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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 13, 2018 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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and republicans are worried that he's going to energize women and democrats in november. >> jonathan swan, live in washington, d.c. thank you very much. reading axios a.m. in a little while will be easy. you can go to axios to sign up for the newsletter. "morning joe" starts right now. i would argue that the president has unleashed not in any way totally. but personally to blame for demons that have been unleashed, whether it's what i saw at a senior center back home and people saying f-u, f-u. at a senior center. the fact that you've got the top guy saying i wish i could hit you in the face, why don't you and i'll pay your legal fees, that's bizarre, we ought to call it as such. back home some of these people have been frankly weird and different, in a town hall meeting, i said what is going
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on? they'll say look if the guy at the top can say anything to anybody at any time, why can't i? >> that was republican congressman mark sanford on "morning joe" a year ago. while the south carolina conservative largely backed the president's agenda, he called out the commander-in-chief as we just heard right there. last night sanford lost his primary race after the president attacked him personally on twitter. just hours before the polls closed, and it was close. welcome to "morning joe," everyone, it's wednesday, june 13th. with us we have msnbc contributor mike barn kill. national affairs analyst for nbc news and msnbc jon heilemann. former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve rattner and author of the book, a world in disarray, richard haass and national political reporter nbc news heidi przybilla. >> a lot to get to.
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>> if you want to know where the republican party is right now, jon heilemann, mark sanford survives career-ending, what should have been a career-ending scandal. as governor, lies about going on the appalachian trail. becomes the butt of late-night jokes. nobody said that guy would ever be elected back to congress. and he won. two years later he votes with trump maybe 95% of the time. >> 87%. >> 87%. says one or two things about trump that people don't like. and is so conservative, conservative really conservative, not a trumpist, so conservative that even the freedom caucus said we would not have passed the tax cuts without mark. there is no more conservative person on protecting tax dollars, balancing the budget, paying down the debt. it's been, that's been mark's
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sole obsession since 199 4. but primary voters said no, we don't care that he's one of the most conservative people in congress. he said one or two bad things about trump. >> it's, there are two things to say. the two -- >> why don't we just say its had devolved into a cult. primary voters in the republican party have devolved into a trumpist cult. >> it's clear that conservatism, liberalism, voting records, none of those things matter, it's a cultive personality and the president has an extraordinary hold over his base. cultive personality is one good description for it. for all of the people out there, at various times everyone at this table and me, all of us who have sat and said, why are republicans afraid of donald trump? why do they -- why will they never cross him? he's terrible, he's this, he's that they should have their the
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courage of their convictions and stand up to him. this is a good example. mark sanford didn't even really stand up to him, but president trump brings the wrath and mark sanford loses his job. the fact is if you get on the wrong side of donald trump, his power over his base is significant enough that he can kill you, regardless of how conservative voting record is. regardless of your history. in the republican party. regardless of your ideology, regardless of everything else, if he wants to put a target on your back, he can and will. >> this is not, mika, it's just not we've said it before. but let us say it again. using this as an exclamation mark. the republican party is not a conservative party. it's not conservative intellectually. it's not conservative physically. it's not conservative
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temperamentally. you look at everything whether, from edmund burke, through russell kirk. through william f. buckley. straight into ronald reagan. what's happening today is an aberration of all of those things. that's fine, i wonder where conservatives go now. >> they are too frightened to actually express themself. the difference between the mark sanford and the rest of the republican actual conservatives in the country is that mark sanford will be okay today. if that's what it takes, if, if he has to lose -- his re-election in order to conservative? and stay trueo the policie beli. that is mark sanford. he is definitely flawed, he's had his problems and he took his knocks. but i will tell you, this is the kind of conservative that is missing in washington today. someone who can stand up. you all will go down together, because you don't have backbones, you don't have a
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moral compass and you don't know how to stand up to the ideals that you say you believe in. he is. he's losing his re-election because of it. but he's standing up for what is right. >> for what he's fought for, for 25 years. >> i may not agree, but -- >> here's what mark told me last week. i was on a phone call with him. if you know mark, you know, he's never nervous. he's just not. i said what's it like out there, man? and he was laughing. he said joe, i'm saying the exact same thing i was saying 25 years ago. i'm going to conservative town hall meetings talking about free trade and they're calling me disloyal. i'm going out talking about balanced budgets and entitlement reform and saving our economy for the future and people are there screaming support your president. and for him it was like he was -- he didn't say this, but i
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am. it would be like you were transported into that movie "idiocracy." water grows grass, not federally-funded gatorade. the very same things that he's been saying that he stood for for 25 years on fiscal conservatism, i stood for. suddenly, that's out of vogue because the emperor who has no clothes says, that's out of vogue. >> but the emperors that incredible ability to mobilize his grassroots. we've had a president who has done something unusual. instead of broadened his appeal. he's narrowed his appeal. he's played to this group of people who will follow him anywhere. i know mark sanford, his first wife worked for me, i may have given to his first campaign. i'm embarrassed to say. >> you shouldn't be embarrassed to say that because you fight for long-term -- debt relief.
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that was what drove mark -- i remember the first day i met him, 1994, he was talking about entitlement reform. >> yeah, no, he was right on that. but just the only thing, i think there are some true conservatives in washington, i think they're hiding under their desks, they're afraid to come out. they're afraid to say anything. they're going a he along with a lot of these fiscally irresponsible bills that are coming before congress, because they're afraid of donald trump and they're afraid of the tweets and what will happen in the primary. >> the latest pointed example of why nothing has happened on immigration or a whole range of issues because of fear, the fear of donald trump's tweets. >> so let's play a game we played during the fall of 2015. when everybody was saying that donald trump was at 3% or 4%, would hold up papers, would say this is the day donald trump is like at 5%. he's at 10%, but his, you know don't worry, the ceiling is 15,
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and he would keep going above that. we're going to do this today. today is june 13, 2018. going to hold this paper up and just remember, here we are, june 13th, 2018. what republicans did last night, and what they are doing in subservience to donald trump is going to lead to a massive democratic wave this fall. and if you don't believe me, you don't believe the short-sightedness and i will say the political stupidity and the radicalism, and the turning away from rock-solid conservative values that have moved this party forward, starting in 1980. if you don't believe me, let's just see what happened in virginia last night. because in virginia last night, democrats, if you heard happy days are here again, blaring out
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of democratic headquarters, there's a reason because last night, democrats, got him another seat, i don't want to call them republicans any more, what trumpists did in the state of virginia. >> in virginia, a trump-supportling immigration hard-liner narrowly won the state's republican senate primary. conservative firebrand corey stewart will face off against democratic senator tim kaine in november. in 2016 stewart served as donald trump's virginia campaign chair. he was fired after staging an anti-rnc protest outside of the party headquarters without the approval from the campaign. "the new york times" reports that quote party leader fear that stewart, a fervent trump supporter who has mimicked his slashing style could drag down other republicans in a state that is key to control of the house. and trump just tweeted a short time ago -- congratulations to
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corey stewart for his great victory for senator from virginia. now he runs against a total stiff, tim kaine, who is weak on crime and borders and wants to raise your taxes through the roof. don't underestimate corey, a major chance of winning. >> at the same time, though, democrats were victorious in the special election in wisconsin, mika? >> winning a state senate seat in northeast wisconsin, a district that republicans had held for more than four decades. the 43rd gop-held seat. >> that's back when conservatives were actually conservatives. this corey stewart guy, how is that going to turn out in. >> it will turn out badly. tim kaine was unlikely to lose that race, anyway and i think the "times" put their finger on the right issue, which is not there was much chance that tim kaine has ever lost a race he has run in virginia.
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but the fact is, that in some sense, corey stewart is now going to be the top of the ticket in virginia. for a suburban republicans, running on house races, they're going to have to deal with repercussions of that vicious campaign that he's promising against tim kaine. just as they're going to have to deal with donald trump and we saw what happened in the virginia off-year elections last year. they have this new problem, in addition to donald trump, now corey stewart. >> heidi, there are four seats in virginia now. four congressional seats that many people have considered to be up for grabs, very competitive, because stewart won his primary last night, those races have shifted democratic by a lot of the major ranking services. >> if you saw what happened last year in the off-year election. it was a fired-up democratic base, so the transfer effect here, corey stewart, could be pretty significant. if you're somebody like barbara
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comstock, you were already in a really uphill battle. this is going to insure that a lot of those crossover educated female suburbanite republican voters, are going to view this as a referendum as corey stewart being effectively trump's proxy. insuring that essentially that same turnout mod that will transferred into a huge success at the state legislative level as well here in virginia will transfer at the congressional level. >> north korea yesterday morning the president meeting with kim, 24 hours later, what are your thoughts? >> it's probably distanced us from war. we've walked that back to some extent. but after that it's mainly criticism, joe. what we got was extraordinarily thin. lacking in substance or detail, no definitions or things like denuclearization.
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no provisions for verification, no mention of missiles, what we got was extraordinarily thin. not even clear what the follow-up is. no timetable and we gave an awful lot for it the idea that once again. >> that picture right there is an extraordinary picture that no other self-respecting president would give the leader of north korea. >> and the fact that once again we did not value an alliance that we played a major card in this case the u.s. republic of south korea exercises, not only did we play it but we didn't consult before we played it it shows this is a president that sees allies as essentially expendable. >> the disruption of our relations with japan, south korea and other alliances around the world. >> we saw it at the g7. what it is, i think you have a president who sees alliances of anything as more cost and burden than benefit. he sees allies as free riders.
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so if that's your mindset, the idea that you would not value or protect their concecomes pretty naturally. when we saw from south korea south korea was just that, look what was not on the agenda, no talk of missile, much less medi medium-range missiles that reach places like south korea and japan. the talking about taking u.s. forces out. when jimmy carter did that decades ago, there was wildly controversial. and again, what worries me as much as anything was the lack of consultation. this is a country who basically has placed its security in our hands. the idea that we would ever make a major announcement like that without first working with them what kind of a message does that send? beyond the immediate substance. >> had what kind of message does it send on human rights that you have gulags all over that country. the most repressive regime in the world and donald trump is saying that kim is quote beloved by his people.
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>> and at the same time insulting the prime minister of canada. >> president trump is back in d.c. this morning returning from his summit in singapore. after an active night on social media. he tweeted four times about meeting kim jong un twice thanking him for taking the first bold step to mote and for suspending nuclear tests. trump took aim at domestic critics writing a year ago the pundits and talking heads, people that couldn't do the job before were were begging for conciliation as peace. please meet, don't go to war. now that we meet and have a great relationship with kim jong un, the same haters shout out, you shouldn't meet, do not meet. very almost caveman like. >> have you seen -- it's like fred flintstone running the country. writing things on a stone. not able to do that. >> did you see the clips yesterday from fox news, the same people that were yelling at barack obama about meeting with
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north korea? and iran without preconditions and saying it was the end. world. now turning around, talking about how this is the most glorious thing ever and he dares to make peace. it's laughable. >> it is. and i think you're giving him too much credit for thinking things out. but i get your point on the approach being about money. joining us from washington, a member of the foreign relations committee, democratic senator chris murphy of connecticut. senator, what is the path to trying to not screw this up so badly for mike pompeo? >> that's a very good question. you know, barack obama had this famous line in 2003. he said i'm not against wars, i'm just against dumb wars from our perspective, we're not against diplomacy, we're just against bad diplomacy. this was really bad diplomacy. the problem is you know this president has never been the deal maker.
