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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 9, 2017 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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>> let's turn our attention to the underlying activity at issue here, russia's hacking into those e-mails and releasing them and the allegations of collusion. do you believe donald trump colluded with russia? >> it's a question i don't think i should answer in an open setting. as i said, when i left, we did not have an investigation focused on president trump, but that's a question that will be answered by the investigation i think. >> i don't think it's for me to say whether the conversation i had with the president was an effort to obstruct. i took it as a very disturbing thing, very concerning. that's a conclusion i'm sure the special counsel will work towards to try to understand what the intention was there and whether that's an offense. >> and with that, the former director of the fbi says possible obstruction of justice by the president is almost certainly on the table. it's one of the big shoes to drop during james comey's testimony on capitol hill. he told congress the president
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tried to derail an investigation into his national security adviser and preetdly lied in its aftermath. this morning we'll talk to two members of the intel committee who led that line of questioning, democrat joe manchin and republican susan collins. good morning everyone. it's friday, june 9th, welcome to "morning joe" on capitol hill. with us we have columnist and associate editor for "the washington post" david ignatius. senior political analyst mark halperin and "new york times" reporter michael schmidt. good to have you all on board. what a fascinating day. >> it was fascinating. >> it seems like a bad day for the president, and the spinning by his lawyer and his press secretary or one of them was stunning to me, absolutely stunning. >> i said it all day yesterday. i'll say it all day today. if you want obstruction of justice you can look at what donald trump himself said to lester holt and what his spokesperson said, what he said to the russians, and then you
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can build around that if you want to try to get intent. we were never going to get that yesterday. but again, everybody going back and forth saying it was a great day for x, it was a great day for y. >> terrible day for the country. >> bad day for the country. bottom line is, what happened yesterday is noise compared to what's happening right now in bob mueller's office. that's where it matters. yesterday everybody can screech and yell and say hurray for our side. none of it matters. what matters is what bob mueller is looking at, the evidence he's gathering and the investigation he's running. willie, what did you think? >> i thought when james comey id bob muell will look at and pursue the obstruction of justice charge. he didn't want to say obstruction of justice, but he indicated from what he had seen he was sure it was something mueller would pursue. when you listen to him lay out the testimony, from the one
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tweet saying he better hope there are not tapes to the appointment of the special counsel, he dug his own grave. >> we have a conservative guest on today who's wife taught carl carly. >> cotton eddy. >> he wrote a fascinating article saying if trump is impeached, it will go back to one tweet. he was talking about that tweet, the tapes. >> the white house asked us why we obsess and cover the tweets. because sometimes they lead to a historic decision, like the appointment of a special counsel. >> they also say they're part of the official record because they're statements, too. they still won't tell us whether there's tape of it. david, your takeaway from yesterday? >> i think the statement that this now goes to robert mueller, that's right. the table is set, the issues are clear. in terms of obstruction, there
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will be a lively argument as there was in the hearing room. when somebody says, i hope you'll let this go, is that an order to let this go or is that an aspiration. >> and how many times? >> repeatedly. >> david, can we talk about this for a second? everything comes at us so quickly, you need to put everything in proper context. certainly a judge or a prosecutor would look at the context around that and say, it all began these conversations with trump going, so, do you like your job, do you want to stay on at your job, after he had already been told he was going to keep his job. after that question then he starts peppering him, and he is the guy who decides whether comey stays there or not. put in that context, i don't know many lawyers or many prosecutors that wouldn't see what was going on there. >> that's precisely what will be argued legally.
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i'm a part-time novelist. so i look at this in terms of the human drama, and to have this very moral, upright, deeply ethical man, walk into the white house for a one-on-one dinner and feel he was being rolled, manipulated, intimidated by the president. >> to the point he had to write it down. >> the scene of him coming away from trump tower and going right into his vehicle and typing the report, you feel he was just deeply shocked. so we know more about donald trump and the way he behaved, the unpresidential things he did. whether we know more about actual illegal actions that could be sustained in an impeachment process, i think that's a different question. >> from part-time novelist to part-time oboist. >> three things. donald trump has said how he feels about a ton of people.
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we now have in james comey somebody who has publicly said back what he thinks of donald trump. that's one. number two, i don't think this is the last we'll hear about james comey on this story, although he talked quite a bit yesterday, there's more to come about what went on between them and how comey operated within the fbi and the justice department. finally, the president is not going to be indicted. it may be thrown up to congress to deal with, but i don't think he'll be indicted for anything related to the flynn investigation. i do think as significant the events around flynn are, as inappropriate at a inmany mum the president's behavior was, we can't loose sight of russia is the issue. it's going to be as big or bigger an issue for the president's faet fate, it will be more about russia than flynn in the end. >> we don't know what's going to happen. we don't know if anybody is going to be indicted about it. we think it is way too early.
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that's why bob mueller is doing his work. michael, your thoughts. >> along the lines of what david said, i was surprised how much his job was being held over his head. when comey describes going to the white house and comey says they had already talked about his job. >> like a low-level threat. >>i didn't appreciate how much comey thought that was hanging over him. >> we're talking about human nature, and sometimes we disconnect to human nature when covering these stories. i guarantee you, if i'm your boss and i call you in and i want something done but i don't want to leave any fingerprints, hey, mike, how are you doing? you do a good job. do you like your job? do you like your job? >> then he said a lot of people really want that job. >> i hope you know how many
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people want that job. it's human nature. okay, listen, could you do me a favor, could you see your way clear to drop that investigation you're having on mark halperin. i can tell you right now, that is not a request. anyone who is a grownup that has ever been in a professional setting, certainly a legal setting knows that is not a request. republican fools that are suggesting and fools on talk radio and fools blogging, suggesting that's just a request, you seriously embarrass yourself because you have been living in your mother's basement, eating cheetos and blogging your entire adult life. go out and get some sun on your face and jog a little bit. you're getting fat. again, it was clearly a threat. >> comey went beyond saying it was just a request, that he felt
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it was a directive. the other thing is that comey doesn't take the bait. comey says he turns to trump and says i'm not reliable in the sense of a regular politician. the idea that we didn't see this coming, that comey and trump weren't going to work out, independence versus loyalty. >> we want to show you this moment from the hearing that caught our ear when comey told senator martin hiem rick that president trump was clearly concerned about michael fly but show no interest whatsoever in how to counter the kremlin's influence in our elections. >> did the president in any of those interactions that you've shared with us today ask you what you should be doing or what our government should be doing or the intelligence community to protect america against russian interference in our election system? >> i don't recall a conversation like that.
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>> never? >> no. >> do you remember -- >> not the president trump. i attended a fair number of meetings on that with president obama. >> wow. well, that's -- not surprising at all. >> the truth is donald trump wasn't concerned about whether or not russia meddled in the election, he was concerned whether he would be wrapped up in the investigation. >> cares about himself. >> whether there would be heat on him, pressure coming into the west wing, into the white house. the fact he didn't stop, that should have been his first question. that should have been his first question, did vladimir putin try to manipulate our election on either side? that's the biggest question out there right now. >> not only was the president not curious what the russians were doing, but to the extent that information about their operations surfaced, he said bring it on. he said, i'd like what he leaks to get more documents about hillary clinton and put them more into our race. let's have more russian
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influence. i think that is a genuinely troubling part of this. one thing that came across loud and clear from both sides of the aisle was this is a serious russian assaulted on our political system. the chairman, senator burr couldn't have been clearer about that. and the fact that trump from the beginning of the story until today doesn't seem to understand that, that our country is under assault from a major adversary, i think should worry people. the whole of the country. >> priorities are way off. >> what about, mark halperin, how do the republicans handle themselves in the hearings. there were people like marco rubio that i thought would be tougher. i guess he went over for dinner. someone said from little marco to trump's wingman. you wonder if it changes stance on trade if you bought him a ham sandwich and a twix bar. >> netherworld party were tough
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on comey -- >> weren't the republicans tipping the scale trying to push back at comey? it seemed like a very concerted effort by the republicans to circle the wagons. >> 100%, although they didn't challenge his credibility. one of the big losses for the white house -- they had a better day than they might have, president trump wasn't devastated by anything from comey -- there's a tendency to say everything comey says is true, his accounts of the meetings are true. the president has pushed back on some of the things. i think the republicans, although they were not -- they were -- time is critical in carrying the white house's water, they largely praised comey, didn't try to challenge comey, he largely emerged unscathed. rubio was a surprise to some people. i think the republican senators were fact-finding as much as anything else. >> david, do you agree with that? i sense they were circling the
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wagons. >> not as much as they could have. >> i thought they were trying to construct the beginnings of the president's defense, and i thought their statements fit right with trump's lawyer kasowitz. i agree with mark that trump had a better day than i thought he would. i thought the statement -- we knew it, yes, it's true. when james comey left, donald trump was not personally under investigation. to have that stated in that forum mattered. i thought the revelation that comey, in effect, set up the disclosure that led to the creation of a special prosecutor. i thought that was a significant revelation. it will make it easier for people who want to undercut comey. the attacks on him will be coming. i think the white house probably is saying we're in a little better spot. >> more to get to. we interrupt this programming because the president has broken his little record --
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>> president trump was silent on twitter yesterday, all three out the hearing, didn't hear from him all day. he's now tweeted a minute ago, quote, despite so many false statements and lies, total and complete vindication. and wow, comey is a leaker. >> total and complete vindication. >> speaking the football already. >> only from the mind of donald trump could anybody see what happened yesterday as total and complete vindication. >> and then there's jeff sessions. james comey was asked why he didn't brief the attorney general on the president's request to drop the flynn probe. comey says that's because the fbi knew weeks in advanced that sessions would be forced to recuse himself from the investigation. >> our judgment, as i recall, was that he was very close and in evidence thatbly going to recuse himself for a variety o reasons. we also were aware of facts that i can't discuss in an open setting that would make his
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continued engagement in a russia-related investigation problematic. >> wow. what does that mean? we don't know. more information coming on jeff sessions and his contacts are yaush. >> a tantalizing comment. there were a number of things that comey said. he alluded to the fbi's interrogation, questioning of michael flynn before he left the white house and came right up to saying that he had made false statements to the fbi, that that was part of this criminal investigation of him. i thought that was also significant. >> one of the many things we don't know enough about now that's intriguing, during the first months of this administration, when the russia investigation is being organized, going ong and intensifying, comey is working for three people he doesn't trust, it's clear. the president, attorney general and deputy attorney general. he's operating in a way -- imagine had he not been fired. >> how about the deputy attorney general who has been held up as
