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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  March 7, 2017 3:00am-6:01am PST

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e officer who blew the whistle on the matter. and that does it for us on this tuesday. i'm alex witt alongside ayman mohyeldin and louis burgdorf. "morning joe" starts right now. >> a war front in washington. number one, republicans trying to steer clear of the president's wild, erratic and disturbing accusations about president obama ordering the wiretapping of trump tower. number two, president trump finally announces the revamped version of his controversial executive order on immigration looking a lot like the hotly first one. and three, house republicans finally unveil their long promised bill to repeal and replace obama ca. democrats, of course, on board. but some republicans also not happy with it. we'll get to that. and some cutting and pasting of press releases. an exxon press release. cut and paste by the white house. it's tuesday march 7th, another day. welcome to "morning joe." joe has the morning off. with us veteran columnist and
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msnbc contributor mike barnicle. senior political analyst for nbc news and msnbc mark halperin. former communications director for ted cruz's 2016 presidential campaign. and now an msnbc political contributor rick tyler, chair of the department of african-american studies at princeton university, columnist for "time" magazine eddie cloud, jr. in washington columnist and associate editor for "washington post" david ignatius joins us along with washington anchor for bbc world news america katy kay. let's begin. fallout continues from president trump's unconfirmed claim that president obama, quoteh my wires tapped in trump tower with no one inside the white house seeming to understand or appreciate the gravity of the claims. press secretary sean spicer would not reveal president trump's source of information yesterday when defending these saturday morning tweets. >> does the president believe that former president barack
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obama commit add feloted a felo? >> i think the president's tweets speak for themselves. he wants the house intelligence committee to look into this matter to understand what happened during the election. >> when did the president come to believe that president obama wiretapped his phones. >> again, i think the president's tweets speak for themselves. >> so far the most definitive comes from director of national intelligence james clapper who said on "meet the press" sunday that it simply did not happen. >> the part of theecity apparatus i oversaw dni, there was no such wiretap activity mounted against the president-elect at the time as a candidate or against his campaign. i can't speak for other title 3
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authorized entities in the government. >> there is no fisa order. >> not to my knowledge. >> anything at trump tower? >> no. >> david ignatius, i'll start with you and get you on the record here. is there any reason we shouldn't move on from this question of where this came from and why the president did it? >> the president's assertion is out there. he's sticking by it. so we have to think what could he possibly be talking about. we've had a statement that's as hard as it can be from jim clapper that there was no such fisa order, what else is possible. the only thing i can think of it is possible collection of russian, russian agents, incidental collection of people in trump tower who might have been talking to them or in some way conversations among people who were being wiretapped, russians normally followed for intelligence purposes. there was gossip about people they knew in the trump campaign,
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people they talked to at trump tower. people talk a lot. my takeaway, first, this is trump's style. if he was a businessman, and was sued, he would counter-sue. he would counter-claim. so i think we're seeing that going oppose. the other is to be really careful about intelligence material. intelligence pickups raw information. you never know the accuracy of it. people brag about what they have been doing, brag about their contacts. in this period when investigations are going on, the only people that understand this are peopl outside of our world in the intelligence community or looking carefully, we hope, honestly at the information. finally, it will be months from now, drawing conclusions. >> so i have some reporting talking to a few people who are either close to the white house or inside it that the president actually knows he messed up and
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won't admit it, just refuses to admit it. mark halperin, all this while there's infighting on the inner circle. really serious infighting and jo jokeying for jobs. everyone in the inner cad re, bannon down, so busy trying to get their jobs they don't realize rome is burning. >> also a challenge for the administration, a lot of unfilled jobs. a lot in the administration have never worked in the building, some have never been in the building this. president's style is to let them fight it out. the challenge is going to be the big things, the immigration ban, temporary ban and health care l law. the question is given all the distractions, can they move these things forward. i think people are underrating chances to do it but it is still
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a very tough climb. >> katty kay, give me your gut on how europe is looking at this, how leaders around the world are responding. i know you focus -- you have a show that's focused on the first 100 days from the world's point of view. what's the world's point of view right now? >> i think t still a lot of confusion about what is coming out of the administration. they hear different things from different principles. they hear mike pence say one thing that is reassuring to european allies alongside jim mattis and hear the president say something else. like us, mika, they listen to the president's state of the union address to congress in which he talked about nato being a strong alliance and really valued. then something happens like it did over the weekend and that resets everything and people wonder what they can trust. that's also the state americans are in. they are looking at the administration and thinking, well, it might seem normalized for today, for a day or two, and
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something happens like it did on saturday morning and people's confidence in that normality is shaken. one piece of reporting i had, i spoke to a good friend of the president who had seen him twice at mar-a-lago. he said he had never seen the president this angry, chris ruddy. when i asked what evidence he had obama tapped the form or ordered tapping the phone, he gave him no evidence but had confidence about it. he kept reiterating. in the trump team they absolutely believed they were the subject of surveillance. >> some republican members of congress were insistent in order to investigate the president should share what he knows. >> the american people have a right to know on what basis the president of the united states said that his predecessor had broken the law by wiretapping trump towers. >> if the white house does provide more information -- >> the american should demand
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and see what he does. the american people should know on what basis and then we'll see what the basis is. if there's no basis for it, there's no reason for an investigation. >> it's really hard to cross-examine tweets. there's only two ways to be intercepted, one title 3, criminal inquiry, the other is fisa, an intelligence inquiry. there is no other way for it lawfully to be done. the good news about both of those, bill, is there's a paper trail, there's an application, there are warrants, all of which can be reviewed. right now the executive branc is controlled not by the obama administration but by the trump administration. >> it's a very serious allegation, the president has at his fingertips buffaloes dollars in intelligence apparatus. i've got to believe, i think he might have something there. if not, we're going to find out. >> mike barnicle.
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>> rick tyler, you have an administration that yesterday issued a second and new executive order in immigration. you have an administration where house republicans introduced the repeal and replace plan they have been talking about for eight years. yet all of this is clouded by the self tied, self-knotted anchor the president tied around this immediate party's future. how do you deal with that. >> let me put it together. david ignatius is on to something absolutely right. that is trump is -- he is trying to say -- they are saying you don't have the evidence on what the russians -- there's no collaboration with the russians. okay, fine, i'll throw something out there and you won't have the evidence and we'll be even. it's like the lawsuit. clapper said he's trading in political currency, joe said yesterday on the show he called him a day trader in political currency. i'll take it a step further and that is now there's a margin call on the integrity of this white house. that is dangerous. because when you have north
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korea have four missiles or health care bill that needs to get passed, people need to trust what the president says about those policies. >> they can't. >> then they can't move forward. >> how can anyone trust what this president says. i'm sorry, get right to the chase here. how can anybody trust what comes out of his mouth or his tweets? >> you can't. >> you can't. thank you. >> unless you can prove that barack obama went to trump tower himself. >> and wiretapped his house. >> and wiretapped. >> rk, help me. >> votes on the house. no president passes major legislation like that without saying to members of his own party my presidency is on the line. i need you to vote for something you're politically worried about and it's tougher to get the votes if they are not invested in the presidency. >> president trump officially rolled out a revamped version of his controversial executive order on immigration. under the new guidelines citizens from iran, somalia, sudan, syria and libya will be
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subjected to a 90 day ban on travel to the u.s. iraq has been removed from the original list. an apparent request from defense secretary jim mattis. the new order does not apply to current lawful permanent residents and the preference for religious minorities has been removed. the plan still bars all refugees from entering the u.s. for 120 days but no longer singles out syrians who were previously banned indefinitely. the president signed the order yesterday in a much more reserved fashion with the white house simply tweeting out this photo. the formal announcement delivered by secretary of state rex tillerson, attorney general jeff sessions and homeland security secretary john kelly. tillerson says the reworked ban is vital for national security. >> it is the president's solemn duty to protect the american people. with this order, president trump is exercising his rightful authority to keep our people safe. as threats to our security
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continue to evolve and change, common sense dictates we tenilletenille -- continually re-evaluate the systems we rely upon to protect our country. >> the guidelines set to take affect march 16th, giving more than a week's notice. president trump previously argued for the immediate rollout of the prior version saying if the ban were announceed with a one-week notice, the bad would rush into our country during that week. >> bad dudes. >> yeah. >> the new version of the order is being met with praise, in some cases muted from republican lawmakers who criticized the original. but democrats have slamm the measure saying it's essentially seco verse, same as the first. >> the truth is, there is very little new or improved about this executive order. it's barely a fresh coat of paint on the same car that doesn't drive. it's still a travel ban. it's still a refugee ban.
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it still makes us less safe, not safer. the new executive order is still mean-spirited, misguided, and in my judgment goes against what america is all about in being a country that accepts and cher issues immigrants not disdains them. >> david ignatius, how does this make us safer, if you can explain the ban to us. >> i think that's the heart of the matter. the area where the administration's case is the weakest. the new executive order fixes the obvious problems that were wrong with the last one that led an appeals court to stay, iraq is out, religious preferences are out. on the question of how this helps our national security, in other words, what was the threat to national security this is trying to fix, it's very vague. there's some specific language, there's an assertion that 300
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refugees have been a subject of criminal counter-terrorism investigations. so see, here is the threat as people have looked at those numbers, they noted 300 people by one count 1/15 of 1% of the refugees who have come since 9/11 from the six countries that are subject to this ban. so it's a tiny number. they are going to have to put more information on the record to convince people that there's a real national security justification for this i think uncomfortable ban on people coming to e u.s. >> soany dferent issues with it in tms of theore of who we are as americans. mark halperin, we also have the added problem of stephen miller who has become sort of like a character on this show. we call him the tiny dictator or little miller because he proclaimed on sunday morning shows with such strength and determination that the president has powers that will not be
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questioned. he also said on the record this ban is no different than the first one. how are we going to see this play out legally? what are your thoughts. >> will be challenged legally. only one federal judge to decide he or she doesn't like parts of it to invalidate it. the white house made substantial changes. i don't think he can argue while there's a robust national debate whether it's consistent with our values, he can't argue it's inconsistent with what he ran out. this is exactly what he said he was going to do a lot of americans do like it. i think we should have the national debate and we will. which parts of the new, revised ban trouble you the most. >> continues to trouble me. part of what troubles me is we have to understand it in the overall policy around immigration that donald trump is putting forward and what it represents in terms of his vision of the country. there's a sense in which not
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only is he trying to sell the issue around safety, protecting the country from terrorists but there seems to be a sense in which he's putting a forward a view of who we are as a people, who belong here. i think to think about the travel ban in connection or in conjunction with broad immigration policy around the wall and the like and mexican immigration and the like, i think we begin to see something that's a little bit more insidious than we might be comfortable w i think going back to the broader question about the debate about american values, who do we take ourselves to be, the travel ban in that sense is noxious in every wap, shape, form or fashion. even the new. >> not the least bit inconsistent with what he said he would do as a candidate. >> not inconsistent but i would say the views he held as a candidate were noxious, so these are consistent.