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the claim was in new york he would throw a lot of bluster up front but when he sat down at the negotiating table he would give away everything the other side wanted and that's how he found himself in multiple bankruptcies and that seems to be what happened here. whether he did it ahead of time or on the spur of the moment, as richard said, giving away the military exercises with south korea without getting anything in return, think puts mike pompeo in a very difficult spot. it suggests that this negotiation is going to go equally badly if we get to the second and third stage. but frankly, a lot of folks think that what kim wants is to just drag this out to just give himself more time. and to the extent that all trump really cares about is these syrupy photo ops, if he finds a way to set up a few more of those, keep trump going, he may be able to get that time he wants without ever having to give up anything in return. >> senator, the iran accord,
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much aligned and now cast aside, could you tell us the difference between the iran accord, worked on for years by secretary kerry and president obama, and what was signed in the philippines, between donald trump and president kim? >> well remember there were two pieces of the iran accord. for a long time there were very quiet negotiations that happened between the united states and iran. such that when those negotiations were finally made public, there was a preliminary deal in which the united states gave something and the iranians gave something. there was no photo op between the united states president and the supreme leader. and certainly there was no public extolling of this new alliance before there was give and take on both sides. unlike this situation, in which you have given kim what he wants, a legitimizing photo op without any concessions. second as you were talking about
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before, the context matters here. and the savaging of our allies, just a few hours beforehand in canada, sends this very chilling message to anybody who is thinking about allying with the united states in the future, that you are going to get brutalized if you do what the united states asks while our enemies are treated very well that was not happening in the context of the iranian negotiations, either. we were doing those negotiations with our partners. we were consulting every day with them so that we were on the same page, very different than today. >> just as a sign on the iranian negotiation. i'm struck by the parallelism. this administration said the previous one wanted the deal too much with iran. now you can say this administration wanted the deal too much with north korea. senator, i'm curious, what will congress do now? instead of waiting for an agreement which we may not like, why not work with senator corker? why not hold hearings about what should be part of the
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negotiation? essentially help give mike pompeo a script thaw think on one hand is good for the united states, on the other hand is negotiable? why not take the lead? >> obviously that should be what congress should do. we have largely abdicated our article i responsibilities to a co-managed foreign affairs with the president over the course of the last 15 years, it's hard to start using that muscle again now. we have an opportunity this week, we are debating the national defense authorization bill we could offer amendments to that bill that would start to provide some manner of oversight, on that negotiation process. i'm going to be introducing an amendment to that bill this week for instance that would require prior congressional authorization to withdraw any sizeable amount of u.s. forces from the korean peninsula something we worry trump will give away, having already given away these exercises. so i'll work with senator corker in these hearings, we can also
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put some statutory confines around these negotiations to make sure that whatever he does is in the best interests of the country. >> we can only hope. senator chris murphy, thank you very much. coming up on "morning joe," we heard congressman mark sanford's honest assessment of the president, to start the show. still ahead, bob corker unloads on his own party for failing to stand up to the commander-in-chief. and as we go to break we want to take a moment to remember our friend and colleague, tim russert. who passed away if you can believe it ten years ago. we'll be talking about him and his legacy and maybe even a little about what he would be thinking today. we'll be right back. at farmers, we've seen almost everything so we know how to cover almost anything. even a "cactus calamity". (man 1) i read that the saguaro can live to be two hundred years old. (woman) how old do you think that one is? (man 1) my guess would be, about... (man 2) i'd say about two hundred. (man 1) yeah...
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in south carolina if mccain wins here. >> give it to me. >> give it to me!
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>> it's chuck norris. >> cat dragged in barn kill. >> barn kill, when do you go to sleep? >> they say there's not a homeless problem in america? >> gosh. >> that was -- february, i believe 200le 8, the new hampshire primary. >> we've all been up all night. >> a remarkable, remarkable, mike, thaits been ten years today. ten years, such a horrible, horrible shock for all of us. >> incredible. i remember the day vividly. just vividly. and looking at him now and you realize what the business misses, what we miss. with his absence. >> he had a tremendous joy in what he was doing and in sharing his insights and asking questions and a fairness about him, a transparency, and really, kind of paved the way for everything that we do here on "morning joe." he blessed our show that day
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when he came in the door and sat down with us. because not a lot of people wanted to sit down with us and hang out, but tim did and it meant so much to us. we'll never forget it. >> he had a genuine love of politics, that stemmed well beyond when he began doing "meet the press" and working for nbc. working for mario cuomo. working for pat moynihan. a genuine love and respect for politics and more importantly the people who practiced politics. the members of the house, the members of the senate and his gift was, at "meet the press," this is what i think, what his demeanor. he had a demeanor that played well both in person, obviously, but on tv as well. it wasn't a gotcha demeanor, as is so prevalent today. it was him. >> it wasn't a gotcha demeanor but he invented the whole idea of going back and getting the clips and saying well senator, let's show a clip of what you
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said to north korea three years ago. he was really great at holding people accountable in a very nice way. >> it was never personal. >> if you look at where we are right now. where east doesn't meet west, red state america doesn't meet blue state america. that was, that was something that tim an ability to bridge those divides. tim had it as a kid from buffalo. who worked for progressive democratic lawmakers. he could certainly understand the democratic side of the debate. but he also was really good at understanding not only the republican side of the debate. but also understanding where america was at any given time. and i have a feeling that he would understand how we got to where we are today. >> he absolutely would have
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understood the trump phenomenon before trump was elected. well before he was elected. because tim he was always more sidewalk than he was seminar. he just understood. he had a gut-level instinct for what was happening in the country. despite the fact that he was tim russert. host of "meet the press" and a media celebrity. that never left him. buffalo never left him, joe, you're absolutely correct. >> just a walking, talking repudiation of the tribalism that kind of governs our politics today. i think it would be so strange for so many people on left today to look at a guy who had worked for the people he worked for and then to watch him holding democrats accountable in the same way that he holds republicans accountable and that's the second thing. someone who was so fundamentally dedicated, the various temperamental things are super important and obviously he's a nice guy. you knew him better than anybody here. but the notion that the core of the job is to hold powerful
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politicians accountable and it was totally irrelevant that he worked for mario cuomo. he was going to be just as tough and serve that principle regardless of who was sitting across from him. he had it just in his bones. >> you could watch endless hours, repeats of "meet the press" when tim was doing it and i would challenge anyone to say he's a democrat or he's a republican. you couldn't tell. >> a lot of it was temperament. a lot of it was temperament and tone. he was able to strike a perfect balance. >> and there was the lawyer in him who -- said his goal was, and he said, my goal is to be the worst enemy of whoever sits across the table from me. that i am just like steve said, like a great lawyer, i'm going to go to the record. i'm going to dig up the evidence and see how they respond to the evidence. and some responded well and some
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responded the way ross perot responded. i don't think anybody has ever deflated a presidential campaign as quickly as that was deflated. it seems to me, there were one or two other candidates that went on there that were in the middle of sort of a political spring of sorts. that he was able to call out. you, you into that when you went on there, you were going to have to answer the tough questions and sometimes you got out there alive politically and sometimes you did not. >> and the other side of it. if you were young, up-and-coming politician and you faced off with tim and you came through it, that was a rite of passage and that's how you made the major leagues. people like barack obama, he had been an incredible phenomenon in a lot of ways, but until he got on "meet the press" and was able to get through a couple of sessions with russert. no one took him really seriously. but after he did, people were
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like okay, he can hit to major league pitching. >> you guys were such good friends, your families did so much together. do you have a favorite story in. >> that's hard. that's hard. >> can you tell on television. >> there's the story that i told at his eulogy, at the kennedy center about years ago, the russerts and the barnicles decided to take a trip out to see tom brokaw out in livingston, montana, in 1 1 or 1992 and the idea of tim russert and myself out in livingston, montana is absurd, luke russert was in one car with tim and maureen and nick and colin barnicle by themselves in the second car with myself and my wife and they had these little walkie-talkies in the cars. tim and i decided let's have a race to see who can get to
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livingston, we were in wyoming crossing the border. to see who could get the livingston first. we were going too fast, 80, 8 5 miles per hour. when suddenly no cars on the road, we get pulled over by a montana state trooper. tim dwets out of the car, i stay in the car. kids are yelling "dad got busted." and the state trooper goes up to tim and says you know how fast were you going? and he says too fast. and he says okay, but i got a problem, he says to tim. i only have one ticket left. and tim looks at him and he looks at the cars and he says, well, he says i was following him. >> i love it. >> well gosh, we thank tim for so much, but especially for tim barn kill. >> his godfather. >> and much, much more. ten years ago, it's really hard to believe. we'll be right back. ♪
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trudeau or trump?
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[ laughter ] >> i'm not sure what activity he's asking me to undertake with either. >> moreover if one was really pedantic, one would have to say that the honorable gentleman's question did not contain a main verb. >> a lot of laughing going on about us. uk prime minister theresa may. that was all at you, mr. president. having some fun at parliament on monday. as for trudeau, the canadian prime minister yesterday continued to speak out against president trump's tariffs, while speaking to the canadian parliament. >> our issue that we have said multiple times to the united states is that they move forward, with punitive tariffs on trade in aluminum and steel, not only are they putting a threat on canadian workers and canadian industry, they're going to hurt american workers as
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well. american consumers as well. this is not in the interests of two countries that have the closest and best trading relationship and alliance in the history of the world. we're going to continue to stand for that. >> i -- it was well said. it was interesting in the end he did the one-on push of mika and self-ie of himself. >> instagram. it's a strong sentiment. >> meanwhile the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee, bob corker has introduced legislation to restrict presidential authority on issuing tariffs on national security grounds. something trump did two weeks ago in imposing heavyies on aluminum and steel imports from canada, mexico and the european union. however corker's own republican colleagues have blocked his bill from coming up for a vote. yesterday, a passionate corker spoke on the senate floor. >> because senators, united states senators that are elected by the people in their state
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don't want to cast a tough vote, they block everybody from voting. i heard senator, senator from texas, the senior senator from texas saying the other day, gosh, we might upset the president. we might upset the president of the united states. before the mid-terms, we can't do that, because we would be upsetting the president. the president of the united states. i can't believe it. i would bet that 95% of the people on this side of the aisle support intellectually this amendment. but no, no, no, gosh, we, we might poke the bear. is the language i've been hearing in the hallway. we might poke the bear. the president might get upset with us as united states senators. if we vote on the corker amendment. so we're going to do everything we can to block it. >> you know, james fellows, with the "atlantic," has been saying the same thing all year. is pretty brilliant.
