his appearance? >> reporter: well, there was a point at which clinton had this group of supporters and press around her, and trump's helicopter literally flew over top as he went to land. in some ways she was literally overshadowed. i think yesterday, the main story at the fair was donald trump. that's remarkable. if you think about the story we would be covering and how we would be covering it if trump wasn't at the top of the field. we had jeb bush here thursday. likely the struggles that they've been having, and the fact they haven't moved into the front-runner status that we both -- well, in the case of bush, he hasn't cemented his front-runner status as we expected. hillary clinton is facing this unexpected challenge from bernie sanders, facing questions about her e-mails. instead of that being the story line we're focused on, it's all about trump and his helicopter landing, rides for kids. it's a political story line that
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pretty much is unprecedented at the fair here, alex. >> i do think about that all the time, just saying. thank you from iowa. coming up in just a few minutes, our political panel assesses donald trump's "meet the press" performance, where so far the consensus is he scored points and lost a few points as well. julian bond is being remembered as a powerful force in the nation's fight for civil rights. bond, who died after a brief illness, was one of the iconic figures in the movement. he co-founded the student nonviolent coordinating committee in college and served as the board chairman for a decade of the naacp. speaking at the 50th of the anniversary on the march on washington, he said the fight was still not over. >> we're still being tested by hardships and diversity, from stand your ground laws, to the evisceration of the voting rights act. but today we commit ourselves as we did 50 years ago to greater efforts and grander victories. >> just a short time ago we
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heard from president obama on the passing of julian bond. as messages of condolences continue to pour in. let's go to ron allen in martha's vineyard, where the president is vacationing. ron, what is the latest from there on this? >> reporter: they're having a quiet day here on vacation. but he did release a statement about julian bond, somebody he obviously feels a lot of affection for. he said in part, michelle and i have benefited from his example, his counsel, his friendship. julian bond helped change the country for the better, and what better way to be remembered than that. they also offered their prayers and sympathies to his wife, pamela, and to his children. and coincidentally, the president and first lady were here also honoring nor civil rights icon last night, jordan, from the national urban league, had his 80th birthday party here. star-studded event, 200 people invited, including the clintons as well and the obamas.
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and today they're mourning the loss of julian bond here on a quiet day in martha's vineyard. >> thank you very much. these are just some of julian bond's accomplishments. he was elected to the georgia state house in 1965. in 1971, he helped found the southern poverty law center, then serving as president of the center. and then from 1998 to 2010, julian bond served as chairman of the naacp. coming up in about a half an hour, we'll take a greater look at the impact julian bond had on the national struggle for racial equality. now as we head out west, this developing news. fast-moving wildfires fueled by dry conditions in the weather, surrounding a popular tourist town in washington. that's not what's sincing up with what you're seeing on the scene. thousands have been forced to evacuation. gadi schwartz is out there looking at some of the damage
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out there. >> reporter: alex, a terrifying fire for the residents here. they tell me on friday there was a lightning strike right above that ridge right there. in the morning, it blew up, and the winds really fanned it. it came down here, it's hard to see, but these buildings are completely gutted from the inside. this is one of the largest co-ops in the country. and you see the line of buildings right here, all containing some type of fruit, and all of that destroyed. the fire was moving so rapidly, it was able to jump over this road, jump this parking lot. here is another building that has been completely destroyed. this was a building supply company. so people's homes being destroyed here in the community as well as people's livelihoods. they tell me that a lot of them did not have insurance. alex? >> gadi, thank you for that tragic update here. this is shaping up to be one of the worst years for wildfires in the last ten years. there have been nearly 40,000 fires so far this year, and a
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decade leading 6 1/2 million acres burned so far. breaking news to share out of southeast asia so far. the wreckage of an indonesian airliner has reportedly been pinpointed in its location. it had been reported missing earlier in the day after a short flight from papau. what are officials officially saying, kelly? >> reporter: well, alex, they're not all that willing to say much in terms of detail until searchers find that wreckage. it's now 2:00 a.m. local time, the search starting up again tomorrow at dawn. this is what we know, about 150 rescuers are heading to this remote part of indonesia where villagers report a plane flying low and then crashing into a mountain. the plane in question is a twin turboprop owned by trigana air, a local commuter carrier in
