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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  March 17, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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it was an kprieting night by the donald followed by an early morning phone call about foreign policy to the gang of "morning joe." >> since we have dire foreign policy issues percolating around the world right now, who are you consulting with consistently so you're ready on day one.
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>> i'm speaking with myself number one because i have a very good brain and i've said a lot of things. i know what i'm doing and i listen to a lot of people, i talk to a lot of people and at the appropriate time i'll tell you who the people are but i speak to a lot of people and my primary consultant is myself. [ laughter ] [ applause ] >> why do i get the idea when it comes time to pick a running mate, he's going to pick himself for that. >> it's very interesting. the second that happened we all looked at each other and said "that could be the quote of the campaign." in. >> in realtime. >> realtime. >> and he meant it. good morning, it's thursday march 17. welcome to "morning joe." we have managing editor of bloomberg politics, mark halperin, nbc news senior white house correspondent chris jansing and in washington republican pollster and columnist in at the "washington examiner" kristen soltis anderson. good to have you on board.
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>> the joke was that he talks to himself and as a punch line it's very interesting what you were talking about yesterday morning, what you first reported on we all started to hear rumblings about. there's a real outreach to republicans from trump. he's starting to aggressively go after any and all republicans. he believes it is time to seek peace with the republican party. >> he's doing the smart things that any outsider becoming the nominee of the party would do. he's reaching out to the old bulls in the party, people like orrin hatch and others who he hasn't needed up until now. formally to become the republican nominee you've been reaching out to these people for months but he's doing it now. not all of them are going to be won over but a lot of them are saying, look, this guy is likely to be the nominee, let's make peace with this. as we all know, he can be charming. on those calls he's coming from a great position of strength, he's reaching out. as i understand it, a lot of them are being very
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accommodating. very willing to hear what he has to say. >> we had willie early the campaign when hillary clinton was pressed "why did you go to his wedding? "she was like "he's a fun guy." that's the thing. we've known him for 10 years on and off and everybody, whether it's hillary clinton or you or us or anybody in new york, one on one he's a charming guy. >> life of the part yeenchy. >> it's very interesting, when he's in front of a microphone he'll say "i'm great, i'm great." but when he's in front of you at a party "willie, you book, the greatest book ever written." and his first book was the greatest. but it's one of the things where people say well, how could that guy get one on one with republicans and pull them over because when he's off camera
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he's the opposite in many ways as when he's on camera, the charm comes on. >> he is charming. i just wonder if charm is enough to twin over as you call him the old bulls who have come out publicly and said he's a disgrace and this guy can't be the standard bearer for our party. do they get in line with him because they think he would be a good president, do they get in line because there's no alternative. there was some feeling that now that john kasich was in there maybe the old washington group would get behind kasich and support his run. any evidence of that? >> some of them are. and i continue to believe he's an undervalued stock here. he's the fourth most likely next president of the united states, john kasich. >> you're talking about kasich? >> but the second most likely -- >> you said he was scattered. that looked like a scattered speech. it looked like you were being polite -- >> about trump or kasich? >> john kasich. >> he got a great reception in pennsylvania. a very crowded town hall but he didn't seize the moment. now go back to trump, he's the
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first or second most likely president of the united states and if you're a republican, even if you oppose him on some level, you have to acknowledge he's most likely to be your nominee. we can imagine what he's saying in these calls and it's intoxicating. it's the first real conversation these people have ever had with donald trump, most likely their nom ghee. >> and you go back to your home state of florida, joe, anti-trump forces spent five, six times what he spent there. >> oh, my god. >> and look what it got them. there's a reality check for a lot of republicans. >> and if you're rick scott, and this is what other people are going to start looking at, they don't like him in washington, d.c., they loved marco in washington, d.c. but you go to a state like florida, the guy is winning by 20 points and florida politicians see he wins everything county except one, he wins 66 out of 67 counties in florida then they're going wait,
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that may not be a risky bet after all, do i want mitch mcconnell campaigning with me in barto, florida, or donald trump? that's easy. and i think we'll start to see, mika, a remarkable amount of rationalization. i talked with alex burns of the "new york times" yesterday, he'll be coming on later today, i think we'll see a tremendous amount of rationalizing over the next two to three weeks because right now everybody will start getting in line. because trump has no infrastructure. there's nobody around him and so that presents opportunity for a washington consulting class that's never been shut out like this before. >> it's very complicated conversation. even to hear several of you say he is charming. you just isolate that and you could literally launch an avalanche of criticism from people in the media, from
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women's groups, from muslim organizations because he has said some horrible things and it's not just -- >> but notice, mika, when we said charming off camera, charming away from the microphone. >> it's still a complicated conversation. >> that's one of the great ironies. >> that's not true. i think some of the things have been said in front of the microphone. >> mika, that's what i'm saying. give the man a microphone and camera and there's nothing charming about him. >> okay. >> have him go to events around new york like we've all gone to and suddenly it's like hillary clinton said, he's charming, he's nice, he's likable. and hillary said in our interview she doesn't recognize the donald trump that's running for president right now. >> it's very complicated. it should be interesting. but i think the falling in line will be fascinating, too, because those private conversations, then these republicans are going to have to explain publicly and i think this is going to be very challenging for them.
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>> i think it will be hard. >> when it comes to the republican race for president, of course, if there's no donald trump, there's no debate. next week's republican debate in utah was officially called off yesterday after two of the three remaining candidates said they wouldn't be there. fox news confirmed the cancellation in a statement writing in part "obviously there needs to be more than one participant so the salt lake city is cancelled." trump cited a prior commitment for not doing the debate. he'll be giving a "big speech" before the prominent israel lobby group aipac on the same day. the kasich campaign followed up saying without trump the ohio governor wouldn't be there either. the only other republican still run, senator ted cruz, used the opportunity to attack trump calling him ducking donald on twitter. just not going to work the same way. >> lying ted just has more of a ring to it, doesn't it? >> ducking donald. >> cruz challenged trump to meet him in washington. >> you have to be careful, also, how you say that.
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>> his excuse is silliness and it reflects his assumption that he thinks the voters can't figure out he's not telling them the truth. aipac would have allowed him to speak at any time, it's a multiday conference. he chose to speak in the middle of the debate because he's scared to debate. he looks down on the voters. he thinks they'll believe whatever he's saying. so i'll be in d.c. for aipac as well and since donald is running away from the debate i'm happy to debate him there. >> so chris we were trying to figure out why he went after megyn del kelly and we said mak pace, i guess he doesn't feel like he has to. >> if i were donald trump i don't know that i'd make a different decision. at this point there's not a lot of polling coming out of the upcoming states but arizona is one of the next ones on the docket where he has the endorsements of sheriff joe and former governor jan brewer. so if you're donald trump, you don't want to disturb the
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equilibrium in the race that has you on best path to 1,237 delegates. and there's something he's been saying in interviews voters might agree which is "how many times do you ask us the same questions?" we saw the same exchange between tuesday and marco rubio over immigration over and over and over again. i think there are still really important questions that need to be asked of donald trump and i think fox news when they've hosted these debates, whether it was chris wallace bringing up graphics to contradict things that trump was saying or the video clips megyn kelly introduced to hold cruz and rubio's feet to the fire in a previous debate, fox has introduced new questions but generally i think trump will find a sympathetic audience when he says "i don't know these that these debates are adding anything to the table, i'm done with them." nobody will have a problem it with. there have been so many and it hasn't moved the meter for him.
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why would he bother? yesterday trump warned of requested bat things happened" if he gets to on the convention with the most delegates and isn't nominated. >> if we didn't and if we're 20 votes short or if we're 100 short and we're at 1,100 and somebody else is at 500 or 400, because we're way ahead of everybody, i don't think you can say that we don't get it automatically. i think it would be -- i think you'd have riots. i think you'd have riots. i think bad things would happen, i really do. i wouldn't lead it but i think bad things would happen. >> meanwhile, donald trump is once again training his attacks on hillary clinton suggesting she is not tough enough to face russian president vladimir putin. he made his point in a new video posted on instagram with the caption "is this what we want for a president?"
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[ barking ] [ laughing ] >> are you going to go scorched earth with hillary clinton? are you going do all the personal stuff with her and her husband? are you going to do that? >> i think i'd rather not say now. it's early. we had one run in about two months ago and i helped bernie a lot because her numbers came down very big after that, but that was my only real confrontation with her. we'll see what happens. but whatever it is, it is. i'll do what i have to do. >> we were thinking he might rest when he got off the campaign trail. he had a very busy day yesterday cancelling debates, attacking hillary clinton, you name it. talking about riots if he's not nominated. once again driving the entire news day while, as mark said, he was lounging at home in his
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barca lounger. >> nhillary clinton in her speeh turned to look to donald trump, he had an instagram post that had her barking out of the context. >> which in context was really funny and real. >> you mean what hillary did? >> yeah. >> but to answer bill o'reilly's question, is donald trump going to go personal on hillary clinton? yes, he is and he introduced it a month or so ago, he spent a week or doing it. it tied the clinton campaign in knots. bill clinton had to just deflect questions on rope lines. it will be interesting to see how they handle that stuff. >> lying ted. little marco. low energy jeb. and he's also, mark halperin, started -- and we can expect more of this -- the low energy attack on hillary clinton as well. but you were commenting yesterday on don rickles, what about don rickles. we always wanted to know what a
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day off the campaign trail would look like for donald trump. it seems he consumed media by doing four very provocative things that if any other candidate had done one of those things it would have made headlines and filled up their basically news quota for the week. >> he got dressed to do the bill o'reilly interview but everything else he did, the web video and the morning shows by phone, including this one, and on twitter, just another show of how he can dominate a day without leaving manhattan or leaving trump tower. monday is going to be a very big day when he does that aipac speech he's doing instead of the debate because hillary clinton is speaking to the same group and while both of them are still in nomination fights, the it will be a side by side comparison for the first time in a forum that you wouldn't think would necessarily play to his strength and i'm pretty confident she's going try to give a speech to frame the general election not just on issues related to israel but on question of who's ready to be commander-in-chief. it's going to be fascinating to see what kind of speech he gives head to head.
