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tv   Melissa Harris- Perry  MSNBC  March 13, 2016 7:00am-9:01am PDT

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good morning. i'm chris jansing here at the root cafe in lakewood, ohio. this morning, concern and criticism continues to grow following more violence at donald trump rallies. in missouri last night, this video posted on twitter shows protesters being pepper sprayed. and while that was happening outside, inside the kansas city campaign event, trump was repeatedly disruptive by demonstrations. just a day after clashes between supporters and protesters after that event in chicago was canceled. here's how trump responded to the protesters. >> i hope these guys get thrown into a jail. they'll never do it again. it will destroy their record. they'll have to explain to mom
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and dad why they have a police record and why they can't get a job. and you know what? i'm going to start pressing charges against all these people. and then we won't have a problem. >> trump's tough talk contradicting something he has often said, that he loves protester s at his rallies, tha they make it fun. without a doubt, it has energized his supporters. kansas city police say four people were arrested last night, but there were nose serious injuries. >> meanwhile, the man who triggered this secret service response when he rushed at trump during his dayton rally yesterday, has been charged with disorderly conduct and inciting panic. trump, true to form, seemed to enjoy the moment. >> i was ready for him, but it's much easier if the cops do it. don't we agree? and to think, i had such an easy life. what do i need this for, right?
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>> it's no laughing matter for trump's rivals. for the first time, senator bernie sanders is responding to trump's attacks on sanders supporters who protest at trump rallies. >> when our supporters are doing is responding to a candidate who has in fact in many ways encouraged violence, when he talks about, you know, i wish we were in the old days when you could punch somebody in the head, what do you think that says to his supporters? >> trump hilt back early this morning with a tweet saying, quote, bernie sanders is lying when he says his disrupters aren't told to go to my events. be careful, bernie, or my supporters will go to yours. sanders isn't the only candidate taking aim at trump. >> he's got to tone it down because pitting one group against another is toxic and divisive, and that's not the way we want to elect a president.
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>> if you play with matches, you can start a fire you can't control. that is not leadership. it is political arson. >> we want to go first to nbc news hallie jackson at the site of trump's rally planned later in bloomington, illinois. there's already a large crowd there. what can you tell us about security in general? have you had a chance to talk to folks. is there concern? what's the mood? >> we had a chance to talk with a bunch of folks in the crowd here. security wise, it's similar to what we have seen in all of these trump rallies. there's a secret service protection, sort of perimeter, people have to go thru the metal detectors to walk in. the mood here, it seems like a pregame. it's sunday morning, but there is an energy. you heard people chanting build that wall, build that wall. they're ready for trump, even though he's still about an hour out. the room, we're in this airplane hangar, it's quite full, and a line stretching down the road when we arrived here several
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hours ago. people want to come, they want to see the spectacle. they want to see donald trump and sort of the image of him pulling his plane in in front of the hangar, coming out to the music that we see at his rallies. as far as people being nervous, it seems like a mixed bag. that's what we noticed since the protests in chicago on friday night. one woman said she was anxious about coming, but the desire and come and see donald trump and hear him in person here in bloomington outweighed anxiety she may have had about concerns with protesters. that's similarly to what we have heard, people saying i was maybe on the fence, one woman yesterday said she had an exit plan, in case things got rowdy, they knew exactly where they were going to go, but they still wanted to see it. that seems to be sort of the general attitude from folks here. some people unconcerned completely. they just want to be here to see trump speak. >> have you gotten a sense of sort of the mix there, how many protesters versus how many trump
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supporters? and are there people in the crowd, we lose track of this, who are undecided, who are coming to try to figure out who to vote for? >> you would think that with the super tuesday primaries just a couple days away, there may be some of those undecideds. although, remember it's not like in the early state contests where you can pop in for a town hall style event. we haven't seen, unlike chicago or st. louis friday, or even kansas city last night, the clear protester crowd walking in. there seem to have been some scattered shouting early, but most of the folks here, a sea of the red make america great ball caps, chris. >> hallie jackson in bloomington, illinois, thank you so much. i know we'll be checking back in with you as the rally gets under way. she mentioned kansas city, missouri. that's where we find trymaine lee. it looks like a quiet morning today, but what a chaotic scene last night. >> that's right.
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quiet today. almost as if a tornado ripped through this place and now we're dealing with the quiet after. it's quite striking that here we are in middle america, literally on main street, and yesterday, we saw main street divided. on one side, we saw donald trump supporters by the thousands wraps around this building. on this side of the street, several hundred protester all with signs. a broad coalition of protesters, young and old, white and black, hispanic. all chanting against the event yesterday. but i think what was also striking was just how the rhetoric that donald trump continues to espouse inside his events trickles out to the people on both sides. on one side, you had donald trump supporters using some of the same language he uses in there about building walls and keeping folks out, and you know, referring to those who are protesting as jobless and being on welfare. on this side, with the protesters, that rhetoric kind of insighted them. they were emboldened. sometimes vulgar, with signs
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demanding that, calling trump a fascist and a racist and a bigot. and so again, we have seen what we have seen in earlier events in st. louis and chicago, in terms of the raw emotions. but what we didn't have necessarily is the violence. though things had gotten chippy at certain points and the police on horse back sprayed pepper spray into the crowd, causing a moment of kind of chaos, it kind of dipped back. we had kind of a natural barrier in the street between the supporters of donald trump and the protesters. there was a heavy police presence out here. i think the concern was after days of fiery clashes in different cities, what would kansas city envelope into, what would happen here? for the most part, it was cool. i even phonoticed a few shoutin matches turn into dialogue. fiery dialogue, but dialogue none the less. we haven't seen that at other events. >> dialogue is important if it does that. that's a step forward. trymaine lee, thanks for your
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reporti reporting. i want to go to tony dokoupil in westchester, ohio, and donald trump will be holding a rally there at 2:00 p.m. hallie was talking about this, how early people get out to come to these trump rallies. looks like you have quite a line there. >> yeah, absolutely, chris. people have been here for hours and really since the sun came up. as we saw yesterday in cleveland, before the rallies began, there's a hopeful, optimistic tone. people are cheering, taking pictures, smiling. they're smiling right now. yesterday, in fact, we saw people handing out flyers saying if protesters arrive, sing to them. don't yell. there's even printed on the leaflets passed out the lyrics to america the beautiful. but after the trump rally yesterday in cleveland, there were some very tense moments, very ugly altercations between trump supporters and members of the black lives matter movement. and today, people in this line are speaking out against those supporters who said some of those ugly things like go back to africa or see you in auschwitz. they hope mr. trump will dire
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directly address that hateful rhetoric and say it doesn't represent the movement they're trying to build, chris. >> sknany nervousness at all yoe detecting in the crowd there? >> well, there was not much nervousness until the moment when the secret service did a sweep of the line and made people pull the plastic poles outf their flags, put water bottles in the car. that's a reminder there is a lot of tension in the air. in dayton yesterday, a man jumped a barricade, tried to rush the stage. people are concerned, but right now, a lot of smiles, quite, damp sunday morning in suburban ohio. good feels, not bad. we'll check in with you after the event. >> good to hear, tony. he's in west chester, ohio. from miami, i want to bring in jeremy peters, a political reporter for the "new york times," and someone on the campaign trail a lot. i want to start with this new escalation that we heard from donald trump, jeremy, where he said he would think about trying to go after some of these
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protesters, look to get charges brought against them. remind people that he said we played this a little earlier, i hope these guys get thrown in jail. they'll never do it again. it will destroy their record. and i guess the key point or question becomes at what point does the right to free speech cross the line into illegality, and have we seen that. is trump trying to suppress free speech or are people breaking the law? >> there is blame to go around on both sides here. no doubt that these protests are being organized by left-wing groups with the intent to disrupt and insight, and it's certainly within their right to free speech to do that up to a point, but what trump has failed to do consistently, and again, chris, this morning he was asked on television interviews do you think you should lower the temperature here? he refuses to do that. he refuses to take blame, and it's this kind of defiance of