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indonesia. the plane itself is 27 years old. it was reportedly getting close to a landing when the airport officials lost contact. there is a bit of a discrepancy on whether it was overdue, or about to land. indonesian search and rescue officials tell nbc news that at one point the pilot radioed in saying visibility was too poor to land, and that was the last communication. alex? >> all right, kelli, thank you for sharing what we know from london. from just a moment, what did donald trump have to gain by appearing on "meet the press" and what did he accomplish? you get used to the lingering odors in your bathroom you think it smells fine, but your guests smell this... febreze air effects heavy duty has up to two times the odor-eliminating power to remove bathroom odors you've gone noseblind to
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big money in power politics
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and paychecks with uncle sam taking in a record amount of tax revenue. more than $2.6 trillion went into the government's coffers for the first 10 months of this fiscal year, $183 billion more than this time last year. here's the problem, though, the government has spent $3.1 trillion so far, which leaves a deficit of $465 billion. and with alabama facing a $300 million budget deficit, a state lawmaker has set up a go-fund-me.com account to come up with the cash. it may be a little tongue in cheek for its efforts, so far in nine days he's raise d money frm some donors. the on-camera interview comes after weeks of trump doing what we call in the business phoners. >> donald trump joins us by phone from new york. >> i'm joined on the phone from new york by donald trump. >> let's begin this half hour
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with donald trump. he joins us now by phone. >> we have a phone call from somebody. let me see who it is on the phone. is it my mother? mom, is that you? >> what have we got? >> good morning, darling. >> well, joining me right now in the flesh, from washington, matt lewis, senior contributor for the daily collar. i'm going to begin with you, matt, what do you think prompted donald trump to give an interview only to chuck todd this sunday morning when there are a bunch of shows to talk to? >> well, i don't know. i will say this. i'm glad to get rid of the phoner. i don't think that it's a good trend that we're seeing. i think that they should require him to show up. i thought it was a very good interview, very interesting interview. donald trump, say what you will about him, he is more than happy to talk to people, and to expound on the issues. and so i think it's a win-win. i think it was a win for nbc news. and i think it's a win for
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donald trump. he loves buzz, he loves publicity. we're talking about him yet again. >> lynn, i understand you're with us now. what do you make of the fact this was an interview face to face and what do you think he accomplished? >> well, i think a few things. one, it is, as trump himself would say, it's a ratings boost for whoever has him on. my compliments to you. did you know he went to wharton for school, everyone? >> we all know. >> yeah. >> i know chuck todd went after him, you know, questioning him, who keeps mentioning what college they went to? maybe matt will let us know -- >> i'm a shepherd college graduate. >> i went to usc, if anyone cares. but keep going. >> my point being, i don't think his immigration plan is really a whole plan. he said he was going to have a plan. what i got out of it is he wants perhaps the 1 population where there's the most agreement between the parties, the
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dreamers, the kids who are here illegally through no fault of his own, he wants to end the executive order that allows them to stay. what he accomplished i think is just keeping up fascination with his presidential candidacy. >> let's listen to what chuck asked him about, which is the seriousness of his campaign. let's take a listen to that. >> you know some of the criticisms, we all feel like -- are we in a reality show? >> no, this is the real deal. i love this country. and i want to make it great again. it's not going to be great if we keep going the way we're going, we're going to be third world, we probably already are. >> we get that he is a celebrity. he's running for fs. but what does his popularity, matt, say about the type of person republican voters want in office this time around? >> i think it taps into a lot of things. i think it taps into the fact that there are a lot of people in america right now that i think have gotten desperate.
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i think they've given up on the system. i think this is a hail mary. believing in donald trump requires believing in magic. that because he's been successful in business, or whatever, that he can suddenly fix everything, right? he can negotiate. he can get the mexicans to pay -- to build a wall. and you just have to trust -- essentially, outsource your judgment and trust him to get it done. i think part of it speaks to a desperation and a frustration that's understandable in this day and age. but i think there's also a very more negative pernicious aspect of it that speaks to a sort of nativism, a sort of populism that i think certainly is highlighted by his immigration stance. and i think that's the dark side of donald trump that i don't like to see happening on the right. >> okay. listen, guys, we're going to take a break with both of you right now, but i will speak to you a little later in the show, so don't stray too far.