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and corker is doing it here. he's like -- floor speeches are fine. you protest against trump are fine. your rolled eyes are great. but we're only two republican senators away from stopping donald trump. from, from pushing the excesses of his policy agenda. two republicans. you know back in the '90s, we needed 1 1. so 1 1 of us went to newt gingrich and said spend less, get closer to balancing the budget, or we're not voting for anything you put on the floor. a remarkable thing happened. they had to spend less money. they had to balance more accounts. we got a balanced budget. here -- it's not that heavy lifting. you never know, you got 11 people in the room, you don't know who is going back and whispering to the speaker to get
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a -- a conspiracy of two. you only need two republicans, jeff flake, hi, great speeches, why don't you talk to bob corker, you guys aren't running again and on some of these more extreme measures, you're going to block us from doing what 95% of conservatives in america want us to do on tariffs? 95% of small business owners want us to do? 95% of ceos want us to do? we're going to block everything else that you troo i to put on the floor. don't believe us? we're going to be back in our home district golfing. the cowardice, mika. we talked about it time and time again. the cowardice of these people to actually stand up to this president. and not just stand up and in a half-assed way. i've got to say not in a half-assed way. there, i said it again. if you're going to go there -- if you're going to invade
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vienna -- then take vienna. you cannot say things and -- i voted with him 98% -- no. if you're going to take vienna, take vienna and tell the president until he stops supporting tariffs, until he stops supporting liberal policies that are more akin to what chuck schumer and nancy pelosi wants. if he's going to keep exploding the federal deficit, if he's going to keep exploding the federal debt. if he's going to keep bankrupting social security. if he's going to keep bankrupting medicare -- you're not on board any more. two, two. it's just not hard so guess what, you can't just say, oh, mitch mcconnell, he's turned into donald trump's boy, which he has, whipping boy, mitch is scared of him. that's okay, fine, you do that to that bill, try passing something else. we can play that game. right now, the democrats are in
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control of the floor, until you guys start acting conservative. guess what, it works. it's not that hard. >> jeff flake is a co-sponsor of the bill. any reaction to corker's impassioned statemts? i mean does anybody hear this? what's happening? >> under behind the scenes, they're all angry, because cork certificate right if you look at the cross section of members who have signed on to this, it runs the ideological gamut. like corker said a few weeks ago when trump rolled out the tariffs, these are not well tailored, they're going to hurt industries, farmers to other industries across the board. >> mitch mcconnell just caving in and killing mitch mcconnell. not allowing this to go to a floor for the vote. >> this is a potentially huge
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wedge issue ahead of the mid terms, think about how this could potentially split the republican base. you just saw with mark sanford, the power of this president turning his twitter handle on you. they are all scared that like you said, poke the bear, he'll come after you. and mcconnell himself, i caught him afterwards, after corker's tirade because it was so emotional. one thing, i don't know if you pitched it up. he actually name-checked not only cornyn by also inhov who was running the floor, who said he's been told to do in. i don't hold this against him. but he's been told to do this by the powers that be. i asked mitch mcconnell, i assume you're the powers that be, do you have any response? >> he did not take that opportunity toe deny that inhof had been ordered to do that it's
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a cold political calculation that if this came to the floor it would really anger trump. turn out all of these members at the white house, 15 senators at the white house and pointedly told them, don d it. >> when donald trump acts like chuck schumer andancy pelosi on trade, you probably should go ahead and not poke the bear. you don't poke the bear. you're like bear bryant. then you beat the bear and the rest of your life, what do people call you? >> bear. >> the president is power to only do tariffs to real national security. what we're doing is using it against our allies. these are the ones we can depend on to give us steel and things like that it's outrageous. congress just on institutional grounds to say this was never our intention this something abused. they should stand up for themselves again, this is part of what conservatives, republicans, democrats used to say was a strong american
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foreign policy. it's unbelievable that they're not challenging it. >> what would the discussion on the issue be without charts? steve has them. we'll show you. >> not as god as my charts, mika. >> you know what, i brought you a chart. this chart as well. >> fantastic. >> that is straight ahead on "morning joe." it can grow out of control, disrupting business and taking on a life of its own.
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until her laptop her sacrashed this morning.eks, having it problems? ask a business advisor how to get on demand tech support for as little as $15 a month. this week get boise case paper for only $29.99 at office depot office max. i was very surprised at the size of this crowd. woman: my question is, why hasn't congress started impeachment proceedings given what we know, and they probably know much more. i think that if you speak to congress-people privately, democrats and republicans acknowledge that this is a reckless, dangerous, and lawless president. for them, political safety is what is driving them to sweep it under the rug. if we don't stand up for the basic values of america, if we normalize this behavior, he will continue, and he will push it every single time he gets away with it.
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i mean, that's sort of the reaction to any bully. it tends to isolate you, anwhen you meet with other people and listen, you get that sense that you're not the only one who feels that way. well, i'm just grateful that everybody... that i'm not the only one that feels that trump needs to be impeached.
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so steve ratner, the president has thrown around a lot of numbers when it comes to trade with canada. what's the bottom line? >> we're running a massive, massive deficit, i guess, justin, in between fighting champions and doing one-arm pushu pushups, he's snookering us. how big is our trade deficit with canada? 10 billion, 20 billion, 30 billion? >> did you peek ahead? >> no. >> the president says it's 100 billion. 100 billion. >> that's bad. we've got to do something. >> and the answer is we actually
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have it -- >> is he off by a little bit? >> we actually have a trade surplus with canada. >> hold on. what? no, we don't. >> this is some weird bizarreo world thing. >> we have a trade deficit with the rest of the world, which is actually $300 billion less than he says it is. let's put that little detail aside. the fact is since the recession which is good for our trade balance -- >> the president says we have a trade deficit? >> we does. >> is he confused or is he lying? >> if you want to get technical, he looks at only goods. you have to look at services. he lies. >> let me ask you, talking about the gdp and adding that up which the president loves to do, does that only take into account goods? >> no. >> so you're saying it takes in goods and services? >> services are a big part of the economy, right? that's not a small part of the
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economy. >> okay. so that's how we calculate this. >> just to be clear -- >> chart number two, these terrible dairy tariffs, 72% on our farmers. another small fact we should be aware of is that we have a trade surplus with canada in dairy that we actually export to them twice as much as we import. >> i will say honestly that shocks me because from everything i've heard even like people trying to defend donald trump. well, it is a horrible, horrible thing what they do with us regarding dairy. >> alex has two minutes. by the way, dairy is an infinite testimal. it's a surplus. >> you mean small? >> less than one tenth -- >> i want to get to chart number three. tariffs. canada has really high tariffs? really high tariffs? >> can't breathe. can't breathe canadian tariffs.
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>> here are u.s. tariffs. here are canada's tariffs. they are lowest tariffs. >> we have biggest tariffs? >> what does that mean? what does that mean? >> so what you're saying is -- >> we put a higher tariff on things that are imported here than they do on things that are imported there. >> we have more access to them than they have to us. >> for people at home, these are hard numbers. these are government numbers. >> this is from the world bank. >> this is world bank numbers. >> that's a leftest, communist, globalist -- >> smoking freaks. >> one minute. one chart. >> go. then we'll sum it up. >> look what happens when you put tariffs on. these tariffs that were put on in november on trump on soft wood lumber coming from canada. >> that will hurt the canadians. >> yes, it has -- well no. look what's happened to lumber prices in the u.s. they're up 27% since this happened. >> in canada, right? >> no, in america. >> but we're trying to hurt
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canada. well, we're hurting ourselves. >> oh my god. >> is the picture different for hardwood lumber than soft wood lumber. >> shut up. >> really quickly, this is important because this is what we've been saying all along, this is what republicans used to say. this is what conservatives used to say. tariffs end up hurting the working class and the middle class more than anybody else. and this donald trump tariff tax is hurting working class americans. >> average increase in home prices projected by the home builders, $6,388 in the cost of building a house because of these tariffs. >> so to summarize seriously. >> seriously. >> canada has much lower tariffs than the united states of america. we are not running a trade surplus -- a trade deficit with canada, we are running a trade surplus. it is the canadians who are running a trade deficit with us. and -- >> dairy, we are also running a huge trade surplus with canada, and it is a infy tes mall part
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of our trade situation. >> that means small. >> that means small. >> wow. we got through them, steve. >> more importantly and most importantly for people at home, seriously, any time donald trump talks about tariffs and talks about america first, he's talking about putting working class consumers last. this is a massive tax on the very people who can't afford it when they go to walmart, when they go to home depot, wherever they go. >> and will cost more jobs than it saves. plus those prices are going up. all the people who have to make things based on those materials, their jobs will disappear. this will cost the american worker. coming up, president trump is still raving about his new favorite dictator, boasting about their great relationship while slamming the, quote, haters. and while the president is back at the white house, his secretary of state is in seoul right now explaining his boss's surprise pledge to stop military exercises with south korea.
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>> god speed, mike pompeo. >> erratic tweets aside, mitch mcconnell says he could not have asked for a better partner on policy than donald trump. >> mitch has been a huge supporter of tariffs and national debt far long time. >> we'll get more of the senate majority leaders' conversations with heidi ahead on "morning joe." ♪ can you love wearing powerful sunscreen? yes! neutrogena® ultra sheer. unbeatable protection helps prevent early skin aging and skin cancer with a clean feel. the best for your skin.