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his that you see his supporters taking their cues from. and as long as their front-runner, their candidate, is saying things like, oh, it's okay. you can take a swing at those protesters. i'll pay your legal fees, i don't think you're going to see a de-escalation in this anytime soon. >> the other thing he said this morning, he was asked about those sanders supporters that he denied he was making a threat against them. let me play that. >> it's not a threat at all. look, my people have said, we ought to go to his rallies because you know, it's sort of interesting. when liberals and super liberals and i don't even call them liberals because i have many friends who are liberal and they're wonderful people, these are beyond liberal. these people are bad people that are looking to do harm to our country. but when these people come into mine, you know, everybody thinks i'm a bad guy. if my people went into one of his rallies, they would say, oh, this is a terrible thing. they would be arrested and all sorts of things would happen to
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them. >> you wonder, jeremy, if this energized democratic voters. i even thought by him really sticking it again and again and again to bernie sanders, if he wasn't doing that in a very calculated way because obviously, if bernie sanders get energized, it hurts hillary clinton, it potentially drags out the nominating contest on the other side. >> right, i think that's absolutely some of it, chris. what i think is happening here is actually a bit broader than that. i think that what you're seeing on the republican side is this dramatic increase in turnout. while donald trump is capturing at most about 50%, sometimes closer to a third of those voters who are coming out in mass numbers, there are also an awful lot of people who are coming out to vote against donald trump. and that's on the republican side of the race. when you look at what could possibly happen in a general election, given the size of some of these anti-trump
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demonstrations, i think there's a potential to create an anti-trump movement that is much broader than the kind o of #stoptrump you're seeing on the right right now. >> and trump said both in chicago and then in kansas city, that he was advised to cancel these events, and then the police chiefs varclearly came out and said we never said any such thing. we never suggested or even had any conversations about cancelling. what's that about? >> it's just more of trump being disingenuous, twisting the facts. this is what you saw this morning when he was asked in that clip that you just played, chris. are you threatening these protesters? no, i'm not threatening them. it sounded an awful lot like a threat to me and probably anyone else who was listening. what donald trump is able to do here through his stranglehold on the media cycle is to basically deny that he has any responsibility for this. and that's good enough for a lot
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of his protesters. all donald has to say is that's not how it happened. my protesters aren't being violent. it's those thugs on the left that are the ones to blame here. and his supporters rally around that. they believe that. and that's enough for them. >> i realize that this question is, relies on anecdotes, but i wonder from what you have seen talking to voters and maybe operatives on the ground, is there any sense you have what has happened in the last 48 hours is moving the needle in florida either for or against donald trump? >> i spent the day yesterday with marco rubio. and i have never seen him as angry and emotional in covering him for the last two years as i saw him when he lashed out at trump for inciting violence at these rallies. i think that may move the needle some. it's very hard to tell. the gap in the polls is, you know, it's significant. their latest nbc/"wall street
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journal" poll that came out today showed trump very far ahead. i'm told by campaign sources with rubio that the gap is not nearly that wide. it's something they think they can close. but to the extent the candidates like rubio in florida and kasich in ohio are able to point to this violence at these rallies and say, look, is this what you want to become of american democracy? i think that's a pretty powerful statement. i just don't know that it's enough to close the large gap here you see in florida in the next day, day and a half. >> jeremy peters in miami, thanks. appreciate you coming on the show. >> thank you, chris. stay right there. much more ahead, including my interview with the mothers of trayvon morris on why they're supporting hillary clinton. i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms.
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it's tough. but he's not going to be the nominee, chuck. as you know, i'm ahead in ohio. i'm going to win ohio with the great support i hope of the ohio folks here who i think are going to help me to take the message and the formula that's helped to fix ohio, improve ohio, to washington. >> that is ohio governor john kasich. just a short time ago on nbc's "meet the press" with a crucial primary here just two days away. so now we've got three candidates and three different strategies for kasich, you just heard it from him. it's win ohio. for marco rubio, win florida. for ted cruz, though, it's keep the delegate tally going. bit by bit. last night, he won wyoming, and his campaign is looking at going into states few will venture. and taking every delegate he can. he won nine delegates last night to trump's 1, making a small dent in the gap between the two leaders. today, he starts his day in
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concord, north carolina, after spending the weekend in missouri. places like baldwin and springfield. and then there's our new nbc news/"wall street journal" poll that shows cruz in third place in ohio at 19%, but look at the true front-runners, john kasich and donald trump, running very close. but kasich gaining some ground. joining me now, mike dejuan, attorney general for the state of ohio who is a supporter of governor john kasich. good morning. >> good to be back. thank you. >> everything that i have been hearing over the last couple days from people on the ground, including like you, supporters of john kasich, is that this race is too close to call. is that still your sense or do you think that he is pulling away? >> i think the governor is pulling away. i was with him yesterday in cincinnati, he's very confident. just what i see as i travel around the state, i think the momentum is building for the governor. and he's going to win on
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tuesday. >> he has been locked in this battle for ohio with trump over the last month or so. we watched as you say, his numbers slowly inch up. he's been the candidate determined long before that to run a positive campaign in the middle of what has frankly been a pretty ugly election cycle. he seemed at a loss for expressing his frustration yesterday. let's take a listen. >> everything is negative. everything is america is losing, and we're terrible. i mean, come on. we're not -- we're -- look, we got our challenges. people are worried about the security of their job, worried about their wages, worried about not getting any interest in the bank, they're worried about their kids' future, but we can fix these things. we have been through far tougher situations before, the depression, world war ii, 9/11. we can fix this. and you know, i walk into a room and i tell people we can get this done by remembering we're americans before we're
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republicans and democrats. and conservative principles can fix this thing. of course, it's a struggle. >> you know, i followed governor kasich. i have been with him on the trail. that's about as heated up as he gets. and the contrast between him and donald trump, particularly over the last 48 hours, could not be more pointed. but is there anything to suggest that what we have seen over the last couple days is a turning point? because as you know, john kasich doesn't just have to win ohio. he has to prove he can win some state other than his home state? >> let me tell you how i see this. i think the spotlight has been on donald trump. been on some of the other candidates. i think after tuesday, tuesday night, when ohio comes in and john kasich has won ohio, i think the campaign, the race really resets. i think that spotlight moves to kasich. and i think with the spotlight on kasich and the other two or three who are left, john is
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going to do very, very well. i think you're going to see him continuing to move up in other states. there's a poll out, your poll, that has him moving up in illinois. and i think as people really pay attention, they're going to start to think, look, this circus has been interesting, but we're really selecting the next commander in chief. we're selecting someone who is really going to be the leader of the free world. and i think john kasich, with his background and his experience, balanced the budget in congress, has balanced the budget here in the state of ohio after inheriting frankly a real mess, someone who served on the armed services committee in congress for many, many years, really understands our military, has a great feel for foreign affairs, i think that's going to come across to people. second, it's going to become evident, i think, to people that john kasich has the best chance of winning in the fall, beating hillary clinton. i was talking with some folks last night in southwest ohio,
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and you know, their concern is about a lot of things, but one of the things they're really thinking about is the supreme court. the idea that hillary clinton would be able for the next four years or eight years appoint people to the supreme court is frankly very frightening. and so i think what you're seeing republicans start to do is, you know, the preliminaries are over. now we're getting down to the real decision, who we're going to pick. we have to have someone who can win. and john kasich is clearly someone that can beat hillary clinton and will beat her. >> really quickly, we're just about out of time, but you have two of the three remaining candidates who are not named trump suggesting if he were the nominee, they might not support him, including john kasich. does that trouble you? >> i think we have a ways to go. i think that this race will play out. i think that john kasich has an excellent chance of becoming our nominee. and if he does, he will certainly beat hillary clinton in the fall. >> would you support whoever the
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nominee is? >> i intend to. you know, again, depending on things that happen between now and the convention, but that would be my intention. i think it's very, very important that we turn this country around. and we certainly cannot do it with bernie sanders or hillary clinton. >> ohio attorney general mike dewine, good to see you. thank you for coming on the program. >> coming up, they're called mothers of the movement, women who have lost children to gun violence or in police custody. they're on the campaign trail for hillary clinton. my conversation with them here in cleveland when we come back. imagine if the things you bought every day... ...earned you miles to get to the places you really want to go. with the united mileageplus explorer card, you'll get a free checked bag, two united club passes, priority boarding, and 30,000 bonus miles. everything you need for an unforgettable vacation.