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>> i think that -- yeah. i'm looking ahead to the speech to aipac but also how they respond, it can kris, to his speech. i haven't ever heard him go incredibly deep on these issues. i don't know how he does a speech like that and kind of keeps it light and says "believe me." >> i was talking to people on the campaign yesterday and they feel obviously pretty confident about this area at least of the competition. where it's more difficult is when you talk about this other stuff like the ad we just saw. if you're the traditional campaign and if you're us, people who have been through many campaigns and you can look ahead normally and you can say so what are going to be the areas of attack and you can preprepare for what you think the areas of attack will be. with donald trump it's almost impossible to calculate where he might go because he goes to places where people have never gone before and so it's almost inevitable that they're going to find themselves back on their heels so aipac, i think, is a
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really great opportunity for her because it's an area where she feels incredibly competent, they feel they are way ahead of him by miles and miles and miles and they can sort of set the agenda. how many other times in this campaign have you seen anybody but donald trump set the agenda? >> i wonder, following up on what chris just said about never knowing where the attack went, were you guys as surprised as i was that david plouffe yesterday repeated what he said several weeks before which was "democrats who are underestimating the chaos that this man can cause for hillary clinton don't know what they're talking about." there's no doubt he fears -- david plouffe, a guy who knows something about this -- donald trump a lot more than any of the other republicans in the race. >> he's unpredictable in his attacks and unpredictable in the electoral college. he says he can compete for northeastern states, he might be able to. he can compete for demographic groups that other republicans
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couldn't compete for theoretically. he could be blown out but he could scramble the map and make hillary clinton play a ton of defense. let's get to other headlines. the obama administration is demanding the release of an american college student sentenced to 15 years of hard labor by north korea. 21-year-old otto warmbier was found guilty of subversion after allegedly stealing a propaganda banner from his hotel. former new mexico governor bill richardson, who has negotiated with north korea in the past, says he is working to get the student released. we will see what happens with that. in washington, d.c. this morning, the metro system resumed at 5:00 a.m. after an emergency one day shutdown for safety inspections. a top official with the metro tells the "washington post" the that the shutdown was necessary and this three of the problems discovered during the course of the day were "show stoppers" that required immediate repair. sad news from the world of entertainment this morning, frank sinatra, jr., has died,
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son of the legendary crooner and nancy sinatra, frank, jr., followed his father's footsteps with his own musical career and worked as musical director for his dad. sinatra died of cardiac arrest while on tour in florida. he was 72. finally the broadway musical "hamilton" may have helped founding father alexander hamilton keep his face on the $10 bill. the treasury department has plans to revamp the bill to include a woman's face. many thought that meant that hamilton would get booted. lin-manuel miranda, the creator and star of the hit musical "hamilton" met with treasury secretary jack lew this week. he says lew told him "you're going to be very happy." >> i knew that was going to happen. >> did you? >> as popular as "hamilton" was, i knew if lin-manuel get in a room with jack lew, it was over. >> $10 founding father. >> just a little strange. >> maybe they'll move him up and
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take somebody off a $50. >> or have multiple versions of the bill. >> like different "sports illustrated" covers? >> exactly. >> put him on the $2. i think we need the $2 back. i want the two-spot back. >> the star of a broadway show is negotiating with the treasury department? >> he wasn't negotiating. he was in washington to perform at the white house and he had a meeting with jack lew. but he said -- >> because? >> because hamilton is -- >> you know what michelle obama said? michelle obama said "ham hamilt the greatest piece of art she's ever seen. >> i agree. it's the greatest thing i've ever seen. >> john podhoretz disagrees. >> he has to say something negative. >> unfortunately you have to take a second mortgage on your house. >> i still don't get the meeting with the treasury secretary. >> john needs to smile more. >> so everybody's seen "hamilton" but us.
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>> you haven't seen "hamilton"? cultural illiterate. >> it's only the greatest piece of art ever. and take a pass. >> wow. >> it's playing a couple blocks from it. >> you can see it in 2019 if you act now. >> for $4,000 a ticket. >> oh, my god. still ahead on "morning joe," the president's chief of staff, denis mcdonough joins us for a live interview. how the white house plans to push through a supreme court nomination amid a bitter presidential election. plus, two of the top legal experts on what the president's pick would bring to the bench. that discussion is straight ahead. but first, bill karins with a check on the forecast. you're not going to believe -- >> which start. >> the sunday/monday part. just stop. >> joe said he wanted one more good snowstorm and i said, you know, for joe i can probably deliver. >> i don't think i said that. >> no? >> what you got for us? >> we're calm today, guys, not much of a problem out there. the only horrible weather is we had a strong thunderstorm go through the fort worth area
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south of downtown dallas. severe thunderstorm with hail and right over the top of desoto waking up people early. st. patrick's day, boston should be great. 54 for the new york city parade. and no problems whatsoever in chicago, either, 55 degrees. a pretty nice day out there, late afternoon thunderstorms will be widespread, though, san antonio along the gulf coast. so let's talk about the sunday into monday piece. our computers are in disagreement. the european model thinks we could have a significant snow event in new england, possibly even south of new york city even outside of d.c. our american computer model thinks we'll have a storm but a little further off the coast so we're still three and a half days out but the potential is there and there will be enough cold air that the potential for a late season snow, that would be for the first day of spring on monday. so we'll give you updates on that tomorrow and over the weekend here on msnbc. you're watching "morning joe." new york city parade starts at 11:15. we'll be right back.
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so yesterday on the
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wonderful program that airs here on msnbc -- >> is that "with all due respect?" >> "with all due respect." they put together clips of governor john kasich of ohio appearing outside villanova university. >> was it great? >> big moment, chance to command the national stage after his dramatic win. >> when you talk to john kasich it's a lot of fun, he covers a lot of ground and he lived up to that yesterday. >> did he get churchillian, though? take a look. >> maybe i should tell you a little story. march madness, this wall street thing, gangs, pizza, cupcake, i don't mean this as a political gibberish here. the mailman and the mailman's wife -- we went from from the smaller tyrannosaurus rex to the big one. the ufo, photography, steelers tickets, 15 college roommates. don't you like the protests? i love it. that's where superman changed his clothes. so big god darn institution headquartered in new york.
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ben & jerry's free for one whole year. i said sir, have you lived here your whole life? he said not yet. beautiful chandeliers and everything. president nixon. daddy, can you give us more snow days? i said why are you asking me? because you're the governor, john. life is pretty simple when you keep it simple. sincerely john kasich. >> oh, my gosh. >> my colleague put that together. >> very good. that's so cute. >> a smart politician named massamino. very good, sir. >> your point was, and john heilemann said the same thing, he had a great opportunity on the road by himself to make big headline, grab media attention but you suggested that the speech was unfocused and he didn't take his opportunity and he doesn't have a lot of chances. >> i was surprised he didn't try to make a big point about the election to say i'm the governor of ohio, there's five candidates left in the race, i'm the one ready to be president. he said it but, again, as you
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saw, his rhetoric was typical john kasich. that's what he's like. that's his personality. i was surprised. only guy with a campaign event yesterday, big battleground state, big moment and i wouldn't say necessarily seized the moment. >> but his speech after the ohio victory was also it seemed to be unfocused given the time and the moment. >> he still has time but i don't think he took full advantage of it yesterday. >> kristen soltis, what -- for republicans that are looking for an establishment candidate, the concern of john kasich has always been that he's not quite as focused a politician as he should be, right? >> i think there's a couple of concerns about john kasich. one you have some folks who consider themselves very conservative who would prefer ted cruz over john kasich as the alternative to trump because they view things like his expansion of medicaid in the state of ohio as being anathema to conservatism and the fight to
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stop obamacare. so there are folks that are conservative republicans who view john kasich as much of a non-starter as they view donald trump. but at this point, off lot of folks saying, look, he's the governor of ohio, that's a big state, at least forcing democrats to play defense in ohio would really be powerful on the electoral map. and, frankly, when i hear him talk about issues, things like gay rights, etc., he both has this kind of blue-collar vibe to him but also talks about these issues where i think republicans are struggling to adapt to the future in a way that i think could potentially be a path forward. so john kasich, it's going to be fascinating to watch because he's got these two factions of the non-trump party that he's going to be trying to go for but i think the hard core conservatives may be lost to him. are there enough of the establishment republicans who are never trump who are not sort of warming to donald trump or going through the accepted stage
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of grief at this point that he can piece together enough delegates to play in a contested convention. >> coming up, the must-read opinion pages. plus elizabeth warren gives her take on donald trump. "morning joe" is back in a moment. welcome to opportunity's knocking, where self-proclaimed financial superstars pitch you investment opportunities. i've got a fantastic deal for you- gold! with the right pool of investors, there's a lot of money to be made. but first, investors must ask the right questions and use the smartcheck challenge to make the right decisions. you're not even registered; i'm done with you! i can...i can... savvy investors check their financial pro's background by visiting smartcheck.gov at safelite,oh nonow how busy your life can be. this mom didn't have time to worry about a cracked windshield. so she scheduled at safelite.com and with safelite's exclusive "on my way text" she knew exactly when i'd be there.
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♪ no, you're not ♪ yogonna watch it! ♪tch it! ♪ ♪ we can't let you download on the goooooo! ♪ ♪ you'll just have to miss it! ♪ yeah, you'll just have to miss it! ♪ ♪ we can't let you download... uh, no thanks. i have x1 from xfinity so... don't fall for directv. xfinity lets you download your shows from anywhere. i used to like that song. the republicans in the senate have been building this for a long time because they have truly given in to the
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extremists in the party. when the whole animating of energy of the united states senate is in effect to try to deny the legitimacy of the president who was democratically elected, the legitimacy of what's called for in the constitution means they really have just gone the extremist route. and, let's face it, trump is the natural consequence of that. >> that was senator elizabeth warren last night speaking with msnbc's chris hayes. i couldn't agree with her more. >> of course. >> does anyone disagree? >> no. >> i think you would blame the obama administration and everyone blames everyone but trump but that's a big part of it. from the get-go the republicans saying no and you see in the the
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supreme court nomination. >> i guess mitch mcconnell called him and said "we're not going to have a vote on you". >> what's wrong with them? >> i'm curious. has nobody in washington, d.c. on the republican side ever heard of the slow roll? let me check my calendar, i'll call you back and we will get you before a judiciary committee some time this summer, sir. >> rude. >> instead of like, no. why? why? are they so scared of their base that they can't at least play this out? >> tell me one thing about this nominee that is offensive to the republican party? >> the key is going to be grassley. there are those who say chairman grassley will never have a hearing unless mcconnell goes for it. there will be a lot of pressure on him in iowa and he cares what iowans think about him. if grassley decides he wants to have a hearing, the whole thing changes but until grassley schedules a hearing obviously he can't be confirmed.