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>> katty kay, if you look at the second order and compare it to the first. there are obvious differences. it appears to be less punitive the latest one. if you really look at it, you have to ask your self why do we need the ban at all given the stringent immigration screens that go on right now. >> it takes about two years to get here. >> what is different about this other than the politics of it. >> this has always been the slight misnomer that has come out of the white house, the idea that people are pouring into the america from these six, formerly serve countri seven countries, as if there's no restriction, as if they jump on a plane. extreme vetting happens. it takes two years to get to the countries. often visas are denied to people who want to come to the country.
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to what extent by playing spot idea that america is at war with islam, which is something that islamic state has already made hey out of is this ban making america less safe versus some more controls of people coming from those countries which might weed out the odd person who had bad intentions. and that debate is the debate that really needs to be had. is it effective or not? there is plenty of evidence from isis on videotapes and things they have said they are using this ban already for their propaganda purposes. >> while we're on the issue of immigration, eddie, help me out here because you're a professor and you might know something about this. tell me if this is bad. hard to even joke. housing urban development ben carson accused of mischaracterizing history when he referred to slaves as immigrants. >> only a matter of time. >> oh, my god. during a speech to hud employees.
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>> that's what america is about, a land of dreams and opportunity. there were other immigrants who came here in the bottom of slave ships who worked even harder, even longer for less, but they, too, had a dream that one day their sons, daughters, grandsons, daughters, great grandsons, great granddaughters might pursue prosperity and happiness in this land. >> i think people need to actually look up the word immigrant. whether you're voluntary or involuntary, if you come from outside to inside, you're an immigrant. whether you're legal or illegal, you come from the outside to inside, you're an immigrant. slaves came here as involuntary immigrants. >> eddie, eddie, eddie, eddie.
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>> what are we going to do? >> that's just dumb. i don't want to sound like an ivy league snob, it's just dumb. he corrected it. he corrected it on his facebook page. but we need to make a very clear distinction between slavery and immigration, involuntary immigration and voluntary immigration, it still isn't slavery. the word slave isn't a synoni s with the word immigrant. they are distinct, different. this is part of the broader problem with not only ben carson but the trump administration, betsy devos, trump himself, they play fast and loose with the history of the country. the immigration ban, muslim ban, it's not only going to provide fuel to the fire for islamic
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state, it's going to add fuel to the fire of islamophobia in this country. here we have ways to rereading the past to make it easier for us to simulaassimilate the darkf who we've been to who -- >> or who we are being led to be. >> who we are led to be. >> one element of what you said, what i think is so overlooked in this culture of ours, we dob teach the measure story to ourselves. we do not know our own history, really know it. >> part of what he was doing -- if you read the longer transcript, he's telling the story of america as the american dream, the american promise. it's an ellis island narrative in one ways. that's one way to narrate the story. another way to narrate is to begin with plymouth rock and puritans, another way is to begin with jamestown. jamestown has at its core slavery.
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we begin to tell these different kinds of begin to narrate who we take ourselves to be in very different sorts of ways. maybe we can put in check some of the unchecked american exceptionalism on full display there that led him to reread, renarrate the the bowels of slave ships as perhaps basements of cruise ships that brought immigrants to the united states. >> reaction was swipt. >> naacp tweeted immigration question mark. condemned calling them tragic, unacceptable, and shocking. and this is where we are. still ahead on "morning joe," it's the moment the republicans have waited for. a plan to repeal and replace obama care. the biggest problem in passing it may be the republicans. our guests this morning include deputy dnc chairman congressman keith ellenson, chris murphy, law professor jonathan turley on
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travel ban. first bill karins with a check on severe weather across the country. bill. >> rough weather, 29 tornadoes. we know we had destruction, a lot of homes lost in the area of missouri. so far no fatalities. these are some of the worst pictures. this is oak grove, missouri. that's a mess. tell what you're looking at in that piure. that car flipped over, a roof removed. on the next house the whole roof completely removed on the structure. more than a dozen injuries in the oak grove area. again, this was during the middle of the night. as we go to daybreak, locate and see where everyone is, that's when we find out more details. hopefully no fatalities. 29 tornadoes mostly in missouri, iowa, portions of kansas, and a lot of wind damage across areas of illinois, missouri and even arkansas. those storms continue this morning. could get isolated strong storms northern mississippi and northern louisiana, a sliver during memphis area. in all 3 million people at risk of severe storms during the day today, the main threat being
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wind damage. a lot of this will work its way to the east. bring the umbrella to new england. a lot of showery weather and a few showers and storms late today in areas of the southeast. the rest of the country actually looking not too bad, near chicago. washington, d.c., have the umbrella handy, no severe weather making its way to the east coast. at least not frigid and cold last weekend. unfortunately you don't want to know what's coming in the upcoming weekend. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. busy your life can be.te, w mom: oh no... tech: this mom didn't have time to worry about a cracked windshield. so she scheduled at safelite.com and with safelite's exclusive "on my way text" she knew exactly when i'd be there, so she didn't miss a single shot. i replaced her windshield giving her more time for what matters most. tech: how'd ya do? player: we won! tech: nice! that's another safelite advantage. mom: thank you so much! (team sing) safelite repair, safelite replace.
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duexperience our mostand perefined models ever.t, including the ls, lx and es. experience amazing. house republicans out with long awaited bill that would dismantle and replace obama care. usually we've got a huge line of people when they roll out something, they want to talk about it.
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they want to this is what we've got, here it is. nobody from the white house, the principles and nobody from gop leadership has made themselves available to talk about this on any level. the proposed bill called the american health care act was released last night by a pair of house committees. the gop plan eliminates the requirement for individuals to purchase health care. it sets 2020 deadline to begin restricting the affordable care act's medicaid expansion and expands so-called health savings accounts. the republican plan would provide tax credits to encourage people to buy insurance. that's a change from obama care where subsidies would help offset the cost for lowererners. the proposal also includes a provision to strip all federal funding for planned "parenthood" for one year. the plan does keep some of the more popular aspects to obama care including assurance that people with pre-existing conditions keep their insurance and people under the age of 26 would be allowed to stay on
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their parents coverage. president trump marked the release of the bill with a tweet. reading this. house just introduced the bill to repeal and replace obama care. time to end this nightmare. so joining us now former governor of vermont and former chairman of democratic national committee howard dean. we would love to talk to the people who put this together and the white house because they are so proud of this but there's nobody who wants to talk about it, nobody. not one person. not one person wants to have this conversation about something they have done because, howard, what do you think? >> i think it's time to end the nightmare but not the one trump is talking about. >> this is the nightmare. 45 days has been the long nightmare and it's not over. go ahead. >> here are the problems with this. first of all, approximately 15 million people would lose their health insurance, the majority of which are in states that voted for donald trump, the big
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majority, because of the medicaid piece of this. >> is the problem perhaps the people who have health care now who would no longer get health care on the new republicans' plan. >> they won't say how many. >> they won't say how many but people who know what they are talking about think it's about 15 million. >> have you had had a chance to go through brief outline. >> i've had a chance to go through it but not a chance to really sink my teeth into it. >> let me reiterate and ask the question again you probably answered. ing the same number of people covered by obama care be the same number covered under this bill, this proposed bill. will the coverage be as fully available as it is now to customers? >> neither of those is going to happen. the estimate is by 2020, 15 million americans will have lost their health insurance as a result of this bill, mostly as a result of the phasing out of the medicaid. the states that didn't -- >> kentucky, west virginia.
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>> kentucky is going to hit really hard, west virginia really hard, arkansas. >> gosh, who knew it was this hard? >> the most interesting thing we han'talkbout is that there is a provision in there which is theoretically unrelated, which gives insurance companies a huge windfall. there is a cap how much deductibility you have over ceos salary. it is lifted. there is no tax for a corporation on money you pay the ceo over half a million dollars. so if you're making $26 million and head ofette any, that's tax-free. basically taking money from people on medicaid in kentucky and west virginia who voted for trump and giving it to ceos of health care companies and other ceos in the countries. it's unbelievable. >> called it object care 2.0 on twitter. senator rand paul had a silver take.
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still have not seen an official version of the house obama care replacement bill but from media reports this likes like obama care light. freedom congress, mark meadows called for full repeal before taking up debate on the relachlrelachl replacement. >> we should repeal obama care but shouldn't replace it with obama care light. there are a lot of revisions still in this version that are obama care light. there continue to be subsidies. they just rename them. they call them refundable tax credits but still giving you someone else's money to buy health care. >> we don't really get rid of the cadillac tax all together. it's still in there, it just comes back in in eight years. we really need to look at some amendments to make sure we get rid of the taxes. we put something on president obama's desk just a few months ago. to suggest what we put on president trump's desk sets a new entitlement, doesn't repeal
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taxes, obama care, we've got to do better. >> some senate republicans are also uneasy about how the draft bill addresses medicaid. four members of the gop says it does not do enough to protect those in the program or provide necessary flexibility for states. rick, you're a republican. >> want me to explain it? >> what i want you to do is like pretend you are out this morning to talk about the great bill that has been drafted. i want you to give it your best try. >> you have a fascinating point. if you're going to roll out something this major, repeal and replacement of the bill, you would wan to have done a whole communications run up to the replacement of the bill so the majority of americans are so excited. they are split. half the people want to get rid of it, half want to keep it. it depends which bracket. in other words, some people have done well on obama care because it's much more affordable and some people have done much worse. many millions of people lost their insurance because of obama
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care but they got a replacement plan. dr. dean you say 15 million people lose their insurance, wouldn't those people be able to go back and buy insurance on the free market. >> normally the answer would be yes except these are medicaid people. they don't have any money to begin with. medicaid was expanded. >> those are in states they expanded medicaid. not everybody did this. >> a significant number of republican governors who did expand medicaid. ohio was one of them. as was the case 20 years ago in vermont medicaid the best vehicle to expand health care. relatively inexpensive. everybody complains about cost because cost of health care goes up. easy to administer and states administer it not the federal government. that's where the real hit is going to be. you're right about the confusion and people who pay too much and stuff like that but the medicaid population has done well. that is half the people who got insurance got it through
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medicaid expansions and half of that is going away. >> they have laid down markers, not honest about winners and losers, same mistake obama made. have you to have a conversation with the country, who is going to do better, worse. in this marker, no appeal to democrats. republicans would say want to make this bipartisan. same mistake president obama made, totally partisan effort. usa read some conservatives against it, moderate republicans against it. there's no perfect bill to unite the party on the first pass. again, their chances of getting it through the house and senate are slightly higher than people are talking about because they have no other option. >> howard dean stay with us. up next, will president trump's new executive order hold up in court. law professor jonathan turley breaks down the argument on both sides. that's next on "morning joe." knowing where you stand has never been easier.