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centurylink. your link to what's next. i can't help trayvon at this time, but there are other trayvon martins that i can help. >> among the more powerful voices advocating for hillary clinton on the airwaves here in ohio, the women who are called mothers of the movement, they lost children to tragedy and are
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trying to turn their grief into action. among them, the mother of tray vaughn martin, the mother of jordan davis, both killed at the age of 17. the women are campaigning for clinton across ohio, touting her calls for criminal justice reform. i caught up with them in cleveland. >> this is a very serious matter. lives are being lost every day because we have guns on the streets that are getting in the hands of people that shouldn't have them. and you know, unfortunately, that very situation cost me my daughter. at the age of 15. it's left me trying to rediscover who i am as a mother, because i also have my son, but as a person, you know, and to try to determine what to do with the rest of my life. and i figured this had better be a big part because my son's life is now up for grabs. >> in the chaos that is this campaign, unlike anything we have ever seen, are you worried that this message is getting
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lost? >> i am not worried about the message getting lost with hillary clinton. she's been very strong on her platform about gun violence prevention, about mass incarceration, about educating people in our communities, about making sure their children are safe. >> is change possible? >> absolutely. >> after almost every incidence of violence, gun violence, that something has to change, and yet here you still are, and still things have not changed significantly. >> well, with all of our children, they weren't really listening. they have never listened to the black lives that are being lost. and hillary clinton took the opportunity to get us together and listen to our stories and to actually do something about them. so we have a platform now. to tell our stories, to make sure that the world knows that our children's lives matter. >> what is it you want the people of cleveland to know by
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coming here? >> first, we want them to get out and vote. that's very important right now. it's an issue at hand. we want them to know that although we face the tragedies in our lives, that we can come back from it, and we want them to be encouraged. >> what do you feel you need to do? what is it you need to say? >> i need to make everyone more aware, you know, bring more awareness to people about this keeps happening, so we must keep the fight up. we must keep on keeping on. we must be the face of the faceless and the voiceless. to someone hears us, until someone recognizes this is real, and we want change. >> this is a community with a lot of power in its voting. what would you say to people who don't think, because of their own personal circumstances, that they have a voice, that their vote matters? >> if we have lost our children and we're out here voting and we're out here speaking and we're out here talking and out here moving, get up and vote.
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get up and move. you have no option to stay in the bed this time. you just don't. you need to get up and move. >> in addition to the mothers of the movement ad running in cleveland, it's also running in chicago and st. louis ahead of tuesday's primaries. >> up next, actor danny devito joins me to tell me why he's supporting bernie sanders. at&t helps keep everyone connected. right now at at&t, buy the new samsung galaxy s7 and get one free. no matter how you hang out, share every minute of it. buy one water resistant samsung galaxy s7 and get one free. and right now, get up to $650 in credits per line to help you switch to at&t. then your eyes may see it, differently.ave allergies. only flonase is approved to relieve both your itchy, watery eyes and congestion. no other nasal allergy spray can say that.
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congratulations on your big win in michigan, senator. >> thank you, tapper. i want to thank everyone who voted for me and apologize to everyone else for making your facebook feeds so, so annoying. i mean, i love my supporters. but they're too much, right? i'm great, but i'm not five posts a day great. >> larry david doing one of his now iconic bernie sanders impressions on "saturday night live" last night. just days out from the big primary races here in ohio, in florida, illinois, missouri,
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north carolina. today, the candidates are targeting the buckeye state where 160 delegates are up for grabs, and bernie sanders is down in the polls. our new nbc poll just released this morning shows sanders behind hillary clinton 58% to 38% here. in florida, with 246 delegates at stake, sanders trailed clinton by 27 points. still, sanders is looking to pull off another major upset, similar to last week's shocking turn of events in michigan. he has big name supporters backing him. joining me now, actor, producer, director, and bernie sanders supporter danny devito. good to see you, good morning. >> how are you, chris? nice to see you. >> i'm well, thanks. it's great to see you. why bernie sanders for you, danny? >> i think it's an opportunity that we have right now to have a person in the white house who is a gatherer of people. he brings people out. we want to make sure people come out to vote, and he's bringing
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them out in droves, especially young people, because they feel a trust with bernie. they feel like he's smart, he knows the issues. he knows what's important to people. he talks about the middle class. he talks about equality, he talks about the minimum wage, which is very important. he talks about black lives matter. he knows how to deal with all of this. he's been an activist for many, many years. and i'm hoping that everybody gets out to vote. that's the main thing, get everybody mobilized, and keep the faith. i mean, the whole thing about the polls, we saw what happened in michigan. you know, you never know. you can trail and the last minute, things turn. they take a turn. and i think if people listen to him and know who he is, they'll be out and vote in droves. and i'm very excited about what's going on. just meeting all the young people here. >> when i listen to what you say, though, i think there are other people who can fit into the category.
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gathering people. nobody has gotten bigger crowds than donald trump when you talk about someone who has talked about income inequality and middle class, that fits into hillary clinton. >> there are other factors. you know, in the turnout for the republican party has been, you know, relatively small. and it has been also for the democratic party. i think that what we need to do is get people to the polls. and people who are thinking of, what do you say, embracing humanity rather than pushing it away. like the way bernie embraces everybody, immigrants and african-americans, native americans. people who were here before us. i mean, he's a man who will bring a spirit of humanity to the america we love. my family is italian-americans. my grandparents were immigrants. i know i made it great in this country. it's a great country to live.
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we love being here. we want to make it good for everybody. we want to embrace people and not push people away. also, you know, i'm a very big anti-war person. i think that what bernie talks about in terms of the peace movement really is going to work. it's going to embrace people all over the world. look what happened, you know, he embraces the muslim community, which we should, because they're our brothers and sisters. he embraces the black community because we're brothers and sisters. the native american communities. all these people need to be taken care of by us. with us. we should do this together. and i feel like bernie is the guy to do it. >> well, i want to ask you about the big picture because so much of the conversation has been about what we have seen over the last 48 hours at donald trump rallies and your candidate bernie sanders finds himself right in the middle of it. trump this morning going after bernie sanders gagain, particularly his supporters saying they're the ones to blame for the unrest of his rallies.