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>> and this nominee makes president obama's eight-year point for him which is that he's putting out somebody eminently qualified? >> trying to be president. >> that many republicans have voted for the past and now he can say if they obstruct him, if they won't even talk to him they're doing it to defy me. >> as they have time and time again. >> isn't there an orrin hatch quote out there where orrin hatch said in an earlier nomination that if they had put him up there wouldn't be a fight. >> he said it about this one. >> i'm saying when there was a fight in the past -- >> i think he said it about this vacancy. >> alex, what do you have? >> this was in 2010 after elena kagan was nominated he said -- quoting the "new york times" -- "senator orrin hatch made clear to the president he considered judge garland a good choice." >> i can do you one better, orrin hatch last week said "president obama could easily name merrick garland, who is a fine man, but he probably won't do that because this appointment
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is about the election. i'm pretty sure he'll name someone the liberal democratic base wants." president obama yesterday nominated -- >> and the white house did one of these calls yesterday and the mood was -- i don't want to call it gleeful but they started going through his resume. he tutors third, fourth, and fifth graders. from his judicial expertise to the quotes republicans have said about him over the years, they feel like they've got -- look, this was completely designed by the white house to give republicans agita, to repunctuate the point that washington is broken and it's the republicans who have made it broken. >> so pull that ayotte quote and the one we have access to, alex. joining us in washington, joans by cue pick and georgetown law professor jonathan turley. i guess, jonathan, if you look
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at this nominee, what is offensive? what potentially could republicans have a problem with? is there anything? >> no, i don't think there seriously is a problem in terms of his -- he's certainly a moderate. i don't think a democratic president could move any further to the right. there are a few issues, however, that would be a concern. one is that he voted to reconsider the case that became "heller." and "heller" is the case where the supreme court said there is an individual right to bear arms under the second amendment. he heller is gospel for conservatives and he's viewed as a non-believer and that's a big ticket item for these members. the nra could score that vote. they could put pressure on both republicans and democrats and that is one wedge issue that could come up. but, of course, that's not going to come up if we don't have hearings. >> it's interesting, you'd think that could be potentially a really important argument or debate or discussion to have so
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i'm sure when top senate republicans were asked about this, maybe they pointed to that. alex, do we have some of the response from the republican side about this nomination? can we roll this now? here's kelly ayotte, i'm sure she'll talk about it. >> out of courtesy and respect i will be meeting with him if he wants to meet with me but i will clearly explain to him as well that i believe that the people should be weighing in on the november elections before a confirmation process goes forwar forward. >> john thnathan, give us a precedent. has this happened before? >> no, there have been long delays for supreme court nominees. there certainly have been rejections. in 1875 you had something like this, but it's relatively rare. i think that what you have to look at is first there's historical practice which favors the white house in having a hearing and a vote and then there's the constitutional standard and certainly the
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republicans are correct. there is no requirement that they hold a hearing and a vote. i think they should. but they're certainly correct that they can withhold their consent and they can even withhold a hearing. and this is a calculated move to be sure. i think part of the view of people like mitch mcconnell is that this is an issue that could very well bring republicans out. the republicans have far more skin in the game here. they have far more to lose. the fact is, even appointing a moderate on the court is likely to flip a lot of results, including issues like gun rights. because whereof scalia was on the far right, any moderate will move that needle to the left. >> so, joan, wouldn't the republicans have something to gain by giving this guy a good clear look? >> i think if they want to be fair about this nominee they would do what usually happens is that you have a look and you meet with the man and initially
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as you remember some senators said we won't even meet with him or do do the traditional courtesy calls but two things should be clear here about what the administration is doing with this appointment. in part it dates to when president obama had his first appointment in 2009. he looked at merrick garland when he ended up choosing sonia sotomayor and he deliberately held merrick garland in reserve for this moment. the white house officials thought if they ever had an opening in an election year and the senate had flipped to the republicans merrick garland would be perfect. and i think we saw that in the tableau yesterday. the senate republicans might hold firm, but the white house has chosen someone who looked very serious, very competent, very able in every way and non-confrontational. think of who had been on the short list, people who maybe might have made a bigger statement, played to the base. and what president obama's message was is, look, we've chosen a serious jurist here, you really do need to pay
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attention in a way you might not have if, for example, he was putting on the first african-american woman who had been on the list or, you know, the first indian american, asian american. so i think this nominee was in some way ready made for this obama moment. will it change things? i think we saw a little bit of an opening yesterday but just going back to what's been said before, the stakes are so high and mitch mcconnell really understands those stakes. he's always been very interested in the federal judiciary and even a moderate like merrick garland will are change things. >> but jonathan, there was perhaps a little opening yesterday but mcconnell got on the phone with merrick garland yesterday and told him explic explicitly "we're not going to meet with you. we're not going to have a hearing." so look on the horizon of this hearing. where does merrick garland end up? does president obama go with somebody else? does he get a nominee during his administration? >> well, where garland ends up is a place no one wants to be.
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he's really between the unmovable object and the irresistible force and that's not where you want to be. you know, theres a chance, a back end strategy that if hillary clinton were to twin election the republicans could say we prefer the moderate we know than the liberal we don't and they could at that point while obama is still in office move this nomination. but i don't think there's any way that there's going get this cat to walk backwards. the republicans have made very clear this is not about him, it's not about person, it's about the principle and they iron play that by bringing up president obama's position with alito and filibustering alito and also what they call the biden rule where biden took this position. so they're pretty armor plated and i'm afraid judge garland is right in the middle. that's why most people would want this cup to pass from their lips. this is not a great place to be. >> chris jansing, isn't there a
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sort of -- isn't this what the president is supposed to do with his authority? >> well, this is the argument that the white house is making. but, joan, i'm curious about how donald trump plays into this. he plays into everything and the concerns that people have if he becomes the nominee and if it becomes less likely that a republican is the next president and then who would a hillary clinton or a bernie sanders nominate? where is me ahe in all of this could it move the need toll see if we have hearings on garland? >> that's a good question. we have a certain set of factors that are dictating everybody. we have a limited knowledge of what's happening judicially but think of how much could play out during the summer. think of what could happen in the nominating conventions, any other changes relative to the court. so we just don't know what will happen in upcoming months, we also don't know for sure what the strategy is of the
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administration. i'm sure when they had merrick garland on the short list, they had 20 steps for why to get there. i'm sure there will be more beyond big name endorsements and visiting the senate. they'll look for cracks where states where republican senators are vulnerable. so i think that what we're seeing now is the early picture of what could develop and as much as people have drawn lines in the sand, this is much different than in 2005, for example, when senator patrick lahey actually voted for john roberts. this time around, the opposite party people have said we're not doing it at all. so there's much more saving of face that could be a factor here. they can't really back down even if they start to -- some of their colleagues get wobbly. but i do think that a lot more will evolve and i frankly,
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yesterday watching everything, started to think maybe they can pull this off, maybe in the lame duck session possibly. >> joan, thank you. jonathan turley, thank you as well. we'll hear from white house chief of staff denis mcdonough on president obama's strategy in just a few moments. we'll be right back. if your family outing is magical for all the wrong reasons. you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin®. because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. try zyrtec®. muddle no more®.
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who are you talking to consistently since we have dire foreign policy issues percolating around the world right now. who are you consulting with consistently so you're ready on day one? >> i'm speaking with myself, number one, because i have a very good brain and i've said a lot of things. in fact, in my book in 2000 i talked about osama bin laden and i do remember someone putting the book in front of joe and josing "no way he wrote about osama bin laden before the world trade center came down." and they said no, he did. and i remember joe saying "that's amazing." so i know what i'm doing. and i listen to a lot of people. i talk to a lot of people and at
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the appropriate time i'll the el you who the people are. i speak to a lot of people but my primary consultant is myself and i have a good instinct for. >> that was donald trump yesterday responding to mika's question on "morning joe." let's sneak in on op-ed on that subject. the "wall street journal" editorial board writes " writes: >> will donald trump, chris
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jansing, have a good answer eventually to mika's question? >> that's the $6 million question, isn't it? he has got to at some point. you brought up aipac. at some point there's going to be a very vivid comparison and world events happen, right? and people will see in realtime how these remains five candidates respond. and i think that could be a clarifying moment for a lot of people, when they find themselves really in the middle of something that they care about, particularly on the world stage and he is asked about it and we'll see what kind of depth he has and he's going to have to come up with that answer. >> if you want to see one person belief of how the party establishment is switching its posture towards trump, look at the same "wall street journal" editorial page today. karl rove, rather than mocking trump, has ten pieces of advice for him about how he can do better and one of it is "you need to bring in people. you need to use this time of the nominating process slowing down to bring in experts and
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consultants." trump gave a big speech on israel and foreign policy to the republican jewish coalition a few weeks ago where he talked about how he won a lot of awards and his daughter is jewish. i think people are expecting -- >> he gave a lot of money. >> and they was grand marshall in the parade. >> have you ever seen him read off of a teleprompter? >> donald j. trump billionaire? no. he has notes, usually they involve the latest polls. >> for a speech like aipac he needs to read off of a teleprompter and avoid -- >> i'd be stunned if he did. >> avoid hummus moments. >> ben carson. the great danger. >> mr. trump did not like when i pointed out that at the republican jewish coalition speech people in the audience laughed at some of the things he said. he's not used to that. this aipac speech is a big moment. >> he needs to read from a
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prepared text. >> so far it hasn't mattered. the message is "we need to be strong, we need to have a military so strong they won't mess with us." it matters now. >> he said to you two in charleston that he was basically neutral between -- didn't want to pre-judge the issues between the palestinians and the israelis. he's going to have to address that question in front of aipac where they don't like that position. >> if he wings it in front of aipac, it won't go well. it just won't go well. we can predict it right now. they will laugh at him. >> this is not an audience that doesn't know the depth of this issue. this is not going into an auditorium in middle america where he can speak in generalities and people can respond to his celebrity and charisma. >> he said privately he knows this is a huge speech. >> the days of speaking in generalities, the days of winging it, the days of speaking off the top of his head are over
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in areas like this. >> chris jansing, thank you so much for joining us. great to have you. coming up, president obama seems increasingly willing to wade into the race to succeed him. we'll talk about that and the battle over the supreme court with his chief of staff denis mcdonough. plus, we'll go live to arizona where bernie sanders is plotting his next move after getting trumped on tuesday by hillary clinton. "morning joe" is coming right back.