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>> the world cup is returning to the united states. moments ago in moscow, the 200 member nations of soccer's governing body fifa awarded the combined north american bid from united states, mexico and canada the so-called united build won 60% of the vote over morocco the only other nation in the running. welcome back to "morning joe." wednesday, june 13th. still with us, we have john heilemann. steve ratner. heidi przybyla. and joining the conversation, professor of history at tulane university, walter isaacson. also with us, associate editor of commentary magazine noah roughman and evan osnose is with us as well. >> we're talking about conservatives, conservatism, talking about mark sanford, a guy who since the day he got to
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washington 1994 has been obsessed on small government, balanced budgets. i remember even before he got sworn in him lecturing us on entitlement spending how we could do a little in 1994 or pay the piper in a big way and watch the debt go up and watch our economy go down. and he's consistently fought for those conservative values. he got sidetracked and still got elected after a sex scandal? but being with trump nine out of ten times obviously is far more concerning to voters in south carolina than what was talked about by donald trump about the appalachian trail or argentina, or whatever. by the way, probably where donald trump will be watching the world cup in 2026 in
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argentina. >> the leader of the party is a strong poll, particularly strong with donald trump because the agenda is so fluid. so voters use fuelty to the president a metric by which you can gauge a person's loyalty to the party and ethicacy in office. it's sort of more an affectation that is attractive to a particular breed of republican primary voter, and that's probably why you have the senate nominee in virginia than you do now. it's not as though -- i don't think that there is a majority of the republican party in virginia primary voters who are attracted to white nationalism. they are attracted to somebody who offends the right people. and i don't know what that gives you, the amount of satisfaction there is equivalent to screaming into a pillow. it is nevertheless a source of satisfaction. >> you look at conservatism defined by donald trump and these republicans and republican voters. let's stop talking about republicans in washington, republican voters support donald
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trump kowtowing to a north korean dictator where he kills people, people come to him bowing on their knees, beats to death american students. this is your new republican party. instead of ronald reagan saying tear down that wall, you have donald trump saying great guy. wonderful guy. and, you know, beloved by his people. >> yeah. even if you think that's sort of fulsome praise for that. the president now declares the nuclear threat from north korea is resolved. we have no indication that they even reached an agreement no agreement to meet in the future no, time line. he's just declared mission accomplished. like i said before, the agenda
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keeps shifting. what actual policy achievements this president wants to achieve are so fluid that you have no choice but to say, well, does he support the president? >> a complete 180 from what conservatives on talk radio and fox news said about barack obama when he said that he would talk to the north koreans. oh my god, locusts descended from the heavens and ate the flesh. >> you know, we talk about this all the time, but it's a great thought experiment every morning to say, what would fox news, what would conservatives be saying if barack obama had just done this? and they would all be going nuts. noah is so right in terms of not only the agenda being fluid, but policies, everything being fluid. certainly you're in favor of high deficits, cutting back trades, in favor of meetings with a dictator like that, in favor of doing what republicans
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used to call challenging our allies and embracing our adversaries. >> we used to call it appeasement is what we used to call it. >> yeah, exactly. so i don't know how we could become so unprincipled. it's almost nonprincipled, as if the principles matter not at all. >> so value free zone where you have mitch mcconnell actually stopping republicans from even taking a vote on tariffs. so, now mitch mcconnell is the champion -- >> free markets, free minds, free people. >> mitch is the champion of liberal style tariffs, which ends up just taxingorking class voters. evan, it's song that -- and frightening, i think, as a conservative -- that if you look at the president's last two summits, look at the g7 in canada, the huge winner, i mean, this is like by
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secretariat leads at the belmont in '73 was russia. then you look at what happened yesterday in north korea, the huge winner of course, china. >> right. absolutely, joe. the sub text that runs across these events is what this means for our american allies around the world. if you're reading this as you're picking up the paper in seoul or if you're moon jae-in and hearing this come across the transom, everything that you had to assume about the reliability, american power, this extends to our american partners, you have to wonder what is america's presence going to be in the region for the decades to come and really how do we begin to think about our relationship with china differently because, as i heard over and over again around asia, people will say, look, we don't want to have to choose between the united states and china, but if your president is going to tell us that he's not exactly sure whether he's going to keep troops in korea,
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not sure what his security commitments will be to his american allies, then we have to think about geography and geography is destiny and china is not going anywhere. >> let's not forget, this is the second time trump has basically taken the ball in hand from the chinese. the first is when we pull out of the tpp which is the way to ballist our way around china and bring our allies including canada closer to us and we just walked off the field. >> everything he has done has empowered china and russia. >> everything is about russia. john heilemann? >> i just, you know, the thing that was ringing in my ears all day yesterday and we talked about this on show frequently for really good reasons, everything that he was saying yesterday about kim jong-un, everything he said in the press conference, everything he said subsequently just is so perfectly consistent with the views he expressed of vladimir putin. to mika's point, on this program in the middle of 2016 campaign, which was the notion of, well, he's murdered journalists, well,
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so what? he's a strong leader. the one thing you can say for trump, his admiration for despotism, for thuggishness, for autocracy, for all of those characteristics it's perfectly consistent. >> we know all that. >> given where he is on putin, of course he'll find kim jong-un to be someone of similar spirit and someone he finds admirable. >> i think everybody knew what they were electing if they watched this show. we brought it out of him. we confronted him with the reality about putin, and he stood by his efinty as putin as a strong leader. he says it everywhere he goes. the question is, where are the checks in congress, in his own party on quite frankly everything he says that flies in the face of running a democracy? >> noah, it's interesting
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yesterday there were no conservatives speaking out in the house or the senate, which of course sad, pathetic that that was the case. very few. and many praising donald trump. but i will say online, a lot of strong conservative voices expressing real concern, even about the american flag flying next to the north korean flag which for decades has represented the cruellest oppression on planet earth. >> yeah. that was a concession. the summit was a concession. all of this the president doesn't seem to believe are concessions to a dictatorship. we just got off a big conversation about the iran deal, about pulling out of an agreement that was too lenient, that allowed for nuclearization over the course of ten years, that didn't have a sufficient verification regime. that was something conservatives went to the mattresses for. and now they have to go to the mattresses to defend something worse. i think that's a real
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vulnerabili vulnerability. >> it is. >> you hear a lot of conservatives say we have to wait, give it six months, a year. who knows what will happen down the line. let's not render a judgment. it's fear and retrenchment because time is not on our side. everybody was on the same page a few months ago. we all knew time was not on our side. we had to act quickly in order to evade the worst case scenario. a year, conservatives need to face up to that and if they're confronted with that, they won't be able to evade the hypocrisy. >> do they see what is happening? do they see that this is a foreign policy being run by a president with no compass and a state department that's unstaffed? i don't understand where the concern is in the republican party. and walter, can you think of any historic parallel to this moment? because i can't. >> no. this is barrelling around without a compass. >> barrelling around. >> you look at what nixon did, it was carefully planned when he
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made major surprise openings. to me it really empowers china, too. i would love to hear evan talk about it because china will now become the great regional player. >> no doubt about it. before we go to evan, here is donald trump last night heaping more praise on kim jong-un. >> other administrations i don't want to get specific on that but they had a policy of silence. if they said something very bad, very threatening and horrible, just don't answer. that's not the answer. that's not what you have to do. so i think the rhetoric i hated to do it, sometimes i felt foolish doing it but we had no choice. >> so strategically you were doing it? >> well, yeah. and i think he gained respect. he's a strong guy. hey, people were saying what's he like? he's got a very good personality. he's funny.
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and he's very, very smart. he's a great negotiator. and he's a very strategic kind of a guy. >> funny, smart, great negotiator. >> funny, poisons family members, kills. >> starves anybody who gets in his way. >> when you think about -- >> sort of the henny youngman of southeast asia. >> name the dictators in our history. >> so, evan, as leader of japan, leaders of south korea, leaders of australia, other long-time allies of the united states hear that, what is the impact? >> well, first of all, you know, if you open the chinese news today, what you see is that they're rejoicing. you know, this is really they've achieve what had they wanted in the korean peninsula. number one, they wanted to avoid a war. number two, they wanted to avoid the united states military abruptly taking over pyongyang and moving all the way up to the chinese border. number three, they never thought
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they would get this, they wanted the united states perhaps to suspend military exercises in south korea which they regard as an intrusion in the neighborhood and maybe some day perhaps reduce american troops on the peninsula. what you heard the president, of course, do was volunteer to do all those things. what's fascinating, what's happened and almost sort of subtle enough that we missed it on the front page is that there's been this inversion of the role of the united states and china in the world. it used to be that china was the bump shous, the new player in town. they were moving in and disrupting the rules-based order, doing what they wanted in the south china sea. it was the united states saying we need to stand up for that rules based international order. what you have right now is that the united states is with holding that basic, authority tative support for the kinds of rules that make the global system function. that worries american al lice. >> you mentioned it before, walter, that the winners have been china and russia since
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donald trump became president of the united states. if you look at what the professor of moscow state university told r.t., which was we don't have to do anything. vladimir putin doesn't have to do anything anymore because donald trump is leading his project in breaking up nato, breaking up the g7, breaking up all of america's strategic alliances. that is why vladimir putin has spent so much time and effort over the past four years trying to disrupt democracies in central and eastern and western europe, why he's trying to do it in the united states still. doesn't have to do it anymore. donald trump is doing his bidding for him. >> if you looked at the last 40, 50 years of what are the strategic goals of russia and the strategic goals of china and you made a list of them, donald trump would be accomplishing all of those goals for them in the past couple of years. what john heilemann said is exactly right, too. it's just a matter of style and
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preference. trump likes autocrats. trump is somebody who would find a putin or a kim jong-un more -- >> attractive -- >> -- attract i have than a theresa may or angela merkel or justin trudeau. >> and it is about looks for him and for a lot of people around him. they like strength and they like women who look the way they think women should look. mitch mcconnell yesterday because the gop longest serving senate leader. to mark the occasion, mcconnell spoke with you, heidi przybyla saying the past year and a half has been extraordinarily satisfying siting gop victories on taxes, deregulation, court appointments and opening the alaska wildlife refuge for oil drilling. the majority leader added that republicans could not have asked for a better partner on those matters than president trump.
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when it comes to core republican issues, mcconnell tells nbc news, quote, he's indistinguishable from what we would have expected from a marco rubio or a jeb bush as president. >> dear lord. >> dear lord, heidi. >> it's a miracle. >> how did you keep a straight face? >> here is his point, okay. if you look at the cards that he was dealt with the election of president trump who campaigned almost against mcconnell personally as the titular head of the establishment republican party, he campaigned on the wall. he campaigned on tearing up free trade agreements, on a big infrastructure spending deal. none of that has happened. what's happened instead is really a cookie cutter conservative republican agenda in terms of all of the things that you just itemized in the story from the wildlife refuge being opened up to the biggest reform in taxes in 30 years. and so by that measure, leaving all of the cultural stuff aside,
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by that measure, mcconnell says that this has been an extraordinarily successful year and a half. i will say, when i pressed him on the how, on how did you do this, did you do this by essentially working around the president in terms of working between yourself, speaker ryan and mike pence who installed his own legislative affairs director in the white house and mike pence who is the one who is always up on capitol hill cutting these negotiations, he was a little bit sensitive to that. and he said it's not that we oppose the president's agenda, it's just that, you know, this is the first time or actually in the past 100 years republicans have only had control of the white house and both branchs of congss forbout 20 years. so we've taken this to maximum affect and accomplished, i think a lot in terms of ticking off those long-held conservative goals. >> all right. >> you have a list there, joe. >> i see scribbles. >> joe is scribbling. i see this coming.