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thank you. you can all watch chuck todd's entire interview on "meet the press" coming up in about 40 minutes or so at the top of the hour. what is it about this cat that's drawing worldwide attention? today's number ones, we'll clue you in on that next. (vo) what's your dog food's first ingredient? corn? wheat? in new purina one true instinct grain free, real chicken is always #1. no corn, wheat or soy. support your active dog's whole body health with purina one.
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can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? our furry friends are in the spotlight of today's number ones. we begin with an international flair as we highlight some great european getaway destinations. they are cities you surely want to visit. but not the obvious places, like paris. the "huffington post" list the most underrated cities you must visit. the top spot, cork, ireland. leon, france, has the vibrant nightlife. and helsinki, finland, with the magnificent seaport and plenty of parks. the best and worst cities for pet lovers.
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it includes costs and availability for pet services. cincinnati leads the list of 100 cities. st. louis comes in second. colorado springs third. due in large part to a high cost of living, newark, new jersey, new york city, and santa ana, california, are the worst cities for pets and owners. a cat named corduroy. guinness just crowned this cool cattle from oregon as the oldest cat in the world. can you believe that? he looks great. guess what, corduroy is almost 26 years old. a guinness spokesman reports his longevity to a healthy diet. >> due to recent medical complaints, he gets treats only on special occasions. >> he's going to need to hang on for 12 more years to be the oldest cat ever. those are your number ones. get ready to show your roots with roots touch-up from nice'n easy.
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welcome back to "weekends
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with alex witt." at 26 past the hour, here are your fast five headlines. the death toll from the explosions in china has now risen to 112. authorities say about 3,000 soldiers are right now taking part in the effort to clear dangerous chemical contamination from around the site at the blast. in chicago, two air show parachutists are injured after colliding in midair after a stunt. one landed on a beach and broke his leg, the other slammed into a building and at last report is in critical condition. a male crew member on a carnival cruise line is facing a sexual assault charge for allegedly molesting an underage boy on the ship. he was arrested yesterday after the ship docked in florida. carnival said it is cooperating with the investigation. in pennsylvania, three people are recovering after a hot air balloon accident. the pilot and two passengers appeared to have suffered burns yesterday when the balloon hit power lines just while it was landing. two women making history in the nfl. they did so during saturday
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night's cardinals-chiefs game. there you see it there, sarah thomas, the first woman to serve as the first onfield referee. you go, girls. those are your fast five headlines. from there to the weather now, the excessive heat warnings that remain in place for 14 million americans across the united states. reynolds wolf is here with the weather headlines. >> alex, my friend, thanks. things could get popping in the central plains maybe moving into the west. scattered showers and storms, some of these could be pretty destructive. not severe weather outbreak, but severe storm potential that could occur for the central plains tomorrow. spotty, damaging winds, heavy rain, hail, maybe some tornadoes. and these are going to make their way into parts of the central plains, and into portions of the midwest as we make our way over the next several days. temperatures beginning to build today. heat in chicago, indianapolis, st. louis and des moines.
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we've got the warm conditions in parts of the northeast. no whining. come on, guys, before you know it, winter's going to be here, so enjoy the nice little bit of summer. you want to talk about serious heat. try the desert southwest, it is going to be stifling in a lot of place. phoenix 113. las vegas, 112. death valley, into the 120s. ay-yi-yi. back to you in the studio. >> thanks so much, reynolds. julian bond has died. he was 75 years old. bond's death was announced by the southern poverty law center. he was the first president back in 1971. president obama said in short just a while ago, julian bond was a hero and i'm privileged to say a friend. justice and equality was the mission that spanned his life. the president and ceo of the urban national league. >> thanks for having me, alex. good afternoon.