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joining us law professor professor turrell y, great to have you on this morning. >> thanks. >> travel ban two, play for you
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a sound be and have you give us your response. this was a response two weeks ago. senior white house adviser steve miller telling fox news the travel ban, the new one, would basically be the same as the old one. take a look. >> he wants to know specifically how the order will be different. >> one of the differences in the executive order responsible to the executive order which didn't exist previously. these are minor technical differences. fundamentally you're still going to have the same basic policy outcome for the country but you're going to be responsive to technical issues brought up by the court and those will be addressed. in terms of protecting the country, those basic policies are still going to be in effect frf i'm not a lawyer. i'm glad to have someone with
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your expertise here. if you're contesting that in court, might you perhaps go to that quote and use it as exhibit a. >> in many ways it is the same travel ban. the thing challenged in the first order is still very much there. still distinguished on the basis of nationality that the challenger said was unlawful. it's still viewed as a muslim ban, while the white house denies that. it has some of the same elements. what are removed are rough edges. often the case good lawyering doesn't change the outcome of good litigation but bad lawyering was. the first order was bad lawyering. there was a lot of provisions they didn't need. very sloppy. badly written, badly executed, badly defended so they can only go up from hoere. they are still having the same problems, matter of urgency. white house officials say they want to wait to give the order
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its own moment like it's a debutante at a mardi gras ball. executive orders don't need their own moment. that moment passed weeks ago when you said it was urgent. putting ought-of-all that aside, it's going to be harder to challenge this. they did what they should have done, which should have been obvious in the first order, they excluded green card holders and permane permanents. this was a badly written order collided with a ninth circuit opinion. frankly both branches could use a do-over. but without that green card controversy, they are going to have a harder time establishing standing, even though many of those same elements are there. >> mike barnicle this comes from a president who is day by day by day losing credibility with everything that he says and does that doesn't have backing to it. >> also the wider context of
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this bill and everyingn washington. david ignatius, let me ask you, the impressions europeans or allies have about the erratic nature of this presidency, is that weighing upon them as much as we're led to believe it might be? >> i think they are troubled watching the trump white house, watching this government by tweet. the europeans have their own problems, french have elections in april, germans later in the year. there's a lot of division and uncertainty. but american leadership in the world really is wounded now. we'll have to see whether donald trump thinks that's an important part of his job as president to rebuild our traditional alliances. he's got a big crisis hitting him now with north korea. north korea has flagrantly had another missile test and kim jong-un, the leader has bragged this is an attempt to hit u.s.
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bases in japan, an aggressive run. trump said he's going to be aggressive with north korea. you only do that working closely with allies, working closely with japan, south korea. you have to have understanding with china as you move forward. real crisis are now going to intersect atmospherics of the first 100 days of the administration. to get traction he needs to be seen to be addressing the problems that the world cares about. >> what do you get asked about president trump when you're talking to people abroad, katty? >> is it going to normalize or be a train wreck. that seems to be the two paths people are looking at. that degree of confusion. is this a president that is so absorbed with things like this weekend and the tweeting about president obama and the surveillance, and then you have these missile launches from north korea. is there the capacity of this president to deal with global
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threats that will come along, isis or changing power structures in the world, did he have the capacity to deal with that. that's the biggest concern, the issue of competence to some extent. jonathan, can i ask you a question quick about that executive order? my understanding, one of the issues raised by the ninth circuit and objection to the original order was the issue of intent and that went back to what donald trump said during the course of the campaign about wanting a muslim ban. how does this second revised order change that intent? >> well, actually i thought that was on the weakest part of the ninth circuit. a lot of judges i don't believe would have relied on campaign statements as a material issue for intent. sometimes intent is considered, for example, with discrimination cases, voting rights cases, but it's rare, particularly when you have a candidate that sort of walked back later on the
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campaign trail. i just dob see how that's going to be a material issue. you've got three cabinet members who have come forward and said, look, we've made a national security determination this is needed. that puts a lot of pressure on the judge to say, well, you know, i'm not so sure. there is a limit to how much a federal court will do in contradicting three cabinet members that are saying we looked at it and we think national security requires these measures. >> jonathan turley, we have to go. before you go, i'm just curious. president trump's accusatio that president obama wiretapped trump tower? >> it's a particular odd moment in our system to have the president ask another branch to investigate his branch. you know, there's an expression called unitary executive theory that the branch speaks with one voice. now it seems to speak with
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various voices and they are not agreeing with each other. that's a very odd situation to be in. it puts comey in a very difficult position. presidents do not ordinarily talk about fisa applications. when i do fisa cases, i've got to go to a secure room to even talk about the existence of an application. so you know -- >> if it's not true, which so far it appears to not be true, is there from a legal point of view, what do you think? >> well, there's no penalty to the president for bad tweets. it doesn't fall under -- it postdated the impeachment clause, so there's no impeachment for bad tweets. presidents have been accused of that type of misinformation or falsehood in the past. never this extraordinary or
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controversial. but there are repercussions within the department. people like comey do work for the executive branch. he's their boss. trump could actually fire him. but he has a separate obligation going to the fbi to protect its integrity. you do not want to get into this type of conflict with an fbi director. he's going to side with his people, particularly someone like comey. and he's not going to walk away. >> jonathan turley, thank you very much. >> thanks. >> the president is trying to get on the same page with american companies when it comes to creating jobs in america. in one case they are using the exact same page. and that cut, paste, yeah, copy, paste thing. we'll explain that coming up. liberty mutual stood with me
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press office, it appears
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they have a lot on their mind. a lot. so the white house press secretary's office might have taken a little bit of a shortcut in crafting a statement on exxonmobil's expansion into the gulf coast. that's a big company that they have a press office, too. >> in fact, tillerson's company. >> rex came from exxon. they apparently used identical wording from energy giant's news release. check out similarities in these highlighted sections on new project and investment with the exception of some minor changes they are exactly the same. in a response to nbc news, a white house official says expansion program has many different components with it. we went straight to the source for some of our information. >> efficiency. >> that's not straight to the source. that's plagiarism. >> this is administrative state, much more efficient this way. >> what does that mean by the way, deconstruction of the
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administrative state. what does that mean? >> howard. >> complete dismantling of the new deal, that's what it means. >> this is cockamamy cultism, this is sort of everybody dressed up nicely with highfalutin words. >> charles murray. >> is this fixable? is david ignatius still with us? what would we need to hear from president trump to reset and move forward? believe me, i have no hope this is going to happen, absolutely none. but is it possible even, david? >> mika, i think of the president a little as someone struggling in quicksand. he's really trying to get some traction, some movement in his first 100 days. when you're stuck in a situation like that, you need to move slowly, carefully, take a rope if somebody throws you one and
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get some help getting out of it. you need to be willing to settle. if you've got a losing case on your hand, don't double down, settle and get out of it. those are the kind of straightforward common sense ideas that trump needs to listen to now. >> you probably should say you were wrong if you were wrong about accusing the former president about wiretapping you. stale ahead on "morning joe" jeremy peters joins us on the gop's plan to get party's conservative members behind the plan to repeal and replace obama care. plus senator chris murphy on his plan to block the president's new travel ban. new deputy dnc keith ellison. we have much more ahead on "morning joe." u.s. postal serv? because when they ship with us, their business becomes our business. ♪ that's why we make more e-commerce deliveries to homes
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we know a place that's already working on it. ♪ . saturday morning while trump was in florida. he teethed, terrible, just found out president obama had my wiretapped in trump tower just before the victory. nothing found. this is mccarthyism. just like that, the white house had to set their sign back to zero. [ laughter ] >> i'm so glad you're laughing. >> you need to. >> i can't. i really can't. >> you need in this day and age with everything that's going on, you need two things, you need a
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little laughter and a lot of baseball. that helps. >> in washington there's a war of words on three front. number one republicans are trying very hard to steer clear of the president's wild, erratic, disturbing and most probably false accusations about president obama ordering the wiretapping of trump tower. anyone hehinks obama did it? >> unlikely. >> there's lots of layers of proof he didn't. are we saying the president lied about president obama and accused him of a felony. >> lie is a strong word. >> it's not a strong word. he lies every day. purely descriptive. >> alternative truth? a revamped version, executive order on immigration, which his staff says is like the first one. three, house republicans finally
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unveil long promised bill to repeal and replace obama care but nobody will come out and talk about it because they know people will lose their health care so it's politically really bad for republicans. so that's what we got today. with us on set tuesday march 7th, we've got mike barnicle, msnbc political contributor rick tyler, chair of department of african-american studies at princeton university eddie cloud, jr. former governor of vermont howard dean, columnist and associate editor for "washington post" david ignatius. warrant anchor world news america catq kay and joining from "new york times" this morning reporter jeremy peters. joe has the morning off. david ignatius, i just want to pick up where we left off last hour. you say the president when he gets himself into a bad situation should get out, sort of reset. do you think he should come clean and say he misspoke when he accused barack obama of a felony and wiretapping trump
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tower? how does either out of that one? >> i think he says we're still at the beginning stages of a long investigation by the fbi, doesn't want to undercut it, congressional committees are looking into this. he wants the environment to be one in which this investigation goes forward without a lot of political noise. i was talking in the earlier hour abo trump's litigation tactics. when someone sues he counter-sues. another tactic is never settle, never let them see you give ground. maybe that worked for him as a hard-nosed businessman, as president of the united states, never settle gets controversies worse and worse. we're on a collision course on the question of russian activities. it's a collision course between white house and congress and fbi. it's not in the president's interest. i hope he'll think how do i clear the air here to make it
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easier to govern, get my legislative ideas moving forward, get my presidency some traction. >> rick, do you want to jump in real quick? >> just a quick question, what's the significant sending out secretary of state and ag to announce travel ban. that seems unusual to me. >> optically that should have been the first thing he did. >> i thought that was good in the section that it's a statement this is about the national security and here are our top. good to see secretary of state rex tillerson has done a disappear act on camera, we should see more of him. attempt to establish this is in the nation's security, here are two people to tell you why that's so. three key people. they are going to have to make the case in court. that's going to be much harder because of the evidence these six countries have contributed in a significant way to the terrorist threat is hard to make.
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>> press secretary sean spicer would not reveal president trump's source of information when he accused obama of a a felony. he tried to defend saturday morning tweets. >> does the president believe former president barack obama commit add felony. >> i think the president's tweets speak for themselves. what he wants to do make sure they look into the matter to ensure the american people understand what may or may not have happened in the 2016 election. >> i guess my question, when did the president come to believe president obama wiretapped his phones. >> again, i think the president's tweets speak for himself. >> when did he become a hostage-taker. >> i don't know. when you see rex tillerson -- three great, attorney general.