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here it comes. >> tell me, i brought in an expert, conservative expert he writes for that commentary magazine. not matlock, d.j., where brother where at thou. let me ask you this question. what's your name? mr. rothman. jeb bush or would marco rubio have supported higher tariffs? >> no, sir. >> would they have been on a jihad as you yankees say in new york city for destroying free trade. >> no, sir. >> okay. what about the tpp, hey, would marco rubio or jeb bush turn china over -- >> i think noah is uncomfortable. >> over to the chinese? >> no, i wouldn't. >> no, you wouldn't. what about white supremacy, would jeb bush or marco rubio
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after charlottesville, preached more equivalency -- >> can i have a water? >> white supremacy? no, of course they wouldn't. what about russia. i'm trying to figure out exactly how jeb bush would have tailored his speech for marco rubio that russia should be in the g8 and justin trudeau should go sit in a corner with a dunce cap. >> no. >> what about north korea, do you think jeb bush or marco rubio would go to north korea and say that kim jong-un was a nice man. >> talented. >> that nuclear weapons were forever banned from north korea? >> funny guy. >> and a funny guy. would they ever say that? >> they might say he's fawny guy. very charitable here. >> marco rubio called him a weirdo yesterday on twitter. >> yeah. >> no. >> would either called hispanic breeders, sir? >> oh my god, he said that. >> jeb would not. >> donald trump called them breeders and mitch mcconnell said that --
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>> you're too good in this role because i'm actually sweating. anxiety. >> what about the press? >> that is a good pint, mr. hyalman. a fine co-counselor i brought in from new york city to understand the people of this state. what about the press? do you think mitch mcconnell thinks that jeb bush or marco rubio would have borrowed from joseph stalin and called the press enemies of the people? >> probably not. >> thank you, sir. i rest my case. >> noah rothman. is that matlock, i don't know what that was, but it was good. >> no. it's the truth. evan, there are so many things that -- so many things that marco rubio and jeb bush would have never done -- >> ever. >> -- the first thing, it's so interesting for years we were concerned, conservatives were concerned, people like jeb bush and marco rubio were concerned that barack obama never made the pivot to asia.
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since donald trump has been president of the united states, first, he takes us out of a trade agreement that would help us keep up with china. and now north korea. again, what's the long-term impact on the geopolitics of asia? >> well, in some funny ways, joe, china has been so staggered, so surprised by how fast things have turned in their favor that they're almost a little suspicious of it. they wonder, why would an american president actually be undermining the quality of its own -- of the united states's alliances in the region. they really for a long time they couldn't decide if donald trump was playing some long game with them or, in fact, whether he was operating on these kinds of tactical short-term political principles. from their perspective, it's crazy to make judgments and to make choices about your own country's future on the basis of how you hope to do a few months from now in an election because they don't have that problem. so, they really look at this and
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they say, this is a profound evolution in the nature of power in asia and from their perspective they are the beneficiaries. >> evan osnos, thank you very much. that was very good. it would be funny if it wasn't so sad. >> noah is such a great actor that he was actually sweating. >> he is sweating. >> he was sweating on the witness stand. >> it's a method. still ahead on "morning joe" -- we have jay johnson, the ranking member of the foreign relations committee, senator bob menendez and congressman tim ryan who made a play for democratic leadership after the 2016 election. what's in store for him on capitol hill? you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. (vo) we came here for the friends.
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my mission was to send a very strong signal of strength. this was particularly important on the eve of an even more --
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far more important summit in korea. and the problem is that in conveying that message i used language that was inappropriate and -- >> special place in hell for the prime minister. >> basically lost the power of that message. i own that. that was my mistake. those were my words. >> he was later asked if he was sorry and the white house trade adviser peter navarro said he was sorry for special place in hell canadian prime minister justin trudeau. >> that was full throated and honest. >> mika that's exactly all we ask. that's all americans ask. we all screw up. do it everyday right here. and all we ask is that our leaders when they make mistakes sometimes they get too excited. he was too excited on sunday.
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okay? he said he was sorry. that matters and it especially matters here on something as important -- the ka yad yans will hear that. >> it matters he spoke out and was self aware and really explained that he lost the entire message because of the rhetoric. i appreciate that. i take that on its word. that looks like the best thing. >> don't make me cross-examine you. >> he went other his skis rhetorically but he was conveying the message the administration wanted. they were all using inflammatory -- >> but let's -- i appreciate everything you said and agree on the apology side. let's remember his views, symptomatic of the trump administration, his views are so far out on the edge of any conventional or reasonable thought about trade that he shouldn't be in this job. he shouldn't have been in the room. he shouldn't have been involved. >> i have said that, too. but walter, at the same time, that wasn't easy for him to do considering who his boss is, who
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has told everybody even when you insult a dying man, john mccain, you are not to apologize. >> exactly. >> well, he apologized and despite the fact i disagree, good for him, good for measuring, good for our relationship with canada. >> i want to pick up on what steve said. whatever you think of his policies. i agree with you and you certainly know more than i do about the trade. we can still try to be a bit more civil those are two separate things. and his apology at least brings him back to saying whether or not you agree with me, i should not have gone that far in personally insulting in an incredibly demeaning way a leader of an allied country. >> i think he handled it incredibly graceful. let's not forget the bigger picture, he's on the fringe. >> agree with you. is justin trudeau now thinking that donald trump -- isn't the key issue what donald trump is saying about canada. does that fix the problem?
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>> we'll take what we can get at this point. >> for me, i think what was so horrifying about what happened was that it wasn't just donald trump, which he's graded on such a low curve by world leaders now. when members of his administration say there's a special place in hell for a leader of our closest ally, tt is something that needs to be walked back. i'murpris he did because donald trump sees that as weakness. we teach our children, where i grew up in the south n my southern baptist church, you told your kids, when they messed up, they apologize. you treat people with respect. we all make mistakes. we've all fallen short of the glory of god. and when we do, we apologize. >> thank you, peter navarro. >> tim ryan of ohio. thanks for being. >> can we get an amen, congressman. >> amen, brother. amen. >> so first of all, i'm curious where you stand on navorro apologizing for getting over his keys.
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do you agree that was a good thing for him to do. >> no question about it. as you just stated, we all learn the same thing. but i have to tell you, here i am standing in front of a camera listening to your panel have a discussion about a frayed relationship we have with canada. it is amazing how far -- >> congressman, everything is going great with the dictator from north korea. >> no, i heard that. i heard that. >> so tell me about the trade deals. first of all, we were running a surplus with canada. secondly, it's americans that are paying at the end of the day for higher tariffs on lumber. and thirdly, this milk mirage that somehow they're screwing us when it comes to milk imports is just a joke. we're running a massive surplus when it comes to milk. >> well, president trump is always going to distort the fact. look, i represent a district that was hit hard by nafta, was hit hard by globalization,
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neither party quite frankly plugged us back into the global economy. it was working in the aggregate but youngtown and akron and these places weren't feeling the bump of the aggregate. so i feel like these trade deals have to be written differently. but what we always argued, joe, is, look, we are all for fair trade with countries that have environmental standards, human rights standards, that's a fair playing field for us. so to see the president of the united states start a fight with canada, we'll be doing press conferences next week back in ohio of manufacturing companies that are going to get devastated by these tariffs on canada and europe. and to me that's the big difference. if you're talking about places that don't have environmental standards, they dump the waste into the local river. if they don't have labor standards, they don't have a national labor relations board, all of these things, that's a different story where we should talk about how do we engage but then negotiate those points out.
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but to do this to canada is going to devastate us in the united states and all of these relationships are based on trust. and i think there's zero trust now between the united states and our allies. and the point i really want to make is, look, the country with the most friends at the end of the day wins. that's why we actually won the cold war. that's why the wall came down because we hung with our friends post world war ii for decades and it didn't happen in a 24-hour news cycle, which i know the president has a tough time dealing with it. it took decades, long-term strategy, plementation investnts and at the end of the day we won. >> congressman, john heilemann here. i want to ask you about the singapore summit yesterday. you were hopeful. wished the president luck before he went to singapore. >> yes. >> yesterday you said yesterday it seems we have nothing to show for our efforts other than a
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toothless statement other than the promise that north korea made before and has broken. president trump said we got something. we put to bed, put an end to the nuclear threat on the korean peninsula, so, sir, i say to you, how could you possibly claim we got nothing. president trump says we got something really big. >> well, this is a perfect example of how the president will take any issue and think to himself, how can i get media attention about this? if it's starting a fight with justin trudeau, i'll do that. if it means i got to wrap my arms around a dictator in north korea, i'll do that. how do i win the 24-hour news cycle. that's the president's main goal. there's no evidence that anything has come from that. but here is the problem, even in the president's own national security strategy, that general mattis put together with great care, we have two major peer competitors now. it's russia and it's china. and the president in all of his
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actions over the past 18 months has broken the nato alliance, the western alliance in favor of who? russia. what he did in the last couple days by saying that we're not going to do military exercises with south korea, it's not just about north korea. it's about building these military relationships with people in that -- countries in that region in the world that can help us stop china from its expansion. they're building islands in the south china sea that they have militarized. they have bases now in africa, so they're protecting the raw materials that they're getting from africa. locking down long-term raw material contracts with poor countries in africa to feed their industrial machine, they're investing in cyber, in submarines in all the latest technologies. so to say we're not going to have a relationship now with south korea is putting us at a huge competitive disadvantage. and you know what happens as china moves throughout the
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world, you know what ultimately suffers, the american economy. we're not going to have the high wage jobs. we're not going to have the latest technologies. we're going to keep falling behind and continue to have the anxiety we have. this all ties together. again, china has 100-year plan. president trump has a 24-hour plan. and he's great at it. he wins it. he wins over 24-hour news cycle. the problem is america is losing. >> 24 hours might be a little long, but i get what you're saying. congressman, tim ryan, thank you very much. >> it's very long. >> if only it would be 24 hours. >> china is looking forward 100 years. looking at technologies that will help them dominate the globe in 2050, like artificial intelligence. donald trump is obsessing over 1850 technology, talking about bringing mining jobs back. >> they are investing more in artificial intelligence, information technology and bio technology than the united states is. they're investing more in education of those things and infrastructure to build those
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things. that is the long game that will make them the economy of the future. >> and they have a plan. they have made in china 2025. they are focussed. they are driven. they are organized and we are floundering. here we are. jared kushner is checking on peace efforts in the middle east and check his credit line with one of his top banks. he's doing well. we'll explain that ahead on "morning joe." >> announcer: "morning joe" is sponsored by -- whoooo.
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really quickly while we're talking about people that have stood up and spoken out. we need to talk about george conway who wrote, i thought, just an extraordinary takedown of all the constitutional arguments that are being used against the mueller investigation. i think most importantly at the end said, you know what, donald trump can be forgiven for -- >> yes. >> there's a lobar for nonlawyers misquoting the law. for the cofounder of the federalist society to just openly and just nakedly misinterpret law and knowing what he's doing and calling it a, quote, legal brief, just to suck up to donald trump is
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unforgivable. >> it's an incredible thing. we noticed this in the past that george conway, very esteemed american conservative lawyer, married to kellyanne conway, someone that was thought to be a potential solicitor general in the trump administration has been increasingly open with his criticism of president trump, his wife's boss, mostly on twitter. and it was the beginning of the administration it was a murmur. he's become much more outspoken. but this is the first time he's uncorked a full-on attack not on president trump but on president trump's enablers on an argument that president trump embraced which he comes down fully in support of the constitutionality the appointment of bob mueller but also an argument about the silence of other conservative legal scholars who by their silence are complicit in a lot of bad constitutional arguments the president is embracing in order to attack bob mueller, the fbi, the justice department and others. >> when it comes to the legal
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argument, mika, it's not a close call. >> it's not. >> george conway is on the side of the supreme court. he's on the side of precedent. it's very important. and i do think there's a huge disservice that's being done to george conway every time he comes out and makes a legal argument. oh my god, there's a fight inside the house of kellyanne. >> why don't we just start judging kelly ann kon way for the work she does and george con way for the work he does. >> it's pretty simple. his piece is in "law fair." george conway. still ahead, new financial disclosure forms show just how much money some members of the trump administration made last year. >> they're doing well. >> jared kushner and ivanka trump pulled in millions. and national security adviser john bolton got a six-figure sum with ties to a ukrainian businessman. we're following the money next on "morning joe." ♪ greetings, sprint engineers.