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>> i'm sure it's a very heavy heart that you have as you talk to me about julian bond. what will you most remember about him? >> i'll remember that julian bond was a student activist in the 1960s, who was part of that generation who helped found the student organizing committee and gave voice to the young people, in the same way you see young people embracing civil rights and social justice today through many, many avenues. julian, from activist, to politician, people have to remember, he was part of that historic election in 1965 that sent the first african-americans to the georgia state legislature since reconstruction. of course, known in the modern times more as the chair of the naacp. but i remember his incredible, if you will, sharp tongue, his way of telling the truth, speaking about issues in a way
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that was very untarnished, but very erudite, and if you will, intellectual. he's going to be missed. i'm shocked and saddened and certainly we send our prayers to his family. and all who knew him and loved him and followed him. >> you know, interestingly, marc, you bring up the 1965 election had to the georgia state house. that was not without its controversy, because his fellow lawmakers did not want him to sit down in the legislature. they said that he was a traitor, because he was opposing the vietnam war, that he was unamerican for doing so. i'm sure you know, but our viewers may not know, it took a unanimous vote by the supreme court in 1966 for him to actually take his place in the georgia state house. >> alex, i'm glad you point it out. it reflected the times when there was massive resistance in many corners of the south, the idea that black people should have a right to vote, and have the right to even be elected to public office.
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and let's not forget this about julian bond. in 1968 at the democratic convention, there was a move to nominate him for vice president. that move didn't succeed, because at the time he was not old enough, was not yet 35 years old, and could not be president, so he didn't meet the qualifications. as vice president. but he came, if you will, to prominence because of his efforts to encourage and support an anti-war plank on the anti-war movement in 1968. he sort of burst onto the mainstream scene in the '68 convention in chicago. and that's a part of history that should not be forgotten as we think about this sort of age of obama, and all of the efforts over the years to help the country move in a more open direction. >> boy, wasn't that 1968 chicago
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convention, for the democrats, it was an incredible convention. but i do want to ask you about the fact that he was never elected to public office on a federal level. he was not a congressman. even though we know he ran against his good friend john lewis in a really bitter battle and lost to that. there are some who would suggest he was more effective in his role outside of official politics. he was able to do more for the country, do more for civil rights. what do you think? >> i think that that generation of elected officials, african-american elected officials had the unique role, if you will, of having served both inside and outside government. but whether he was in the georgia legislature, serving on the board of the southern poverty law center, serving as chair of the naacp national board, or teaching in a classroom, his fundamental vision, his fundamental principles, his passion for, if
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you will, civil rights, social justice, in a more open nation, was the string that connected all of those. i think many from his generation did not see the inside-outside divide as much as they saw the synthesis, if you will, of what they felt and what they believed and what they were passionate about, and that was civil rights and social justice. >> it's important to note he was a man who was embraced and applauded for his efforts beyond just the african-american community. this was for social justice for all. that was really his template. >> and you know, i think julian bond saw himself as he evolved, because if you will, his opposition to the vietnam war was very early, at a time when his highly controversial, as part of what i would call a larger progressive civil rights and human rights social justice, economic opportunity movement, which was taking shape in the
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1960s. and which continues to this day. and i always thought he saw himself, and he saw the civil rights movement as a peace, a part, a foundation to a broader movement to make america more inclusive. and that's one of his most important contributions. his voice and his intellect are going to be sorely missed. >> yeah, well, marc morial, thank you for weighing in. your intellect and insights, i always appreciate them. >> thank you, alex. julian bond dead at the age of 75 after a brief illness. donald trump and his chopper are gone. but there's still a lot to come at the iowa state fair with the gop field heading to the soapbox this week, today, tomorrow and beyond. joining us from the fairgrounds is vaughn hilliard. vaughn, welcome to you. what's on tap for this week? >> reporter: outside of the 1:30 arm wrestling match, we've got ben carson this afternoon. we're talking outsiders, in a
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new poll this morning, second to donald trump. and george pataki. in dubuque we've got bernie sanders. back at the fair tomorrow, scott walker is coming in in the morning. the third outsider in the republican circus is carly fiorina will be here. rick perry, rick santorum, they're going all across the state over the next couple days. a state fair. i think we've got as much fried food as candidates. >> all i can say is drink plenty of bottled water to flush all that out. what about the two big heavyweights yesterday with donald trump and hillary clinton? how did the crowds compare today as opposed to yesterday? >> reporter: i think it's hard to beat that, what we saw yesterday. ben carson has a following of his own and we'll see what he comes up with this afternoon. it's sunday at the fair. the iowa fair is a popular place to be. donald trump and hillary clinton, you're not going to repeat that.