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paragon of integrity. comey went to rod rosenstein, said i've got real concerns with donald trump. he keeps asking me to do things that are inappropriate, and he voiced his concern to him. rosenstein then sat down after having that information and wrote a memo suggesting the firing of comey. he's told by the director of the fbi, hey, rod, i've got real problems with the president. i think he's asking me to do things that are inappropriate. i'm uncomfortable being with him, i just wanted to let you know. then the president comes to him going, hey, rod, i want you to set comey up. i want you to draw up a memo because i want to fire him. what does rod do? he draws up the memo. again, in a real world, a guy like that sure as hell wouldn't
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work for me. he had a responsibility, these people have an active responsibility to step out and do the right things. when you write a memo for a boss that has made the fbi director uncomfortable because of unethical actions he's taken, how do you then write that memo? >> the question with rosenstein now is he still has not recused himself from the russia investigation. mueller technically reports to him. there's folks in the justice department that didn't understand why right off the bat because he wrote the memo why he didn't recuse himself. they believe at some part he'll have to do that and that will be another story. >> is this a political win for donald trump, willie? >> i don't think so. what he got yesterday and what he can say, when he says vindication that's not sprained case, there was no evidence of collusion presented in this hearing, jim comey did not go as
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far as saying he colluded with the russians. >> he was called a liar. >> we take it for granted now this morning, but you had a former fbi director sitting in an open hearing in the united states senateesterday calling the president of the united states a liar. this was all set off -- he took the memo, why did you start writing these memos that eventually led to the tweet and the special prosecutor and all that? he took them because he was concerned the president of the united states might lie about their meetings because they were in a one-on-one setting. >> we have objective proof that the president did lie. yet the president is calling that a great day for him. >> his announcement that he's vindicated is wildly premature. there is a special counsel investigating every detail of this. this has a long way to go for donald trump most of all. one more thing struck me in yesterday's session was the question of why comey never turned to the president in
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person or raised his voice on the phone and said, mr. president, that's not appropriate. mr. president, i won't do that. he kept trying to find a way to operate within donald trump's orbit, and he was asked by senator feinstein, do you regret that? do you think you could have pushed back more? i felt listening to that, he should have pushed back. i think he felt that. you could hear it in his voice, maybe if i had been stronger i could have done that. >> i'm not saying comey is not telling the truth. all of the discussion is presuming his account is 100% accurate. >> do you think he would go out in realtime and me thi up out of thin air? is there anything in his 30 years of public serce that would suggest that he would immediately get in a car after a meeting and write fiction? >> we have not seen memos. they're not carbon dated. again, i'm not accusing him of
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making -- >> is anybody questioning the veracity of those memos other than you? >> the white house is. i'm not questioning the content. i'm saying comey yesterday was scathed a little bit on his accounts as we talk about his motives, et cetera, rather than stepping up publicly or confronting the president, he said he gave his friend permission to leak the memos to "the new york times." that's an unorthodox way to behave. >> where? there are a lot of unorthodox people in this white house and past white houses. that is how business is done every day. that's how you write stories every day and everybody at "the washington post," "new york times" and "wall street journal" write stories every single day. there's nothing unorthodox about that. it's the most boringly predictable thing that came out of yesterday. >> not for an fbi director trying to get an independent counsel. there's other ways to do that, stand up to the president, stand
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up to the attorney general, the deputy. >> i will say for kids watching at home and republicans behind me, there's something i never understood. this is whole, don't be afraid of your shadow. if james comey had stood up in one of those meetings, pointed at the president and said, mr. president, what you're asking me to do is unethical, and i will not do it. fire me if you want to obstruct justice. i'm not doing it. he's holding all the cards. that's the one thing i never understood in washington. there are times when actually doing what seems to be dangerous is the safest thing to do. >> the only way to go. >> if he had done that -- first of all, donald trump would have been too scared to fire him. you stay quiet -- >> i wonder that about everybody in the administration honestly, some of the people we're so
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impressed with, that we're holding on to hope for, but also especially his communications staff who repeatedly go out and repeat his lies. sarah huckabee sanders yesterday, that was cringe worthy to hear her say the president is not a liar and i take offense to that. i can sit here for three hours and go over lie after lie after lie, it would be very hard to debunk every one. "the washington post" did a survey of, like, five lies a day. she simply was not telling the truth at all. >> quickly and then we have to go to break. we do have to say, jeff sessions is the first person to go to the president and say, if you don't like what i'm doing, i'll quit. >> that doesn't make me feel better. >> it should. but if i stay here, you've got to back off and let me do his job. guess what? when jeff sessions said that to the president anood up to the bully, he said oh, no, no, i want you to stay here. >> comey had nine times, nine
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interactions to do that, between meetings, the one-on-one dinners and phone calls. we know he's capable, as senator tom cotton pointed out, he recalled the 2004 incident at john ashe croft's bedside where he did stand up and say i'm not going to allow this to lap for the good of our country and the good of the organization. he did not do it with donald trump. >> still ahead on "morning joe," house minority leader nancy pelosi joins us in washington, plus two of the senators present during yesterday's hearing, democrat joe manchin and republican susan collins join the conversation. we'll be right back with more "morning joe" live from washington. ♪ this is a story about mail and packages. and it's also a story about people. people who rely on us every day to deliver their dreams they're handing us more than mail they're handing us their business and while we make more e-commerce deliveries to homes than anyone else in the country,
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what i want to say to the men and women here is two things. number one, thank you, thank you, thank you. thank you for your prayers. thank you for your passion. thank you for your time. thank you for your energy.
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thank you for speaking out and working to retake our nation. >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage the southern regional director of faith and freedom coalition, virginia galloway. >> that's not very nice. that's ted cruz getting an unceremonious send offer following his speech at the faith and freedom coalition. >> he was just going in for the kill, for that last line. >> and finally, let me say -- >> shut him down. >> ask not -- >> you've got to go. you've got to go. >> good-bye. >> let's head over to the white house to nbc news national correspondent peter alexander. >> we'd never cut peter off. you were there covering the comey hearing all day yesterday. we saw the trump tweet.
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>> marc kasowitz's, the president basically saying that james comey is a liar and he vindicated me. so just thinkbout that for a second. puts him in a challenging position as they try to make their argument. strikingly this kweet coming out about 6:10 in the morning, if he had made it three more minutes, it would have been his longest drought since announcing his candidacy back in the day. that was striking as well. the bottom line yesterday is the message discipline, he was off twitter, didn't make any mention of james comey. he was pressed by reporters, ignored it as well. for marc kasowitz, and this was america's introduction to a man who's own website describes him as the toughest of tough guys, he's described as the donald trump of lawyering. he cherry-picked the parts of the testimony they liked saying,
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well, he acknowledged the fact he said i wasn't under investigation, the president wasn't under investigation, but then trying to dispute other portions of it like the idea of a loyalty pledge ever taking place or the idea that he ever told james comey to back off anything. so that was one of the fundamental challenges for the white house right now. obviously the challenge for the white house is broader than communication strategy i think at this point. we did hear from don junior. he described the flynn story as bs. he said very far from any kind of coercion or influence and certainly not obstruction. behind the scenes to give you some color at the white house, every television as you would suspect was watching this play out. the president was monitoring this with his advisors in one of the dining rooms. here is part of what we heard from marc kasowitz. >> the president never in form or substance directed or
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suggested that mr. comey stop investigating anyone include the president never suggested that mr. comey, quote, let flynn go, closed quote. the president also never told mr. comey, quote, i need loyalty, i expect loyalty, closed quote. he never said it in form, and he never said it in substance. mr. comey admitted that he leaked to friends of his purported memos of those privileged communications, although mr. comey testified that he only leaked the memos in response to a tweet, the public record reveals that "the new york times" was quoting from those memos the day before the referenced tweet. we will leave it to the appropriate authorities to determine whether these leaks should be investigated along
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with all the others that are being investigated. >> reporter: the disputes he presented there could easily be settled if the white house released the secret tapes the president has suggested exist but has yet to produce. we asked sarah huckabee sanders, the deputy press secretary, about this sterday, whether there was a recordingr taping system. she joked to reporters she'll haveo look under the couches. >> others in the white house say i can't talk about whether there are tapes. nbc's peter alexander, thanks. >> mark, i want to give you a chance to respond to what attorney marc kasowitz. the memo came after the tweet, not vice versa. >> the first story i did was on the loyalty dinner, the one-on-one where they face off and he asked twice for the loyalty and he declines and he says honest loyalty. it was in the aftermath that twum tweeted, comey better watch
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out there's tapes. the following monday comey wakes up at 2:00 a.m. in the morning and say, hold on, this just dawned on me, if there is a taping system, maybe we can corroborate the conversations i had with the president and sets in motion the things that lead to the meeting about -- with trump about the flynn investigation coming up. >> that was a fictional account of what happened yesterday. >> the facts were not accurate. >> the donald trump of lawyers as they say. let's talk about the february 14th article, you're still standing by it, that comey says was inaccurate. why are you standing by the story? what can you tell us about it? >> what happened yesterday is the senator asked about this february 14th story. comey said it was mostly not true. we spent an enormous amount of time on this story, including yesterday. our reporting shows there's
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indeed been extensive contact between the trump associates and russian officials and we've cited -- wrote a whole story today that laid out the case of why we still think that is. comey did not say specifically what issues he had with the story. we went to the fbi and asked them. they did not. we think maybe the fbi may be putting a fine definition on intelligence officials. they may be saying that the amount of intercepted calls that we think there were was wrong, but our reporting still supports it. it's also something that a lot of other outlets have reported. >> the reporting you stand by and the reporting that you continue to get and there's abundant evidence out there is that the overall view of the story, that there were an abundant amount of contacts between trump's people and russian official is still an
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accurate part of that story. >> correct. we continue to report on this story because obviously there's questions about it. we continue to push. we're as upfront as we could be in the paper today, we'll continue to do that. >> michael schmidt, thank you. >> whatever you did yesterday -- >> we were watching in the hospital. your facebook thing is a lwas good. >> it was a little different. i got cticisms about my tie. >> you have great presence. >> i don't know. that was some of the criticisms yesterday. >> some. >> don't beat yourself. >> top political reporters join the conversation, "washington post's" bob costa and glenn thrush from "the new york times." back in a minute.