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axios has new reporting that president trump's son-in-law and white house senior adviser jared kushner will be traveling to the middle east next week. according to a senior u.s. official, kushner will visit, israel, saudi kushner will visi egypt and saudi arabia to discuss the next effort in the peace plan. this follows trump's decision to move the embassy to jerusalem. this comes as bloomberg reports that kushner has expanded his personal ties to israeli financial firms. according to bloomberg, kushner's most recent financial disclosure shows a line of credit he and his father hold with israel discount bank. jumped to as much as $25 million during the past year from under $5 million in late 2017. that financial disclosure also shows that jared kushner and his wife, ivanka trump, brought in at least $82 million of outside
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income while serving as white house senior advisors last year. the filing shows ivanka trump earned $3.9 million from her stake in the trump international hotel in washington -- >> you say what line would you file that under? >> there's like a special schedule that is just labeled the emoluments schedule on tax returns. >> more than $2 million in severance from the trump organization. >> it was a tough split. with us now, investigative reporter for "the washington post" and msnbc political analyst, david farrenholt. help us out trying to figure out where this $82 million came from. >> some of it is from the trump organization, pieces of business that ivanka cass pawas part of, trump hotel, three "ts," consulting which is with her
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brothers. jared's family business is a very complicated business with all over the world. >> you just said ivanka trump earned basically $4 million from her stake in the trump international hotel in washington, d.c. do you know what her stake is in that hotel? >> the overall revenue of that hotel was $40 million last year. sounds like a 10% stake. >> that's revenue. $40 million of revenue wouldn't give you $4 million of profit. >> her father at least is -- blends revenue and profit, often revenue in place of profit on those forms. you're right the bigger statement is bigger than that if it is $4 million in profit. >> david, the emoluments clause of the constitution -- i'm sure you are very familiar with it. let me just read it real quick for our viewers. no person holding any office of profit or trust under them shall, without the consent of
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congress, accept any present. so here we've got the china trademarks that have come through. we've got a lot of the stories that you've written. the cash infusion into this indonesia properties, a mere 72 hours before trump cut the deal on zte. at what point does someone challenge this money flowing to the president's family and also folks in the cabinet, advisors, as unconstitutional? >> well, there's a lot of debate about that emoluments clause. a lot of previous presidents and other officials were so worried about the appearance of taking some sort of gift from a foreign government that they didn't even really get close to the line. the trump family has not shown that kind of reticence. they've sort of taken on lot of these relationships. now there is a couple of court cases, the most important one was in court earlier this week, the suit by the attorneys general of d.c. and maryland suing president trump saying he was basically violating that clause by doing business through mainly the trump hotel in d.c.
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which ivanka also has a piece of. they've had a couple of national day celebrations for kuwait, the philippines just this week. that case is going on and we'll see how the judge interprets it. there is a lot of question about what the framers of the constitution meant to prohibit by taking emoluments from foreign states. >> hey, david, turning to another subject -- actually i think a piece of new news that we hadn't heard before about john bolton receiving i think $115,000 for two speeches he gave on behalf of a ukrainian who's been trying to curry influence, i guess for lack of a better word, in the united states. how should we think about that in the context of ethics and appropriateness? >> the ukrainian steel businessman has been trying to curry favor in the u.s. for the ukraine for a long time, going back to the reign of viktor yanukovych, the pro-russia ukrainian strong man who's now
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out. he gave a $150,000 to the trump foundation in exchange for a 10-minute speech that trump gave in 2015. this guy spent a lot of time trying to cultivate u.s. both future elected officials and also people with sort of soft power in the u.s. seems like that is what this was. he got $115,000 to appear on two panel discussions. one he wasn't even on the panel. he was in the audience and got to answer one question. the other panel he was on with newt gingrich which means he only talked for 5% of the time. >> ooh! good point! >> $115,000 for those two panel discussions. this is part of an influence campaign by this guy. but bolton is not the first one to take money from him. >> all right, david, thank you so much. >> by the way -- we should thank david fahrenhold for his reporting. this is why we need a free press. if you're ever going to say
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let's attack the press, look and see what david's been doing for the last few years and say this is why we need it. that guy is good. >> man, walter, we all -- i'll put myself right in there -- made such a big deal about bill clinton getting paid $500,000 for a speech and once hillary became secretary of state, his fee doubling and going off into places that wanted their policies influence inside the state department. but the clintons ended up just being peons compared to the trump. we're talking tens of millions of dollars. >> i think john's right on the emoluments thing. we know general whether i whly founder are trying to prohibit, people spending money at trump hotels oand giving them patents. this is so much worse than the speaking fee type stuff. still ahead, candidacy
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aligned with president trump win primary elections in south carolina and virginia. is that good news or bad news for democrats? and, the president says everyone is safer after his meeting with kim jong-un. we'll ask former homeland security secretary jeh johnson about that. plus, the top democrat on the senate foreign relations committee, bob menendez, weighs in. and the president just tweeted something positive about the u.s. alliance with canada and mexico. he says congratulations on the world cup bid. "morning joe's" coming right back. come with us to a new world deeper than the ocean as unfathomable as the universe a world that doesn't exist outside you, but within you where breakthrough science is replacing chemotherapy with immunotherapy where we can now attack the causes of disease not just the symptoms.
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plus get $1,000 bonus cash. i would argue that the president has unleashed personally -- again, not in any way totally but personally to blame for demons that have been unleashed, whether it is what i saw at a senior center back home and people saying f-u, and f-u and f-u at each other at a senior retirement center where they're going to see each other playing croquet the next day? you have the top guy saying i wish i could put you in the face. if you do, i'll pay your legal fees. that's bizarre. we ought to call it as such. back home as some of these people have been, frankly, weird and different in a town i'm in, i'll say what is going on? they say, look, if the guy at the top can say anybody to anybody at any time, why can't i? >> that was republican congressman mark sanford on "morning joe" exactly one year ago this friday. while the south carolina
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conservative largely backed the president's agenda, he also called out the commander in chief, as we just heard right there. last night, sanford lost his primary race after the president attacked him personally on twitter just hours before the polls closed. and it was close. welcome to "morning joe," everyone. it's wednesday, june 13th. with us we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle. national affairs analyst for nbc news and msnbc's john heilemann. former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst, steve ratner. and author of the book, "a world in disarray," richard haas. and reporter heidi pryzbila. >> john heilemann, mark sanford survives career-ending -- what should have been a career-ending
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scandal as governor. lies on going on the anticipate la a appalachian trail. no one thought he would be elected back to congress. two years ago he votes with trump maybe 90% of the time. >> 87%. >> says one or two things about trump that people don't like -- >> off with his head. >> -- and is so conservative that conservative -- really conservative. not a trumpist. so conservative that even the freedom caucus said we would not have passed the tax cuts without mark. there is no more conservative person on protecting tax dollars, balancing the budget, paying down the debt. mark's -- that's been mark's sole obsession since 1994. but primary voters, no, you know what? we don't care that he's one of the most conservative people in congress. he said one or two bad things about trump.
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>> it's -- well, look. there are a lot of things to say about this but -- >> why don't we just start to say it has devolved into a cult. primary voters in the republican party have devolved into a trumpist cult. >> it's clear that conservatism, liberalism, voting records, none of those things matter. it is a cult personality and the president has an extraordinary hold over his base and cult personality is one good deskr s description for it. for all the people out there, at various times everyone at this table, and me, all of us who sat and said, why is it republicans are afraid of donald trump? why do they -- will they never cross him? why he never repays their loyalty? he's terrible, he's this, he's that, they should all have the courage of their convictions and stand up to him. this is a good example. because mark sanford didn't really stand up to him. he just made a couple of snotty comments about him and trump brings the wrath upon that guy. probably everyone here would say you should take a stand for what
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you believe in and be willing to lose your job. nonetheless, the fact is that if you get on the wrong side of donald trump, his power over his base is significant enough that he can kill you, regardless of how conservative voting record is. regardless of your history in the republican party. regardless of your ideology and everything else. if he wants to put a target on your back, he can, and will. >> this is not, mika, it's just not -- we've said it before, but let us say it again. using this as an exclamation mark. the republican party is not a conservative party. >> right. >> it's not conservative intellectually. it's not conservative fiscally. >> temperamentally. >> it's not conservative temperamentally. you can go back from edmond burke, through russell kirk. you can go through william f. buckley, straight into ronald reagan. what's happening today is an aberration of all of those things. that's fine, but i just -- i
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wonder where conservatives go now? >> well, they're too frightened to actually express themselves. the difference between mark sanford and the other actual conservatives in the party is that mark sanford will be okay today. if that's what it takes? if he has to lose his re-election in order to remain a conservative? and stay true to the policies that he believes in, so be it. that is mark sanford. he is definitely in a flood. he had his problems and he took his knocks. but i will tell you, this is the kind of conservative that is missing in washington today, someone who can stand up. you all will go down together -- >> yes, you will. >> -- because you don't have backbones, you don't have a moral compass and you don't know how to stand up to the ideals that you say you believe in. he is. he is losing his re-election because of it. but he's standing up for what is right. >> for what he -- >> conservative beliefs. >> -- for what he's fought for. >> for what he believes.
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>> for 25 years. >> i may not agree, but -- >> last week i was on a phone call with mark. if you know mark, you know, he's never nervous. he's just not. and i said, what's it like out there, man? he was laughing. he said, joe -- >> it's bad. >> -- i'm seeing the same exact thing i was saying 25 years ago. i'm going to conservative town hall meetings talking about free trade, and they're calling me disloyal. i'm going out talking about balanced budgets. and entitlement reform. and saving our economy for the future. and people are there screaming support your president. and for him, it was like he was -- he didn't say this, but i am. it would be like you were transported to that movie "idocracy." you're saying water grows grass. not federally funded gatorade.