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let me play for you something that he said when he was asked about it by al sharpton. >> we have never, never once told anybody to do anything like that. the truth is, this guy really is a pathological liar. he says the first thing that comes to his mind. i guess he's referring to me as a communist. i think it's terribly important that trump tell his supporters that in america, you don't go around beating up people who are protesting or who have a different point of view. he's got to start changing his rhetoric and not blame other people for the problems that he is causing. >> fair number of people who have said objectively that, yes, donald trump has said things at his own rallies that could be considered inciting this kind of action, but at the same time, it clearly -- there clearly are bernie sanders supporters who are going and trying to disrupt
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these rallies. what's your take on it? >> i think, you know, the human race, we are who we are. and you know, there are people who are going to be conflicted with certain things. and in terms of the republican party, i mean, i feel like unfortunately, they have -- it's almost like they had a really nice big car and they loaned it to the crazy brother-in-law who has taken it for a joy ride, and that's where donald is. he's got a lot of people who are riled up, he's dividing people up, and i think there's always going to be a reaction from the folks because we are human beings and we do get upset about being attacked or hearing things we don't want to hear. it's unfortunate. did you ever see a movie called "2001"? there's a great scene in it with the dawn of man, where these animals, apes are around us, as
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apes in the beginning, around a watering hole, and the other tribe comes to try to get water and we chase them away. and then they go and find a bone, and that bone is like something they can use for a weapon. and they go back to get the water the next time, they get chased away, and the guy uses the bone and commits the first murder. violence is violence. it's like something that we're bred with, but that's something we have to evolve from. we don't embrace violence. we don't embrace war. we don't embrace animosity. we don't embrace divisiveness. we embrace brotherhood and center sisterhood and pulling people together. that's why i believe the young people of the united states of america are supporting bernie sanders. because they feel that. they feel that there's nothing -- he is not beholden to anyone. he can get up there and together we can work -- this is a movement. this is not just going after the presidency. we have to change the tone of america and make it the best it can be. >> quick final question, danny.
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a little tongue in cheek, as i was reading about bernie sanders supporters, including susan sarandon, zoe kravitz and you, they were describing this article as a combination of hollywood hipsters and '60s rebels. i wonder which you are? >> i don't know. i like to think of myself as a little bit of a hipster, but i also am a rebel. i did have a draft card, didn't want to fight in vietnam, so i did protest in the street and did march for civil rights just the way bernie did. >> danny devito in st. louis, good to see you. thanks so much for taking the time. >> thank you very, very much. feel the bern. >> up next, mr. rubio's neighborhood is up next. we'll hear from voters in the miami community that senator rubio calls home. of their type 2 diabetes with non-insulin victoza®. for a while, i took a pill to lower my blood sugar. but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza®. he said victoza® works differently than pills.
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entire election. check out the latest nbc news/"wall street journal" poll which is just out this morning. it shows donald trump up by more than 20 points. marco rubio trailing in his home state. nearly holding on to a one percentage point lead over ted cruz. rubio is still campaigning hard. msnbc's jacob soboroff visited west miami to find out what residents there feel about their neighbor. and it's so interesting. you hear marco rubio out on the trail, and he still says we're going to win here. but i wonder what you're learning from the people who arguably know him best. >> chris, it's a mixed bag, quite frankly. he touts his youth and sort of his teenage years growing up in west miami, a working to middle class suburbs, a very small town. he got his political start in this neighborhood, being a city commissioner in west miami. a largely latino neighborhood. you would think he would have to win if he's going to do well here on tuesday. he's struggling behind donald trump, and it seems like it
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could be some of the same stuff in his own neighborhood. >> it's a beautiful day in mr. rubio's neighborhood. he lives right down that way. that's why wei came out here to west miami to see what his neighbors think about his chances to win the florida primary on tuesday. i'm just walking the neighborhood because you know your neighbor is running for president. >> i know. >> you do know? >> yes. >> you think he's got a chance of winning? >> i hope so. >> are you a marco rubio supporter? >> yes. >> you're going to vote for him on tuesday? >> yes, i'm going to vote for him. i already vote. >> you did the early vote? >> i did the early vote. >> what's your dog's name? >> bella. >> who are you voting for? marco rubio? >> marco rubio. >> your name is cynthia, right? >> yes. >> cynthia, you know your neighbor is running for president? >> no, i did not know that. >> come on. >> my neighbor is running for president of -- >> the united states. marco rubio, he lives right over there. >> no, he doesn't. >> yes, he does. >> really? >> you didn't know that. >> no, i just moved to miami, so i don't know -- >> he lives literally on the
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street, down on the street. >> good to know. >> so -- >> don't particularly like him. >> you don't particularly like him? >> no. >> you think he's going to win on tuesday? >> i hope not. >> what is this right here? >> the name, rubio family, this house. >> it says rubio. >> yes. >> i think i read he wrote this when he was a kid. >> maybe. you never know. >> so wow. >> yeah. >> what happens on tuesday here if he doesn't win? >> doesn't matter. we love him anyway. >> you live him anyway. >> oh, yes. >> do you live around here? >> up the street. >> you know your neighbor is running for president? >> yeah, right. >> going to vote for him on tuesday? >> no. >> who are you going to vote for? >> i don't know. >> think he's going to win? >> no. >> people in the neighborhood like him? >> my neighbors don't. going to be tough. rubio has to win florida, right? if he doesn't, that's it. that's it. >> that's it. >> that's it. >> chris, i should say there are people that are fiercely loyal to marco rubio in this
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neighborhood. they saw him grow up there. they saw him walk around the neighborhood. that place where his name is etched in concrete, he wrote that when he was around a senior in high school, his folks still live there. the thing that is the saving grace for him if people aren't going to vote for him is the early vote. i talked to several people who voted early in this neighborhood, and around 200,000 people in this county, miami-dade, have already voted early. marco rubio's great hope, i would think, is that the people in his neighborhood and throughout his home county have gone out and already cast their ballots for him and they don't need to do it on tuesday. >> yeah, and the other thing i have heard is it doesn't matter if you're republican or democrat, everybody is pointing to what happened to michigan with bernie sanders upsetting hillary clinton saying, see, the polls don't really mean anything. but we shall see on tuesday. jacob soboroff, really interesting stuff. and some very cute dogs. thank you so much. >> you got it. much more ahead when we come back. stay with msnbc, the place for politics. allergies distracting you?
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good news for john kasich who has won his third endorsement, a major newspaper so far. usually the columbus dispatch doesn't endorse, but they said they did it this time given the alarming assent of donald trump. kasich in ohio today. we see donald trump in bloomington, illinois, which is where we find hallie jackson. that's expected to get under way shortly. how's it going there? >> full crowd. packed house here at this hangar in bloomington. the crowd does seem fired up. you hurt chants of build this wall. every once in a while, a big cheer will erupt. people will wave their signs. folks seem ready, energized to see donald trump. what is hanging over this, at least with some of the folks i talked with, is what happened over the weekend in friday in chicago and st. louis. yesterday in kansas city. i spoke with one yang man who is voting in his first presidential election. he was at the rally in chicago that turned violent on friday
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night. he was inside, he got into it a little bit with some of the protesters. he hasn't decided on donald trump definitively yet, but he is leaning towards trump. i said, what's the difference in the energy level? he said this is so different. coming here, i knew it would feel more relaxed and no tension. so that seems to be the vibe from him. that said, not far away, i also spoke with a man who plans to silently protest here, fully expecting to get kicked out, but he said he wanted to come and at least stand up for what he calls this culture of racism that he believes is prevalent in donald trump's campaign. we'll see what happens when trump gets here in just a couple minutes potentially. >> nbc's hallie jackson in bloomington, illinois, ever hopeful donald trump will be on time, or any candidate will be on time. that, by the way, kicks off a day of rallies. there will be 11 rallies at least by the presidential candidates today. seven of them here in ohio. and coming up next, joy reid will continue our coverage from miami, florida. stay with msnbc.