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there's a potential major shakeup in england following yesterday's general elections. in a surprising outcome, the conservative party has lost its majority resulting in what's known as a hung parliament.
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jeremy corbyn celebrated last night after his labor party had a stronger-than-expected showing. it's a major blow to prime minister theresa may who called the snap election early in order to bolster her position during brexit negotiations, although now her future in power is uncertain. within the next hour, may is meeting with the queen to ask for permissn toorm a government. with us, washington anchor for "bbc world news america" and "morning joe" special guest katty kay. >> katty, we were talking about this before. i heard on the bbc last night that theresa may actually got 44%, which was about the same that tony blair got and margaret thatcher got in huge landslide victories. why wasn't 44% enough for her to get a majority? >> what theresa may did, her majority expanded in safe tory
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seats. the labor party managed to encroach in conservative areas, scotland, london, southeast england and took away some pretty critical seats. even kensington -- the places you stay in london, joe, which are looking safe -- >> oh, my god i may have nowhere to go. >> this was the revenge of young voters who failed to turn out in the brexit elections and turned out this time around and voted heavily for the labor party, who liked what they saw in jeremy corbyn, didn't like the stiff candidate that theresa may was. london was furious with the tory party. >> you have that. did she ever recover from the so-called dementia tax? >> no. up to when the tory party
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manifesto -- after the manifesto her numbers plummeted. >> the conservatives started to get momentum to start pushing back against that, there was a terrorist attack. those two terrorist attacks may not have changed votes. it did stop the momentum. the dementia tax hung over the heads throughout the campaign. >> watching this from a great distance, i thought it was her inability to speak to the country powerfully that the terror attacks that hurt her. >> we went into the election with a female candidate who was supposed to win. she was far ahead in the polls. she was the heir apparent, running against somebody hated by his own party, seen as too far out there, seen as a useless candidate which is why we all thought she was smart to call this snap election, right? sounds very familiar to the
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american voters. the wooden stiff candidate in an era where people want authenticity failed to connect with voters and he managed to do so. >> what does this mean o for brexit? >> this is a huge deal for britain and how we negotiate britain is a very important question. at the moment it looks like we'll have to have another election in the uk, which means we could spend the two years of the brexit negotiations having non-stop general elections instead. we're like italy. >> how exciting. mark halperin, if you look at what happened in britain, you can even say what happened in ance, what'sappening across the world, there's no doubt younger voters, especially in america, younger voters are not just going left, they're going way left. younger voters are energized by corb corbyn. younger voters are energized by bernie, by socialists. >> within the tory party they have to decide if she should
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remain the leader. corbyn has some hold over his constituency nationally, but not a huge one. part of it is young people are attracted to him at some level, but there's still a need to figure out a future-oriented agenda for young people. i don't think either of them has it -- >> there is no anti brexit party. voting labor was not a vote against brexit because labor is also in favor of doing the brexit negotiations. >> coming up, the top democrat in the house, congress woman nancy pelosi joins us. "morning joe" is coming right back.
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xfinity mobile. time now for the must-read opinion pages. we picked erick erickson who writes, quote, the president seems to prietd himself on his ignorance. he has taken at face value that people rejected politics as usual and politicians as usual.
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he has doubled down on that and refuses to learn the boundaries and parameters of his job. the president is not supposed to be king. he is not above the law. congress is a coequal branch of government. the republicans there need to make sure the president knows there are boundaries, there are parameters. and if he does not learn them, he needs to turn over the office to someone who will. if your goal is to stop the left, all trump is doing is both emboldening them and driving independent voters to them. soon he will be a catalyst for a left wing resurgence if republicans do not sort this out themselves. i did speak slowly hoping that he was listening. >> eric -- i'm sure -- >> not talking about eric. >> it's not really eric. it's not even whoever you want to listen. it's the republicans behind us.
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you can look, mark, poll after poll, and it shows that independents who helped republicans win big in 2016, one year to the democrats. you look at -- you know, there's a reason why donald trump has 75% approval rating in the republican party but only a 36, 37% approval rating nationally. the left is emboldened and independents are deserting the republican people as quickly as possible. >> and the lock is ticking to the mid terms and number of legislative days left. the bet that mitch mcconnell and paul ryan are making, that despite everything that eric erickson cites there, they will have passed legislation, the stock market will be up higher and they will be doing better. that is the bet. >> david ignatius, what are they going to pass? a health care plan that the cbo says kicks 24 million people off
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health care? i know conservatives hate that line. that's what the congressional budget office is saying. now mick mulvaney can say its irrelevant but that's the refuge of the truly desperate. >> i hear people talking more and more about tax legislation that seems to give people money that is stimulative. subject of the week today for the white house, i think republicans realize that with this cloud, the mueller cloud continuing through next year, they need to pass legislation. this has been a republican congress that h done nothing with its joriti. and if that continues, they're going to get clobbered. quite apart from the scandal issues. >> and, katty, they are working, mitch mcconnell, ted cruz and others, on the health care bill in the senate quietly because all the talk has been about russia and our focus is on the comey hearings and other things. they would like, this summer, to get something done before the
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recess. >> they've been having those secret meetings that we keep hearing about. the trouble is that as soon as they stop being secret, the chances of moderate republicans, they're still in the same position in the senate. how are you going to get enough moderate republicans to sign on to get the bill pass bid the house passed? that was not -- in making that bill more conservative, in making that bill satisfactory for the freedom caucus, it's very hard to see how they get that through moderates. they've still got the same problem in the senate. >> you know, there's some talk, mark, that rob portman and senator caputo from west virginia are moving towards getting rid of the medicaid guarantee. but, again, even if they try to pass that through the senate, that cuts against the very people who voted for donald trump. >> well, look, this is a multi-step process on both the legislative front and on the pr front. mitch mcconnell wants to get
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this done. he's very crafty. he has a pretty good hold over the conference. what they say they need to do is get a bill out of the senate, go to conference and then they need to do a significantly better pr job, trying to explain to their own constituents why this is the national interest even though lots of people will be worse off if they pass it in the short term. >> we have this ad on the dccc on health care. take a look at this. ♪ >> i mean, that's what republicans are going to be watching for the next year and a half, if they pass the health
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care bill. the house republicans are already strapped with that. i understand sometimes you jump first, ask questions later. i have it hard to believe that rob portman wants that hanging over him the rest of his career, that pat toomey wants that hanging over him in the philadelphia suburbs for the rest of their career. they don't and i don't see them voting for a bill that the congressional budget office says kicks 20 to 25 million people off the roles. they can say that's garbage all they want. if you have cbo on your side, you're in pretty good standing on the 30-second ads. >> the alternative is that the promise that every republican made for the last seven years is broken. >> by the way only 28% of americans support trumpcare. 66% disapprove. >> he and the congress have done
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almost nothing to sell the benefits of this in the long term. >> what are the benefits of this? >> are there any? >> they believe -- i'm telling you what their argument is, market-oriented health care system where more people will have better coverage. >> even conservatives don't believe that. >> what's the truth? >> that's the oblem. >> but i'm telling you,he problem is that many people in capitol hill believe this, the legislative agenda could be dead if they don't pass health care. >> and if you receive health care through obamacare, republican or democrat, hearing that there will be, down the road, market-driven opportunities that will help you get health care, all they know is they're taking it away from you right now. there's no guarantee i'm going to have it down the road. >> and president trump is making our lives terrible again. >> all they need to do is look what donald trump promised himself in the campaign. >> you can't really look at anything he says because he means nothing. >> in the 30-second commercials, mika, in the 30-second commercials, having donald trump promising expanded health care and then having the
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congressional budget office saying it's going to cut 24 million. you just go down the line. he made five or six promises repeatedly. every one of them is broken. every one of them, sarah huckabee sanders, is a lie. despite what he promised in the campaign, that's what republicans will see, along with ads like that. they will be destroyed. >> and it won't require demigoguery, just facts. >> no, just facts. it's over. i've found a permanent escape from monotony. together, we are perfectly balanced. our senses awake. our hearts racing as one. i know this is sudden, but they say...if you love something set it free. see you around, giulia
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save when you buy now. so it confused me when i saw on television the president saying he actually fired me because of the russian investigation. i also was confused by the explanation offered publicly. although the law required no reason at all to fire an fbi director, the administration then chose to defame me and, more importantly, the fbi, by saying that the organization was in disarray, that it was poorly led, that the workforce had lost confidence in its leader. those were lies, plain and simple. >> let's start with the january 6th meeting in trump tower. what was it about that meeting that led you to determine you needed to start putting down a written record? >> a combination of things.