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water grows grass. the same thing he stood for for 25 years on fiscal conservatism, that i stood for, suddenly that's out of vogue because the emperor who has no clothes says, that's out of vogue. >> but the emperor has this incredible ability to mobilize his grassroots, his -- look, we have a president who's done something unusual. instead of trying to broaden his appeal, he's narrowed his appeal and he is playing to his base and he's created this group of people who will follow him anywhere. look, i know mark sanford. his first wife worked for me actually and ihink i may have even given to his first campaign, i'm embarssed to say. but whatever. >> no, you know what the funny thing is? you shouldn't be embarrassed to say that because you fight for long-term debt relief. that is what drove mark to congress. i remember the first day i met him, 1994, he was talking about entitlement reform. >> no, he was absolutely right on that. the only thing it says, i think there are some true conservatives in washington. i think they're hiding under
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their desks. >> yes, they are. it is so embarrassing. >> -- afraid to say anything. they are going along with a lot of these fiscally irresponsible bills that are coming before congress because they are afraid of donald trump and they're afraid of those tweets and they are afraid of what would happen in a primary. >> this is just the latest example, the pointed example, of why nothing has happened on immigration. nothing has happened on a whole range of issues. because of fear. the fear of donald trump's tweets. >> so let's play a game we played during the fall of 2015 when everybody was saying that donald trump was at 3% or 4%, was never going to win. hold up papers. we say this is the day donald trump's at like 5%. he's at 10%. don't worry, the ceiling's 15%. and he'd keep going above that. we'll do this today. today is june 13th, 2018. going to hold this paper up and just remember, here we are. june the 13th, 2018.
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what republicans did last night and what they are doing in subservience to donald trump is going to lead to a massive democratic wave this fall. and if you don't believe me, you don't believe the short-sidedness -- and i will say, the political stupidity and radicalism and turning away from rock-solid conservative values that have moved this party forward starting in 1980. if you don't believe me, let's just see what happened in virginia last night. >> okay. you want to do that? >> because in virginia last night, democrats -- in you heard "happy days are here again" blaring out of democrats headquarters, there's a reason. because last night democrats got them another seat in the united states senate because of what -- not republicans. i don't even call them republicans anymore. what trumpists -- what trumpists did in the state of virginia.
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>> in virginia a trump supporting immigration hardliner narrowly won the state's republican senate primary. conservative firebrand corpsly stewart will now face off against democratic senator tim kaine in november. stewart has pledged to run a vicious campaign against the senator. in 2016, stewart served as donald trump's virginia campaign chair. he was fired after staging an anti-rnc protest outside of the party headquarters without the approval from the campaign. "the new york times" reports that, quote, party leaders fear that stewart, a fervent trump supporter, who has mimicked his slashing style, could drag down other republicans in a state that's key to keep control of the house. and trump just tweeted a short time ago. congratulations to corey stewart for his great victory for senator from virginia. now he runs against a total stiff, tim kaine, who is weak on crime and borders and wants to raise your taxes through the roof. don't underestimate corey, a
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major chance at winning!" >> at the same time though, democrats were victorious in the special election in wisconsin, mika? >> yeah. winning a state senate seat in northeast wisconsin, a district that republicans had held for more than four decades. >> four decades! wow. >> it is the 43rd gop-held state legislative seat to flip to democrats since trump's inauguration. >> four decades? i mean that was back when conservatives were actually conservative, john heilemann. this corey stewart guy. how's that going to turn out? >> i think it is going to turn out badly. tim kaine is unlikely to lose that race. the real issue is there is not much chance to gain -- he's never not lost a race he's run in virginia. but the fact is that corey stewart is now going to be the top of the ticket in virginia. for suburban republicans running on house races, they're going to have to deal with repercussions of that vicious campaign that he's promising against tim
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kaine. just as they're going to have to deal with donald trump. we saw what happened in the virginia off-year elections last year. it is going to be just as bad. they have this new problem now in addition to corey stewart. >> heidi, there are four congressional seats in virginia now that many people have considered to be up for grabs. very competitive. because stewart won his primary last night, those races have shifted democratic by a lot of the major ranking services. >> right. and if you saw what happened last year in the off-year election, it was a fired-up democratic base. and so the transfer effect here of corey stewart, like john says, being effectively at the top of the ticket could be pretty significant if you're somebody like barbara comstock, for example, you are already in a really uphill battle. this is going to ensure that a lot of those same a crossover educated female suburbanite republican voters are going to view this as a referendum as
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corey stewart being effectively trump's proxy and ensuring that essentially that same turnout model that transferred into a huge success at the state legislative level aswell here in virginia will transfer the at congressional level. still ahead on "morning joe," president trump tells americans they can sleep well tonight following his summit with north korea's dictator. we'll bring in a member of the foreign relations committee, senator chris murphy, to talk about that. but first, here's bill karins with a check on the forecast. bill? >> well, we're going to finally see summer arriving on the east coast by the weekend right in time for father's day. but first we have to deal with severe storms the next two days. pittsburgh, buffalo, syracuse, rochester, state college, slight risk of severe storms for about 11 million people. the storms will die by the time they get to washington, d.c., philadelphia and baltimore. maybe some rain but you won't get the severe weather. tomorrow enhanced risk around bismarck and maybe a couple isolated tornadoes.
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the big story this week and into the weekend, excessive heat warnings tucson, phoenix to veg vegas. it is not just hot there, it's hot all through the inner mountain west. an incredibly warm june. salt lake city, 96 degrees. typically should be in the upper 70s to low 80s. boise, reddington, 108 degrees. then the heat starts to move to the plains. pueblo at 100. wichita, 98 on thursday. by the time we get to friday, near 100 in omaha. some of that heat makes its way to the east coast, look at new york city -- back up to 87 degrees. that's back on schedule as a lot of people are out there enjoying their summertime plans. new york city, one of the spots that's had very nice spring weather as of late will only get hotter in the days ahead. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. you've tried moisturizer after moisturizer
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president trump is back in d.c. this morning, returning from his summit in singapore after an active night on social media. last night he tweeted four times about meeting kim jong-un. twice thanking him for taking the first bold step to meet and for suspending nuclear tests. trump also took aim at domestic critics writing a year ago the pundits and talking heads, people that couldn't do the job before were begging nor conciliation and peace. please meet, don't go to war. now that we meet and have a great relationship with kim jong-un, the same haters shout out, you shouldn't meet, do not meet. joining us now from washington, a member of the foreign relations committee, democratic senator chris murphy of connecticut. senator, what is the path to trying to not screw this up so badly for mike pompeo? >> that's a very good question. you know, listen. barack obama had the famous line
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back in 2003. he says i'm not against wars. i'm just against dumb wars. from our perspective we're not against diplomacy. we're just against bad diplomacy and this was really bad diplomacy. the problem is this president has never been the dealmaker he claims to be. his reputation in new york was that he would throw a lot of bluster up front, but then when he sat down at the negotiating table he'd give away everything the other side wanted and that's how he found himself in multiple bankrupts. th that seems to be what happened here. whether he did it ahead of time or at the spur of the moment, as richard mentioned, giving away the military exercises with south korea, without getting anything in return i think puts mike pompeo in a very difficult spot because it suggests that this negotiation is going to go equally badly if we get to the second and third stage. but frankly, a lot of folks think that what kim wants is to just drag this out, to just give
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himself more time and to the extent that all trump really cares about is these syrupy photo-ops, if he finds a way to set up a few more of those, keep trump going, he may be able to get that time that he wants without ever having to give up anything in return. >> so the iran accord is much maligned and now cast aside. could you tell us the difference between the iran accords, worked on for years by secretary kerry and president obama, and what was signed in the philippines between donald trump and president kim? >> well, remember, there were two pieces of the iran accords. for a long time, there were very quiet negotiations between what happened between the united states and iran such that when those negotiations were finally made public there was a preliminary deal where the united states gave something and the iranians gave something. there was no photo-op between the united states president and the supreme leader.
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and certainly there was no public extolling of this new alliance before there was give-and-take on both sides, unlike this situation in which you have given kim what he wants, a legitimizing photo-op, without any concessions. second, again, as you were talking about before, the context matters here and the savaging of our allies just a few hours beforehand in canada sends this very chilling message to anybody who's thinking about allying with the united states in the future, that are you going to get brewalized if you do what the united states asks while our enemies are treated very well. that was not happening in the context of the iranian negotiation either. we were doing those negotiations with our partners. we were consulting every day with them so that we were on the same page. very different than today. >> on the iranian negotiation, i'm struck by the -- this administration said the previous one wanted the deal too much with iran. now you can say this
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administration wanted the deal too much with north korea. senator, i'm curious, what will congress do now? instead of simply waiting for an agreement which you may not like -- and by then it is essentially a done deal -- why not work with senator corker, why not hold hearings about what should usually be a part of negotiation? essentially, help give mike pompeo a script that you think on one hand is good to the united states, on the other hand is negotiable? why not take the lead? >> obviously that should be what congress should do. we have large lly around kat ll article 1 responsibilities over the course of the last 15 years with the president so it ise ii now. but this week we are meeting. we could offer amendments to that bill that would start to provide some manner of oversight on this negotiation process. i'm going to be introducing an amendment to that bill this
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week, for instance, that would require prior congressional authorization to withdraw any sizable amount of u.s. forces from the korean peninsula, something we worry trump will give away having already given away these exercises. so i'll work with senator corker to do hearings. i hope he will. but we can also put some statutory confines around these negotiations to make sure that whatever he does is in the best interests of the country. coming up on "morning joe" -- >> i have to be honest with you. this is the weakest statement i have ever seen come out of any engagement with north korea, much less highest ranking of the president of the united states. >> that's senator bob menendez on the president's summit with north korea. the new jersey democrat joins us straight ahead. "morning joe's" coming right back. ♪
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and enjoyed by the community in the future. the chairman of the senate foreign relations chit, bob corker, has introduced legislation to restrict presidential authority on issuing tariffs on national security grounds, something trump did two weeks ago in
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imposing levies on aluminlualua steel imports fr. yesterday a passionate corker spoke on the senate floor. >> because senators, united states senators that are elected by the people in their state, don't want to cast a tough vote. they block everybody from voting. i heard senator from texas, the senior senator from texas saying the other day, well, gosh, we might upset the president. we might upset the president of the united states before the mid-terms. we can't do that because we'd be upsetting the president. the president of the united states. i can't believe it! i would bet that 95% of the people on this side of the aisle support intellectually this amendment. but, no, no, no. gosh. we might poke the bear, is the language i've been hearing in
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the hallways. we might poke the bear. the president might get upset with us as united states senators if we vote on the corker amendment. so we're going to do everything we can to block it! >> you know, james fellows with "the atlantic" has been saying the same thing all year. pretty brilliant. corker's doing it here. floor speeches are fine. protests against trump are fine. you are rolled eyes, that's great. but were only two republican senators away from stopping donald trump from pushing the excesses of his policy agenda. >> jeff flake is co-sponsor of the bill. any reaction to corker's impassioned statements? i mean does anybody hear this? what's happening? >> under -- behind the scenes, they are all angry because corker is right. if you look at the cross section
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of members who were signed on to this, it runs the ideological gamut. and that's because, like mcconnell himself, by the way, said just a few weeks ago when trump first rolled out these tariffs, these are not well tailored. they're going to hurt potentially a lot of different industries if we see retaliation from farmers to other industries across the board. >> so, heidi, why does mitch mcconnell just caving in this way and killing mitch mcconnell not allowing this to go to the floor for a vote? >> this is a potentially huge wedge issue ahead of the mid-terms. think about it, joe, about how this could potentially split the republican base. you just saw with mark sanford the power of this president turning his twitter handle on you. they are all scared that, like he said, poke the bear, he'll come after you. mcconnell himself, i caught him afterwards, after corker's tirade because it was so emotional. he was literally red in the
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face. one thing -- i don't know if you picked it up, he actually name-checked not only cornyn, but also inhofe who was running the floor at that time. he said, look, he's been told to do this. i know he's been told to do this. i don't hold it against him but he's been told to do this by the powers that be. so i approached mitch mcconnell after this and said i assume you are the powers to be. he didn't have any response. he normally does not do any hallway interviews but he also did not take the opportunity to deny that inhofe did not do that. it is a political calculation that if this came to the floor two really anger trump. trump had all of these members at the white house, 15 senators at the white house last week, and pointedly told them -- don't do it. rm coming up on "morning joe," former homeland security secretary jeh johnson joins the table next on "morning joe." crashed this morning.