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they said they've never seen anything like that here at the iowa fair. hey, maybe the donald will make a return, who knows. >> from your vantage point, both have huge entourages with them, but who do you think picked up more popularity, more focus? you've got hillary clinton, huge name leading the democratic party. donald trump, big entertainer. who caught the most attention? >> reporter: well, who's flying a helicopter around? that's the question. we saw it today with the helicopter. they both are. bernie sanders you have to throw into the mix as well. he had a crowd that went around the soapbox. he was the only one who went up to the soapbox actually. you have to include him in the conversation. of course the donald brings a lot. but when you look at these three, we won't replicate what we saw with barack obama in 2008, but we're seeing something similar. >> thank you for mentioning all three of those big titans yesterday. donald trump will have to
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take a break tomorrow, he's going to go to court, because the donald has been summoned to serve jury duty here in new york city. he reportedly had ignored five previous jury duty summonses since 2006 for which he's been fined $250. trump says he's looking forward to fulfilling his civic duty. like donald trump, hillary clinton stole the spotlight at the iowa state fair. during the press event she was once again asked the questions regarding her e-mails. >> i think there are disputes going on among agencies about what should have, could have, would have been done back five, six years ago. that is something for them to work out. i am repeating the facts. the facts are, i did not send nor did i receive material marked classified. >> joining me now, once again, lynn sweet, washington bureau chief, and matt lewis for the daily caller. lynn, hillary clinton just cannot seem to dodge this issue.
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on friday night, she even appeared to make a joke about it. what is the right way to go about this? >> the joke is in the side. you can't get rid of the snap shot about the joke, or any joke. stop the drip, drip, drip. she finally turned over the server. perhaps if there's anything else to turn over, or disclose, i think we're at the end of the road. but just try -- this is classic damage control. i'm surprised they didn't do more of it, to try and get ahead of just the facts, especially since everyone knew the issue of turning the physical server over was out there. >> okay. i want to ask you, though, i'm sure you read the article in "the new york times" that talks about potentially history repeating itself. are you concerned, or do you see echoes of previous hillary clinton presidential campaign here today? >> to me or matt? >> to you. >> okay. well, what i see is that she
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needs kind of to get out of this, to have the clean start for this next chapter that she's on. the other thing to think of, alex, is that a lot of people don't know the hillary of the past. we've been covering her for years. but there's so many voters there who don't know all the ins and outs of whitewater, and right-wing conspiracies and all that, that might seem ancient history. >> matt, on "morning joe" this past week, you said there is a risk in the republicans constantly talking about the e-mail situation. what did you mean by that? explain that. >> look, i think hillary with the old napoleon line, never interfere with your opponent during the process of committing suicide, i think it's better for the press to cover this. as they are doing a good job. and the administration, by the way, you know, hillary's team wants you to believe, or wants us to believe this is partisan, that is republicans saying that
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hillary did something untoward, or possibly unethical, or even illegal. in fact, it's obama's ig, obama's doj, obama's fbi who be looking into this server. so this transcends party bickering in the right-wing conspiracy. the worst thing republicans could do is try to make it look like it's just normal political skirmish. >> matt, can i ask you, though, do you really think she's committing political suicide here? do you really think this is what the american population wants to be talking about? are there other things that might be high on their list, what they want to hear the candidates talking about? >> well, i'm sure that they'd rather talk about a lot of other stuff. but this is a very legitimate issue. it obviously matters where the next president of the united states violated law, or even policy as secretary of state. so it's a legitimate issue.