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i think the circumstances, the subject matter and the person i was interacting with. i was honestly concerned he might lie about the nature of our meeting and i thought it really important to document. that combination of things, i had never experienced before, but it led me to believe i have got to write it down and in a very detailed way. >> that was the former fbi director, accusing the president of lying. >> pretty persuasive. >> yeah. this morning, the president is up and tweeting this morning. despite so many false statements and lies, total and complete vindication. and, wow, comey is a leaker. welcome back to "morning joe." it's friday, june 9th. >> let me tell you something. if i ever get to the stage in my life where what happened yesterday is vindication for me -- >> that's a bad day. >> just going to dig a hole in the backyard and bury myself. >> david ignatius -- >> if that's vindication for you, my friend, things have gotten especially bad. >> joining us, national affairs
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analyst john heilman, glenn thrush and political reporter for the washington post and moderator of "washington week" on pbs, robert costa. >> so, bob, the republicans seem to be circling the wagon yesterday, seemed to be trying to defend trump as much as they could. was that your take? >> i think the line of questioning was pretty partisan. it's reflective that most republicans know that trump still has the base, the republican party core voters still pretty much with president trump but privately on capitol hill a lot of them are starting to feel unease about how this is proceeding. the president did wait until 6:10 am this morning to tweet. glenn and maggie over at "the times," my colleagues were writing how the president was not tweeting. when i was filing that story yesterday i was hoping that that would stay the case, at least until deadline. >> a couple more hours. it's surprising. marco rubio, a guy that trump
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humiliated through the entire campaign, called him little marco. >> trolled him, tortured him. >> trolled him, tortured him, said he sweated so much, he thought he was going to knock him out or thought he was going to pass out. marco gets invited over to the white house and then the next day, he's -- somebody said i read on twitter he went from little marco to trump's wing man. it was surprising. >> it was quite a turn. >> it must have been quite a dinner. what do you think -- >> what do you think they had? >> senator rubio, having covered him in the last few months as he returns to the senate, he's trying to rebuild his political profile nationally. rubio is indicative of a lot of senators. they're not really spoiling for a fight with trump. this isn't august of '74 for the republican party. this isn't people really grappling behind the scenes with the president they think is out of line. do they have concerns? yes. they think the president has many problems and controversies that could suffocate the entire republican agenda. at the same time they're still
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taking up for him publicly. >> why? >> behind the scenes they're not concerned about him -- >> being a loose canon? >> -- firing an fbi director to kill an investigation into russia meddling into the election? >> they know the question of obstruction of justice does hangover this entire situation but they're not sure if comey's comments lead into that becoming any kind of criminal -- >> right but donald trump himself said i fired james comey -- >> correct. >> -- to get the pressure off of me, my dear russian friends. >> are we speaking a different language than everybody here in washington? >> now he is fired and the pressure is off of us. that doesn't disturb republicans? >> the way they saw the comey testimony was this was one obstacle to get through. at the end of the day, bob mueller and the special counsel will bring down the hammer on president trump or not. >> what does a republican like marco rubio or paul ryan get out
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of jumping in the bunker with donald trump? >> this is new for the president. this is new? that's not what i want to hear. >> to what end? what's the strategy if there is one? >> you talk to republicans. they say that the country is so divided, the political esblishment and media have seen their capital diminish, that breaking with trump has an immense political cost that we don't always calculate in our reporting. if they break with trump, their career could be truly threatened not just in a primary but in terms of the entire national reputation. >> that is so backwards. there are so many careers to be made right now by being a thoughtful conservative that actually opposes the thuggishness. republicans, it's your time. if you have the courage to come out and oppose the thuggishness of donald trump, that's a big one. talk about a huge lane for a good conservative to drive down.
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trump said he was vindicated yesterday. what say you, jon heilman? >> to me -- look, you're on the cover of the new york daily news with the giant word "liar" on your face. >> he reads that. >> he does and you have the fbi director calling you a liar. >> it's not just "the daily news." >> i'm using one example zblfr major paper. look at that one. >> it's hard to say complete and total vindication i think it's been said that yesterday could have been worse for trump. one thing that trump maintained that people doubted was that comey had suggested to him that he was not under investigation, and that turned out at least to be true. in that sense, he was vindicated on that. >> true at that time. >> true at that time. >> not necessarily true now. >> in trump's mind that was an important thing. he had claimed that was true. comey backed him up on that point. putting aside the question of vindication, it seems to me
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almost totally irrelevant what was true in february and january and march and april. the only questions now is what is true today and going forward? again as you have noted on the show, it was almost -- now we're almost certain on the basis of two things. one, what comey said yesterday and suggested yesterday about mueller and obstruction of justice and, secondly, the fact that comey's notes, his memos, have been turned over to mueller and they've not been turned over yet to the senate. they're squarely in mueller's crosshairs, the obstruction issue. going today the president is almost certainly under investigation for obstruction of justice and possibly collusion, much more relevant than what was happening in february. >> that's the reality now. >> yeah. >> it certainly looks that way. these are the newspapers that donald trump reads from every story written. >> and cares about. >> trump trying to seek inquiry, comey says.
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peter baker, respected reporter for trump, a looming cloud just grew that much darker. front page -- >> does he read beyond the headlines? >> front page of "usa today," comey calls trump a liar. "washington post" comey says trump ed about him. "the new york daily news"hich he reads, "liar" across his face. glenn thrush, doesn't sound like any vindication for donald trump. sounds like things got more complicated for him. >> i think, as john pointed out -- i'm happy they raised the chair. >> we did that for you. >> first time in my life i'm taller than john. >> you look good today, glenn. >> much better than you're portrayed on "saturday night live." >> i know. it's not fair. i don't get it. >> i don't either. >> but go ahead. >> i think he -- >> you brought this on yourself. >> i did.
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i think there's no vindication. as john pointed out, legal issues are significant for him. comey said he had no insight whatsoever into what mueller was looking into. as for the senate, it's it said more about marco rubio than overall conditions. this is the guy who was born without the audacity gene and he doesn't want to challenge the president. you cannot change presidents like spark plugs. if you pull trump out of there, it's not like the car's going to just keep running. their fate is tied to him. as long as they can kind of keep him running, patch him together and keep him rd worthy, they have at least some possibility of getting something done. here is the thing. a lot of them walked the plank for him yesterday. a lot of them put themselves in an awkward position. they are going to demand some sort of payment, in terms of change of behavior or capacity to dictate terms. >> that's just not going to
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happen. why would you walk the plank for someone who has proven over and over and over again to the point where there's no other option that he's going to bully you. he's going to betray you. he's going to lie to you and he's going to undermine you with a tweet the minute you think you're getting anywhere. like paul ryan. i wouldn't do this. i'm begging you not to do this. don't say he's new at this. you're acting like he can learn. let's take a look at the past six months. and anyone name a moment when this president has evolved in any way. if anything, what you have seen is someone who has devolved, who has really turned himself into a complete -- i think he called the media like turning themselves into a pretzel when he would make fun of them. i'm not trying to be funny. he has literally devolved to the point where there is concern about his health or about his ability to take in information and use it correctly. it's like a child almost. >> let's look, jon heileman, at
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what's happened over the past two weeks. >> how do you walk the plank for that? >> if you're walking the plank now for donald trump, you have to have some reason in faith that he is going to get better. the last two weeks have been the worst. look what he did with qatar. he had no idea that one of our most important air basesn t world is qatar. he let them know b tweet storm that we're no longer an ally. he tweeted about the travel ban. thank you, mika. >> that's idiotic. that's self destruction. >> george conway, himself, has said you have just basically lost the case. >> in a second. because he couldn't help himself. >> and i have so many more, mika. thank you so much. article v of the nato guarantee that mattis wanted stripped out. the way he treated our nato allies. >> what a joke he is abroad. >> you could literally go down and find 15 things over the past
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two weeks where it's shown that he has devolved in his ability to control himself or his outbursts. >> not well. >> given the things you've cited and the trajectory that we're on, on the legal political front, you then cite the things you just cited and look forward and look where we are on the status of health care reform, tax reform, the way in which all of this has consumed the capital. bob, to your point, i understand that right now, republicans in congress look at the calculus and say it would be too expensive, to costly for us to up end trump right now. there will bel come a moment where trump's numbers will reach a tipping point and it's too expensive to stick with trump. >> what moment is that? >> we see his poll numbers now in the high 30s. we think the trump base is, what, about 25% or 27% of the electorate. he has another 10 points to drop. what is going to stop that, given the behavioral -- we see
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the behavior joe just cited and the state of where his legislativ agenda is right now. what is the thing that will put the brakes on declining poll numbers that if they drop low enough, get to 30, say, senate republicans say it's now more expensive to stick with him than to leave him. >> what poll is that? our timecode is blocking that. what poll is that, alex? quinnipiac? quinnipiac has a 34% approval rating, 57% disapproval. horrific. gallup has him at a 37% approval rating. people like to get in their cars and drive out to, you know, my hometown or somebody else's -- your hometown and talk to three guys in a bar and say, look, they're still with him! but, you know, you have people that -- my dad -- i'm not being facetious. my dad was with richard nixon until august 6th, 1974.
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he resigned, what, august 8th? he resigned two days later. this is not the story. it's the independents that are flooding away. it's the democrats who are getting energized. >> what about the shredding of our constitution? >> i would venture the republicans are not watching the polls as much as you think. they're not driven so much by ideology. most republicans privately will acknowledge that their party is in the thrall of the celebrity anti-establishnt populism, that they don't really know how to handle. so it's not about breaking from trump. it's that the whole party has become this anti-media, really nonideological, very partisan but not for an ideological reason political organization. how do you deal with the -- >> it's about resentment.