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look at this. [ laughter ] who won? i didn't know who won. i can't see. oh, my god! john kasich was like "might as well use it up, i'm not going to need it again." [ laughter ] >> wow. >> that's a lot of confetti. >> welcome back to "morning joe." they were celebrating. it's nice, it's thursday, march 17. with us on set, managing editor of bloomberg politics mark halperin. in washington, republican pollster and columnist in at the "washington examiner" kristen soltis-anderson. and joining the conversation, former john mccain advisor steve schmidt. so donald trump emerged with a clear lead in the delegates and while it's now more possible he can secure the convention before the nomination, he warned of "bad things happening" if he
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is not nominated. >> i think we can win before the convention but if we didn't and we're 20 votes short or if we're 100 short and we're at 1100 and somebody else is at 500 or 400 because we're way ahead of everybody, i don't think you can say that we don't get it automatically. i think you'd have riots. i think bad things would happen. i really. do i wouldn't lead it, but i think bad things would happen. >> steve schmidt, maybe not violent riots, but there certainly would be upheaval at the convention if they tried to take the nomination from a guy who had a large plurality of the delegates who won the most states and the most votes. what would that scene look like? >> i'm not sure "upheaval" is the word for it. it would be chaos. he is an outside insurgent candidate. his voters, many of them first-time voters in the process and those voters don't necessarily understand the two parties are the vehicles by which we advance democracy in
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america but by themselves are not inherently small "d" democratic institutions. this is not a one man one vote process but i think ordinary people view it as such so if you go into the convention you have all the political machinations and it results in a -- it results in a nomination by someone who maybe didn't even run for president during this process or with the second or third place candidate and people will go nuts and you know certainly if it's seen as being engineered by the quote/unquote establishment and at the end of the day the republican party is fragile and donald trump's candidacy for the first time in a long time, even some republicans who say "i'll never be with trump" he's picking up new voters, expanding the party's base. it would implode under those circumstances and have dire
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consequences down ballot for the house and senate. . >> the these historical analogies for people who say well, this has happened before, overlooks a couple things. first of all, it used to be primaries and caucuses were not as big a part of selecting the nominees. this process has become democratized and millions of people will have voted. the other thing is twitter and social media. it will be -- they'll have to change the rules to make this happen on once they start changing the rules it will look like a fixed inside game. there will be a huge pr effort to convince the public this is fine but it will be hard. >> you had a republican official who said yesterday "i have news for the voters, you don't choose the nominee, we in the party choose the nominee, the delegates choose the nominee." which begs the question of why voters go out and vote. >> which goes a long way to explaining why jeb bush and marco rubio and every establishment candidate has gotten their political brains beaten in this political season because washington, d.c. is disconnected. the republican party in
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washington, d.c. has been disconnected for 30 years. steve, they have promised to deliver on balanced budgets. they've promised to deliver on smaller government, they have promised to deliver on a mortar restrained foreign policy and they have given voters, especially working class voters who voted for them time and time again just the opposite. >> think about the nitwit kid in texas who was let off of his murderous drunk driving charges with the affluenza defense. the republican establishment in washington, d.c. has a case of affluenza. you have six of the ten wealthiest counties in the country surround washington, d.c. you have a real estate market that took a narrow downturn but rebounded very quickly. you have a city that's insulated from economic distress, it's recession-proof to some degree. so this republican establishment, the consulting
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class in washington, d.c., these are not living wage jobs. and at the end of the day, i think they totally miss the psychic impact, the economic impact of the great recession, of the economic collapse. it was such a seismic event in the modern history of the country that even eight years later it's the defining issue of the 2016 campaign as it was the defining issue of the 2008 fall campaign. and they just don't get it. don't understand the impact for blue-collar wage voters and you're seeing them all play out in this general election and this republican establishment in washington, d.c. until the middle of the fall, legitimately if you talk to people in washington they say, well, no, jeb bush will win, he's the republican front-runner. until very, very late in the process. >> and then they immediately
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said "marco rubio is going to win." >> then it was marco rubio. and now it's there's going to be a brokered convention and we'll upend the results of the actual voting and have paul ryan be the nominee. so all of this continues to play out almost on an hourly basis by a very disconnected and decapitated republican establishment in washington, d.c. >> so yesterday trump picked up the endorsement of florida governor rick scott. i mean, nobody saw that coming. he wrote in facebook in part "if we spend another four months tearing each other apart, we will damage our ability to win in november. it's time for an end to the republican on republican violence. it's time for us to by again coming together." >> this while south carolina governor nikki haley, who endorsed marco rubio with great fanfare sticking the political knife directly in jeb bush's back is now backing ted cruz. >> okay. >> and it didn't quite work for
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nikki haley and marco rubio in that state. another rubio supporter, senator jim inhofe of nebraska endorsed john kasich yesterday. that's john kasich's second endorsement from a sitting senator. >> oklahoma. >> what did i say in. >> the prompter said nebraska and you beautifully read it. >> oklahoma, never been to spain but i've been to oklahoma. giving him the most of the republican candidates. ted cruz thinks he can beat cruz if it's one. >> i think there's some data to suggest he could. >> why is ted cruz getting weaker? why did he have such a bad night. he didn't win a single state. what's happening? >> well, he was targeting congressional districts to win delegates more than to win states. he dropped off with some of the groups he'd done better with before. i think he's not -- my sense is
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he's lost because trump is such a powerful force. he did not do well with voters who care about the economy. he has a tax plan but they haven't been part of his national profile. he needs toe do that. >> the republican front-runner is once again training his attacks on hillary clinton, suggesting she is not tough enough to face russian president vladimir putin. he made his point in a new video posted to instagram with the caption "is this what we want for a president. is [ barking ) [ laughter ] >> are you going go scorched earth on snhillary clinton? are you going to get into the personal stuff with her and her
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husband? >> i think i'd rather not say. it's early, i want to get it first and we had one run in about two months ago and i helped bernie a lot because frankly her numbers came down very big after that but that was my only real confrontation with her. we'll see what happens but whatever it is, it is. i'll do what i have to do. >> kristen, this is a guy who doesn't buy advertising and he doesn't have to because he puts up something like that on instagram, a 15-second clip or whatever that was. it goetets picked up all over t place. an effective message? is that a good way to go after hillary clinton? >> it will be interesting because this contrast between strength and weakness is something donald trump has used to destroy all of his opponents thus far in the republican primary and he wants to take that to a general election. but the question of whether or not hillary clinton is tough,
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voters may think she's trunot trustworthy or too liberal, her unfavorables are low but they don't think she's weak or a pushover so it will be interesting to see if he's able to make the case against her he's been making against the marco rubios and jeb bushs of the world. >> steve schmidt, i don't know that that's a place to go: hillary clinton has been far her 30 to 40 years in public office one of the tough eest political figures on the scene. she's endured more in one decade than politically most endure their entire life. >> no doubt. but if we go back and survey the political field over the course of this campaign, for sure the craziest answer anyone's given to any question was jeb bush. "knowing then what we know now, would we have done iraq again?" and jeb bush says yes. what is hillary clinton say when that question is out if her with regard to libya? and so talk about national security, we talk about foreign
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policy. what are the successes from a national security perspective of this administration? >> where is america stronger in the world. where are we more respected in the world? where are her successes as secretary of state? there has not been a secretary of state who had a more incompetent performance than hillary clinton in the modern era. this is going to be exploited in this general election campaign and i believe he's setting that -- setting the stage. >> why do you say that? >> this was an administration that began by sending to the united kingdom back the winston churchill statue that was in the oval office. the "atlantic" this month, an american president taking the special relationship outside of the privacy of it and attacking a british prime minister publicly on a range of issues. outside of iran, outside of cuba
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where is the united states stronger and more respected internationally and globally than we were before january 20 of 2009? the world is in chaos, the country is unmoored from a global strategy and i think she was the architect over the first four years of the administration. huge vulnerabilities. >> as a matter of political strategies, donald trump and karl rove share one view. don't shy away from your opponent's perceived strength, go after it. george bush went after john mccain for being corrupt when mccain's reputation was being honest and not corrupt. they went after john kerry on his war record when it was thought because kerry served that might be an advantage. i believe donald trump looks at not just the factual record as steve has outlined it on the
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administration's foreign policy but he looks at hillary clinton's perceived strength on that and says "i'm not going to yield that, i'm going to go right at her strength and try to demolish it by saying she's not an effective leader." >> she supported regime change in iraq and afghanistan. >> he will ask the question of steve -- >> doubled down in afghanistan. >> if he's the nominee, he'll have a version of what steve said. name countries in the world where the united states has better relationships now than before barack obama and hillary clinton took office and he'll say the correct answers are cuba and iran. and that answer will not play particularly well in certain parts of the country. >> hmm. well, i think this has been argue t argument all along but he has got to get a team and he's got to get some names standing by his side that make people feel more confident than "i talk to myself. and i have a great brain." i mean, this is incredibly dire
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situation around the globe that call for very specific language. >> no doubt it's time to start bringing people around him. again, as mark reported yesterday and we're hearing, he's starting to reach out and call a lot of people. we'll see if that continues. kristen, the question is from what you have heard and people you know in washington, d.c., republicans, do you get a sense that at some point the republican establishment and rank-and-file republicans are going to line up behind donald trump if he is their only chance to beat hillary clinton? >> i think we're still way too far off from knowing because i think at this point the math has it that if donald trump was going to get enough delegates to walk into a convention with that 1,237 locked up it wouldn't even happen at this point until june most likely. so we've got a long way to go
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for people to decide if they want to accept trump as their new overlord or if they hold out hope something will happen at a convention where trump comes in with less than that majority and therefore in subsequent rounds of balloting you wind up with a situation where you have a cruz/kasich ticket. i think as long as there is still -- as long as people are saying -- you're still saying there's a chance. you'll see a lot of republicans hesitant to jump on the trump train unless they are somebody like say a chris christie where there's no political down side to doing so or a rick scott where there's really no political down side to him for doing so. for folks that i think have a longer career left in republican politics, who want to perhaps one for things in the future, who view trump as potentially very risky train to get on board with and are worried about potentially damaging their own reputation over the long term, i'm talking like decades that they view themselves as being in politics, they may choose to stay never trump, try to sit
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this out and wait as long as possible before deciding if they're in or they're out. >> kristen soltis-anderson, thank you. still ahead on "morning joe," president obama has drawn battle lines after putting forth merrick garland as his nominee for the next supreme court justice. up next, white house chief of staff denis mcdonough joins us to explain how we'll get time through a less-than-enthusiastic senate. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. we got another one. i have an orc-o-gram for an "owen." that's me.
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>> thank you, the mr. president. this is the greatest honor of my life other than lynn agreeing to marry me 28 years ago. as my parents taught me by both words and deeds, a life of public service is as much a gift to the person who serves as it is to those his serving. >> out of courtesy and respect i will be meeting with him if he wants to meet with me but i will clearly explain to him that i believe that the people should
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be weighing in on the november election before a confirmation process goes forward. >> wow, interesting to see those two soundbites back to back. this morning, reaction is pouring in from both sides of the aisle following president obama's nomination of judge merrick garland to the supreme court. a handful of republicans, many of whom up for reelection like kelly ayotte say they are open to considering or at least meeting with garland. others, like senator roy blunt said "i can barely schedule a call with my son's math teacher so probably no." >> oh, my god. >> really? joining us now from the wuss, president oba -- the white house, president obama's chief of staff, denis mcdonough. >> have you been able to schedule calls with your children's math teachers? have you had time to do this? >> we always make time for our kids' teachers. >> i know you guys have such challenges with these issues.
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>> but you can also somehow manage to do your constitutional duty, right? >> so what's the strategy given that republicans seem to be digging in even on a candidate or nominee that has been chosen that's really i think -- there have been leading republicans who have named this nominee as a good idea. is it to just humiliate them by letting them be themselves? >> thanks for the opportunity to be with you, happy st. patrick's day. our play book for this one is the constitution. when there's a vacancy on the supreme court, the president has the responsibility to nominate someone to fill that vacancy and then the senate has the responsibility to confirm that nomin
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nominee. the president has nominated someone with years of experience, somebody who led the federal response to the terrorism in oklahoma city so we think that this is the right judge for that assignment and we think the senate should meet with them and vote on them because that's what the senate has done for more than 225 years so we hope they do that this time as well. >> have you been actively speaking to chairman grassley and do you believe that he may, in fact, schedule hearings? >> we have been talking to senators throughout the course of the last month since the sad and obviously unexpected death of justice scalia. so we have been working with and talking to senators. i won't characterize where they
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are. we were gratified to see more than a handful of republican senators changing their position agreeing to meet with justice garland which is, frankly, not surprising given the unquestioned excellence and remarkable experience of this amazing judge. so we'll see how this develops over the next several weeks and months but the play book is the constitution. denis, i want to ask you a purely political question. if chairman grassley decides -- changes and decides he wants to hold a hearing and senator mcconnell is against it, do you think he'll be able to overcome senator mcconnell's resistance? >> well, you know, i think there's several conditionals, if in that sentence. so here's what i will say. every judiciary committee chairman over the course of the last several decades has give an hearing in a vote to supreme court nominees. we think that's what this chairman should do and what this
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senate should do. it's a similple question of fairness on top of their constitutional responsibility. we think they should be fair as the president said yesterday and we think at the end of the day they will be. >> steve schmidt? >> chief, good morning. how many calls did you make to republican senators? did the vice president make to republican senators? did the white house counsel make to republican senators seeking their advice about the confirmation, about the nomination of the judge over the period of time between justice scalia's death and yesterday. >> steve, thanks. i couldn't add them up right now. we made a lot of them. on this and other issues and obviously talked about this at length with our friends. i think what's important to point out here, though, is that going back to 2009 when we were confronted with the first vacancy on the supreme court uniformly at that time through
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2010 and up to today republicans and democrats have said to us the judge garland is the kind of nominee they would like to see on the supreme court. so while the president ran an exhaustive process here to come up with a judge of excellence we came back to somebody that has been referenced to us by republicans and democrats is going back to 2009 when we first got here. as you did into the judge's record, you see his temperament as you just showed. you see why we dime that conclusion. >> all right, denis, thank you so much for being with us, denis mcdonough, we appreciate it. >> thanks, guys. let's bring in the moderator of "meet the press" and host of "mtp daily" chuck todd. chuck, how do you think republicans are handling this? >> i think they put themselves in a box by drawing this line in the sand because if mcdonnel somehow caves i think the base
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will go bonkers. i think it only would feed the notion that donald trump has been exploiting which is the leaders in washington don't fight, they're out of touch, all of that. at the same time, this has put kelly ayotte, pat toomey, mark kirk, rob portman, all of these swing state republican senators running for reelection in an awkward spot because they have to sit here and, look, you have to give the white house credit. i think a lot of people didn't think they would do garland because garland isn't fighting up the democratic base. garland isn't an identity politics pick that will galvanize a specific group or be used as a way to get out the vote or something like that. he went purely for the pick that would make republicans most uncomfortable. >> i'm just wondering how limited they are in their thinking, these republicans that you listed, chuck.