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we've seen a thing or two. ♪ we are farmers. bum-pa-dum, bum-bum-bum-bum ♪ good morning, everyone. i'm joy reid coming to you live from the bayside marketplace here in downtown miami. we're waiting for donald trump to take the stage in bloomington, illinois. for now, florida, florida, florida. which along with illinois and three other states will hold nominating contests on tuesday. more than 1 million early votes have already been cast in the sunshine state, representing nearly a quarter of all registered voters. that number is expected to double by primary day, when on the republican side, 99 delegates are on the line, and it's winner-take-all. according to a brand-new nbc news poll, donald trump leads by a 21-point margin. florida senator marco rubio is
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still hoping to somehow beat those odds and stay in this race. today, he'll continue his tour of florida with a rally in the villages retirement community, a required political stop in the sunshine state. ohio governor john kasich, meanwhile, is faring much better defending his home state against the trump takeover. he's leading in the ohio primary polls by six points. senator ted cruz, meanwhile, will be staking his claim on north carolina. taking the stage today with carly fiorina and right-wing radio host glenn beck. meanwhile, hillary clinton and bernie sanders are vying for the 793 delegates up for grabs on tuesday. sanders is looking to follow his poll-defying victory in michigan wins in ohio and illinois, two states that shear concerns about jobs and trade policy. he's got a much better shot in illinois. the clinton lead expands to 20 points in oo hi. we have all your primary news covered here. let's start with trymaine lee in
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kansas city, missouri, the morning after the chaos at donald trump's rally. set the scene for us today. what happened last night? what are you looking to see today? >> i'll tell you what's so amazing. here we are, it's quiet. we're literally on main street. it's a quiet day. there's a theater behind me. there's going to be a peppa pig show later. last night, i think the divide along main street was clear. on one side, you had donald trump supporters. on this side, you had hundreds of protesters. and it was volatile at best. it wasn't at violent as what we have seen in st. louis or chicago, the night before. but the emotion, the raw emotion was there. you had people yelling at each other. arguing with each other. some good positive dialogue also came out of it, but when you think about this kind of donald trump experience rolling through, and the next day it's quiet and it seems everything is back to normal, what was left behind? what emotions are still here? this community is cloearly divided as we have seen in other cities across this country.
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now it's a matter of this fire that's been let loose, how it can be contained? will it be contained? we have tuesday coming up. how does that equate to voter turnout. talking to folks here, some are die hard supporters of donald trump. some are supporters ofbu bernie sande sanders. some are curious, some are angry. yesterday, we talked about some of the black lives matter protesters on the ground in chicago. what we saw here, black, white, hispanic, all making their voices heard against donald trump. >> wow. trymaine lee, thank you for that report from kansas city, missouri. keep tabs on it for us. thank you. sgroo now i want to bring in nbc news hallie jackson at the trump rally in bloomington, illinois. let's talk about the crowd where you are. what's the composition of it and what is the attitude? >> so composition, we're in bloomington, illinois, which is south of chicago, sort of in central illinois. it's a majority white community. and that's what you're seeing reflected in the population
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here. as far as the attitude, we haven't seen what you have seen in kansas city or the other places where donald trump is headed, which is protesters ready to demonstrate outside or even inside. really haven't seen any of that. there's been a couple scattered folks who have had signs, for example, who plan to hold them up. one gentleman is fully expecting to be kicked out, but it's not similar to what we saw, again, in kansas city. overall, people seem excited. they seem fired up. there doesn't seem to be a sense of tension. i spoke with one young man who was in chicago on friday. he's here today. i asked how does this compare, the mood. he said, i didn't expect any issues. i asked why not. he said because of the sort of makeup of where we are. so he said, there's i guess a running joke in illinois that north of i-80, more liberal, more democrat. south of i-80, it's more republic. this is a friendly crowd presumably for donald trump who is expected to come to the podium any minute.
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he'll probably pull his plane up in front of the hangar. it's a speck kk tacle. it's another reason people turn out. there's an energy and a sense that something could happen. joy. >> all right, nbc's hallie jackson in bloomington, illinois, thank you very much. let's head over to tony dokoupil in west chester, ohio, outside of cincinnati, where donald trump will hold a rally at 2:00. people have been lined up before dawn. tell us about the scene there. >> hey, joy. we're about 18 miles outside of cincinnati. this is a strongly republican suburb of cincinnati. 75% of the voters here went for george bush in 2004. people have been lining up for a long time. doors are going to open at 11:15, just in time to get the people out of the rain. interestingly enough, this morning, donald trump went on face the nation, and he said he rejects responsibility for some of the violence that has occurred at his rallies
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recently, and the voters here are taking an even softer approach than their candidate. they would like to see donald trump actually address some of the violence head on. this is noel, who is a trump supporter. you have been to three different rallies. >> yes. >> how do you respond to trump supporters who have said things such as go back to africa or see you in auschwitz. >> i think a lot of donald trump supporters need to understand that these people are just misinformed. they don't really maybe not know what trump is actually saying. he should more try to have a conversation with these people and figure out why they're angry, what about donald trump they don't like so maybe we can clear up some of the misinformation. >> do you think people who speak in those terms are hurting your candidate? >> absolutely. i do. i think donald trump should encourage his supporters to reach out to people, because no one ever said, you know, that any certain group couldn't attend these rallies. we want to bring people in, include everyone who is an american citizen.
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that's what this movement is about, america. you know what i mean? bringing people in. >> thank you very much. joy, we had first contact between the protester whose are across the street at a special protest area and trump supporters. as long as the protesters stay over there, beyond that yellow line, it should remain calm here. of course, the way things have worked at recent rallies and recent trump gatherings, it's calm in the beginning, hopeful in the beginning, people have a copacetic message, and then they see the candidate and when they come out, that's when confrontations occur. >> all right, tony dokoupil with an important point about how these things progress, coming to us from ohio. let's bring in my guest. joining me from washington is nbc's perry bacon jr., and e.j. de, and back at nbc headquarters, jean carlo. >> you heard that series of reports. what i got was sort of a trend. when donald trump is operating in whiter, more republican spaces, there is less of this tension and violence.
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but when he tries to take his campaign into more urban environments, to more mixed racial environments, that's when the powder keg explodes. am i reading it differently than you? >> no, i'm reading it the same way you are. if you think about 2014 and early 2015, you had the black lives matter emerge, and in thelalitier part of 2015, the rise of donald trump. what you have seen in the last few days is those two movements have intersected with each other. trump was having a lot of rallies in suburban areas, in and the last few days. he's been in the center of chicago, center of st. louis, where you had police activity strongly there. you had a crowd of people who were deeply concerned about trump's rhetoric, appropriately so, and there were built-in networks of protesters and people who were concerned who showed up at the trump rallies. as you get more into the west chester, ohio, places, you'll
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see less aggressive tension. this is a big campaign, and most people in america live in big cities. this is not the end of that. trump will campaign again in big cities and you're going to have more protesters, particularly as his rhetoric remains so strong and so divisive. >> and e.j., i want to play a little bit of sort of the back and forth between trump and some of his opponents about the rally. there's a trump v. sanders subtext to this. donald trump tweeted out, and i believe he tweeted this today, because bernie sanders has denied he is sending his supporters to trump rallies to protest. there were bernie sanders supporters at the chicago protest. trump tweeted, bernie sanders is lying when he says his disrupters aren't told to go to my events. be careful, bernie, or my supporters will go to yours. trump was asked on cnn whether that essentially was a threat because we know that there's been -- let's listen to what donald trump said today regarding bernie sanders. >> it's not a threat at all.