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and look, i would say this. i think hillary's biggest problem is, she's been on defense now talking about this for months. it's not just that it looks like she's hiding something or secretive, but she seems very inauthentic. i've used the term phony. she seems -- she's, frankly, not a good politician. i think bill clinton could have survived this. but the fact that bernie sanders is doing so well, now we're talking about al gore. now we're talking about joe biden. that tells us all we need to know about how she's doing. >> bernie sanders, i want to ask you both, and lynn, i'll let you answer first, is the bernie sanders rise in popularity more about bernie sanders or hillary clinton? what do you think, lynn? >> it's a combination. i think that the -- there is always a yearning for the icona clastic candidate for 2016. we're not using the words hope
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and change now. i don't think bernie sanders, the socialist independent can necessarily put forth a broad based appeal at this stage, but he does speak to a certain frustration among democrats, as i think trump does speaks to frustration among republicans. matt just used the term authent authentic. i think what trump has, what bernie sanders has, are ways of doing their own version of straight talk, and somehow striking a chord with voters who are fed up. hillary clinton's challenge is to get out from this suffocating talk about e-mails, benghazi, and present herself as the fresh and the -- somebody with fresh ideas. and fresh start. >> matt, you'll have to make it quick. what do you think about bernie sanders? >> lynn's exactly right, it's about both. bernie seems real, he seems authentic. hillary does not seem real.
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she seems inauthentic. it's the perfect storm, the yin and the yang. she needs to do something to fix it. >> matt and lynn, thank you both. >> thanks, alex. jeopardy in the skies, what's being done to stop a growing danger to planes in flight. do you want to know how hard it can be to breathe with copd? it can feel like this. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva is a once-daily inhaled
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copd maintenance treatment that helps open my airways for a full 24 hours. spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva respimat does not replace rescue inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva respimat. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain or problems passing urine, stop taking spiriva respimat and call your doctor right away. side effects include sore throat, cough, dry mouth and sinus infection. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me breathe better. to learn about spiriva respimat slow-moving mist, ask your doctor or visit spirivarespimat.com watch as these magnificent creatures take flight, soaring away from home towards the promise of a better existence. but these birds are suffering. because this better place turned out
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to have a less reliable cell phone network, and the videos on their little bird phones kept buffering. birds hate that. so they came back home. come home to verizon and now get 12 gigs for $80 a month plus $20 per line. verizon. come home to a better network. the possibility of a flare swas almost always on my mind. thinking about what to avoid, where to go... and how to deal with my uc. to me, that was normal. until i talked to my doctor. she told me that humira helps people like me get uc under control and keep it under control when certain medications haven't worked well enough. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where
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certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. raise your expectations. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, control is possible. turning to what has become a worrisome problem, drone sitings by pilots. just wednesday there was a near miss involving this medevac chopper transporting a patient to a hospital in fresno, california. the pilot said he was forced to alter course avoiding the drone which passed just about 20 feet away from the chopper. the faa said the reports of close calls of drones have increased dramatically this year. here's more on all this. it is an extraordinary situation, jamie. >> the faa said operating a drone near an airplane or helicopter is dangerous and illegal. according to the agency, there
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were 36 drone sightings by pilots july this year. this july, 137 sightings. many sightings according to the faa were reported by pilots of major commercial airliners. the federal government has for years required that engines be tested for collisions with birds. but according to an nbc news report on thursday, major manufacturers of plane engines confirm they have not conducted test for drone strikes, because the faa has not mandated such testing. however, the faa now appears to be taking action, telling nbc news it will develop testing for troen impagts on windshields, engines and other parts of a plane. aviation experts say this is a priority. >> the faa needs to put a standard together. we know what engines are capable of with bird strikes, and hail ingestion, water ingestion. we don't know what these drones -- because they're made of different things, that is, they're made of plastic, carbon fiber, some of them have a lot
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of metal in them. of course, they all carry cameras, or a good majority of them carry cameras. we need to know what kind of things, the debris that a drone strike could create that could damage an engine or an air frame such as a windshield. >> a drone industry group says it supports testing, along with existing and newly proposed rules governing drones. and that it wants the faa to act aggressively. it's essential for anyone operating in the national air space to fly safely and sponsably the group said. >> we noticed these videos popping up online showing the drones downed by birds. what is going on there? >> this is kind of a budding genre on youtube. many drones carry cameras, and some have captured the moment a bird appears to decide it doesn't want to share the sky any longer. this was shot in australia, uploaded by a local production company. according to the company that the wedge-tailed eagle flying
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directly into the drone, it went straight down. it appears to show that the natural world is adapting to this new technology, to new technology. >> indeed it is, thank you so much. what is really up with the so-called godzilla el nino. who needs to worry about it and why up next. no student's ever done the full hand raise in ap calc. but your stellar notebook gives you the gumption to reach for the sky. that's that new gear feeling. this week, these office depot brand notebooks just one cent.