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>> grievance party, how do you break with the party if the president is the king of grievance? >> shoveling more things like taking away their health care. >> if you're the grievance party because the guy at the top of the ticket is the grievance candida candidate, and you're attacking the media nonstop, the fbi, the cia, and freaks on cable news late at night are talking about deep state conspiracies that the fbi and cia have against you, but you're embracing people that work for russia, if that's where the conservative party is now, what is the future once donald trump leaves the stage? they are setting themselves up for an ultimate collapse. >> i also think what you're looking at when you look at those poll numbers, david ignatius is a party, a group of conservatives who voted for donald trump because he was a middle finger to the establishment, because he offended the media, progressives and offended the establishment. but they also wanted jobs, health care. they wanted their lives made
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better. under this cloud of russia and everything else that donald trump has brought on himself, there has been no progress in that direction. the people may still be with him. we talk about this floor he has, 36% or 39%. they're not going to be there forever. >> people want accomplishments from their president, from the republican congress, if they're republicans. one of the most interesting set of poll numbers i saw over the last week came from nate silver, looking at the sharp declines among strong supporters of donald trump, the real trump base. numbers suggesting that there was a ten-point drop in support from white males without college education. other numbers like that, suggesting real erosion among these core supporters who were the angriest. people have to get more of that up raised middle finger as we head into the mid term elections. republicans have to pass legislation. i do think republicans may have
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an issue if they can run against bob mueller, against the elites who are attacking the president, if they can characterize this investigation as illegitimate and attempt to take away their president, their victories, i think that's going to be a very divisive, difficult issue. basically they need legislation. >> they will not be able to run against bob mueller. >> what did the president say yesterday at the faith of freedom conference? he said we are under siege. everyone is taking you on, they're taking us on. >> siege. sorry. first time he said the word. >> everybody else is fighting you. i'm with you. >> what's the market -- here is the question. you talk about 28%. what's the actual market for that, right? how many people, how many of his supporters -- we've seen this enormous erosion on independents. 70% of independents don't believe trump on any of this
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comey stuff, extremely dangerous number for the white house and one they're actually considering. once you get past this grievance, where are people going to be energized? energy is not on the right. the reason why trump is up there, screaming, saying i'm with you -- by the way, the irony -- i've seen this. i was with him in lynch burg a couple of weeks ago. trump is appealing to his core being evangelical christians is noan inconceivable irony, considering where he was last year. he is out the doing that because he needs to fire up a base that isn't energized. >> i talked to a friend from south carolina, who was astounded that all her friends who grew up in very conservative christian schools, all of her friends on facebook were all in for donald trump during the campaign. so i just asked, are they still going up on facebook? she said no. it's gone quiet. >> i've had that experience. >> they're not -- now, listen,
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if they had a chance to vote for donald trump and hillary clinton a thousand times more in their life, they would always vote for donald trump, but they're not at the barricades for him anymore. and, in fact, they're embarrassed and they wish he would stop tweeting. and this is the sort of thing. it is the intensity of support. we see this all the time. we saw it with george w. bush in 2006. it's war. it's us against them. in 2001. in 2002, max mccleland is not a real war hero. he beats john kerry, who is weak, flip flopper. in 2006, they all kind of wander away. a good friend of mine who say pastor from pensacola, florida, actually told me in 2004 he had to sit down with people in his baptist church and explain to them, seriously, that you could be -- >> this disease -- >> let me finish, please. that you could be a christian and still vote for john kerry.
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like this has infected this party before. it didn't just start with donald trump. it's definitely there now. >> just going to say, i think it's terminalhis time. go ahead. glenn? >> i was out in cincinnati with him a couple of days ago. it was a hand-picked crowd. by the way, he can't go to a big city. it has to be on the exurbs of the city, get in, fly out quickly. it was a fairly small crowd, 400, 500 people. i talked to two, three dozen people. the level of intensity of support compared to the rallies we saw last year, way, way down. antagonism toward the media -- i identified myself as a "new york times" reporter, did not have a bodyguard with me. and the antagonism toward the media is less intense. >> that's because they recognize
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you from "saturday night live." >> if you have the energy, you have an opponent, especially if you have a flawed opponent, the campaign setting, one on one in the ring every day. when you get into this setting, the threat of the opponent is much more diffuse. you don't have an individual. it's hard to make bob mueller the enemy. much more diffuse set of challenges. if you're just running on grievance, it's harder. the energy is not -- still that energy when the opponent is that diused. >> they're struggling at the white house. they're trying to turn to infrastructure this week. republican cease infrastructure as tax credits and democrats see it as spending. how do they reconcile that? the white house doesn't seem to have an answer. >> by the way, we all talk about this like it's just politics. it's just politics. we like trump. we like this team, that team.
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we keep forgetting that donald trump won, in part, in wisconsin, michigan, and upper midwest states because people that voted for barack obama, one in five voted for barack obama five years ago, voted for donald trump. when donald trump promised he was going to giving people better health care, they believed him. >> right. >> when donald trump promised he wasn't going to give more tax cuts to the rich, that he was going to help working class american, they believed him. right now -- let me show you who they are. this is who they are, right here. ♪
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>> you know, you can be an aide, sit there in the oval office, think this is all fun and games and you can do analytics and manipulate this and manipulate that. at the end of the day it's human beings with children who voted for you because they believed you were going to make their lives better. that's why they didn't vote for bush or clinton. the bushes and the clintons, if hillary had won, would have controlled the white house for 34 out of 48 years. they saw their lives going down. so when working class americans suddenly say, wait a second. i'm reading the news i'm going to lose my health care. suddenly, that cuts to the quick there. it's not just about james comey or a russian investigation. it's about their lives. >> that's a choice democrats are going to have to make.
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are you really going to run on the obstruction cloud, russia collusion or against the republican health care plan? i think the problem many republicans have, they look at history. they look at an outsider president. jimmy carter's first year in 1977, bill clinton's first year in 1993. even president obama struggled. people thought he would lose because of how health care was unfolding in 2009. they wonder, based on history, could trump, even if the house majorities get swept away in 2018, does he come back? presidents come back. at this point, 140 days in, despite of everything you've laid out, joe, they're not walking away. >> i will add, that ad will hold up whether or not health care becomes law, whether or not they repeal obamacare. donald trump flanked by mostly white men, republicans standing behind him in the rose garden where they cheered for a bill that the cbo says takes 24 million people off the health care roles for 20 years.
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that die iscast. whether or not it becomes a law, he voted for that, supported that, advocated for that idea. still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> it's not a republican thing or democratic thing. it really is an american thing. they're going to come for whatever party they choose to try and work on behalf of. and they're not devoted to either, in my experience. they're just about their own advantage, and they will be back. >> that's my observation. i don't think put sin a republican or democrat. he's an opportunist. >> i think that's a fair statement. >> we'll be joined by two senators who questioned the fbi director yesterday, senator susan collins and joe manchin. plus, house minority leader nancy pelosi joins us as well.
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the russians interfered in our election during the 2016 cycle. they did it with purpose, with sophistication. they did it with overwhelming technical efforts and it was an active measures campaign, driven from the top of that government. there is no fuzz on that. it is a high confidence judgment of the entire intelligence community and the members of this committee have seen the intelligence. it's not a close call. that happened. that's about as unfake as you can possibly get. >> joining us now, member of the select committee on intelligence, democratic senator joe manchin of west virginia. senator, good morning. good to see you. >> joe. >> how are you? >> i'm doing well, thank you. what was the biggest thing you learned yesterday? what was your takeaway? something you walked in that room that you didn't know and after hearing director comey's testimony, you now know?
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>> mika, i want you to know that my wife, gayle and i, our family, our thoughts and prayers are with you today and your family as you say good-bye to your dad. i just want you to know that we're thinking of you very, very deeply. >> thank you. we are saying good-bye today, actually, after the show. we're all going to church. >> i know. >> senator, thank you. thank you so much. >> i know. >> thank you. so now to willie's question. >> okay. wi willie, let me just say, russia's involvement, russia's intent, how doing ggedly they t humanly possible and how they will continue to try to change how we do business in america, how we have confidence in our government. they are not our allies, our friends. we need to work with them, have a working relationship. i'm the first to say that. but i also know their purpose and what they're trying to do and we're not going to tolerate or stand for it.
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i want the public to know about it. >> that was the point, senator, that director comey made over and over again. >> yes. >> this is not a republican or democrat thing. russia has attacked us and will be back for more. they'll be back in our next election so we have to be vigilant about it. in terms of the relationship between the russia investigation, this white house, what was something new that you learned? what can americans take away from that hearing? >> there's an awful lot of us on both sides of the aisle that are very uncomfortable with this relationship that they seem to have with the white house. it goes all the way the day comey was fired to date after the russians were there, not allowing the united states of america's press in, the free press of america but let the controlled press of russia in. those are concerning things. people have talked about that. let me say, first of all, i thanked former director comey for coming openly. he came twice.
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he came, as you saw the open meeting we had. then we had a classified, closed meeting. and he stayed for that. and if you saw his answers on some, he says i can't speak about that in this open hearing. we did go into a closed hearing. also he has put under oath when he first came in. he is a private citizen now. if he would have been an elected official out of courtesy, they don't do that because they've already taken their oath. that's how that started that meeting and sometimes people wonder why it's done that way. i wanted to clarify that. >> hearing that jared kushner is going to be meeting with the intelligence committee staff, do we have any idea when that's going to happen? do we know if he has turned over any documents? >> let me just say that everything that i know, jared has been very forthcoming and willing to help and sit down. he has not been saying i'm not coming. he has not been difficult at all. he and the people that work with
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him have been very cooperative. we appreciate that very much. mika, i said if everyone would just come forth -- if you saw the meeting the day before we had with the four highest intelligence people we had, as far as the fbi director, and now the acting attorney general on this russian investigation. we had mike rogers and also dan coats. that was painful. it was painful for us to get any information from them. they just said we're not going to speak about that. i felt that absolutely horrible that they would take that position. it was almost on the brinks of contempt, because it was not classified information we were asking in an open meeting and so they did say -- and i was very appreciative of this. i asked point blank mike rogers and dan coats would you answer diven ly differently if you came into the secured closed meeting we have? they said yes. and they couldn't come that
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afternoon. it couldn't be arranged. >> katty? >> after hearing white house counsel basically saying that the president didn't ask for loyalty and didn't ask mr. comey to back off on the flynn investigation, and you heard the director yesterday, you were there. who seems more credible if this is going to come down to he said, he said, who do you believe, jim comey or donald trump's lawyer's account? >> let's just set the stage of what we were in. we were in an open meeting. he was sworn in under oath. he is a professional, law enforcement officer of the highest degree, knowing the consequences if you lie under oath to a senate committee. so, i would think that mr. comey is basically explaining to us and giving us his reminiscing of the events that happened in a
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most accurate way. there would be no reason for me to believe anything other than he was being as honest and straightforward as he possibly could. >> does that mean you don't believe the white house counsel's account? >> everybody seems to have different opinions of this. we don't have the white house counsel under oath. they weren't there. if they want to make that statement in front of us and go under oath and give us the same recollection of what they have. that would be the way that you could find out. until that happens we only had one person under oath and that was james comey. and, you know, he knows the consequences. you cannot come in front of a committee, raise your hand and be sworn in and tell us something coletely false o lie to us. it just doesn't work. mark halperin? >> we'll see. this is troubling, very troubling. you know that. we've got to get past this and find out the facts and move on. i was hoping, all of you
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there -- mark, i'll go right to you, but i was hoping that everybody came away yesterday seeing that that was a bipartisan, professional approach to what we should be doing in the committee. i always felt so strong and so good about being on that committee. both richard burr and mark warner have done a gentleman's job of holding it together in the most professional manner. >> what was the current theory of the case about what was going on with michael flynn in russia and michael flynn in turkey? >> michael flynn, all of a sudden, shut down. first of all, he wanted to tell us his story. that came out first. i want to tell my story, tell you exactly what happened. all of a sudden he got lawyered up and now we have to subpoena just to get his records, if you will. >> based on what you know, what's your theory about his relationship with them? >> with the russians? >> and with turkey. >> is that the question? >> turkey?