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because their options are to look at someone that on paper they could be open to. or to wait it out and to force president obama going against the constitution which i've heard they like, to wait it out and see who hillary clinton or donald trump picks. i mean, i'm sorry, it defies logic. >> did you see what pat toomey said yesterday? >> it seems like the word "stupid" could be used here -- with respect. they're not being smart. >> did you see what pat toomey said? >> what did he say? >> he would probably consider and possibly vote to confirm judge garland next year. >> oh, okay. cool. >> so it seems to me mitch mcconnell coming out of this quickly as they did. steve schmidt calling them up saying we won't provide hearings, he has actually boxed them into a position where three months from now if kelly ayotte,
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rob portman, pat toomey, other -- ron johnson, other people in swing states are saying i'm getting killed back at home. even if we vote him down, we have to have hearings. it seems that escape route was cut off and i haven't understood the logic of the republican party from day one. from the instant scalia died to immediately go oh, we're not going to -- why don't they slow roll it. why don't they let the process play out and have the vote even if they vote him down? >> good question. mitch mcconnell's knee-jerk response after justice scalia's death is a public relations debacle for the republican party and as chuck pointed out, you look about these republican senators in contested races and democratic states and marginal seats, mitch mcconnell has put them in a more difficult position by orders of magnitude than anything that donald trump has done.
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this is a real issue in all of these states and there are four ways to derail a supreme court justice nomination you can do it ideologically, you can do it through an ethics prism, you can do it through a qualifications aspect but you can do it through process that there are violations of process on the senate's role to advise and consent. there are many, many opportunities to say, hey, we'll give all due consideration to the judge and to derail it slowly over time to do in the bad faith, that's the nature of politics. there's really no person in american politics who has more politicized the supreme court in the confirmation process than joe biden has over the last 20 years so, you know, there's not a lot of sympathy on the hard ball politics side of this but mitch mcconnell put republicans in extremely tough position with regard to this confirmation.
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>> chuck, let's talk about -- more about chuck grassley, the chairman of the judiciary who remains the key to this. >> i agree. >> tonight on "with all due respect" we'll have patti judge, the former lieutenant governor of the state who will run as a democrat against grassley. what will it take for her, the "des moines register" and other voices in the state to pressure grassley to change his mind which i think, again, is the key to the whole thing. >> apoll that shows grassley under 50 against patti judge. we've seen -- chuck grassley is somebody that listens to his constituents. in 2009, chuck grassley and orrin hatch were working with the white house, were talking about health care, were -- he was part of that working group with max baucus of a bunch of republicans that were working in good faith on a health care bill. then grassley saw what was going to happen to him at home, experienced the town halls, saw that he'd probably get primaried and lose, saw where republican primary voters were.
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he was up in '10, he listened to his constituents and he backed away from health care. the point is that i think he is -- he will listen to iowa constituents before mitch mcconnell every day of the week, that's the chuck grassley way. so you show -- if there's a poll that shows chuck grassley in trouble because of this, he's going to hold hearings. >> all right, chuck todd, thank you very much. just ahead, if hillary clinton wants to beat donald trump in november, does she need to stop acting like a politician? we'll talk about joe klein's provocative new "time" magazine column ahead. which allergy? eees. bees? eese. trees? eese. xerox helps hospitals use electronic health records so doctors provide more personalized care. cheese? cheese! patient care can work better. with xerox. that's it. how was your commute?
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♪ we can't let you download... uh, no thanks. i have x1 from xfinity so... don't fall for directv. xfinity lets you download your shows from anywhere. i used to like that song. washington, d.c.'s metro service resumed service after an emergency one-day shutdown for safety inspections. top officials met with the metro and the "washington post" is reporting the shutdown was necessary and that three of the problems discovered during the course of the day were "show stoppers" that required immediate repair. no subway meant d.c.-area highways were packed with slow-moving traffic during rush hour yesterday as hundreds of thousands of commuters, visitors, and residents were forced to search for alternative means of transportation. perhaps the only winner
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yesterday was ride-hailing app uber which saw a 70% spike in down loads in the d.c. area. the company offered a $20 credit to users during their first ride and capped surge pricing at 3.9 times the normal fair. coming up next, apple ceo tim cook makes his case against the obama administration and the white house is trying to pressure him into making it easier for the government to open a phone belonging to one of the san bernardino shooters. we have "time" magazine's nancy gibb. she spoke exclusively with apple's yeceo. that's coming up next on "morning joe." accelerating innovation. accelerating next. hewlett packard enterprise.
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decade after decade of innovation, inspiration and wonder. so, we say thank you america for a century of trust, for the privilege of flying higher and higher, together. ♪ 40 past the hour, joining us now, editor of "time" magazine nancy gibbs near reveal their cover story, which is the exclusive interview with apple ceo tim cook. really important story. i think a lot of people think it's pretty basic and there's one side to it. it's probably more complicated than that in this interview.
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>> that's why we wanted to talk to him. lev grossman and i went out. it seems so obvious, there's a terrorist's iphone that could be unlocked, we learned something, why on earth -- >> wouldn't they hand it over? >> the most admired company in the country, why would they pick a fight with the fbi over this. the more you look at it and listen to him and people who agree with him the more you realize this is a much more complex issue. >> explain to viewers why it's more complex. >> because if it's about law enforcement, the fbi is on very solid grounds. we have 200 years of law that says you're allowed to people e search people's homes, cars, whatever. why should a phone be any different? the point cook and others make is this is about security. apple didn't invent encryption, they don't own encryption but the fact that we carry around so much information about ourselves, health, finances, where our children are on our phones is to give away that security, that privacy is a huge thing in this age. we've created databases about
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ourselves that didn't exist ten years ago. >> so are they saying if we create a back door to this terrorist cell phone and if information in there, we're also creating a back door for hackers to get into your bank accounts, get into your personal information, to know where you and your family are moving? >> you can't create a back door that only the good guys can use. once it exists, it exists and it will be out in the wild essentially and so people are trying to hack apple all the time and people like michael hayden who knows the cyber security threat as well as anyone comes down in favor of apple on this which is very surprising. even people like lindsey graham who started out thinking apple was wrong, the more looking into this comes to the other side. it's a more complex issue with higher stakes and so cook's main point is having a single judge and a single court looking at a single case, setting a precedent that has such high stakes is not how something like this should be decided. this should be something congress actually passes a law
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about. >> steve? >> is there a more narrow scope and ability to look at this particular terrorist phone to see if there are other operating cells in the united states without opening the door writ large that we're worried about that you're discussing today? is there no proportionality that can be brought to this case? >> that's a good question and the fbi is saying this is just about one phone, one case. what apple is saying this is not a matter of "we have a key to this phone, we hand over, you unlock it, you give it back, we're done." they have to write a new operating system that would allow the fbi to get into this phone. that's a very different thing. everything that is available and accessible, apple has already turned over to the fbi about this phone. to create a new operating system that would allow the fbi to get into it, there are other -- you know, the d.a. in new york has 175 phones from other cases that he is just waiting to have apple have to unlock as well.
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so there are understandably if your job is law enforcement, if you're jim comey or anyone else you want to be able to get into these phones. the question is, is it in everyone else's interest to weaken the security of these devices. and that's -- it's not a privacy versus security so much as it is law enforcement's needs to try to solve a crime versus the security of people who are trying to prevent bad things from happening. >> mark halperin. >> tim cook is a patriots and businessman and has a responsibility to his share holers. is he doing this because his shareholders want it? is he doing it to protect his business? is he doing it because he believes in a higher principle? >> does it have to be one of those? >> it can be both. >> there's no question apple has been very successful, that secrecy is apple's product. it's very much part of what they're identified with and they have enormous stakes outside of the u.s., too. 25% of apple's iphones are sold in china. so there's no question that there are huge commercial
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implications to this. but every other major tech company pretty much from facebook and twitter and microsoft all have weighed in on apple's side so it's not -- and they are -- including apple's competitors. >> do you think he thinks it would hurt his bottom line if he gave in? >> he talks, at least, like a man with a mission and this is not to say that he is not also protecting his shareholders but what was so interesting talking to him is to hear where he was most passionate and clearly most invested and i think he feels like this is not a soundbite conversation. these are -- the stakes of this conversation are enormously high because of the power of these devices and so we have to be having a more sophisticated nuanced conversation than you can have when it's one quick soundbite. >> so, joe klein wrote a provocative piece in "time" and says "to take out donald trump, hillary clinton must first stop acting like a politician" and he
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writes this of stopping donald trump. "clinton seems particularly ill equipped for the task. worse, she's the human embodiment of the establishment that trump has been running against." >> hiss -- he makes an interesting point that it's okay to lie, you can't temperize. when hillary clinton changes a position about the keystone pipeline or tpp it plays into the notion that you don't know what she believes, that politicians will say anything to get elected, all of the arguments about inauthenticity and temp heerizing 245 this election season is putting a high price. >> so his lying is authentic and hers isn't? >> i think people -- and you have explored this a great deal -- whether it's bernie sanders or donald trump, the candidates who are not talking in the way politicians traditionally have. who are saying things that you quote/unquote can't say and survive and yet they are is
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changing the nature of the political dialogue so completely. i don't know whether four years from now or eight years from now any of what we're seeing and learning now will apply, but right now in this atmosphere the way hillary clinton talks does not work in her favor when voters are looking for something that sounds very, very different. >> to somebody not "bought." ish the new issue of "time" is out right now. still ahead, louis keeps austin weird. very weird. his dispatch from south by southwest. stay with us. scale up. microsoft cloud changes our world dramatically. it wasn't too long ago it would take two weeks to sequence and analyze a genome. now, we can do a hundred per day. with the microsoft cloud we don't have to build server rooms. we have instant scale. the microsoft cloud is helping us to re-build
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work with our young people all over the world, not as president, i will not run for president. no. no. not going to do it. hey, and here is one of the reasons -- >> that was first lady michelle obama speaking at south by southwest yesterday, the festival is in full swing in austin, texas, it's been 30 years since it began and lewisburg do remember of is keeping it weird. >> in 1987 south by southwest music festival was founded right here in austin, texas, 30 years later the international festival showcases the biggest names in film, tech and of course music. we came here to see what it's
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all about. ♪ we thought wouldn't it be great to invite those people to aus be and the business and maybe 300 will show up and we will have some bands play and we will see what happens. >> this is our first time so lots of things are bound to go wrong, but you are there with us learning as we go along. >> over the next decade south by southwest took on a life of its own. capturing the attention of the music industry on a global scale. >> tonight in nigeria -- >> flash forward to 1994, perhaps the most pivotal year in the festival's history. >> johnny cash uses south to relaunch his career. >> i wanted first to do some songs from my new album.