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>> stick with two. >> two of the three have great reputations and are great leaders and great men. i just don't know why there's nobody at the white house who walks down the hall and says, mr. president, you can't get it. you've got to stop. and steve bannon has to go or i'm ne. when does somebody do the right thing and pte their own reputation and thisou cntry from this president. kat katty, am i overstating things? >> there's clearly a concern this is a president who came into the office without any experience of governing, which is precisely why he got elected, why populists get elected. he has to go through an incredibly fast learning curve. sometimes he's getting that. sometimes he's getting the message you're trying to send him, mika, to get his white
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house back on track. saturday morning at 6:00 in the morning and he's by himself and he's got his phone with him, it's like the real donald trump reemerges and you have this conflict between his instinct, who he is, his gut, the discipline the office of the presidency needs to impose. right now it looks like it's his instinct that's winning will that's not reassuring for the country and definitely not reassure for the rest of the world. >> mike barnicle. >> jeremy, david ignatius just used the phrase we're on a collision course, which it appears we are as a country, as a republic, and yet we have a president of the united states whose past, past record, has been one to create his own separate universe around himself and the trump organization and his own sense of reality. so in this situation, given what has happened just over the past three days, who in his party
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comes to his defense? how do they defend him when he is really creating his own separate universe maybe even they don't understand. >> it's the universe of alternate facts, alternate reality, as you said, mike. this is one of the more troubling developments for the truth in american political discourse right now is that even when the facts are not on donald trump's side, there are people around him in talk radio, in conservative media, on capit hill, in hiswn west wing offices who will create their own set of facts to back up whatever outrageous claim he has made. what i'm referring to here is you already have people on the right saying, well, you can't trust james clapper. he says obama didn't wiretap trump tower. james clapper lied to congress. so you can't believe anything he said. you have an effort to distort what "the new york times" has
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reported on this matter about a month and a half ago my colleagues reported that the government had intercepted russian communications. not that it had wiretapped trump tower. that's being completely mi lly mischaracterized by people who suggest he's not leading american public when he says his wires are tapped. >> you mentioned james clapper. here is the sound bite for "meet the press." >> for the part of american security apparatus i oversaw, dni, no wiretapped activity mounted against president-elect at the time as a candidate or against his campaign. i can't speak for other title 3 authorized entities in the government or state and local. >> there is no fisa court order. >> not to my knowledge. >> of anything at trump tower. >> no. >> so david ignatius, i'm trying to think of who i can put this
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position. i think i can get this question to you. yesterday i said i'm worried because a lot of people from different countries, especially meeting with ambassadors, talking about how they view trump, they say we're worried because this is how it starts. and it's a very strong statement. but how when you have the president tweeting what he tweeted on saturday morning, how do you not look at everything as perhaps marching toward an area where we don't want to go? how do you not look at this travel ban as a part of venturing into territory that could be bleak and dangerous for our country? >> mika, the simplest way for me to answer that is president trump has to realize he's the commander in chief of our armed forces. he is our chief executive, head
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of state. we don't have a king, somebody else to represent the country. so every word he makes is taken seriously from around the world. one thing i've learned from watching president obama is that the credibility of american power depends on what a president says and whether a president follows up with whether or not he says with clear policy. these off the cuff statements pounded out at 5:00 in the morning are a way to leave allies and adversaries both confused, beginning to doubt what ab american president says, not understanding the implications. we've seen how easily power slips away from the united states in situations like that. for his own sake, for the sake of his presidency, donald trump has to get a better handle on this. he's commander in chief.
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everything he says matters. >> for his own sake, which is what matters to him. >> for our sake. >> he doesn't care about that. >> it's more dangerous than dynamite. >> two very quick points. first of all, he's not going to change. he's 70 years old, this is going to go on as long as he's in the office. there's a fair amount of danger in the world. second of all, i'm not that worried about the domestic situation. the truth is there's always a small number of americans that believe in conspiracy theories and crazy talk show hosts and all that stuff. dick nixon had 29% favorable rating on the day he resigned. that means 29% rejected all the evidence in the "new york times" and so forth and so on. we're going to survive this domestically. whether the world survives it is another matter. there's going to be a major restructuring of world power as a result of trump. trump is not going to change. >> is anybody concerned he's tweeting at 6:00 in the morning
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flittingly about unbelievably -- >> it's interesting, he's a networker. he's always calng -- he hear he makes dozens of cls a day. >> does anybody question his stability at this point? >> i think some are. i think one of the interesting things that's evidencing itself right now for me is the kind of collision of two things. one is the idea of imperfectly presidency we've seen since richard nixon. the way the office of president has accorded itself an extraordinary amount of power. the second thing is the way in which the office of the presidency has been diminished since the election of barack obama. the attack on the prestige of the office. then you get someone like donald trump. donald trump, who assumes to try to posture himself as this big guy who can exercise the power of the presidency. but at the same time through these tweets, through the way in which he behaves, how he administers, governs, he's
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diminishing the office of the presidency. you combine that with the attack on the free press, attack on independent judiciary, the two structures that sustain our democracy. i'm much more worried about the state of domestic affairs as well as the world. >> you can make a strong case, ig, the effort to delegitimize the presidency began during clinton presidency. >> that's true. >> and continued through bush presidency, obama presidency. but this presidency, you can make a case, i think, for one additional step. in addition t delegitimizing presidency among political people, largely that occurred. now the delegitimatization of the presidency taking hold in the country with ordinary people looking at the presidency, a position they once revered and held on higher pedestal. now it's like trump is president? really? >> i can tell you from personal experience and i'm fairly certain it's even happening now even after the saturday morning
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tweets that have really, i think, pushed in in who is trying to give this first 100 days the benefit of the doubt and have an open mind over the edge for sure, i can tell you this is a guy who will still engage you in a long conversation about the crowd size of his inauguration and cares deeply about that. deeply. still. >> the danger is the legitimate grievances he represented when he ran. it's why he won. those legitimate grievances are not being heard and not being acted upon. >> that's why you have this travel ban, right, "which was a campaign promise. 50,000 refugees, was 110, cut in half, this vetting, how is it
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different from whether or not the policies was earlier? >> it's not. differences are large ly superficial. you take iraq out. >> i don't mean first policy, immigration as it stood before the first executive order, how is this second eo different from the way we handled immigrants. >> largely superficial. extreme vetting happening was happening with the program. inside the administration you asked themhy they targeted refugee program. well, talk to middle eastern countries they don't take refugees, saudi arabia doesn't take refugees. so there was always this fixation on the refugee program as a weak spot in our immigration policy when, in fact, it's one of the most exhausted vettings we have. >> jeremy, you have new reporting how white house wins over conservatives who might be
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hedging a bit on new health care repeal and replace. tell us about that. >> conservatives in congress are under enormous pressure to not support anything that looks like obama care light. you're seeing people on the right attack the plan that came out last night has. what i'm hearing from the white house is president trump himself will get involved in trying to bring members of the house freedom caucus around on this issue. mulvaney, diehard conservative in congress himself until he went over to be prmpz budget director had a hand in craftin s this. if trump can twist articles and bring people along, maybe this proposal isn't as in trouble as we think. >> jeremy peters, thank you very much. still ahead on "morning joe,"
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apprehend pressed on first travel ban, tweeted, if the ban were announced with one week's notice, the bad would rush in. how does the administration explain the very slow rollout of the second version? we'll go live to the white house. plus several new tweets from the president this morning. it's clear he's watching cable. we'll explain that ahead. ♪ oh! the things you say ♪ ♪ oh♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ you're unbelievab♪e ♪ you're unbelievab♪e "how to win at business." step one: point decisively with the arm of your glasses. abracadabra. the stage is yours. step two: choose la quinta.
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22 past the hour. joining us from the white house peter alexander. peter, president trump is up and tweeting this morning about gitmo. good morning to everybody. peter, tell us about it. >> good morning, this is your president speaking in 140 characters or less again. he's been touting new health care plan from house republicans. separately on the topic of guantanamo bay, another shot in effect at the former president.
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president trump writing 122 vicious prisoners released by the obama administration from gitmo have returned to the battlefield. just another terrible decision. the statement from president trump comes as nbc news is confirming that just last week in new airstrikes in yemen, u.s. successfully hit at al qaeda and arabian peninsula targets including killing one individual, an aqap leader by the name of yasser arafat al sill mi formally locked up at guantanamo bay, 2002 to 2009 before he was sent overseas by this past administration. it's notable as we talk about yemen, yemen remains one of the six countries on this new revised travel ban signed by the president behind closed doors in the oval office. yesterday syria, yemen, iran mock other countries but one country removed from that list, of course, is the country of iraq.
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sean spicer, press secretary tells me that there were sufficient changes and sufficient assurances made by iraq to make the americans feel confident that country was doing what's necessary to vet individuals before they went through the process of potentially coming here to the united states. separately what's notable about this, this new travel ban won't go into effect until march 16th, nine days from now, ten days from the president's signing. when the first ban went into effect, it happened so rapidly and in one way explained chaos and confusion because the white house insisted and president consistently said the bad would be able to rush into the country if there was any delay. press secretary sean spicer pushed back on the delay this time and says the courts already undercut that element of surprise. here is sean spicer with me yesterday. >> one of the things we discussed at the time that happened, there was an element of surprise that benefited our country's safety. we lost that after the ninth circuit ruled the way it does.