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>> what's tyour view of his relationship with russia and turkey? >> yeah. well, it's one that we didn't know was as in depth as it is. we did not know the financial ramifications of this and his financial well-being, if you will. that was not given up front. we're starting to find that out and pulling that up as records come out. it's all troubling, especially put at the highest level that he was. and they intended to keep him there. that was not something that was comforting for any of us. and we're waiting to get michael before us. i mean, i knew mike flynn when he was in his capacity as department of defense. had no problem whatsoever. i can't tell you what happened. this is not the michael flynn i knew before, from what i'm hearing and seeing and also his "for hire" type attitude. it's one thing to want to go out and make a living for your
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family. it's another thing to do it and jeopardize the well-being of the united states of america. >> senator joe manchin, we'll end it there. thank you very, very much for being on this morning. >> well -- >> and thank you for your kind words. >> well, thank you. thank you all for what you're doing. it's been a tough day yesterday, couple of days has been tough but we're going to get through this. this country is resilient. it's stronger than that. we have faced more challenges than this and we'll come out of this. we will. the senate intelligence committee will get the facts and the fact also lead us to the truth and the truth shall set you free. >> all right. senator joe manchin. still to come, under the radar. the house took a big step to undo major portions of dodd/frank under the heat of the testimony. nancy pelosi joins the table just ahead.
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coming up next, senator susan collins. >> wave, mika, as you go past! >> former fbi director, how he leaked through to the press
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find your awesome with the xfinity x1 voice remote. this is exciting. >> you would have thought people would have picked that up. >> i would have thought so. >> what are you talking about? >> seems pretty obvious to me. >> the front page of "the daily news"? >> this is exciting. >> senator susan collins of maine. >> great state of maine. i love mainers. >> you have good taste. >> i know. they don't hold back. >> that's true. >> yes. sorry. >> every question now is an easy question. let's start with jon heileman. john? >> we've been talking about the attorney general and what unfolded in the testimony that related to him, what jim comey said. in closed session it's been reported by nbc news that senators learned there was an
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undisclosed third meeting betweensions and the russians and then yesterday after that meeting, senator manchin, who was just on the show came out and said, quote, there's one meeting we don't know about and people would like to know about it." what can you tell us about that? >> well, in a closed session, of course, i can't tell you much about it. let me say this. the committee is going to be requesting documents and an interview with the attorney general and there are some unanswered questions. the attorney general clearly made the right decision in recusing himself from the russian investigation in light of the report of these meetings. and he made the right call. >> i thought it was fascinating -- >> is it right, though, that there's a third meeting, that that's what you want to get more information about? >> i truly can't answer that question because of the -- >> good try, john heileman. >> how fascinating, david
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ignatius, that jim comey said that because of information i can't tell you here, the attorney general had no choice but to recuse himself. >> he knew something was i want to ask senator collins, one of the interesting issues that was discussed of yesterday's hearing was the question of taping in the white house. when come y realized that sudden suddenly it may have been taped, his deviant changed. what can you do to get a holdf them? >> we need access to those tapes and special counsel needs access to those tapes. i have doubts whereabouther the exist or in attempt by the president putting pressure on mr. comey or raise some doubts.
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>> should the white house tell you whether they have tapes or not instead of playing games with us all and everyday. >> and pushing republicans to show for the white house? >> we have the right to know whether there are tapes. this reminds me of the taping system, of course, it reminds of all of us of richard nixon had and he press was ordered to turn over the tape. that president has been established and we do need to know whether it exists and we do need access to them. i cannot imagine special counsel mueller is going to want access to those tapes. >> the president tweeted this morning saying james comey is a leaker. he's talking about the testimony where he gave over the questions
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and who then gave it to new york times. is that a leak as what you understand it per se? >> i consider that to be a government work product. after all, it was produced on an fbi computer. it was immediately aft his various meetings with the president. he memoralized them in each memo. when i asked him that question, i did out of curiosity because there is been so many reports in the press about these memo memos -- how did it get there? i asked him never dreaming that he would say that i gave it to a
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columbia professor with expressed direction for him to get it out in the press in the hopes of prompting the appointment of a special counsel. >> did it concern you that he passed that document on? >> james comey i believe to be an honorable individual and a person of integrity. for him to turn out to have leaked a document -- >> was it a leak? >> i view it that way regardless of his motivation. i think his motivation may have been a good one. >> how could you call it a leak? >> it was not a classified document. >> it was not a classified document to the best of my knowledge. if it is a government's work product, it belongs to the fbi
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and not a prite citizen. a better way was to give it to our committee or to the special counsel, since a special counsel was appointed. >> i find him to be a credible candidate and thorough. he testified under oath. >> the follow up then do you find the president to be an honest and trust worthy man. >> i put more credance in testimonies that's given under oath. i think he should have told the president when he made an outrageous and unacceptable request that he dropped or let
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go the michael flynn investigation. he should have said mr. president, i cannot do that and you should not be asking me to do that. >> all right. i will take that an answer. >> susan collins, thank you very much for being with us. >> is it remarkable when you ask a question and you got an answer from james comey. >> fun, is it? >> still ahead, nancy pelosi is joining us live and we'll play more of james comey's testimony yesterday from capitol hill and why he says the president requests of an oath of loyalty made him feel so uncomfortable. >> the statute of justice has a blindfold out because you are not supposed to peak out with your patrons see what you are doing. ♪ (woman) one year ago today mom started searching for her words.
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but the true secret to his perfection... was a heart, twice the size of an average horse. . the president is new at this. he's new to government so he's not steeped of protocols. he's just new to this. >> welcome back to "morning joe" it is friday june 9th. we have our senior analysts m m
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huffin and joining us is nancy pelosi. >> mike barnicle , you got to be pleased, michael flynn is your guy. >> all right, we have speaker to be, nancy pelosi. how are you doing this morning? >> well, how are you ing? >> the country is great and can withstand anything and god is always with us. i think we can survive. >> lets talk about that. there is a lot of people who are concerned and again we have a lot to talk about and a lot of news yesterday. i am so glad to hear you say that. our system has been challenged and our courts have been challenged and the independence and the judiciary has been challenged. so many institutions that we have always taken for grant it have been challenged. yet six months in, they stood
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some heaard attacks. everything you described is our system of checks and balances. >> right. >> and freedoms of our bill of rights. we have to recognize what is happening because this is not a strengthen of our country. it is not bringing our country together. >> no. >> we have a bigger responsibility bigger than politics aof republicans and democrats to put these places in place. >> how do we get out of these political tribes. every two years we hear somebody comes along and we are going to figure out a way for both sides to work together. how do we ever get to that point? >> one of the biggest divisions of the congress of the united states is triple down economic verses middle class and income. that economics -- that's everything you see when
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republicans disagree with trump. trump is an enable for them and they are an enable for him for that economic principle. you know it well. they sacrifice everything on that alter. abraham lincoln, to the extent that we can take this argument and debate to the american people and we come up with a compromise, respect. i always grant people their position and i respect they believe something. i don't know what the president believes. >> hold on, you may not agree but you respect. >> and mike pence. >> and where can you guys meet then? >> can you think of an issue that you can work with donald trump? >> we have always worked on infrastructure together and never political until president obama made some suggestions. i think we have to step back and observe what one of the branches of government are doing. we have someone in the white house who really is disrupting
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the checks and balances system whether it is the courts or commons or not. new yorkers have said to me, you watch this behavior, this is how he operates and you judge it. first he will try to charm you and if that does not work, he will bullies you and walks away from you. if that does not work, he will sue you. >> i find his charm rather offensive. no. we are here because of what we believe and what our responsibilities are to the american people. part of that responsibility is to find common ground and not to just say i didn't know what was going on here and didn't know it is so hard. >> your description of him and this question is not meant to be exaggera exaggeration in any way. yocan e comey's testimony that every exposure he had with donald trump he was growing more and more concerned.
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do you have any concerns? >> any of you have been in the oval is a very intimidating place. the president of the united states t leader states, the leader of the free world. when the leader of the free world calls you in the office and clears the room says what he hopes what you will do. >> first, he turns and asks, do you like your job? >> do you your job? >> are you going to be loyal? >> do you like your job? that sets the tone of the conversation from the beginning. >> that's a pattern. >> do you loo i can your job, i want loyalty. i hope you will do this. >> the speaker says he's new at this? no, he's not new at obeying the law.
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>> is he abusing his power? >> i think that he could say that he's given reasons to believe that this should be looked into. >> many democratic colleagues and yesterday and others are mentioning, we are not going so far to suggest that this is obstruction of justice based on what they know and they'll leave it to bobueer to sort out. do you see it is something inappropriate? >> it is certainly inappropriate. let megge get back to your question, yes, i do think it is an abuse of power. in terms of obstruction of justice, i believe mueller should look into this. nobody is prosecuted because of what they said what they hoped.