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look, my people have said we ought to go to his rallies because it's sort of interesting. when liberals and super liberals and i don't even call them liberals because i have many friends who are liberal and i think they're wonderful people. these are beyond liberal. these people are bad people that are looking to do harm to our country. but when these people come into mine, everybody thinks i'm a bad guy. if my people went into one of his rallies, they would say, oh, this is a terrible thing. they would be arrested and all sorts of things would happen to them. >> so, e.j., what do you make of this? that now you have donald trump sort of playing the victim and making it sound like his supporters are the ones who are being victimized when his supporters are the ones beating people up? >> well, you know, it's hard to say anything but he is clearly inciting his people, when he calls his opponents bad people who want to do harm to our country, what is he saying? when he puts out a tweet like
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that, that's not just a threat. it's an invitation to his people to show up to bernie rallies. and i think that what you're seeing here is trump has always had this ability to dominate the news right before the next contest. and he's taken violence in chicago and all of this chaos and turned it to his advantage by sticking himself right into the story yet again, at the end of this campaign. there's a curious effect on the democratic side. what will his lifting up of bernie do on the democratic side? where people really dislike donald trump. the person being left out of this dialogue is hillary clinton. i have been thinking that she ought to speak up in favor of bernie sanders and say that it's trump who is lying about bernie organizing this. that's clearly not the case. i think, a, it would be true. it would get her back in the mix, and it would show there's some solidarity against trump on this.
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>> yeah, that's very interesting. that's a good point, e.j. hillary clinton did say regarding trump, if you play with matches, you're going to start a fire you can't control. that's not leadership, that's political arson. but john carlo, i want to bring you into this because this is taking place in your political party. this is ted cruz on "meet the press" this morning, and his response to what's happening not just at the rallies but what's developing around trump and what he's calling essentially a cult of personality. take a listen. >> i'm troubled by the rallies that donald holds, where he has asks all the people there to raise their hand and pledge their support to him. this is america. we don't pledge allegiance to a man. we pledge allegiance to a flag. we pledge our support for the constitution, but that is something that you see kings and queens doing of their subjects, and all of this is part and parcel of the same thing. we need a president who understands he works for the people. listen, i am running to pledge my support to you. not the other way around. >> and so when you now have ted
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cruz sort of speaking probably for the majority of democrats and non-trump republicans, you know, i think we have entered a sort of interesting world. stuart stevens has called donald trump's comportment at his rallies thuggery. he's compared him to george wallace. a lot of people have. i have written about it. this is taking place inside your party. is this anything like something you want to see representing the gop in cleveland at your convention? >> joy, it's nothing short of sad when political discourse in the united states devolves to the point it has. there's violence. we see images of police turning fire hoses on protesters on both sides. and let's face it. these instances are occurring at donald trump rallies and donald trump has a responsibility to cool the rhetoric. he has an opportunity to be a leader, and to step up, and to ask americans on both sides to cool their jets. and unless and until -- >> you keep saying on both sides. the reality is, i really can't
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let you continue with that line of thought, because there is not a counterveiling example on the other side of this kind of behavior. this is happening at donald trump rallies. these are protester whose are getting in one case sucker pu h punched by someone donald trump has now said he would pay the sucker puncher's legal bills. this is taking place inside of donald trump's rallies in your party. >> i understand that. i'm of the opinion, joy, that a true leader tries to rise above that and ask for the problem to be solved. if it means that the brunt of the responsibility falls on his or her followers, then that's obviously where the call needs to go and where the message needs to be delivered. trump ultimately, probably will have the most influence with his partisans, and that needs to be the focus, those individuals need to be the focus of his message, but he has an opportunity here and he should seize it. he should be the better man and ask that his supporters cool it so we can have an honest and open dialogue that is so much in
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line with the history of presidential politics in this country and does not devolve into chaos and 1968 chicago or things of that nature. >> and you know, you mentioned 1968 chicago. e.j., you have written a book about the evolution of the republican party, really from the goldwater era to today. this sort of, you can only describe it as sort of george wallacization of the part of the republican party. it has its ant acedents in american politics, not necessarily in the republican party. is there anything you can see that could counteract this that's strong enough to stop it? >> you're quite right that this has come, this has not come from nowhere, and in fact, trump himself, if you look at the whole period when he was talking about the president's birthday certificate, implying he was an illegitimate president, there wasn't push back against him in the party. the party kind of embraced him. mitt romney certainly embraced
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his endorsement in 2012. now that things are out of hand, i thought it was very striking that we saw ted cruz earlier really speaking out against authoritarianism and highlighting a danger that people on the left have been highlighting about donald trump. i ran into a democrat yesterday who said i can't believe it, i watched ted cruz talking about trump, and i actually agreed with ted cruz. so i think speaking out against this kind of authoritarian strong man tendency is something people on both sides ought to be able to do. >> perry, on the democratic side to an earlier point that i think e.j. made, you see bernie sanders becoming the foil to donald trump in a lot of ways. what does that then do to hillary clinton? does she wind up marginalized? >> the polling would suggest no. she has a strong coalition with her particularly in north carolina, florida, african-american voters likely to vote for her overwhelmingly.
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i don't see it that way. i do think she gave on friday a kind of both sides are at fault response initially to what happened in chicago and in st. louis. i think she last couple days sort of realized i'm in the wrong place on this, and has been much more forceful in condemning donald trump's rhetoric and making it a donald trump problem and not a both sides problem. to come back to the george wallace ideas, gorgeous wallace was the last time a person of a third party ran, won a primary. we have three different parties in the election. i feel like we're seeing three parties almost right now with the kasich/rubio/cruz in one party, trump in another, and democrats in another. really important moment in politics and a striking one. >> indeed. i think it's important to point out that george wallace at that time was a democrat in a lot of the southern dixiecrat movement wound up migrating to the republican party and we are where we are. appreciate it. thank you all for being here. and when you come back, we have
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b been hearing these comparisons, you heard it from our guests, between the trump rallies and the 1968 democratic convention in chicago. we will explore further that connection next. i have asthma... ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed.