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our goal was to be sure we used that time to ensure the most effective implementation. >> right now a lot of state's attorneys general, including in washington state, a state that successfully sued to block the original ban say they are reviewing this order right now and have yet to make a decision about whether they will try to plok this one as well. mika. >> peter, can you do your best here, what did sean spicer mean? what was he saying? >> the point they were trying to make was that initially there was the elent of surprise, so nobody can come in any window, any gap created, hey, this big travel ban. nobody from these seven countries allowed in for 90 days, refugees, 120 days. if it didn't start, everybody would have rushed in. for now anybody that tried to rush in had that opportunity. there is no element of surprise. to be clear they are insisting they have done vetting. any new visas issued since
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january 27th have been voided from those countries. they insist all americans should feel safe. >> that presumes two things. one, people would jump on a plane and come to the united states without a visa or, two, they intended to block visa and green card holders. >> is the white house insisting people are running across the border, jumping on planes and making it to america in just the matter of a day? what exactly do they mean by rushing in? >> well, it was the president who himself tweeted about this when he signed the original ban. he basically said the bad would be able to rush in. sean spicer with our colleague chuck todd on "meet the press" made the same point and said strategically this the explanation about why it happened so quickly, why there was no pause or opportunity to better explain it before it was put into effect. obviously that explains in part why the courts pushed back because in the eyes of many there wasn't enough vetting done of the extreme vetting process
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itself. right now obviously as the white house likes to explain, there are vetting processes in place. nobody able to rush across the border. what it ignores anybody who wants to come, specifically refugees, they already go through what is a rigorous vetting process. >> i think up to two years. >> 18 months and all the way up to two years before they even have the opportunity to rush in. >> that doesn't sound like a rush to me. that sounds like a long, arduous, difficult, painful process for families with no place to live. mike. >> peter, back to tweeting and the pleasanton of the united states. the most recent tweet, 122 detainees from gitmo who have been sent back onto the battlefield cording to the esidt, do you have any way of knowing wheree ts this information? was he sitting there this morning, do you figure, with 122 vicious prisoners in mind. does he watch it off tv? get it off tv? >> that's a good question. obviously we're going to reach
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out to the white house to find out specifically. what we can tell you, earlier this morning, it was like 3:00 something in the morning, fox and friends broadcast tweeted something about this very topic. you can see what they posted earlier, former gitmo detainee killed by airstrike in yemen. 122 former gitmo detainees reengaged in terrorism. that's what the president tweeted later. as we try to get better sourcing, wiretap, we have an idea what might be his sourcing this time around. >> oh, my god. oh, my god. >> at least the bad dudes -- >> nbc's peter alexander. thank you. coming up, senator chris murphy joins us live putting up a bill to counter the president's second pass on the travel ban. also ahead a new wrinkle in the global game of risk. the white house sends a missile defense system to seoul after north korean missile launch and now china bears its teeth.
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the u.s. military sending
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missile system to south korea one day after north korea launched three missiles into the sea of japan. joining us live from china, janice, the system isn't without controversy. tell us the latest. >> it is ramping up texas across asia. part of controversial u.s. defense made system arriving in south korea overnight. it was no secret the u.s. committed to it long ago. it is coming just after this latest missile test electric north korea where four missiles were fired toward japan in what the regime state news agency said was practice to strike at u.s. miller base there. this is a big security challge for president trump. the problem is chi is strokely opposed to this missile defense system. they think it does nothing more than upset strategic balance in
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the region. officials vowed today they will, quote, take powerful measures not only against south korea but the united states as well. we're seeing it small ways consumer-like sanctions, chinese companies telling people not to go on tours there. there have been protests against the retail giant that gave up its golf course to the south korean government to use as launch site. the u.s. at this point seems willing to accept some strain on the u.s.-china relationship, some friction in that relationship. in reviewing north korea, its policy object north korea and obviously what they see as a rising threat level. mika. >> thank you so much. we want to bring in a member of the foreign relations committee democratic senator chris murphy of connecticut. senator, we have dave ignatius and katty kay standing by. but first mike barnicle has a question for you. mike. >> last weekend i was in berlin,
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with a group of people from the india, saudi arabia, turkey, kuwait, and they were all universally concerned about the erratic nature of this presidency in dealing with specifically allies around the world, wondering where it was all going and seemingly indicating this was weakening our picture in the world. do you pick up on that, hear anything about that from our allies? >> as a member of foreign relations committee i have members come in every week. i've traveled since the inauguration to speak to leaders in europe. the world is freaked out right now because they see american leadership vanishing before their eyes. it's not just the erratic nature of the trump administration. one day you have nikki haley coming out and talking about russia being ukraine. two days later the president of the united states cast doubt
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whether russians ever invade ukrain one day we're against one china policy, another day we're for it. daily briefings gone, not communicating values to the world. no nominee for secretary of state or assistant secretaries. america seems to be fundamentally with drawing. this is at a moment when we live in a multi-polar world. it's easy to accept an offer from china or russia to be your pal if the united states isn't on the playing field. it's a really critical moment right now. it's hard for many of us to understand why the president doesn't see the reality of what's happening. >> so to quote the gentleman from connecticut, important to do that, the world is freaked out. i just want to say i'm not the only one slightly concerned at this point. senator david ignatius has a question for you. david. >> senator, i want to ask you about the north korea threat with this latest round of
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missile launches yesterday. north koreans keep pushing toward capability to attack u.s. bases, u.s. territory with eventually nuclear missiles. i want to ask you, "new york times" published united states using most advanced cyber weapons, efforts to interfere in north korean supply chain to try to stop that program. my question is, is that a tactic you think it appropriate, one that congress would support in trying to deal with this very serious threat? >> so i wouldn't list it as number one on my preferred tactics to deal with this problem in part because, of course, it renders the united states open to the same kind of attack. we know already that the north koreans have a fairly sophisticated cyber warfare operation. but our tools are fairly limited, as you know right now, david. one of the things that really worries me about the lack of diplomic cability in this administrations the inability
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to work with china to try to get north korea to get north korea to change their mind. president obama had a fairly functional relationship with the chinese premier. i think he would have known how to work through this problem over the thaad missile system deployment. again, the fact we really don't have a state department today, a president interested in creating a fuchsal working relationship with china makes it much more difficult to solve the north korea problem and leaves us with very few tools other than the cyber warfare tools. so it's not the preferred method but this president is taking other tools off the table. >> katty kay. >> freaked out is a pretty good way of describing it, senator. that's pretty much what i'm hearing, too. at some point in this presidency and rumblings from pyongyang, sooner rather than later, this president will face an international crisis. where do you think that crisis will come from and do you think this white house, as it is structured at the moment, is capable of dealing with that?
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>> i do not k this white house is capable of dealing with a crisis. i will tell you i am more confident now that michael flynn is out of the nsc and mcmaster is in. i think he brings a sober mind to this that is necessary. i'll come back to the concern i expressed earlier. when you're not stafrg the agencies that will help you deal with a crisis, showing no interest in putting diplomats out on the playing field wherever it comes, it's going to be difficult to manage. i was initially very concerned we were moving quickly toward a confrontation with iran. i think with flynn out of the picture, that maybe is less of a likelihood but it's going to come, and it's pretty clear this administration right now is not ready for it. >> eddie. >> senator murphy, i want to return to the new executive order for a quick second. how do you convince all those americans who supported donald trump and who support the ban that what this new executive order -- it doesn't represent
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our values. what do you say to them at the moment? >> listen, i want to make the case on moral grounds this violat the concept of what this country has been from the beginning, a country founded on the idea that people can come here fleeing religious persecution and be free to practice the religion of their choice. i guess with those voters i would lead with national security. i would show them the traffic on extremist websites that calls this the blessed ban. it's an important term because the invasion of iraq was called blessed invasion because it created a means of recruitment for global jihadists, flow into iraq, learn how to fight against united states and kill a lot of americans. those same recruiters or at least recruiters of the same ilk are called this the blessed ban just as isis militarily defeated in iraq and syria. i'd show them what is happening right now and this is realtime
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putting america at a greater risk of a terrorist attack. >> senator, what could the president do at this point or say at this point to assure you that he is fit to lead, that could restore his credibility if you could agree he's failing on that front on a very basic level, not to put words in your mouth. but do you think he's failing? >> yeah. i think he fails to understand how to put together a fair and consistent for policy. i would like there to be a week in which america takes the sim position on monday with respect to its foreign policy as it has on friday. i would like for the president to make a commitment to stop tweeting about for policy for a period of time. if he wants to tweet about the health care law, go ahead. stop tweeting about america's position with our allies because it's making they will more difficult to understand what america is for. i'd ask him to staff up his agencies. let rex tillerson be secretary of state.
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have public briefings again so america can know what we stand for. i think it's unlikely he's going to take these steps. again, the world isn't waiting for united states to have a coherent foreign policy. other countries are making the deals with the russians or making their deals with the chinese right now, they just don't see that we're going to be on the playing field for very much longer. >> mike barnicle, not that he's listening to me, but he needs to have the guts to get rid of negative forces in his inner circle and we know who they are. he needs to work object a speech with his foreign policy team and execute it and stick to it. that would be the only way there could be any semblance of a reset at this point. >> well, there's one specific area he might need to address by not addressing that. i'm looking for a little insight on this from david ignatius. david, rex tillerson is a hugely respected figure around the globe. he would arrive in riyadh or moscow or any other capitals around the world and be regarded
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almost as a head of state given his importance, and yet now he is being treated by the white house as if he were a gs-12. what's his future? >> well, his future is to chart. i think tillerson has been slow off the mark. i'm told he didn't want to be visible until he really had command of his brief. he's got a little bit of a skeleton state department. he hasn't got enough people in the top jobs. again, he didn't want to go off until he was fully supported. he is somebody who can be persuasive. when he speaks the kind of depth authority of american power comes through. he's been a global ceo. he knows people around the world. the same thing with jim mattis. we shouldn't talk as if this administration is simply donald trump. to the extent the world is reassured they see people in senior positions who they know have good judgment and they trust.
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somehow this process has got to work back toward the white house so someone like a tillerson, someone like general mattis, general kelly at homeland security is seen to have more of a voice, more of a role on how this works and tweets, these crazy tweets have less of a role. question whether the president is going to get that message. if not, this is going to be one self-inflicted wound after another. member of the senate foreign relations committee chris murphy, thank you very much for being on the show. >> thanks, guys. >> still ahead on morning. >> i'm not going to let wall street get away with murder. >> the stock market has gained almost $3 trillion. >> i know the guys of goldman sachs, they have total control over hillary clinton. >> my staff has been amazing. gary, as you know. you all know gary from goldman. >> president trump and his on again/off again relationship with wall street appears to be off again with investors concerned about his ability to
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implement his economic policies. why wall street matters next. ♪
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all right. 48 past the hour. when new york voters went to the polls last year, 63% of democrats and nearly half of republicans said wall street hurst the economy more than it helps. those feelings still resonate today. even as the market soars to new highs bringing retirement savings with it. as part of why so many americans, including political leaders don't know whether to celebrate or denigrate wall street, that is focus of new book by best selling author william cohan, "why wall street matters." william jones us now. why it matters and give us a sense of how it matters, because the president seems to have a bipolar relationship with wall street. >> not only the president but
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the former democratic nominee hillary clinton has a bipolar relationship. >> absolutely. >> i don't think elizabeth warren and bernie sanders have a bipolar relationship, a one polar relationship. i think there's a relationship. there's a fundamental misunderstanding. no one has been more critical than i have. i spent 17 years there, 13 years writing about it. there was so much wrong doing adg up to the financial crisis. after that, there was a prosecution of wall street executives. that led to this, i think, swinging of the pengulum. it's easy, no one is going stand-up for wall street. i don't like being in that position. that's why i wanted to write this book, to put it in perspective. we needed a fact based debate about why wall street is important. they are the left venn trical.