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♪ to be free in addition to the man in black that same year the film and interactive portions of the festival were born. one of the early pioneers richard linklater. >> 23 years ago nick barbaroe got up on a stool and read off a crinkled piece of paper the award winners in a lobby of the theater. it was so like first year festival. >> every year it just gets bigger and bigger and cooler and cooler. i used to think i was doing rick a favor coming here and now it's like i'm lucky to get in. >> great thing about austin is this dynamic cultural mash up of hugely talented people, whether it's art or food or government or high tech. >> it's one of those great american cities that feels like a town and a city at the same time. >> yeah, i love this town. >> it's just got a good vibe. >> women making media that matters, we are so about that. >> i think this is a really good city to showcase the talent
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around the world. >> our country, the way things are going right now, people need more elements like this in their life. >> it started from just a little bitty gig to -- to the president giving a speech here. >> south by southwest brings together people who are at the cutting edge. >> he's kind of i think really showing us it's as much a tech fest as it is a film fest or a music fest. and whenever the new thing that will happen in our society is going to be it's going to be here first. >> this year's festival is larger than ever with thousands of musical acts and hundreds of films, but despite its evolution its essence remains the same. >> this town has always been a place of art is first. >> austin is a place where you can be as weird as you want and no one cares. >> everywhere else there is total chaos and austin seems to be a city of love, man. >> austin is like a love of weirdoes, walk down south congress you will see it. it's great. >> keep it weird. whatever your weird may be, nobody is judging you for it, man.
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>> no matter what you're about, come here and be passionate about it and be authentic and austin will embrace you. >> party town, man. isn't that a crazy town? >> you're head there had and you know you are. >> it is a great town. >> we will talk more about that later, but you are going to austin even weirder this weekend. >> austin, what a town. >> incredible place. and they have -- they have great music, great food, great people, pretty much great everything. even the airport is good. >> wow. >> such an eclectic mix, too, steve schmidt, everything combined in one. >> hands down one of the great cities in the country, great university, as mark said the food is great, the music is great, it's an awesome place. >> still ahead on "morning joe," which donald trump will we see today? the one reaching out to party leaders to prevent a nasty break up or the one who predicts riots if he loses the nomination at a contested convention? we will try to figure that out
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it was an exciting night for the donald, followed by an early morning phone call about foreign policy to the gang at "morning joe." >> since we have some dire foreign policy issues percolating around the world right now, who are you consulting with consistently so that you're ready on day one? >> i'm speaking with myself, number one, because i have a very good brain and i've said a lot of things. i know what i'm doing and i listen to a lot of people, i talk to a lot of people and at the appropriate time i will tell you who the people are, but i speak to a lot of people.
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my primary consultant is myself. >> you know, why do i get the idea when it comes time to pick a running mate he's going to pick himself for that? >> it's very interesting, the second that happened. >> yes. >> we all looked at each other and said that could be the quote of the campaign. >> in realtime. >> realtime. >> and he meant it. good morning, it's thursday, march 17th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set we have managing editor of bloomberg politics mark halperin, chris jansing and in washington republican pollster and columnist at the washington examiner kristen soltis anderson. >> mark, following up on that, though, the joke was that he just talks to himself and that was a punch line. it's very interesting what you were talk being yesterday morning, what you first reported on we all started to hear rumblings about. there is a real outreach to republicans now from trump. he's starting to aggressively go
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after any and all republicans. he believes it is time to seek peace with the republican party. >> he's doing the smart things that any outsider becoming the nominee of the party would do. he's reaching out to the old bulls in the party, people like orrin hatch and others who he hasn't needed up until now. i mean, normally you try to become the republican nominee, you would be reaching out to these people for months, but he's doing it now. not all of them are going to be won over but a lot of them are saying, look, this guy is likely to be his nominee, let's make peace with this. as we all know he can be charming. on those calls now he's coming from a great position of strength, he's reaching out and as i understand it a lot of them are being, you know, very accommodating, very willing to hear what he has to say. >> and we had willie early in the campaign when hillary clinton was pressed, why did you go to his wedding? she was like, he's a fun guy. that's the thing. you know, we've known him for ten years on and off and
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everybody, whether it's hillary clinton or you or us or anybody in new york, he is a -- one-on-one he is a charming guy. >> the life of the party. >> yeah. always at the center and always telling you that you're great. it's very interesting. when he is in front of a microphone he will say immigrate, but when he is a party, willie, your book, the greatest book ever written. and people don't -- it was the greatest. his first book was the greatest book. >> i was waiting for that part. >> it was. no. it is one of the things where people say, well, how could that guy get one-on-one with republicans and pull them over? because when he's off camera he's just the opposite in many ways as when he's on camera, the charm comes on. >> he is charming, i just wonder if charm is enough to win over as you call them some of the old bulls who have come out publicly and said that he's a disgrace and that this guy cannot be the standard bearer for our party. do they get in line with him
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because they think he would be a good president or do they get in line with him to the extent they are because there there is no alternative to him. i think the feeling was now that john kasich was in that they would get behind kasich and support his run. >> i continue to be he is an undervalued stock here. look, he is at fourth most likely next president of the united states right now, john kasich. >> kasich. >> but the second most likely -- >> you said he was scattered, though. that looked like a scattered speech. it looked like you were being polite. >> trump or kasich? >> john kasich. >> he got a great reception yesterday in pennsylvania, very crowded town hall but he didn't really seize the moment. going back to trump he is the first or second most likely president of the united states and if you are a republican, even if you oppose him on some level you have to acknowledge he is most likely to be your nominee. i mean, we all can imagine exactly what he's saying in these calls and it's intoxicating for a lot of these
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people. it's the first real conversation most of them have ever had with donald trump, most likely their nominee. >> you go back to your home state of florida, joe, right. >> right. >> anti-trump forces spent five, six times what he spent there. >> oh, my god. >> look what it got them. >> $20 million. >> there is a reality check for a lot of republicans. >> if you are rick scott and this is what a lot of other people are starting to look at, they don't like him in washington, d.c., they loved marco in washington, d.c., but you go to a state like florida, the guy is winning by 20 points and florida politicians see that he wins every -- every county except one, he wins 66 out of 67 counties in florida, then suddenly they're going, wait, that may not be a risky bet after all. do i want mitch mcconnell campaigning with me in bar toe, florida, or do i want donald trump? that's easy. and i think we're going to start to see, mika, a remarkable amount of rationalization.
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i talked to alex burns with the "new york times" yesterday, he's going to be coming later on today, but i think we're going to see a tremendous amount of rationalizing over the next two to three weeks because right now everybody is going to start getting in line because trump has no infrastructure. there's nobody around him. and so that presents opportunity for a washington consulting class that's never been shut out like this before. >> it's a very complicated conversation. i mean, even to hear several of you say he is charming, you put that -- you just isolate that and you could literally launch an avalanche of criticism from people in the media, from women's groups, from muslim organizations because he has said some horrible things. >> but notice, mika, we said charming off camera. charming away from the microphone and that is -- >> it's still a complicated conversation. >> that is one of the really great ironies.
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>> that's not true. >> what's to true? >> i think some of the things have been said in front of the microphone. >> no, mika, that's what i'm saying, give the man a microphone and camera and there's nothing charming about him. >> okay. >> okay. have him go to events around new york like we have all gone to and suddenly it's like hillary clinton said, he's charming, he's nice, he's likeable and hillary said in our interview she doesn't recognize the donald trump that's running for president right now. >> right. it's very complicated. it should be interesting, but i think the falling in line will be fascinating, too, because those private conversations then these republicans are going to have to explain publicly and i think this is going to be very challenging for them. >> i think it's going to be hard. >> when it comes to the republican race for president of course if there's no donald trump there is no debate. next week's republican debate in utah was officially called off yesterday after two of the three remaining candidates said they wouldn't be there. fox news confirmed the
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cancellation in a statement writing in part, quote, obviously there needs to be more than one participant so the salt lake city debate is canceled. trump cited a prior commitment for not doing the debate, he will be doing a big speech before the israel lobby group apac on the same day. the kasich campaign said without trump they wouldn't be there, either. senator ted cruz used the opportunity to attack trump, calling him ducking donalded on twitter. it's just not going to work the same way. >> no. lying ted has more of a read to it, just kind of flows. >> cruz challenged trump to meet him in washington. >> you have to be careful, also how you say that. >> his excuse is silliness and it reflects his assumption that he thinks the voters can't figure out that he's not telling them the truth. listen, apac would have allowed him to speak at any time, it's a multi-day conference. he chose to speak right in the
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middle of the sedate because he's scared to sedate. he looks down on the voters, thinks they're gullible and will believe whatever he's saying. i will be in d.c. for apac as well, i'm happy to debate him there. >> so cruz said at this point -- actually we were trying to figure out why he went after megyn kelly. you have to make peace. i guess he doesn't feel like he has to make peace with megyn kelly or fox, that he's just not go to debate again. >> if i were donald trump i don't know that i would make a different decision. at this point there is not a lot of polling coming out of the upcoming states, but you have arizona is one of the next ones op docket where he has the endorsements of sheriff joe and former governor jan brewer. if you are donald trump you don't want to disturb the equilibrium in the race that has you on the best path right now to 1,237 delegates. and there's something he has been saying in interviews recently that i think a lot of voters might agree with which is how many times are you going to ask us all the same questions.
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one of the problems is that a lot of these debates are not illuminated a lot of new things. we saw the same exchange between ted cruz and marco rubio over immigration over and over again. i think there are really important questions that need to be asked of donald trump and i think fox news when they've hosted these debates whether it was chris wallace bringing up graphics to contradict things that trump was saying or those video clips that megyn kelly introduced to hold rubio and cruz's feet to the fire, i think fox has introduced new questions but generally i think trump will find a sympathetic audience when he says i don't know that these debates are adding anything to the table, i'm done with them. >> there have been so many and it just hasn't really moved the meter for him. why would he bother? >> yesterday trump warned of potentially bad things happening if he gets to the convention with the most delegates and is not nominated. >> i think we'll win before getting to the convention, but i can tell you if we didn't and if we're 20 votes short or if we're -- if we're, you know, 100
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short and we're at 1,100 and somebody else is at 500 or 400, because we're way ahead of everybody, i don't think you can say that we don't get it automatically. i think it would be -- i think you would have riots. i think you'd have riots. i think bad things would happen. i really do. i believe it. i wouldn't lead it, but i think bad things would happen. >> meanwhile donald trump is once again training his attacks on hillary clinton. suggesting she is not tough enough to face russian president vladimir putin. he made his point in a new video posted to instagram with the caption, is this what we want for a president? ♪ [ barking ] [ laughter ] >> are you going to go scorched earth on hillary clinton? are you going to get into all the personal stuff with her and her husband and the scandals? are you going to do all that?