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when the candidate urges supporters to engage in physical violence, to punch people in the face, the predictable consequence of that is that it escalates, and today is unlikely to be the last such instance. the city of chicago in 1968 saw some ugly days. when politics descended into hatred and incivility and even violence. and it is my hope that in 2016, that we can appeal to our better
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angels and avoid going down that road once again. >> that was senator ted cruz speaking friday about the violence at donald trump's canceled rally in chicago. the senator compared the scene to clashes also in chicago during the 1968 democratic convention. it was in chicago that year that riots broke out over the vietnam war. at that time, democratic party leaders were fighting over the war, over whether to support the pro-wall policies of johnson's administration or the anti-war stance of mccarthy. outside, anti-vietnam war protesters were clashing with chicago police. police beat protesters as well as reporters with billy clubs and tear gassed the ground. joining me now, jasmine, and edwardo. thank you both for being here. i'm going to start with you, professor. let's talk about the parallels. we have heard a lot of comparisons of donald trump to george wallace. to that sort of populist campaign that galvanized working
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class workers then and now. what about the comparisons? what do you make of them? >> i think the context are somewhat different. in 1968, right before the convention, we had the assassination of martin luther king. the assassination in fact of the leading presidential contender in the democratic party was robert kennedy, and then of course, the anti-war movement headed by eugene mccarthy. and also in that context, you have really a very, very active black power movement that became part of the, you know, of the whole student demonstration on the outside. so there are parallels, but i don't think that we ought to take them that far because context really does matter. we have now an african-american president, we have an economy that's doing fairly well. we are in a war. and we have a lot of mad people. and we also have a deeply divided party. in 1968, it was the democratic party. this time, the really divided
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party is the republican party. >> in fact, so divided you had george wallace, the former governor of alabama, split off, go into a third party and run. it's interesting because you even have some trump supporters who have made the wallace connection themselves. i want to play a little bit of sound, and this is from august. this was a 73-year-old supporter in alabama, and this is what this person said. they said, quote, donald trump is telling the truth. oh, i think we might have it. we don't have it. okay. i'm going to read it. donald trump is telling the truth, and people don't always like that. said donald kid, a 73-year-old retired pipe welder from mobile, alabama. he's like george wallace. he told the truth. it's the same thing. if that's the case, if people are making that same connection, then do we have the resurgence of a sort of george wallace style candidate? >> i think in some measure, yes. and i think mr. trump does bear a lot of the responsibility, because he is essentially mouthing off certain things. i mean, he started off with mexicans. he's gone on to muslims, a
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number of different groups. women and so on. it's also quite noteworthy that most of the people that are being either attacked physically or being ushered out of these conventions, the protesters, are people of color. >> yeah. >> we saw it in chicago. so i think there are some parallels because people that see this and if you look at some of the rallies, they are predominantly white americans. so what mr. trump is saying by not condemning some of these words and actions, he's essentially endorsing them. and that's what makes it okay. and so people are saying -- >> and even threatening to send his ralliers to bernie sanders events to sort of continue the narrative. one of the things that's been interesting is you have seen these preponderance of people of color, racially mixed, the protests, but a lot are african-american. rhetorically, donald trump hasn't gone after african-americans, ate least not yet. why do you suppose there's such
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a large contingent of african-americans to lead the rally. >> look at his message, what he's saying. he's attacking people of color verbally and having his supporters attack them physically. we have to consider the messages he's sending in the things he says. i think through history, black folks have always taken the forefront on standing up and fighting back. it's in our blood so it's what we're going to keep doing, standing up and fighting back and joining with other marginalized people to make sure our voices are heard. >> do you as a young activist make the connection between what you're doing, the dream defenders, people associated with black lives matter, and sort of the 1960s, both the civil rights movements, the sncc movements, those connections among yourselves? >> absolutely, and folks from back in the day and older folks who are our mentors and guides us tell us it's a leftover fight that we're fighting. that we never really reached the
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promiseland and we're fighting for some of the basic rights we need every day. so absolutely. voting rights are still being stripped away. the right to live and the right to eat, the right to drink healthy water. those are things we're still having to fight for. >> and what does history tell us about where this is going? a lot of people are concerned it's getting to a really violent, really racially charged violent place. what does history tell us about where this thing is headed? >> i have a fairly optimistic view of how american politics generally works. it has a way of working things out. and you know, i think your story is very interesting because it shows us really that while there has been enormous progress from the '60s, from the '70s, there's still a long way to go. but that there are moments in which we have these enormous setbacks as well, and unless we have forward progress, we're going to fall back into that pattern. >> indeed. >> i think it's very, very important the kind of work that
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you all do, but it's also really important for the rest of the republican party and the democrats to make sure, to insure there's forward progress in the middle of this tremendous -- >> it cannot be lost on folks this is happening in the wake of the first black president being elected. we didn't have that in 1968. professor, thank you for being here, jasmine, thank you. hope people get to talk to you again. coming up next, we'll dissect the phenomenon known as the bernie bros. proof of less joint pain.his is a body of proof. and clearer skin. this is my body of proof that i can fight psoriatic arthritis ...with humira. humira works by targeting and helping to block
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call your doctor immediately. children and adolescents in particular may be at an increased risk of seizures, confusion, or abnormal behavior. the most common side effects are mild to moderate nausea and vomiting. anti-flu? go antiviral with tamiflu. you may have heard the term bernie bro this election season. typically young, white, and male. they have been accused of online trolling, misogyny, and outright bigot bigotry. sanders addressed it last month. >> call them bernie bros. do you have anything to say to that? >> anybody who supports me who
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is engaged in sexist attacks is unacceptable. i don't want that support. >> and joining me now is janell ross, a political reporter at the "washington post" and the author of a recent piece on some of bernie sanders' more vitriolic supporters. i read your piece. it all was so very familiar as somebody who covers this race and tweets a lot so is on social media. you said in your piece that bernie sanders's most vitriolic supporters test the meaning of the word progressive. what did you mean by that? >> i think and i think many people who would consider themselves progressives would say that fundamental to those ideas or that philosophy is a belief that human beings are equal and should be treated equally, publicly, legally, et cetera. and an expansion of opportunity and participation in public life. and what you see, and i want to of course be very careful here and make it clear that we're talking about a subset of some portion of sanders' supporters.
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but what you see is behavior, language, messages, party names, et cetera, that do not seem to be consistent with those ideas. and it is, i think, sometimes surprising to even take note of the way or the frequency with which that's dismissed but it's very real. >> indeed, the intercept, which is run by glen glean wald, the libertarian writer, said the bernie bro phenomenon is made up, a cheap campaign tactic masquerading as journalism, and mashable wrote the bros who love bernie sanders have become a sexist mob. there are a couple of hashtags you called out that just read on their face seem really disturbing. we see a lot of #bernthewitch. referring to hillary clinton. and then more recently, "meet the press" mississippi berning. did those surprise you, and what was that about? >> they do surprise me.
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you know, i can say only that perhaps people who have used either of those hashtags were not particularly thoughtful about the things they were referencing. witch burnings or a witch hunting crusade was, i think, if you're familiar with american history, a pretty notoriously sexist and misogynistic affair, and it was an effort often to control women who were not, i guess, living their lives in ways that were consistent with sort of socially prescribed roles for women. it was a form of social control. similarly, mississippi burning is a reference to a movie about horrendous race related violence. and while i heard from many people after my story ran that they were not even familiar with the film, that may be, but i think that there is such a -- there is such a thing as responsible public engagement and responsible public discourse.