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it's the envy of the world in terms of what it does right. now, it does a lot of things wrong, which we can't forget. there would be no apple or devices we have on our -- there would be in tv studios or comcast without wall street and the capital it raises and the people that have it. that's a point worth remembering. a lot of that is lost in the debate. >> is there any communal interest, any intersection of interest in what wall street would like to get from the trump administration as opposed to someone, a young couple making $175,000, 150,000 grand between the two of them and what they would want to get from the trump administration? >> look, it pains me to even imply there might be something that donald trump is doing right. i think one of the things he is doing right and perhaps a result
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of the advisers he has around him who come from wall street is there too much regulation on wall street. not that there's too much, just not smart regulation. now there's one person in every wall street firm looking and watching what the other four do all day. small businesses can't get loans in an easy way. the ges of the world, they can get all the money they want. having the -- having wall street function properly so small businesses and new business zs can get loans so that couple, who is making a lot of money, $150,000, relatively speaking, can get access to capital. one of the great innovations of wall street people don't think about is credit cards or mortgages themselves or auto loans. they are a result of innovation on wall street and creativity on wall street. we should be celebrating that, not stifling it. in the last eight years, look,
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obama did an incredible amount of things well. when it came to wall street and the demagogue, the american people have the wrong impression. >> rick? >> the miracle drug that is are financed. what do you think is at the heart? why is wall street such a villain? fat cats are getting rich on wall street? >> i think what happened was people were understandably upset about the financial crisis. wall street played a big role in that. at that moment, the justice department's responsibility was to prosecute the wrong doing. they failed. they never tried again. that left a vacuum. people are still angry about what wall street did. into that void stepped congress, the elizabeth warrens, bernie sanders, donald trump's and hillary clinton's of the world and regulator who were going to punish them. they threw sand into a beautiful
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machine of wall street. that didn't help anybody. >> it's a beautiful machine. when we think about the history -- >> step back and not -- not demagogue. >> no, the facts. think about it in terms of the history of economic panics in this country and the worry about financialization that is driven in so many ways. you try to make a different claim that wall street is the first sight of expression of economic crisis. some make the claim that increasing it has, in some ways, jeoparze the stability of economic system. so, what do you say t those folk who is are deeply suspicious of increasing financialization that actually turns our attention away from the very hard, productive things, if that makes sense to you. >> of course it does. there have been financial crises in the world before a wall street. >> right. >> okay? financial crises at the heart, at the beginning of our country.
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that's why washington, d.c., is the capital of the united states because there was a financial crisis, the compromise to move from new york to washington. throughout the 19th century, there's been financial crisis. the thing the united states did well is say this is caused by wall street or washington, but we have to move on. if you like your pick-up truck, if you like your wide screen tv, if you like your iphone, a lot of people like iphones, there have been a billion of them sold, they do not exist in the abundance they are in and the price we can afford to pay without wall street. what i say to people is understand wall street, get wall street, do yourself a favor and read the book. >> the book is why wall street matters. william cohen, thank you very much. >> thank you for having me. still ahead, top republicans are showing frustration with the president's failure to back up his claims, fantastical claim that is the president, president obama bugged trump tower.
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accused him of a felony. plus, something we don't need the white house to prove, this tweet from the president, this morning, once again, about his predecessor is incorrect facttually. peter alexander will come back to clear that up. what a difference a court challenge makes, or maybe not. look at the body language here. they leave sessions in the middle there, awkward. three cabinet secretaries, i'm going to get away from you, i'm out of here. aside from the subjects, what else changed? congressman keith ellson joins us ahead. tech: at safelite, we know how busy your life can be. mom: oh no... tech: this mom didn't have time to worry about a cracked windshld. so she scheduled at safelite.com and with safelite's exclusive "on my way text" she knew exactly when i'd be there, so she didn't miss a single shot. i replaced her windshield giving her more time for what matters most.
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♪ time to think of your future it's your retirement. know where you stand. a war of words on three fronts in washington. number one, republicans trying to steer clear of the president's wild, erratic and disturbing accusations about president obama ordering the wiretapping of trump tower. the revamped version of the controversy yawl executive order on immigration, looking a lot like the hotly contested first one and three, house republicans finally unveil their long promised bill to repeal and replace obamacare. democrats, of course, not on board. some republicans are also not happy with it. we'll get to that. it's tuesday, march 7th, another day. welcome to "morning joe." joe has the morning off.
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we have mike barnicle, senior political analyst for nbc news and msnbc, mark halperin. the director for ted cruz's campaign, rick tyler. chair of the department of african-american studies at princeton university, columnist for "time" magazine and columnist for "the washington post," david ignatius joins us along with washington anchor for bbc world news america, katty kay. let's begin. the fallout continues from president trump's unconfirmed claim president obama, quote, had my wires tapped in trump tower with no one inside the white house seeming to understand or appreciate the gravity of the claims. press secretary, sean spicer would not reveal president trump's source of information yesterday, when defending the saturday morning tweets. >> does the president believe that former president, barack obama committed a felony?
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>> i think the president's tweets speak for themselves. he wants to ensure the house and senate intelligence committees look into the matter to ensure the american people fully understand what may or may not have happened during the 2016 elections. >> when did the president come to believe his phones were tapped? >> the president's tweets speak for themselves. >> the most definitive statement comes from the former national intelligence director, james clapper who said it simply did not happen. >> the part of the national security apparatus that i oversaw as dni, there was no such wiretap activity mounted against the president-elect at the time or as a candidate or against his campaign. i can't speak for other title iii authorized entities in the government or state or local entity. >> there is no fisa court order?
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>> not to my knowledge. >> anything at trump tower? >> no. >> david ignatius, i'll start with you. is there a reason we should move on with this question of where this came from and why the president did it? >> the president's assertion is out there, he's sticking by it so we have to think, what could he possibly be talking about? we had a statement that's as hard as it can be from jim clapper that there was no such fisa order. what else is possible? the only thing i can think of is, it is possible that an in collection intelligence on russians, russian agents, there was incidental collection of people in trump tower that might have been talking to them or, in some way, conversations among people who were being wiretapped, russians who fall for intelligence purposes, gossip about people they knew in the trump campaign, people they
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talked to at trump tower. people talk an awful lot. my take away from this, mika, first, this is trump's style. as a businessman, if he was sued, he would counter sue and come in with his own claim. we are seeing a little bit of the counter suit thing going on. the second thing is to be really careful about intelligence material. intelligence intercepts pick up raw information. you never know the accuracy of it. people brag about what they have been doing. they brag about their contacts. in this period when the investigations are going on, the truth is, the only people that are really going to understand this are people outside of our world in the intelligence community, looking carefully, we hope honestly, at the information. finally, it will be months from now, drawing conclusions. >> i have some reporting talking to a few people close to the white housor inside it that the president actually knows he messed up and won't admit it.
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just refuses to admit it. mark halperin, all this is infighting in the inner circle and jockeying for jobs to the point everything in the inner cod ray from bannon on down are so busy trying to save their hides or get each other's jobs, they don't realize rome is burning. is that what you are hearing as with well? >> it's a challenge. a lot of unfilled jobs. most of the people working in this administration never have been in the building before they took these jobs. this president's style is to let people fight it out. so, the challenge is going to be, you know, the big things, the immigration ban, temporary ban, and health care law. the question is, can they, given all the infighting and distractions, can they move these things forward? i think people are under rating their chance of doing it. it is a very tough climb. >> katty kay, give me your gut
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on how europe is looking at this, how leaders around the world are responding. i know you focus, you have a show focused on the first 100 days from the world's point of view. what is the world's point of view right now? >> i think there's a lot of confusion about what is coming out of the trump administration. they hear different things from different principles. they hear mike pence say one thing that is reassuring for the europeans along with mattis, then hear the president say something else. they listened to the president's state of the union address to congress which he talked about nato being a strong alliance, then something happened like over the weekend. that resets everything and people wonder what they can trust. i think that's the state that americans are in. they are looking at the administration and thinking it might seem normazed tay for a day or two, then something happens like it did on saturday
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morning and people's confidence in that normality is shaken. one piece of reporting i had, i spoke to a friend of the president who saw him twice at mar-a-lago saturday and he never saw the president this angry. when i asked him what evidence the president had for these claim that is obama tapped his phone or ordered the tapping of his phone, he gave him no evidence. he had a lot of confidence about it and kept reiterating. in the trump team, they believe they were the subjects of surveillance. >> some republican members of congress were insistent in order to investigate, the president should share what he knows. >> the american people have a right to know on what basis the president of the united states said his predecessor had broken the law by wiretapping. >> if the white house provides no more information -- >> the people should demand it. see what he does. the american people should know
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on what basis. then we'll see what the basis is. if there's no basis for it, there's no reason for investigation. >> really hard to cross examine tweets. i need witnesses. i need documents. there are two ways u.s. citizens electronics communications can be intercepted, one is title 3 roe and the other is -- there's a paper trail, an application, warrants, all of which can be reviewed. right now, the executive branch is controlled not by the obama administration, fwu trump administration. >> it's a very serious allegation. the president has, at his fingertips, tens of billions of dollars of intelligence apparatus. i have to believe, i think he might have something there, but if not, we are going to find out. >> wow. mike barnicle? >> rick tyler, you have an
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administration that issued a second and newrder on immigration. andmintration where house republicans introduced the repeal and replace plan we have been talking about for eight years and yet all of this is clouded fwi self-tied, self-knotted anchor the president tied around this party's immediate future. how do you deal with that? >> let me try to put it together. i think david ig nashnatius is something. that is, trump is trying to say, they are saying you don't have evidence on what the russians -- there's no collaboration with the russians. okay, fine. i'm going to throw something out there. you don't have evidence, we'll be even. it is like the lawsuit. clapper says he's trading in political currency, joe said yesterday on the show, he called him a day trader in political currency. i'll take it a step further. now there's a margin call on the integrity of this white house. that is dangerous because when you have north korea with four
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missiles or a health care bill that needs to get passed, people need to trust what their president says about the policies. if they don't, nothing moves forward. >> how can anybody trust what this president says at this point? i'm sorry, get to the chase here. how can anybody trust what comes out of his mouth or his tweets? >> you can't. >> you can't, thank you. >> unless you can prove barack obama went to trump tower himself and installed a wiretap. >> votes in the house. no president passes major legislation like that without saying to members of his own party, my presidency is on the line, i need you to vote for something you are politically worried about. it's tougher to get the votes if they are not invested in the presidency. still ahead on "morning joe," keith ellison joins us on the effort to repeal and replace obamacare. first, is the second time the charm? the president leans on his
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cabinet to roll out the new version of the travel ban. but, will it survive the legal challees t fir one could not? you are watching "rning joe." we'll be right back. during the lexus command performance sales event, experience our most thrilling models ever. including the exhilarating is, gs and rc coupe. ♪ experience amazing. "how to win at business." step one: point decisively with the arm of your glasses.