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it is certainly in the court of public opinion very in criminating. >> i want to show you that moment you were describing where the president cleared the room, here is comey describing it. >> my question is something big is about to happen and i need to remember every single word that's spoken. the attorney general knew, he should not believing. i knew something was about to happen and i need to pay close attention to. a significant fact to me is so why did he kick everybody out of the oval office, why would you kick the attorney general, the president, the chief of staff out to talk to me if it was about something else -- so that to me as an investigator is a significant fact. >> nancy brought up abuse of
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power, what we are focusing on is obstruction of justice. >> the president on his words and the intent there. but, i am not saying he's ever going to be impeached. there is talk of 43% of americans want him to be impeached. article 4 of bill clinton was abusive of power. you are using your office to try to intimidate him to doing it and you are talking to other people and using your office to intimidate them in killing an investigation which indicates you are criminally? >> read that article. >> in violation of the
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constituti constitutional oath faithfully to execute the office of the president of the united states. we can stop there, mike. >> they can just lift that from 1998. >> joe, what's interesting about this being in this town today and yesterday afternoon after the conclusion of the hearing that you can literally hear a gasp of release coming from the white house that oh, we dodged the bullet that there is nothing that's a surprise and that. now, the stuff gets serious. bob mueller has it. he's an honorable guy and if there is anything there and a use of power there, bob mueller will find it out, he will get to it. my question to you, miss pelosi,
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of the expectations of this country and what bob mueller does, what is going to happen to the agenda that both you and republicans have on tax reform and healthcare and -- >> anything. >> this is infrastructure and a whole bunch of stuff. what's going to happen. >> well, lets go prior to this for first few months of ssion of congress and the president few months in office. we have not seen anything. we thought we are going to see infrastructure, and jobs built right away and an over turn in terms of tax reforms. we thought we'll see some positive agenda coming from the white house, jobs, jobs, jobs, that's what the election was about. when they say this stand in the way of his agenda, what agenda? he says his tax bill is moving to congress -- there is not a
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tax bill. he loses millions of jobs and hospitals are closing. what he's done for climate, loses new green jobs for the future where america has to be prei am mea preimmine preimminent. he's a job loser and he has not has androgen da. what are the what do the republicans want to hide from donald trump? they are tripling down economics and that means everything to them. >> if he came to you and said i got this problem with russia and i want to get back to the people's business. what would you advise him to do? >> go to sleep. get some sleep. bring yourself to a place where
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s sysnaps are working. >> he was going on and on, it was like midnight and i said why don't you go to sleep. i think there is somethin something -- more sleep maybe a solution for him. >> expand on that. he does not sleep and he wonders around the white house and he bangs around there like steve bannon and he's obsessed with the news and he sits there and watches tv six hours a day. i am just saying. he's not in a good place. >> well, we are not in disagreement with that. what i would say this is important. i say to my members, if you want to talk about making judgment about his presidency, you have to have the facts. lets have an independent outside commission to have the facts
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about what the russians try to do. why didn't he ask any questions about that? why would he be holden to putin to put him on a pedestal? why would he question whether he will do sanctions and what does the russians have personally and financial financially. >> more importantly, we have to find what he's suggesting to take our country forward so we can agree or disagree or compromise but he's got to get to work on his job. for some reason he thinks his job is a reality tv show. >> it is so true. >> we now learned that the attorney general now has had a third meeting with the russians that was not revealed.
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reportedly revealed and coming from private sessions yesterday. the questions we were asking before, why is it? why do they lie all of their meetings with their russians. >> well, mueller, as you mentioned a highly respected guy he will do a good job inside the justice department, nonetheless, a great person. we have congressional investigation from the intelligence committee house and senate. hopefully, they'll be useful inside republican congress. we need an outside independent commission to look into this. it is bigger than donald trump and bigger than democrats and republicans. it is about your direct examination. so when you talk about all these things, remember that there are something that's strange that's connecting now.
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i cannot confirm or deny the issues of the third meeting. i should say -- >> given the fact of very few people other than you are more familiar with the stress of the job of the presidency, given your remarks of a few moments ago. are you concerned of the president's health? >> i think his family should be concerned of his health. the fact is this is hopefully not reparable. he's the president of the united states. >> you hope it is reparable. >> it is not -- >> it is about facts and the law
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and there is nothing else. we need to get the facts. didn't you hear yesterday that the white house says he's not a liar, does it sound like i am not a crook? >> that was painful. lets hear the truth. why would republicans stand in the way of an independent commission to investigaten intervention into our election, an adversary. >> part of the deal and all those things when i get to washington, i want to be on the phone all the time and making things happen and pulling things together. has he been a good deal maker and has he brought people together and getting things done? >> i will give you this as an example, the first meeting we
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had, house and senate, democrats and republicans leadership in the white house, this is a big deal. i mean it feels you with some pride to have a seat at the table and a new president, i have been at that meeting with president george w. bush as a leader and same thing with president obama and now here we are with a new president, first thing he says, you know i won the popular vote. [ laughter ] >> well, i thought since he's being unconventional so will i. i was respectful with president bush and we worked closely with him. >> i bet you are missing him now? >> i would. that was a long time ago. i wish he was president now wishing that romney was
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president or john mccn were president. as far as the people voted for him is like any mammals will do. they were just voting in a certain way. >> that's a good way of putting it. >> when he said that, i said, that's not true, there is no evidence to support what you just said and if we were going to work together, we have to stipulate to a certain set of facts. we all have to start at a place where we are dealing with facts, evidence and data and you can compromi compromise. you cannot make up -- i said well, that's not true. and he said and i am not counting california. >> oh my god. >> so, that was pretty sad because he did not understand his place in history. you cannot expect people to respect the office of president anymore than the occupant of the job does.
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i do respect the office of the president, i hope that he will rise to that occasion. the fact that he has not so far. >> he's gotten worse. >> his first week of obsessing ton popular vote and the crowd size of the inauguration. >> he still obsesses o f the crowd size and he even had multiples and dozens of pictures of the crowd all over the west wing instead of pictures of the president with veterans or the president with children and connecting with people. it was the crowd to show how big he thinks his crowds were which is i am sorry, kind of sick. >> was kind of sick. >> he knows he was trying to invent something that did not happen. he knows the power of ceremony, he knows the power of the oval office and that's why had -- he
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knows what that is. this one question i had, if you are the president of the united states, with all that goes into this historically and current events, why would you go to saudi arabia as your first country >> thank you. >> president bush went to canada. president bush went to canada. president george h.w. bush went to mexico. i think we have plenty of friendly country he could have gone to. he went to saudi arabia. >> why do you suspect this? >> i am looking into it. >> i want to clear something up. what advise and you said, he needs more sleep. are you concerned about his health or not? >> i am concerned about his fitness for office and that's really is a question and i think as i started to say and we got
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into repable a in into -- i said if you want to go work in the white house, know your blood type because he will throw you over board in a second or under the bus. >> that's right. >> do they have the confidence to say to the president some of these things -- bringing the country together which is what we all have a responsibility to do. unless you have the facts and not just to say it. >> right. >> not to in flame the situation. >> correct. >> i am sorry, can you say anything more about the comment that you made about saudi arabia and what you are looking into. >> i don't know, i just think it is a strange choice to go there in light of having served on the committee and investigated 9/11 and knowing the suspicions that
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exist s in our country and amon his people. not to go too far down this path. he also asked palestinians to clear the room there. >> wow, thank you very much and thank you for honoring my father today. >> one of my friends and my college roommate of all the things that have happened in congress, that's wonderful that you are invited to speak. >> oh, thank you. >> doctor berzinsky when he came out in the iraq war were isolated. so many were coming out aggressively against him, he's not fearful but concerned about coming to the hill because even democrats, lotf democrats
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were shutting him. he said you invited him to the hill and you embrace him when it was not a popular thing to do and being aggressively against the iraq war as he was. >> i will never forget it. >> he likes -- >> barack obama. >> still ahead on "morning joe." if the president were impeached, will it be a specific tweet to blame? >> we'll get a live report from the white house about how the trump administration is trying to pivot from the bad press. you are watching "morning joe," we'll be right back. okay. got it. rumor confirmed. they're playing. -what? -we gotta go. -where? -san francisco. -when? -friday. we gotta go. [ tires screech ]
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did you show your memos to anyone outside of justice? >> yes? >> to whom did you show the copies to? >> i asked a friend of mine to share the memos with a reporter. >> joining us now benjamin witty, a friend of james comey and editor and chief of the law firm law and also with us, former justice department spokesperson now for msnbc, matthew miller and nbc news capitol hill kasie hunt is with us. >> david is back with us as well. >> and when you put an i mage u
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there. >> i think it would be great if we can start with a big image of the law firm. >> give us the break down of yesterday, what did it mean at the end of the day? >> the significant of yesterday is a person of whatever you think of james comey of judgment and decisions and his integrity and a person who does not lie went on the record, under oath and talked about the president lying about the bureau and talking about the president misrepresenting his interactions with him,e talked about the president putting pressure on him for investigative matters and he talked about a significant pattern of completely inappropriate contact between the white house and the fbi. i think to have someone of comey's stature and i don't mean that just literally going on
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record under oath and make those allegations, it should provoke a crisis for the president. >> was there anything in the testimony that made you believe to be more likely of obstruction of charges that could be brought or less likely? >> the question of the conduct of the president as a technical legal matter amounts to obstruction of justice is a question that a responsible prosecutor would probably never evaluate at the end of the day without hearing from the president first. with that said, there are some shocking allegations in that oral testimony and the most important of them and two of them are that, first of all, the
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president asked the fbi director to -- and the fbi director received it as a directive to drop a pending investigation of the formal national security adviser. you have to go along way back to u.s. history before you have an allegation that shocking of the public conduct. >> and then he was fired. >> that's the second one. comey said explicitly yesterday that he believes he was fired because of his conduct of the russia investigation. >> of course, it does not matter what he believes because we have admission not only from the white house's spokesperson who said we wanted the russia investigation to end, comey was fired and we believe that's the best way to end it and you have the president admitting it to the foreign minister of russia as well as the russian