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picture perfect view there of central park on a sunny sunday in august. the world could be headed for one of the strongest el ninos in recorded history. that is a climate fen nom monday triggered by temperatures across the planet. the fast moving storms just the like of the ones out west are a preview of what's toe come. months of record-shattering weather affecting the rest of the nation.
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the so-called godzilla elme nin could bring historic warm temperatures and upper rainfall in areas. joining me now is reese halter. welcome from los angeles. i want to ask about the godzilla reference. some meteorologists worry this is overhyped. is it as grand as all that? >> no, alex, good morning, here from los angeles. not at all. the waters are extraordinarily warm. four degrees warmer than 97, 98, the wall of water will bring torrential rains to us here in southern california. and the wild card by the way is it may not bring warm temperatures this winter to the northeast. we're missing, alex, ice, the size of california texas and maine, the arctic ocean, now compared to '97, which means
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that we will see more polar vortex cold blasts this winter. >> so it's starting in the winter but we talk about the drought for the last four years in the state of california. does el nino eradicate the drought or have that potential or no? >> not at all. we'll so an immense amount of water come down and it will roll down into the ocean and other unknown is whether the precipitation will stick above 6,000 feet. we need about 14, 16 feet of snow on sierra nevadas to even come close to re -- somewhat recharge but this won't break the drought at all. >> i want to pick up on the rolling thing. we have pictures of the so-called shade balls being used in california. millions of these plastic black balls rolling into the l.a. reservoir and how does it work? >> well, essentially they are the size of an apple, 34 cents
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each, 96 million of them. they are bpa free. there's a plant pigment that mimics the color black. they will keep the water from going evaporating into the atmosphere, about 300 million gallons that they are going to help us save, alex. but you know, there's a bigger question here, every day in california, 50 million gallons of fresh water are used for coal fired power plants. we -- we're in the process here of distancing ourselves as fast as humanly possible from these subsidized fos sill fuels. >> i tell you this, if we could only learn to bottle that. i was in lake tahoe and the amount that evaporates in one day, extraordinary. >> phenomenal. >> extraordinary statistics on how many could be fed and supplied with water. reese halter, thanks so much for joining us from l.a. >> thank. >> that's a rap of this sunday
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edition of weekends with alex witt. we have "meet the press" with the donald talking with chuck todd. have yourselves a great sunday. . i knew it'd take some time. and her sensitive stomach didn't make things easier. it was hard to know why... the move...her food...? so we tried purina cat chow gentle... ...because it's specially formulated for easy digestion. she's loved it ever since. and as for her and ben... ...she's coming around. purina cat chow gentle. one hundred percent complete and balanced for everyday feeding of adult cats. it's more than it's multi-layered security and flexibility. with centurylink you get advanced technology solutions. including cloud and hosting services - all from a trusted it partner. centurylink. your link to what's next.
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this sunday, face this sunday face-to-face with donald trump. >> is this a reality show? >> no, this is the real deal. >> my interview with the man leading the pulls, on furtherism, isis and his plan on illegal immigration. >> it will work out so well, you'll be so happy. in four years you're going to interview me and say, what a great job you've done, president trump. >> is hillary's campaign in crisis, the e-mail and poll numbers and questions about trust. this isn't just washington, iowa voters are saying this about hillary's troubles. >> we're down to rumors of gore jumping in. >> his latest talk of joe biden and the rise of this man, senator bernie sanders.

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