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president trump rolled out a version of his controversial executive order on immigration under the new guidelines. citizens from iran, somalia, syria and libya will be subjected to a 90-day ban on travel to the u.s. iraq has been removed from the original list, an apparent request from defense secretary jim mattis. the new order does not apply to permanent lawful residents and the preference for relinlgous minorities proved. it bans all refugees from entering the u.s. for 120 days but no longer singles out syrians who were ruled out
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indefinitely. the president signed in this photo. jeff sessions and homeland security john kelly. tillerson says the reworked ban is vital for national security. >> it is the president's solemn duty to protect the american people. with this order, president trump is exercising his rightful authority to keep our people safe. as threat strikes continue to evolve and change, common sense di dictates we re-evaluate and the systems we rely upon to protect our country. >> the guidelines are set to take effect on march 16th, giving more than a week os notice. president trump argued for the immediate rollout of the prior version saying if it were announced with a one week notice, the bad would rush into our country during that week. >> bad dudes. >> yeah.
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the new version of the order is met with praise. in some cases muted from some republican lawmakers who criticize the original. democrats slammed the matter saying it is second verse, same as the first. >> the truth is, there is very little new or improved about this executive order. it's barely a fresh coat of paint on the same car that doesn't drive. it's still a travel ban. it's still a rug ban. it still makes us less safe, not officer. the new executive order is still mean spirited, misguided and in my judgment, goes against what america is all about in being a country that accepts and cherishes immigrants, not disdains them. >> david ignatius, how does this make us safer? could you explain the ban to us? >> i think that's the heart of the matter. i think that eesz probably the
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area where the administration's case is the weakest. this new executive order fixes the obvious problems that led an appeals court to stay. iraq is out. religious preferences are out. on the question of how this helps our national security, one was the threat to national security this is trying to fix. it's very vague. there's some specific language that there's an assertion that 300 refugees have been a subject of criminal counterterrorism investigations. here is the threat as people looked at the numbers, they noted 300 people is, by one count, 1/15 of 1% of the refugees who have come since 9/11 from the six country that is are subject to this ban. it's a tiny number. they have to put more information on the record to convince people there's a real national security justification
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for this, i think uncomfortable ban on people coming into the u.s. >> we are going to have more on this conversation coming up on "morning joe." the future of refugees in america with familine breaking out. we'll talk about america's moral crisis abroad. charles desantos joins us. on the big day republicans roll out the replacement plans for obamacare, a rift already forming among some in the party. "morning joe" is coming right back. your insurance company won't replace
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what's in your wallet?
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house republicans are out with their long awaited bill that would dismantle and replace obamacare. the proposed bill called the american health care act was released by a pair of house committees. the gop plan eliminates the requirement for individuals to purchase health care. it set as 2020 deadline to restrict the affordable care acts medicaid and expands using health savings accounts. the republican plan provides tax credits to encourage people to buy insurance, a change from
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obamacare where subsidies offset the costs for lower earners. it include as provision for federal funding for planned parenthood. it keeps aspects including people with pre-existing conditions keep their insurance and people under the age of 26 would be able to stay under their parents coverage. president trump marked the release of the bill with a tweet, reading this, house just introduced a bill to repeal and replace obamacare. time to end this nightmare. joining us now, chairman of the democratic committee, howard dean. we would love to talk to the people who put this together and the white house and they are so proud of this. there's nobody who wants to talk about it. nobody. not one person. not one person wants to have this conversation about something they have done because, howard, what do you think? >> i think it's time to end the nightmare, but not the one trump is talking about. >> this is a nightmare.
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45 days has been a long nightmare. here is the problem with this. first of all, approximately 15 million people lose health insurance, the majority in states that voted for donald trump, the big majority because of the medicaid piece of this. >> is the problem perhaps that people who have health care now would no longer get it on the new republican's plan? >> they won't say how many. >> they don't say how many, but the people who know what they are talking about think it is 15 million. >> have you had a chance to go through the brief outline? >> i have had a chance to go through it, but not to really sink my teeth into it. >> let me ask the question again. will the same number of people being covered now by obamacare, will the approximate same number be covered under this bill, this proposed bill and will the coverage be as fully available as it is now to customers?
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>> neither of those is going to happen. the estimate is, by 2020, 15 million americans will have lost their health insurance as a result of this bill, mostly as a result of the fazing out of medicaid and the state's that didn't take -- >> kentucky and west virginia? >> kentucky is going to get hit hard. west virginia really hard. arkansas -- >> gosh, who knew it was this hard? >> the most interesting thing is there is a provision in there which is unrelated, which gives insurance companies a huge windfall. today, there's a cap on how much deductibility you have over ceos salary is lifted. there is now no tax for a corporation on money that you pay the ceo over $50,000. if you are making $26 million and head of aetna, that is tax free. they are taking money from people on medicaid in kentucky
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and west virginia and giving it to ceos of health insurance companies and every other ceo in the country. it's unbelievable. >> coming up, keith ellison. as we go to bak here is bill karins. >> the sun is up in missouri. the pictures are as ugly as we thought they would be. oak grove is the hardest hit. no reports of fatalities. this is at least a dozen to a dozen and a half homes and people's lives that have been turned upsidedown overnight. 15 injuries with the tornado. it looks like it was a strong one. this happened in the middle of the night. the sun comes up, you are looking at this, trying to figure out how to move on. wish them the best. in all, 29 tornado reports in kansas, missouri and iowa. there was a lot of wind damage there, too. a ton of clean up in the midwest. as of now, the storms weakened.
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we have a chance of isolated wind damage in northern louisiana, southern arkansas. memphis, you are just about all clear as the storms have been over you for the last half hour. here is the graph that shows 3 million people at risk with the wind. that will be improving. the other story, it is mild now. unfortunately, cold air is coming down. this looks like another brutal shock for the great lakes and the northeast. here is the snowfall map over the next seven days. this is where it could possibly snow. watch out areas of virginia and the great lakes. especially virginia. d.c., we are not sure if it's going to be over you or south of you. pay attention to that. that would be a sunday possible snow event. we leave you with new york city and time square where we got done with a frigid weekend. another one coming our way. spring, where are you? "morning joe," when we come back.
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another wild weekend for president trump. he tweeted, terrible, just found out obama had my wires tapped in trump tower. nothing found. this is mccarthyism. do you think he believes president obama tapped his phones? james comey doesn't. he rejects the accusation and asked trump's department of justice to refute it. that did not happen. the white house is calling for congress to investigate. trump is even taking the unusual step of hiring a security expert to examine his phone system. this guy, they say is very good. >> oh, my gosh. president trump is taking new shots at president obama this morning. he tweeted 122 vicious prisoners released by the obama administration from gitmo have returned tthe battlefield. junoer terble decision. nb news national correspondent, peter alexander joins us from the white house back-check thag
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tweet. peter, what did you find out? >> reporter: good morning to you. the claim is 122 vicious prisoners were released under the obama administration. with we went to the computer and went to the director of national intelligence's latest report that was recently released. we found 122 detainees, as the military refers to them have been released from guantanamo bay. 113 of them, in fact, were released by president bush under his administration. just nine of them were released by president obama. so, there is your fact check. the president is right, 122. he was way off in suggesting they were released under president obama, not president bush. what's notable is he tweeted about this at 7:00 this morning. it came after a segment on fox and friends. they tweeted about this issue at 6:30 this morning, writing former gitmo detainee killed by an air strike in yemen.
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they have re-engaged in terrorism. the fox segment never said the obama administration released the 122 detainees, it was president trump that made that inference and spread it to 25 million followers. >> sad. >> nbc's peter alexander, thank you. let's bring in former under secretary of state rick stengel. rick? >> morning, mika. >> what do you make of this? >> the thing is, i saw my colleagues shaking their heads. in the obama administration, the information that goes to the president of the united states is so carefully cure rated. the fact he has a way of getting information, not checking it, hey, you might want to look at this before i tweet it out is astonishing. this mixture of insecurity, narcissism and ignorance is
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very, very dangerous. >> is there anybody in his inner circle able to say every time you take your fingers and tweet away something inaccurate and chip away at the credibility of the presidency and respect of is country worldwide. is there anydy who can say this to the president? i don't know everybody in there and i don't think they can. >> we don't know if they are. they are not listening. >> this is a huge problem. >> it's frankly dangerous. this stuff is supposed to be 100% correct when it comes out so you can trust what the president says. >> spreading misinformation. >> do you think it's bad? maybe i shouldn't have tweeted that. >> it's toxic, insecurity, narcissism. >> from the top. >> that's not making the distinction between eggheads and working class folks. ignorance and insecurity. >> when the president is insecure, the country becomes insecure. he's got to grab hold of that. >> joining us, deputy chair,
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congressman chief ellison of minnesota. congressman, if you could respond to the president's factually incorrect tweet this morning. >> well, of course it's ridiculous. but it's also a head fake. last week, jeff sessions was found to have been arguably lying to congress regarding his contacts with the russian ambassador in the context of all types of strange and unnerving connections with russia and he puts out this silly stuff and now we are talking about it. i'm not critiquing you for talking about it, it's news, but it shifts the dialogue around the country when he puts out this absurd stuff about stuff that really is detrimental, damaging and worrisome. of course, you know, this muslim ban, this is not a muslim ban,
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although that's what he called it on the campaign trail is a hot issue. when he puts this stuff out, i agree it's narcissistic and insecure and has the effect of changing the conversation. >> mike barnicle, than katty kay. >> you are now number two in the dnc trying to get the democratic party back on the winning side of things nationally. >> that's right. >> how do you go about doing this? how do you go about getting a 42-year-old man with his 42-year-old wife and their two kids who live in suburban minneapolis who are taking in 75,000 to 100 grand. how do you convince them your party is not so far left that their hopes and dreams are in the rear-view mirror? >> if that person is in suburban minneapolis, they voted for me. i won with 70% of the vote and my turnout has been increasing every year i have been in
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office. that person is not a problem. let's say somebody in kentucky or youngstown, ohio, somewhere like that. we have to talk to them. we have to go to their doorstep, listen to them, ask them what they think is critical to improve the lives of them and their families, then we have to get people elected who are going to make sure they are getting their aspirations met through their elected representatives. the problem with the democratic party is, we become a presidential party, not necessarily a, you know, an every day local government party. tom and i are absolutely committed to doing that. we become a every four year party. we need to be an every day party. the thing is, we talk to everybody all over the country. >> katty kay? >> what it seems to me with the democratic party is it is old. you are young. tom perez is a little bit young. if you look at the leadership of the democratic party in the house, the average age is what?