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ambassador of the united states. david, you have a question format. for matt. >> i want to ask matt and ben. matt knows the bureau of the department well. what would comey say today, the day after if he would evaluate what happened yesterday and where things stand? >> i would think that the direct wentnto this thinking himself as a fact witness. he was asked quite blank in the first question senator burr whether or not this man is of obstruction of justice. you know it is not for me to evaluate. his opinion have changed. he's gone from being a chief investigator to the chief's witness of an obstruction case. one of the big take aways, if
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you look at him as a chief's witness and thinks of himself as a chief's witness. he said i am not going to draw that conclusion but i am sure that's the conclusion the special prosecutors are going to work towards. if you have been in the justice department, if you look at what james comey said about that yesterday and he turned his memos over to mueller already. it is clear he's obviously investigating the president for obstruction of justice. that's the biggest take away from yesterday. >> kasey, a couple of interesting thing to talk about with you as you covered the hall of congress yesterday, you were up there early and late. >> basically lives there. >> you end up shopping there that jared kushner will appear and speak to the staff and senate intel committee and reports that senator collins d
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collins -- there was a third meeting that we did not know before of jeff sessions and some russian entities. what more can you tell us about it? >> well, look, first of all, as far as you know what this means in the context of you're talking about the justice department and where republicans are going to be on this, i think there is real nervousness that has emerged and was kind of under current among the republicans that i talked to after this hearing concluded. democrats, the one i spoken to, republicans are becoming more nervous, i think. there is a real growing sense that they think that there is a shoe that shoot is going to drop here. if you look at marco rubio of the different posture he had in the hearing and the one he had yesterday, he came out after the
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hearing to explain, hey, those tough questions i wanted to ask and they have been asked before. look, what the president did in this case is inappropriate. they're going to be caught at some point if that shoe drops between their electorals and their party and all the demands and of where the president is. >> very quickly, what do you make of an attorney general who now has three meetings with russians that he did not report. wee the president's closest adviser had meetings with the russians he did not report. we have a national security adviser having phone calls with the russians he did not report and you can go on and on. >> what do we make of the fact that they don't report, they do not testify truthfully. they did not report anything to russians. >> the short answer to that is
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nothing's good. i don't know what it means. there is this obligation when you fill out an sfa 86 which is the form for your security clearance that you report those meetings. sergei kislyak must have this effect on the people he talks to, they all seem to not remember meetings with him. i don't know what to make of it. but, if i were a member of the trump administration, that would make me very nervous. that one person after another seems to have not met with the person and forgot about it. >> i am not really good as you know. >> you would not confuse me for a statistician. i would like a statistician to tell me at some point, what are the odds of kislyak meeting five or six or eight people at ten
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times, a matter of forget fullness or lacks of reporting that they would forget in the testimony and in their disclosure forms in every other way that they would all forget they met with the russian ambassador? >> 538 on that to get an exact number. it seems extraordinary unlikely. >> matt, i want to ask a clip that you play from paul ryan that he said "the president is new into this." >> you can be new at a job that you are asking the director of the fbi to shut down the investigation. >> come on. >> be new is not an excuse of obstruction of justice. >> how about a business of power? >> the interesting thing about that defense is it takes for
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granted that the president lied. the president said he never did it or asked him that. >> every time paul ryan talks like that, he misses an opportunity to get real and be honest with his supporters and not walk the plank which he's doing. it is really sad to watch. >> i will tell a potential problem for the speaker, every single time this happens, he's creating a -- if this ends back for the president, you can push play on that and that's what "snl" hit on that. >> thank you both, with e'll gee latest reporting out of the white house, story ahead on "morning joe." a millie dresselhaus doll! happy birthday, sweetie! oh, millies. trick or treat! happy birthday, sweetie!
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do you have any concerns? >> of course, this is the classic scandal. it is not the same as watergate but it has the same earmark of a new revelation every few days. >> that's senator john mccain yesterday and joining us now halie jackson. good morning, the president is
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breaking his silence on twitter, he went all day without saying much about it letting his personal attorney goes out and giving the briefing and his son, donald jr. >> let me start there, what you saw and not just on twitter, this show, it is time to move on. here is the deal. nobody else is moving on. the senate intelligence committee is still looking enin this and it is our reporting that jared kushner is going to come in and talk with that committee and although the third source says the timing discussion is ongoing with that. what we are seeing o f this tweet and what we are seeing the way the responses happening here, it is almost likeampaign deja vu coming back out again. look at who he's putting out on tv? you see more of corey lewandowski who was on the
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"today" show this morning with matt a savannah insisting that comey who's the one that's not credible. two big questions moving for ward, is the president here holds a press conference in the rose garden as we look ahead of that. number one, ton the matter of these tapes that triggered his whole action releasing the tapes, if there are a tapes, will you release them. will the president testify under oath. my question is will republicans do the same and will the president take it up on that offer? >> othhe's everything that's wr in washington, corey lewandowski talking about james comey this morning. halie jackson at the white house. thank you very much.
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>> so the white house who is aggressively pushing lewandowski, pushing out some somebody dthat's now walking through the swamps of conspiracy theorists of the all rights. >> and criticizing for comey passing the documents to columbia reporter because he was not manned enough to give it himself. >> again, not classified documents. >> still ahead, trump's twitter habi habits helped him win the presidency and now it may help him lose the presidency. more on that ahead.
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♪ all righty then. >> with us now reporter at "usa day" heidi presbelia, jonathan turley and editor and chief of "the washington freebie con," matthew cutanetti. that's not why i'm shaking in my shoes. he's married to -- >> she's very tough. >> so tough. >> she is tough. >> makes me shake in my shoes,
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as well. >> smart man. >> hard to get a good grade from her. >> i'm graded every day. >> i bet right now. >> i am. >> you better watch it. >> best behavior. >> i don't know if you want the go home tonight. >> jonathan turley, you are like the rational buzzard. the buzzards flying around the caucus saying let's go, devour, devour, devour. you're saying, wait, hold on. let's think through this rationally. you are basically the one that just keeps saying over and over again, no obstruction of justice. nothing to see here yet. are you still there after yesterday's hearing? >> pretty much. i actually thought that comey helped himself and hurt himself in that hearing. he helped himself a great deal by explaining how he reacted to and spoke to the high-level aides and pervasive he felt he couldn't go any further. he hurt himself in a number of respects. frankly, as a defense attorney, i think he's pretty damaged
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goods ever put on the stand. >> why is that? >> a couple of things. first of all, he said in the hearing that trump did tell him at one point or agree with him that the russia investigation should continue to its natural conclusion. he agreed that he only asked him whether he could drop the flynn investigation. >> trump said if anybody around me -- >> yeah. he described this colloquy with trump saying play this thing out and the president did agree with me it should go down that road. it's the lack of clarity on intent where those comments really hurt. the biggest problem for him is the leak. i mean, by leaking that information, first of all, it takes away from his image as this sort of eagle scout if you're engineering a special counsel investigation through a leak. the second thing is that's problematic. the fbi has very clear rules on the handling of fbi material. this is not some diary. this strikes me as a fbi document. he wrote them on a fbi computer. about an issue that was core to
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his responsibilities as a director. with a pending investigation. he wrote it like what's called a field 302. he wrote it much like a lot of agents write it. to say that that's your material that you can leak to get into the media, pretty problematic. >> heidi, talk about the reaction, kasie hunt earlier said republicans afterwards not feeling any better about their situation. >> well, you know, i heard those comments and my observation of it was, yes, they did toe the line in the sense to establish what the president said all along, he was not under investigation is true but no one really went out on a limb. you saw all of us saw the day before the rnc put out the lking points. they wanted to go hard after comey's credibility. none of thos republicans did that. i think that is a sign of just the nervousness upnderneath and why are none of them being more aggressive? joe -- >> you're saying none of the republicans went aggressively
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after comey. >> correct. >> it's interesting nicole wallace said yesterday if this was any other president you would have had former attorneys generals, former prosecutors all of these people going out supporting the president during the testimony. he had don jr. >> well, there was also zero crisis management coordination on this. right? usually when you had the monica lewinski scandal or scooby libby scandal, there was coordination of outside groups, the white house, capitol hill an you did not have that here. >> matt, you made a point in the writing for the freebie con that he made at the top of the show, however it ends, ends badly for donald trump, you may trace it back to the may 12th tweet where he said the director better hope there are no tapes of our conversations and what we learned yesterday was that the director took that as, oh maybe, there are tapes. and i got to get this mem row out, i have to get my side of the story out in the hopes to lead to a special prosecutor which it --
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>> for me that's the most riveting part of the testimony with susan collins about the process. friends of his were talking to "the new york times." that was the first story about the loyalty pledge. and then the following morning the president tweets out i hope he -- he better hope there are not tapes and according to james comey set in motion the release of the contents of the memoso "the new york times" in the express purpose he said of getting a special prosecutor appointed, bob mueller, who he spoke very highly of and i believe that's the train of events to end badly for the president and other people in this administration. >> how badly? >> well, i mean, i agree with professor turley. i'm not a lawyer. i don't think what we have seen so far rises to the level of obstruction of justice but there are many democratic and liberal lawyers who disagree vehemently already. >> abuse of power. >> that, too. obviously when this is a long process, and in that process there are plenty of other
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opportunities for the president and his team to make mistakes. they need to be on guard and what the problem for them is i think they're isolated already in terms of the legal fight and they could soon be isolated politically because of what's happening in georgia and the health care fight on the hill. >> heidi, agree? >> i think part of the reason why back to your point of republicans, why this isn't breaking through is, frankly, and the democrats tell you this, they're not pushing it out there. when you look at their advertising, when you look at the messaging, they're a little nervous on russia. why? they know the republicans control all of the levers of power here in washington. they control the committees where the investigations are going on and they also were burned from the past election not staying focused on issues like health care so this is the issue in the bubble but out there and other than the democratic hard core base, it's not yet breaking through. >> they're pushing health care which i think is very smart. >> final word. >> what is your takeaway? all in bob mueller's hands now?
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>> it is. i mean, there's still a lot of road to be coved to get this nearimpeachment and referred to article iv of impeachment and did not get through the senate. >> it did not. >> it was rejected and article i impeachment of nixon was much more detailed. >> all right. thank you very much. >> thank you, guys. >> matthew, you get a c-plus. >> what? >> room for improvement. working harder next time. >> didn't fail. >> exactly. >> she is a -- >> is there extra credit? >> take that home with you. >> best line i have heard since the doctor passed away. tributes of bobby. she said, he read an article that he wrote and the doctor wrote him a quick note and said, very well argued. weak conclusion. bobby said it was the greatest compliment he ever got. >> we are heading to church to re

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