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>> i want to read a quick clip from your piece. you said essentially these vociferous supporters critique the objectativity of what is a political analysis based on polling data and analysis. they insist that black voters are dumb or we have a personal obligation to help voters see the error of the clinton voting ways. it's vile and stands in contrast to the claim that no portion of sanders supporters are angry people. we have seen vicious attacks on people like elizabeth warren for not endorsing. did you hear from the campaign after your piece ran? >> i did not hear from the campaign, but i think that in fairness to the campaign, they are aware, as you mentioned, senator sanders has commented on this. he has himself said that this is not something he's looking for from his supporters. it's not consistent with his publicly expressed views. and of course, there are some
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things that every candidate cannot control. in much the same way we're having a discussion about donald trump, i think over much of this weekend and perhaps what he has encouraged or facilitated or set in motion, there probably has to be some conversation inside of the sanders campaign about what they have even if not intentionally, signaled is an appropriate or enjoyable way to express one's support for bernie sanders. >> yeah, indeed. i think on "snl" the pretend bernie sanders joked about them being a little much on social media. i really appreciate your piece. thank you. everybody should read it. all right, and next, what the chicago mayor means for the presidential race. that's next. the roles you play in life are part of what make you, you. and you're not going to let anything keep you sidelined. that's why you drink ensure with nutritious calories,
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clinton supporter rahm emanuel. >> i do not want mayor emanuel's endorsement if i win the democratic nomination. that is not the kind of support that i want to take. >> joining me now is chicago tribune political reporter rick peerson. so bernie sanders is attempting to take this state from hillary clinton. this is her home state. she was recently at home in her home town. is his strategy on the ground from your view proving successful? >> when we did a chicago tribune poll a couple months ago, taking a look at mayor rahm emanuel's popularity, it had fallen dramatically, particularly among african-american and hispanic voters. and so what you're kind of seeing i think with bernie sanders is a two-prong strategy of trying to peel off those dissatisfied voters of color who don't like rahm emanuel, linking
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him to hillary clinton, and of course, rahm emanuel having served in bill clinton's white house as a top adviser. actually, this morning when i left tribune tower to come over here to the studio, there was a trash receptacle in front of the tribune that had a sticker that was hillary and rahm. i had to wonder if that wasn't something from the bernie sanders camp. >> interesting. has rahm emanuel endorsed hillary clinton? it seems the clinton campaign has been very distant. >> rahm emanuel has definitely endorsed hillary clinton. i'm sure knowing the political animal that rahm emanuel is, he's somewhat frustrated for not being able to get actively involved here. but certainly, the strategy by bernie sanders is calculated to link that unpopularity toward rahm emanuel to hillary clinton. >> we have bernie sanders also campaigning with chuy garcia, who i know he's chuy, but he ran against rahm emanuel in the last
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mayoral race, is he popular enough to start to pull over some support to bernie sanders in the community of people of color? >> i think so. and one thing, yes, chuy garcia, cook county commissioner, ran against rahm emanuel, lost in a historic first ever run-off election to rahm emanuel, but still retains substantial popularity. in fact, garcia was endorsed by sanders for mayor, and garcia has actually not only in chicago, but he's played a national surrogate role for bernie sanders' campaign. >> and lastly, does the district attorney race, because we know that anita alvarez is very punp as well. is that race going to draw a lot of volume to the polls? >> i think so. i mean, the u.s. attorney's race, or pardon me, the cook county state's attorney's race is a very important factor here. anita alvarez, the two-term incumbent, is being challenged mainly by kim foxx, the former chief of staff of cook county
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ward president, she's a popular figure, and certainly, the fact of the issue of the laquan mcdonald shooting video that was released is a driving force in this race. >> all right, interesting to see which side it helps on the democratic side. rick, thank you very much. now, one of the young men who joined bernie sanders yesterday -- >> can you feel the bern, chicago? can you feel the bern? >> -- is a shawn johnson, a young chicago activist and sixth grader and i like to think friend of mine. how are you? it'sigate to see you. great to see you doing your advocacy. why are you feeling the bern? >> well, i feel the bern because bernie sanders, i like to say that i would help endorse him with the chicago teachers union because i feel that bernie
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sanders is a president that will fight for everyone. because we need a president that will not be endorsed by our mayor because of the things that our mayor has done, like with cutting programs and making us lose money. and bringing down the economy. >> and one of your big issues has always been the schools, the schools you go and and your feeling that mayor emanuel has not been supportive of public education. do you feel -- there's a big horn behind me, but do you feel that bernie sanders has a strong platform on education, for instance? >> yes, i do. i do feel that he has a strong platform. and the reason i say that is because of the things like he went to csu, and i feel that he likes to invest in the children, like when i was with him yesterday, we talked about different things with schools and how he said that he supports an elected school board, which we need in chicago, because our mayor has an appointed school board, so he gets to pick all
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his friends. that's what i like about bernie sanders, is that he supports an elected school board so the people get to pick who they want in that seat. >> and so you have a basketball game, i understand, to go to, but you're into basketball, you're a great public speaker. why should a kid your age care about politics? >> i feel that every kid should care about politics because it gives them a chance to know what's going on in their city and everything, because politics connects to a lot of things. like the mayor has his hand in everything. he can have his hand in the bank, the schools, and the community. so politics can connect to a lot of things. and that's why i think kids should be able to connect with politics. >> okay, so back on your basketball game, what position do you play? >> i play like a small forward type of position for the illinois select huskies. >> okay. all right. i'm sure you guys will win today. we'll be rooting for you, asean,
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always great to talk to you. we can't wait until you're old enough to be president. i think everybody will vet fvot for you. thank you. appreciate it. stay with us, and this is the place for politics. incredible bladder protection from always discreet that lets you move like you mean it now comes with an incredible promise. the always discreet double your money back guarantee. always discreet is for bladder leaks and it's drier than poise. try it. we're so confident you'll love it, we'll give you double your money back if you don't. incredible bladder protection. double your money back guarantee. that's always discreet. feel like this. look like this. feel like this. with dreamwalk insoles, turn shoes that can be a pain into comfortable ones. their soft cushioning support means you can look like this. and feel like this. dreamwalk.
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they have a felony conviction. including almost a quarter of the state's black residents. what does it mean if a quarter of the black population cannot participate in the democratic process? our guests are desmond mead.
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someone who is in the situation, also an attorney in the miami area. let's talk about what this means for individuals in this state who are in the situation where they cannot vote and cannot participate. >> when you talk about almost two million floridian who is cannot vote and you have prisoners participating in the primaries. you have them with me and the person that has overcome many difficulties and to become an attorney. my wife sheena is running for public office. i can't even vote for her. you can't pro. >> you are trying to turn that around. >> this is a state wight ballot initiative to amend them. once they serve their time and pay back society to have the right to vote. >> it didn't used to be this
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way. there was a point when this was fixed. what happened? >> i think we have just seen continued criminalization and dehumanization. here we are with the hoopla about the elections. they don't have the right to participate. how important are the elections if they are not guaranteed. >> the current governor reversed this. >> he undid the policies. it's notable to put out there that prior to the current governor, 155,000 individuals were able to have their rights restored and since this governor has been in office, less than 2,000 people had their rights restored. >> it's up to him. >> with the policies they are making them wait before they are able to just apply. there is an additional 8 to 10 year wait time. when you think about here we are on a sunday and so many people
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are in church and they think about when christ was on the cross, christ didn't say he had to wait to seven years. so that's the message we are trying to put out. throughout the country. once a person has done their time, restore their right to vote. voting is the essential block of citizenship. >> they're disconnected from citizenship. beyond voting, where else did you lose? >> your ability to get education and pursue your degree and be uplifted, it is barred. jobs will exclude you. it's absurd. >> getting back the franchise would be the key to getting back
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this menu of rights? >> of course. here's another point. when you bring franchises, you reduce the level of resydvation. the sooner you help a concern integrate back, give them a stake. that's more people than the population of 17 states there was their own fault. they lost their right. >> that argument never made sense to me.
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i never heard a logical reason why someone who committed a mistake should not be able to vote. it's as if you lose the ability to reason and put your name down on a piece of paper. >> we have to -- we have to go to desmond reed. that's it for us this hour. our coverage continues with tamron hall. know your financial plan
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come on grandma! giving you the strength and energy to get back to doing... what you love. from the #1 doctr recommended bran. ensure. always stay you. >> hello, everyone. live on a sunday morning at the root cafe in lookwood, ohio. key tuesday primary state and we are less than 48 hours to the start of voting. many people here will be among those voting. new polls and new reaction to report to you including from the

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