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>> i think i'd rather not say now, it's a little bit early, i want to get it first. we had one little run in about two months ago and i helped bernie a lot because frankly her numbers came down very big after that, but that was my only real confrontation with her. we're going to see what happens, but whatever it is, it is, i will do what i have to do. >> so, you know, we were thinking that he might rest when he got off the campaign trail. he had a very busy day yesterday. canceling debates, attacking hillary clinton, you name it. talking about riots if he's not nominated. once again driving the entire news day while, as mark said, he was lounging at home in his barcolounger. >> hillary clinton in her speech tuesday night turned to look to donald trump, his was that instagram post that had her out barking. >> which in context was really funny and real and --
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>> you mean what hillary did. >> yeah. >> to answer bill o'reilly's request he is donald trump going to go personal on hillary clinton? yes. yes, he is and he introduce it had a month or so ago, he spent a week or so doing it, it tied the clinton campaign in knots, they didn't know how to answer, bill clinton had to deflect questions on rope lines. it will be interesting to see how they handle that stuff. >> lying ted, little marco, low energy jeb and he's also, mark halperin, started -- we can expect a lot more of this, the low energy attack on hillary clinton as well. but you were commenting yesterday on don rickles, what about don rickles, you said we always wanted to know what a day off the campaign trail would look like for donald trump. it seemed he consumed media by doing four very provocative things that if any other candidate had done one of those provocative things it would have made headlines and filled up their basically news quota for
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the week. >> he got dressed to do the bill o'reilly video, but everything else he did, the video and morning shows by phone and twitter, just another show of how he can dominate a day without leaving manhattan or leaving trump tower. monday will be a big day when he does that apac speech that he's doing instead of the debate because hillary clinton is speaking to the same group. while both of them are in nomination fights it will be a side-by-side comparison in a forum that you wouldn't think would necessarily play to his strength and i'm pretty can have it dent she's going to try to give a speech to frame the general election not just on issues related to israel but on the question of who is ready to be commander in chief. it's going to be fascinating to see what kind of speech he gives head to head. >> yeah. i'm looking ahead to the speech to apac but also how they respond, chris, to his speech. i haven't ever heard him go incredibly deep on these issues.
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i don't know how he does a speech like that and kind of keeps it light and says believe me. >> i was talking to people in the campaign yesterday and they feel obviously pretty confident about this area at least of the competition where it's more difficult is when you talk about this other stuff like the ad we just saw. if you are the traditional campaign and if you are us, people who have been through many campaigns and you can look ahead normally and you you can say, so what are going to be the areas of attack and you can pre prepare for what you think the areas of attack are going to be, with donald trump it's almost impossible to calculate where he might go because he goes to places where people have never gone before and so it's almost inevitable that they are going to find themselves back on their heels. so apac i think is a great opportunity for her because it's an area where she feels incredibly competent, they feel that they are way ahead of him by miles and miles and miles, and they can sort of set the agenda. how many other times in this campaign have you seen anybody
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but donald trump set the agenda? >> still ahead on "morning joe," the quotable john kasich. did he miss a big opportunity after a big win in ohio? plus with work slowing to a crawl for march madness renewed concerns about how the ncaa treats its student athletes. that make colleges and the ncaa millions but is what they get in return enough? ♪ ♪ ♪ for your retirement, you want to celebrate the little things, because they're big to you. and that is why you invest. the best returns aren't just measured in dollars. td ameritrade®.
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so yesterday on the wonderful program that airs here on msnbc. >> is that with all due respect. >> mark halperin and john heilemann, they put together clips of governor john kasich of ohio appearing outside of ohio
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at villanova university. >> a chance to demand the stage after his dramatic win. >> it's a lot of fun, he covers a lot of ground and he lived up to that. >> maybe i should tell you a little story. >> march madness. >> this wall street thing. gangs. i don't mean this is some political gibberish here. the mailman and the mailman's wife. we went from the smaller tie ran sour russ rex to the big one, did you read the story about this? student debt. steelers tickets. don't you like the protest? i love it. that's where superman changed his clothes. some dig god darn institution that's headquartered in new york. ben and jerry's free for one whole year. i said, sir, you've lived here your whole light life. he said not yet. president nixon. daddy, can you give us more snow days? i said why are you asking me? because you're the governor,
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john, dad. >> life is simple when you keep it simple. sincerely, john kasich. >> my colleague matt negrin put that together. >> your bigger point was, though, and john heilemann also said the same thing, he had a great opportunity yesterday out on the road by himself to make big headlines, grab media attention, but you suggested that the speech was unfocused and he didn't take his opportunity and he doesn't have a whole lot of chances to take that opportunity. >> the crowd loved him. i was surprised he didn't try to make a big point about the election to say i'm the governor of ohio, there's five candidates left in this race, i am the one who is ready to be president. he said it, but again, as you saw, a lot of his rhetoric was typical john kasich. that's what he's like, that's his personality, but i was surprised. only guy with a campaign event yesterday, big battle ground state, big moment and i wouldn't say necessarily he seized the moment. >> his speech after the ohio victory was also --
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>> a little rambling. >> it seemed to be unfocused given the time and the moment. >> he still has time but i'm not sure he took full advantage of it yesterday. >> kristen soltis, for republicans that are looking for an establishment candidate the concern of john kasich has always been that he's not quite as focused a politician as he should be, right? >> i think there's a couple of concerns about john kasich. one, you have some folks who consider themselves very conservative who would prefer ted cruz over john kasich as the alternative to trump because he view things like his expansion of medicaid in the state of ohio as being an athema to obamacare. there are a lot of folks who view john kasich as as much of a nonstarter as they view donald trump. you have a lot of folks who are saying, look, he is the governor of ohio, that's a big state, at least forcing democrats to play defense in ohio would really be
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powerful on the electoral map and frankly when i hear him talk about issues, things like gay rights, et cetera, i mean, he both has this kind of blue collar vibe to him, but also talks about some of these issues where i think republicans are, you know, struggling to adapt to the future in a way that i think could potentially be a path forward. so, you know, john kasich it's going to be fascinating to watch because he's got these two factions of the nontrump party that he's going to be trying to go for, but i think the hard core conservatives may be lost to him. are there enough of the establishment republicans who are never trump, who are not sort of warming to donald trump or going through the acceptance stage of grief at this point that he can piece together enough delegates to play in a contested convention. coming up on "morning joe" it's full speed ahead for bernie sanders, but after a surprisingly bad string of elections are there signs his campaign is losing steam? we'll ask that question straight ahead on "morning joe."
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of course republicans don't like calling it a brokered convention, they have a much nicer name. >> from an rnc perspective we are going to prepare for all contingencies calling an open convention. >> i think it's an open convention. >> we could have an open convention. >> not brokered just like open, just like, honey, we don't have a broken marriage we have an
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open marriage and i know we never discussed it, but it will spice things up to bring in an outsider and i think we will end up trusting each other even more. >> oh, wow. let's bring into the conversation author columnist and political analyst jeff greenfield, "the new york times" political reporter alex burns and steve schmidt is back if us as well. >> all right. alex, we've been talking about what the republican party is going to do. based on your reporting obviously everybody is sort of dancing around each other now trying to figure out what the next move it. what are they hearing? >> they are caught between i don't want to say a rock and a hard place but this race has eluded a final definition and they are in this tricky middle zone where trump has not fully locked down the nomination, he hasn't totally put to rest about his concerns or anything close, but at the same time he is not so weak that it's clear he could be stopped. we are in a week of hand ringing where folks are trying to
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determine keg blocked from that 1,237 mark or is it worth doing if he gets close enough. >> is it remarkable how as a republican establishingment, they just haven't gotten trump from the beginning. last week they're sitting around saying we're going to spin -- but nothing is ever coordinated, nothing seems to be organized and it seems like they have been keystone cops shooting at each other. >> he clearly -- it clearly bothers trump that he has been laughed at and dismissed and played down but in a way it has been the biggest gift to his campaign that he was not taken serious for months. if there had been an organized effort starting last july to drive a stake in this campaign it could have been a lot more difficult for him. but at this point after he has been indulged and validated it's a little tough -- >> he has become part of the momentum. jeff greenfield, it seems like that might have been the biggest offense in the stop trump movement is those who did not get where the people were and
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his potential from the beginning. >> i think it's two things. i think the second point is very valid, the idea that he was a joke, remember what jon stewart called him which we can't say on this air that he was a figure of fun and the fact that he was tapping into something that kind of people knew when the abstract was out there, this anger, this discontent, but the second thing is to some extent it's a little like john mccain's position in '08, there were so many people fighting for that other piece of the pie that mccain was able to win, what, south carolina and florida and then the winner take all states with plurality, wrapped up the nomination. so i think it's two things. i think it's the bigger issue that he was speaking for a constituency that had no voice and the fact that, you know, the rest of them spent all their waking moments fighting each other. >> steve schmidt, no republican, no conservative is going to want donald trump to be compared to ronald reagan, but alex hit on it, as did jeff, the one thing
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they both have in common their greatest gift perhaps politically, the ability to be underrated, the ability to be mocked, the ability to be writ ku ridiculed, i remember 20 years ago reading an article about pat brown laughing at ronald reagan in 1966 all the way through the campaign and the last scene was iconic, pat brown goes up to the microphone after reagan whipped his ass and one of the most successful governors in california history, they said he just mumbled into the microphone and just stepped off the front of the stage and just stumbled through the crowd and walked out into the night. and that happened because reagan was seen as a joke, trump has snuck up on everybody because they played him as a joke. >> presuming that donald trump is the republican nominee incredibly this will all start again. we will go back to square one where everybody will say donald trump has no capacity, no
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ability, no chance to beat hillary clinton. >> david pluf actually -- >> you saw david pluf. >> i did. >> saying that he's nervous. >> david is brilliant and i think he is an outlier here, but the conventional wisdom will be that he has no chance against hillary clinton, but go through this exercise, what state does ted cruz win that mitt romney and john mccain lost? >> there is not one. >> not one. what state does john kasich win that mitt romney or john mccain lost. >> ohio. >> probably ohio. and marco rubio you might have been able to make the argument for florida, but of course he was resoundingly defeated by donald trump there. donald trump puts michigan into play, puts ohio into play, puts pennsylvania into play, puts wisconsin into play. he puts all these states through the industrial midwest into play, he has the capacity to pick up democratic voters. >> right. >> union voters and he also has the capacity, i think, to attract african-american votes. i said this on the show not long
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ago. people went nuts over it on twitter and then tavis smiley came out and said i think donald trump could do very well with african-american voters. >> i was surprised when al sharpton said the same thing, not well but do better. of course, when you are only getting 5% of the african-american vote -- >> doing 10 to 15% is a game changer. >> so do you guys agree that trump changes the electoral map at least in industrial midwest. >> absolutely. >> of course he does. the point is it's the unpredictability. >> right. >> you can also see him bleeding suburban pennsylvanians outside of philly. it's just the fact that i think i've said it yesterday, i'm seeing billboards all over pennsylvania and ohio with hillary clinton's quote we're going to put a lot of coal miners out of work. and the point that you have raised and i raised yesterday do we think trump is going to let himself be called a mess oj nis without turning to hillary clinton and saying can we review that record i think. >> i think he changes the map in a lot of ways, maybe he brings in these states where he's
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motivating the blue cal lar vote, puts in play states like georgia or minnesota where he is going to lose those upper income or middle income suburban white voters who have not voted for him at all in these primaries. >> georgia is one of those states, we think of it as the deep south, but georgia is tipping closer and closer, the hispanic population is going up, the black population obviously pretty high for a southern state. georgia does come into play. arizona does come into play, states like new mexico and nevada that republicans would like to pick up. those states come into play on the other side of it. >> and georgia the closest state in the 2012 election that was not heavily contested by either party was a single digit race even though we think of it as sort of in that same category as not quite alabama but certainly south carolina where democrats, you know, give me a break. >> so on the democratic side bernie sanders is vowing to stay in the race for the democratic nomination despite hillary clinton's clean sweep on tuesday. on a call with reporters yesterday sanders' top
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strategist said they still believe they can make up the delegate gap and pointed to upcoming contests where they believe they can start to do so. meanwhile campaign manager jeff weaver also suggested that a sanders exit could actually hurt hillary clinton. he said if sanders were to drop out clinton could expect months and months and months of immediate and vicious and very personal attacks from trump. >> he's going to get those anyway. >> yeah. >> so, alex, bernie sanders finds himself in a position that say a guy like marco rubio didn't find himself. marco had to win states, jeb had to win states to keep the money coming in. bernie doesn't need to do that. >> it's a pretty extraordinary position for a protest candidate to be in that we can say at this point that he's going to be basically unlimited resources, i don't know that he shields hillary clinton from attacks from donald trump. what he does do is present her an opportunity if she chooses to take it to use him as a foil that makes herself look a little more moderate than she is. >> i agree completely.