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75 of the top three leaders. the average age of the top three leaders in the republican house is 45. that's a huge problem the democratic party has trying to get a younger, more talented bench. what are you doing to do about that? >> well, what we are going to do is talk to the grass roots. we are going to engage the grass roots. we are going to get them voting, engaged, writing letters, seeing congress push the issues they feel critical. we believe that will yield the kind of leadership people really, really want. i will say the leadership we have n is responsive. nancy pelosi has been on the forefront of the key issues, so has chuck schumer. i don't think their age matters in this thing. i think they have a lot of experience and i think they are pushing the issue that is are critical. our main goal is to engage the grass roots, make sure people feel listened to and heard. that will solve our political problems.
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>> so, rick stiengel, the trave ban, let's move to that, if we can. it's very hard. this is getting harder and harder to cover policy when the president has lax credibility on every level and appears to be lying or copying and pasting ridiculous things from fox news. tell me about the travel ban. what does it change and how is it different from the first one? >> it more narrowly tailors it from the first one. it changes the words, but not the music. people look at it as a muslim ban. had they, it might be a little renegade here, had they proposed this originally, it wouldn't have caused the ker flufl it did. i think it still has the same problems, philosophically that it has due process problems. it has first amendment problems and it has problems of credibility from a sense there's no acts of terrorism from any
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refugee or visitor from any of these banned countries. so the ninth circuit can look and say you haven't justified it. so, again, had they done this originally, it wouldn't have caused the fury it did. now, everybody has this in mind and the u.n. statement below where people around the world see it the same way. again, the only thing i would say is people do see, at least our system seems to be working. you know, a court overruled the action of the president. the white house came back. in so far as people look at that, let's hope they think we are still functioning. >> keith ellison, is that fair? is that one positive particle of this? >> well, i guess you have to look for some glimmer of hope in an otherwise dismal situation. >> yeah. >> the fact is, this is a ban that was originally designed to bar people because of their religion. it is still that. i mean, it doesn't ban every
quote
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muslim in the world but all the people who are banned are banned because they are muslim. if you look at the countries where people who committed acts of terrorism in the united states come from, those people are not -- those countries are not on the list. it's an irrational list. it's a mean list. let me say this, in minneapolis, we are proud of our somalia-american community. they are making, starting businesses, running for office. first state legislature of somalian decent and they are now -- somalia is going through a drought and a famine. they could be banned from getting relief through coming to the united states because of this ban. this is a rare -- this is inhumane and it's cruel and wrong. i just can't -- >> your description of it, congressman, irrational and mean, is matching the behavior we are getting from this president on other levels. it is incredibly disturbing.
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congressman keith ellison, thank you. >> thank you. making the case for suspending the refugee program. the trump administration is saying more than 300 people admitted into the u.s. as refugees are being investigated for terrorism related activities. for more on what the executive order means for refugees, we bring in the chair of usa or unhcr, i am proud to say i am on the board. charles desantos, good to have you on the show. >> good to be here. >> where do we begin with the travel ban? what does it mean for the people you have been working tirelessly to help and explain, also, the reality of the process for them before the bans came up in the conversation. >> you know, it's hard. you have me on something after something big happened in the refugee world. it's huge right now. 65 million refugees.
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21 million refugees identified, half of those people are children under the age of 18. you know, i can't really talk about the implications of a travel ban except to say that this is already a complex issue. you know, we support that process of providing services and support and contribution and awareness of what's going on in the refugee world. this process just put something in an already complex scenario. in my mind, the works that we do is to raise money and awareness with the scenario where it's alarming. the numbers, you know, are alarming for the issues around us. 1 in every 113 people globally are asylum seekers or nationally displaced or interimly displaced refugees. it's a dramatic number. less than 1% of refugees get
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resettled anyways. >> if you had to prioritize refugees allowed in this country, what is the top two or three priority countries where refugees are desperate and need help to get into this country. >> the bulk of refugees are from syria, they come from afghanistan, they come from somalia. that's the biggest bulk. that has been the largest in three to five years. we have issues supporting refugees in the first place. we have a huge charter to support refugees worldwide, 65 million. they never have the full budget to do that. the reason we exist is to really support that entity and ensure they have as much resources the american public can provide in the private sector. last night, i was at steve rattner's house, having an
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engagement as it relates to getting with the influential people together to talk about the refugee issue, to really share the importance and have their voices be heard. cate blanchett, alan coming, they brought this together. the importance is we have to have a louder voice around refugees. >> can you give us a reference point like the refugees today as compared to the past? >> the last biggest snar joe was world war ii. we were at the largest scenario, ever, for refugees. it's amazing. i think about this. the last time i was here it was 59 million. it's 65 million a year and a half later. we also have a situation where, you know, i have four kids. i have one that is disabled. i worry about if i were in a scenario and have to transport a child. being at sea is not a safe place. we still are forcing scenarios forcing people to put their families at risk like this.
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we are at huge cross roads where everything in the world is awkward right now. you know, i can't talk about the government. i can't focus on that, but i can say those complexities provide a situation for us to be even more important and valuable in this crisis because -- >> rick seng l. >> i want to ask how you see the united states in this. they have taken a smaller number of refugees over the last few years. the obama administration tried to increase it. how do you see the role of the u.s.? now we are cutting back from those limited goals. >> you know, in my mind, the role of the u.s. is to provide support in this in the best way posz possible. we are a very capable country to give money and provide resources and provide awareness. i think very few people in the u.s. really have large connection to it.
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so, to me the awareness of making sure people understand what unhcr does, the refugee issue, the resources needed. i'll give an example, mika and i talk often on this subject, one is how do you deal with resettled refugees in the u.s. i want to adopt a family. how do i make it happen? >> it's not as easy as one would think. so, you know, mika, of course, wants things yesterday and i try to do that. >> yes, i do. >> in this scenario, we are looking at how do we have mika be the face of a campaign that allows us to go out to the u.s. population, say we have refugees here that need you and we are working with other organizations to help her be the face of that, have those moneys come in and support people. i have a scenario, a really poor part of maryland where there are refugees there that are having a
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difficult time. you know, i usually am not in that detail, but people know who i am and they come to me. that's when we start having a dialogue. you need to support those people. so -- >> i love what you are doing. thank you for coming on. i'm there. let's make it happen. >> we are going to make it happen. >> anyone who can support us, please do. chair for unhcr, charles desantos. thank you very much. i would be happy to be a face of that and have a family. >> we are working on it. >> the house means committee is set to murk up the republican bill to relace obamacare. first, the best pitch. kevin brady is next. alright, and before that? you mean after that? no, i'm talking before that. do you have things you want to do before you retire? oh yeah sure... ok, like what? but i thought we were supposed to be talking about investing for retirement? we're absolutely doing that. but there's no law you can't make the most of today. what do you want to do?
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and together, we'll help you make decisions for your plan... to keep you on track. ♪ time to think of your future it's your retirement. know where you stand. in a moment, the ways and means committee that has a huge role to repeal obamacare. first, here is a look at some of the ground we covered this morning. the fallout continues from president trump's unconfirmed claim. >> it is possible there was incidental collection of people in trump tower. >> i have some reporting the president knows he messed up and won't admit it. all this while there is infighting on the inner circle. they are so busy trying to save their hides or get each other's jobs they don't realize rome is burning. >> there are people around him who will create their own set of
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facts. >> you should say you are wrong if you are wrong about accusing the former president of wiretapping. >> house republicans are out with their bill to replace obamacare. >> 50 million people would lose their health care insurance. the majority are in state that is voted for donald trump. >> the chance of getting it through the house and senate are slightly higher. they have no other option. >> revamping the executive order in immigration. >> they did what they should have done. they excluded green card holders of permanent residents. >> this is putting america at a greater riske of terror attack. >> people banned are banned because they are muslim. >> don't now how there is nobody in the white house that doesn't walk down the hall and say mr. president, you can't do this. when does somebody do the right thing and protect their repization and this country from this president? so far, there hasn't been much of a public rollout to the gop
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health care. they are critical of their own party's plan. joining us now live from capitol hill is chair of the house ways and means coittee, congressman kevin brady. thank you souch for coming on the show this morning. >> thanks, mika. thanks for having me. >> so, tell us how this new plan improves the situation and will there be people who lose their health care on it, which is obviously the big political question for those who have to go back to districts and explain it. >> this is a huge first step. one, we are clidelivering on ou promise and president trump's promise to relieve americans from the taxes, mandates, penalties from obamacare. we are taking two very important steps for consumers. one, restore control back to the states and the individual so they can restore the free market so people have a broader choice
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of affordable health care directed by them, not directed out of washington, d.c. so, this may be only the first step in getting to where we want to go, but it's a huge and important one. >> will there be people who lose their health care in this process? >> you know, i think more americans will have access to affordable health care they can actually use and they need than they do today. here is why. we have a lot of people i know in texas that are obamacare plans. they can't use it. they can't see their local doctors and afford their out-of-pocket costs. we are going a different direction and focusing on patients and families rather than washington. >> mike? >> congressman, you said, quote, this plan would give individuals it power and freedom to choose plan that is are right for them. what if these people just simply cannot afford the plan? what do they do? where do they go? how do they get coverage? >> can i tell you this? we know the obamacare experiment
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failed. the one that said everyone should have very expensive health care plans with expensive subsidies and it turns out, it didn't work for them. let's try another route. let's try affordable health care with affordable credits to buy plans they need. instead of ad or silver or bronze type of choice, in many counties, they have no choice at all. why don't we unleash the power of the states in the free market to give them the broader range of plans they can choose from. i think at the end of the day, we'll have more people on affordable health care they can use than today. >> mark halperin asked the question about who are the winners and losers with this plan? the obama administration wasn't honest and straight forward about the winners and losers. who are the winners and more particularly, who are the losers? >> you know, i think the winners are those who crave affordable
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health care, especially those small business people, the mom and pops, those who work for small business, the entrepreneurs, the families in between jobs who don't have affordable health care. today, i think the winners will be every american who knows they can't keep paying a trillion dollars of obamacare taxes for a retirement they can never afford. the losers are the big government types who thought they could force americans into expensive health care washington's way. that failed. we are going a completely different direction. >> congressman, kevin brady, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> before we go to break, i want to grab final thoughts. katty, i'll start with you. >> the president seems to have an inability to back down when he's on a losing streak. if he doesn't learn that ability as part of his deal making, he isn't going to have a successful presidency. it's not possible for him. >> rick? >> i agree with katty in the
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sense that it affects our public diplomacy around the world. people are looking at what the president is doing and his inability to back down thach. that hurts us. >> the only thing that stands between resolving it or improving it is the president with 140 characters tweeting. >> >>ed di? >> international strike. day without women. >> there's a strong foreign policy team and there's reince, mattis, tillerson, kelly, there's dana powell. step up. we need you to step up. that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> thanks so much, mika. good morning, i'm stephanie ruhle. so much to cover. breaking news overnight. republicans reveal their long awaited replacement for obamacare. individual mandate and medicaid expansion gone, replaced with tax credits and expanded

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