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joining us from now from sedona, arizona, kasie hunt. kasie, you were on that call we mentioned. what's the sanders strategy going forward? >> hey, mika. well, you guys touched on it right there, they think that the back half of this map favors them. they are not wrong in that all these western states, we are in arizona, you've got hide hoe, utah, washington state late next week all voting and those are places where people are really excited by bernie sanders. they also feel like eventually we're going to get to the point where there's basically one contest every week so the next big one like that is wisconsin. so that's a place where they feel like they can basically park bernie sanders, he can hang out there for, you know, full seven days if you listen to what they said about what happened on this past tuesday, it's that, well, we didn't -- if we had given bernie sanders himself a little more time in missouri, a little more time in illinois we would have been able to push those over the edge, but, you're
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right that the money is what's enabling this and as long as people are continuing to give him small amounts of money there's no telling, you know, when he might get out of this race. really it comes down to the candidate himself, bernie sanders resents the idea that he should be pushed out of the race and the more the clinton people push those buttons i think that's why you're seeing them tread so carefully around him. >> kasie hunt, thank you so much. i agree. if i'm hillary clinton, i love bernie to be the race just to try ang late. listen, we love all of those things that bernie is talking about, that's fantastic, but then strike a more general election tone. >> she didn't get out of the race in 2008 until the end so she can't do anything credibly to push him out of the race. i think it's good for america, it means more larry david on "saturday night live" for at least another couple -- another couple months here, but he has no chance to be the democratic nominee. fanciful that his campaign would go out and say there's a route
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to acquire the requisite number of delegates to be nominated at the convention. he is a protest candidate but he's shaping the direction of the democratic party in some fundamental ways and he keeps her pinned to the ideological left, he's moved her out of the center to the left over the course of the primary and i think in a way that will have consequences in the general election. >> i guess also financially hillary clinton would like to stop spending money right now and start repairing for the fall. >> yeah, but i think that's probably true, but what i'm wondering is whether or not this is an opportunity that i think so far she hasn't taken. that is if she's in a formally contested battle for the nomination it gives her a chance between now and the convention to define herself in a way that maybe doesn't trap her into the ideological left. one thing that i'm curious about, with very few exceptions she hasn't drawn that sharp distinction. one of the few times she did is
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when she wrapped bernie sanders about his naivety about castro. she was saying i'm not being careful here, you are just off base on this. when she says to him these proposals of yours cannot happen. we've got to learn how to govern again for the sake of the people you're talking to, that's an argument that's easier to make if you have an opponent. whether she'll do it, i don't know. >> especially if the two people that are surrounding her are bernie sanders on the left, donald trump on the whatever donald trump is, she can actually sound like the established responsible foreign policy and economic leader. >> the trick is established but not establishment. >> right. >> if you look in those exit polls from these primaries on tuesday you do see that argument breaking through even in the states that were closest a considerably larger share of voters said that her ideas were realistic, haven't said that about bernie sanders. >> established but not establishment. i think somebody ought to take that credit. alex burns, jeff greenfield, thank you very much. still ahead a sea change for
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sea world, ending their orca program. plus a space age design from nike. sara eisen joins us on set for business before the bell next. ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪ ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪
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at chase atms. technology designed for you. so you can easily master the way you bank. all right. we're following a breaking story out of the state department. secretary of state john kerry is expected to announce today his determination that the islamic state is committing genocide against minority groups in iraq and syria. the administration has been under pressure from lawmakers to make that declaration after the deaths of christians, yazidis and other civilians. in an announcement today meets a congressional deadline that the state department said yesterday it would miss. officials tell the "associated press" that the finding will not obligate the u.s. to take additional action against isis, but we'll be following that story throughout the day. let's turn now to business before the bell. sara eisen is here on set. what are you looking at today? >> we're looking at the reaction, good to see you guys on set, to the federal reserve
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meeting yesterday. no change in policy, but is somewhat of a surprise on the note of caution that fed chair janet yellen sounded about the economy. it seems like the fed is really spooked by the market action that we saw in january, worst start to a year ever for the u.s. stock market. she mentioned two big risks facing the u.s. economy, the financial volatility, what's going on with stocks and bonds, and also the international developments. and this is sort of new territory for the fed. usually the fed just looks at the jobs picture in the u.s. and inflation, how fast consumer prices are rising and we have been seeing progress on both of those fronts, but they are worried about what's happening overseas and what's happening in the markets and as a result the fed is forecasting two interest race increases, which is the policy change that some investors are worried about, what that would do to the economy, back in december they were forecasting four. so cautionary and the markets celebrated yesterday, stocks went up because they like easy
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money, they like the fed to be cautious, unclear in that's going to continue, it looks like there's some pressure on stocks this morning. >> also in the headlines sea world making big changes. that i think god we had steve schmidt here. >> an orca expert. >> first the head line. >> under political pressure and financial pressure sea world has announced today that it is no longer going to be breeding orcas. of course, this is very controversial, it was really brought to public attention from black fish the documentary that happened in 2013. we've also seen the financial pain, though, for sea world, it's fortunes have been hit, the stock is down about 50% over the last two years. the public pressure is growing and today they made that announcement. they're going to phase out the entire theatrical show of orcas. >> that's sort of their brand. >> which the ceo writing in an l.a. times op ed said the only reason there is so much public awareness is because of sea world and because they have attracted so many people to look at these orcas. >> steve, you are a born again
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tree hugger on this issue. free willie. >> these aren't just intelligent an shals they're magnificent creatures and should not be held in captivity. this is a good thing that sea world has done today, they should not be bred into captivity. this is a good thing today. >> that's what i was saying. what about nike, any -- is there any sea world or orca connection to the into nike story? >> big tech story with nike finally unveiling these back to the future self-lacing shoes which will be available to the masses later this year, we don't know the price, but there are two buttons i got to try them on yesterday, there is a plus sign and minus sign and it hugs your foot around it with the laces. >> was it comfortable. >> it was comfortable although i was a size 5 1/2 women's and they were men's so it was big on me, but they are making a big
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leap here in terms of technology. is it going to be a game changer for nike like fly net was which has been essential to their process and product. >> we are not going to have had to do anything for ourselves ever. >> americans get lazier and lazier. we are waiting for the self-eating pot pie. >> how does that work? >> don't make me laugh. >> i don't know. we shall see. sara, thank you so much. up next, march madness gets under way today which means you just have a few hours to finish your bracket, but does the massive popularity of a college sports mask a very dark side to the ncaa? we will dig into that when "morning joe" comes right back. is it becoming a better professor by being a more adventurous student? is it one day giving your daughter the opportunity she deserves? is it finally witnessing all the artistic wonders of the natural world? whatever your definition of success is,
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the ncaa men's basketball tournament tips off in just a few hours, mika. >> yes. >> it's really hard to overstate just how big march madness is, it keeps growing every year and last year's tournament set record viewership. >> according to one estimate this week's action could cost up to $4 billion in lost productivity. but there's also a darker side to the hugely popular and highly lucrative world of college sports, that is tackled in the new book indentured, the rebel bonn against the ncc by joe nucerr. we recently sat down with the authors and asked hem though they treat their athletes.
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>> college football and men's basketball players who are the revenue generators and literally bring in billions of dollars for these schools are fundamentally exploited. not only do they not get paid but they don't get a decent education and there are all kinds of rules that restrict their movement, what they can say, what they can do, how many times they can eat at somebody's house. it's absurd. it's an absurd system that really needs to go away. >> you say they make money, the stunning thing that i didn't know until i looked in the book is they make $13 billion a year, the ncaa and who would believe this, makes more money every year than the national football league. >> how is that? >> $13 billion i think the nfl is around $10 billion. so that's how massive this is. and the coaches are making 2, 5, sometimes even $10 million a year, basketball coach at duke
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mike krzyzewski. the chief of staff to the head coach at clemson has a $250,000 salary. there's so much money in the system that the schools and these athletic programs don't know what to do with it and what they ought to do with it is give it to the players. >> joe, how does this institution, the ncaa which is so powerful, continue to pros p err -- prosper? >> a culture got established by a guy named walter beyers. >> he did change his mind after he left. it's a culture that's rules bound, lacks compassion and lacks common sense and nobody has been able to change that culture, nobody has even really tried. so they will have -- you know, the kansas kid this year, he is ineligible for how long, nobody knows why and then suddenly one
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day he's eligible because there's heat. there's no rhyme or reason to what they do and for how it operates. >> and how much money do they make? we talked about the $13 billion, i've seen this before, kid comes to alabama, he plays, he is a hero for three years, his shirt sells, they make millions and millions of dollars off of him, millions, then the senior season his leg snaps in half and he's pumping gas or working at bagging groceries at the pigly wiggly for the rest of his wife. >> tell you a guy from alabama by the time of tyrone prothrow. >> i was at the game when his leg snapped in half. >> a couple weeks before he had made this incredible touchdown catch it was voted the pontiac game changer -- so pontiac gave money to the school. >> great. >> for this great play. tyrone doesn't get any of this money. after he graduates, after he breaks his leg, decides to write a book and he goes to the
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university of alabama and says can i have some photos to use in my book and they said, sure, ten bucks each. >> are you kidding me? >> where is that pontiac life changing moment? >> 10 bucks each and not only that he has had seven, eight, nine, ten leg surgeries and at this point alabama has said we are not going to pay for another one. and the pontiac game changer performance is the idea that players make money on individual plays for their school. so the dichotomy between, you know, an individual player earning money for his play, you know, directly for his play versus what he can't do for himself is sort of staggering. >> and that money of course goes to the school, they don't get any of it. >> let me ask the both of you, why haven't more coaches spoken up about the outrages and the excesses and the hypocrisy of the ncaa? >> the reason is that they're part of the system. that is. nobody has had the nerve until
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bill self at kansas this year to stand up and say, this is wrong. they are afraid, historically they have been terrified of the ncaa. list or kplee the ncaa has been a very vengeful organization that will go after people that criticize it. they did with jerry tar cane yan back in the day that led to a supreme court case. plus a lot of these coaches they want the kids in the dummy classes because they want them to remain eligible and the dummy classes are often held at the time when there is no practice. shane battie the fine basketball player he told me once he was a religion major because religion was the only serious subject he could major in that didn't interfere with practice. >> with schedule. >> with practice. >> you ask about coaches, there is a basketball coach at lsu in the '80s and '90s, perhaps more than anybody he tried to speak out -- >> dale brown. >> dale brown is his name.
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speak out against some of these injustices that he saw. there was a kid on his team who was dying of cancer and there were a couple of players that wanted to go to a fundraiser for his family. the ncaa said no. so he brings them into his office, he shuts the blinds and gives them an envelope full of cash so they can go and visit their dying teammate and dale brown because he discussed some of the things that are wrong with the ncaa was investigated for 15 years of his career. at every turn the ncaa asked his players what is dale doing, how is he breaking the rules? so that's what happens when you sort of cross the system. >> the book indentured the inside story of the rebellion against the ncaa is out now. great book, guys. thank you so much. >> thank you guys. these are the hands that build the machines, the machines that sort, stack and seal. these are the hands
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