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you do not get to come to america if you have a private
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threat or someone personally attacks you. you do not get to have asylum for that. >> attorney general jeff sessions last night speaking about the justice department's rollback of the obama administration's policy of granting asylum to victims of domestic and gang violence. we areback with mike barnicle, commentary's noah rothman, white house reporter for the associated press, jonathan lemire joins the table. and also we bring in former secretary of homeland security under president obama, jeh johnson. good to have you on. i want to talk about north korea abdz and if we're finally safe, as the president says. first to this policy jeff sessions was just talking about. your reaction. >> under the law, a person qualifies for asylum in this country if they can demonstrate they are part of a particular group in their home country that is in some way being persecuted by the government.
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in 2014, the immigration courts began to accept claims from women who were victims of domestic violence because the government in those countries, in central america, were basically unwilling or unable to do anything about it. so as a class, the immigration courts began to recognize that these were people -- and these were heartbreaking cases. a woman, for example, who was beaten 8 months pregnant began to recognize that these are the types of people who, as a class, should qualify for asylum in this country. it is regrettable that the attorney general has decided to reverse that. and it will probably go to the appellate courts from here and we'll see what happens. >> noah, what's the counterpoint to this? is there one? >> as the secretary mentioned, this is statute. if congress wants to act and create conditions where there is, for example, an exception for individuals who are under
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duress, one of the individuals who received a lot of attention was somebody who worked for a terrorist organization, forced into it, and the 2-1 decision said that she has to be returned to her home country. now is that unjust? sure. but the statute is the statute and if congress wants to address this -- and they are fully aware of the problem -- then they can and should. but it is not the province of the justice department to make up law. >> mike. >> there are statutes. and there's also, i think, pretty much universal concern about protecting our borders among all americans. just common sense to do that. but there is also judgment, and there is also, i think, an element of morality in this. and where does it fit in? i mean these are tough calls. but this aggressive policy now towards separating children from their parents at the borders is just -- it's it's upsetting i think for average people to read about, to see it. where are we on that?
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under what code are we doing this, and what other aspects of -- what else could we do to make it more humane? >> mike, for three years i had the responsibility for enforcing our immigration laws. in three years on my watch we probably deported or returned or repatriated about 1 million people to enforced border security. one of the things that i could not do is separate a child from his or her mother, and literally pull a child from its mother's arms. i spent days and hours in south texas with these families, and i know what you literally see at the border are women clinging to their young children. and i couldn't separate a child from its mother. i couldn't ask an i.c.e. officer or border patrol agent to do that, nor could i even send that message as a deterrent. i think that there is room in the enforcement of our immigration laws for certain degree of humanity and american values. this, frankly, is not who we are as a nation, nor do i think that what we're doing right now with
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our federal criminal justice system, trying to prosecute literally everyone in this zero tolerance policy, is something that can sustain itself. there's something like 50,000 people now coming across the southern border per month. there's no way that you can sustain that volume of people and trying to prosecute everybody in some zero tolerance policy. so the lesson learned from all of this, from my three years? illegal migration reacts sharply to perceived changes in enforcement policy. we saw that in 2014. saw numbers go up, we drove tell down. but it always reverts to the longer-term trends. as long as we do not address the underlying conditions in guatemala, honduras and el salvador, the poverty and violence in those countries, we're going to be dealing with this for a long time. and the current administration is finding that out right now. >> question for you, secretary. two questions. one, you talked about some of the practical implications.
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what is sort of the damage to the nation's moral standing for some of these policies you are seeing, children being separated. secondly, there's a report yesterday the administration is considering erecting some almost tent cities near the border to provide some sort of housing while they figure out what to do here. is that something that could work? what do you make of that? >> i've seen that movie before. we had to create temporary facilities in the summer of 2014 when we had the surge. first of all, it is hugely expensive. it is a budget buster. and you simply cannot detain everyone. there are going to be a large volume of people, no matter what you do, who have to be released on bail or some circumstances of release pending their deportation proceeding. so the reality is that illegal migration is a fraction of what it used to be. but the demographic is totally changed. it is women and children from central america. almost all of whom are pleading for asylum in this country. that's a more complex
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environment and unless we deal with the underlying circumstances, we're going to continue to bang our head against the wall here. >> let's turn to north korea. the president's trip to singapore, his description of kim jong-un and his personality and getting along with him. but more importantly, the president now says that -- i want to get the words right -- that we are safe now? because of this agreement. as a former secretary of homeland security, would you agree that we are safe now? >> well, it's always better when you have enemies talking to each other as opposed to trading insults and threatening military actions. that's always better. so my assessment is that this was a good start, but that's exactly what it is, a start. they signed a document that was essentially an agreement to try to agree. nothing binding. and the devil will be in the details. it will be up to the state department and the north korean
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government to try to make something happen here. but it is the very, very beginning of a process and it is probably pretty fragile. this could all change in the course of a week or a month. i mean look how fast we went from fire and fury to where we are now, in a matter of six or seven months. >> looking at his tweet now -- president obama said that north korea was our biggest and most dangerous problem. no longer. sleep well tonight. noah. >> briefly going back to immigration, the trump administration received some criticism over a report indicating they'd lost -- rather, couldn't locate a variety of children that had been detained and sponsors, the department of homeland security said a lot of these people don't respond because they're put with illegal immigrant families who sponsor these individuals to come across the border. in 2016 an inspector general report says about 84% of the children they placed with sponsors could be located. another 4,159 went missing. this is essentially the policy
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that was bequeathed to the trump administration, correct? >> what happens when you have an unaccompanied child cross the border, the law requires that homeland security turn that child over to the department of hhs within 48 hours. and hhs then has these large shelters, and they try to place the child with a family member or some other suitable circumstance. and when you have spikes like this and you are dealing with the volume that we're dealing with now -- 50,000 a month -- it's very, very difficult for hhs to keep up with where they place these people. their first priority is getting them out of the shelters and putting them in a suitable home of some sort. so there's very little follow-through and very often when there is follow-through, the child has moved on, gone to another family, circumstance or something of that nature. so it is the nature of the problem here. >> back on noah's point, during that same -- when that story took off a few weeks ago, there were images around as children
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sort of in cages. there was suggestion some of that was happening now, but some of that was happening during president obama's watch. was that something that was happening for you? what are your thoughts about that? what can we do to present suvena disturbing image that yupsets s many people. >> it is the demographic we are dealing with now. we see far more women and children from central america crossing our border. they are placed in a border detention facility where they're processed, screened for health reasons. there is a risk of flight assessment. and the way the infrastructure exists right now, it is not necessarily equipped to deal with families. the stereotypical migrant coming from mexico or the south is a single adult from mexico. and so you see these images and very clearly, those images could have just as easily existed in 2014, 2015, 2016. and they are heartbreaking. i saw them in person and i spent hours talking to these women and
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children about why they would make this -- make this journey. but one thing i would not do is separate a child from his mother. just couldn't do that. >> couldn't do it. before we go, since the president says we should sleep well tonight, curious what -- when you look at everything that's going on from your perspective, what keeps you up at night? >> when i was in office -- actually, the best question to ask a national security official. everyone asks me that question. the best question to ask is, what is the gap in information between what i know reading "the new york times," what you know reading pdbs and classified reports, sometimes the gap is very big, sometimes the gap is very small. when i was in office the thing that kept me up at night was home grown bound extremism. the next orlando, the next san bernardino style attack. i am these days a little depressed about, frankly, the state of our politics. we have a president who
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denigrates the institutions of his own government, which i simply cannot get my head around. and then when we look at the primary results last night from south carolina, mark sanford, who in my experience, a very thoughtful member of congress. he was on the house homeland security committee. he would sit through the entire hearing. he was the most junior member so he'd be last. but he'd always ask the most intelligent, insightful question, and it wasn't a knee-jerk question requiring a knee-jerk response. and so it's depressing to me to see a thoughtful member of congress like that lose re-election. >> yeah. the state of our politics, the denigration of our institutions, along with it, a compliant congress. it's a lot. and i appreciate your insights. former homeland security secretary jeh johnson, thank you very much for being on this morning. our next guest has introduced an amendment calling on donald trump to retract his
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statement that russia be re-admitted to the g7. the ranking member of the senate foreign relations committee, bob menendez is standing by. keep it right here on "morning joe." at&t gives you more for your thing. your getting serious thing. that moving out of the friend zone, moving in together and getting two of everything thing. those fur babies preparing you for real babies thing. that one for me, one for you, us together for the rest of everything. buy one iphone 8 and get one iphone 8 on us. more for your thing. that's our thing. visit att dot com. bp's natural gas teams use smart app technology to share data from any well instantly. so they can analyze trends and stop potential problems in their tracks. because safety is never being satisfied and always working to be better.
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on fine lines and wrinkles. one week? that definitely works! rapid wrinkle repair®. and for dark spots, rapid tone repair. neutrogena®. see what's possible. it can grow out of control, disrupting business and taking on a life of its own. its multi-cloud complexity creating friction... and slowing innovation. with software-defined solutions, like hpe onesphere, you can tame the it monster. hewlett packard enterprise. clouds, apps, and insights faster. joining us now ranking member of the senator foreign relations committee senator bob
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menendez. thank you for being on the show this morning. >> thank you. >> i want to ask you about the amendment that you're putting forward that the president retract his statement on russia's readmission to g7. i get it, but i just wonder with everything else he's saying and doing, why focus on this? what's important about it? >> well, what's important about it, the president has upended the essence of the international order that the united states helped to help create after world war ii that the allies have brought better peace to the world. and if russia can go ahead and don't occupy crimea to destabilize even ukraine through reduction of forces, then the message to the world is there's no consequence. if russia can rejoin the g7, make it the g8, and continue to do that occupation. so, it's important to send a
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mobile message that the rules-based order, the international order created, has to be observed if not there are consequences for it. >> yeah, i just wonder what kind of support you get, if you have it. and is part of it trying to corner the president on russia and get him to come clean on what the relationship is? >> reporter: well, obviously, you know, republicans control the process here, including on the armed services committee. we're going to push hard for it either be one of the included amendments or if not to at least get votes, if we get votes on this bill but i think it's important to lay down a marker. and i hope to follow it up on the foreign relations committee, it seems that the president gives the back of his hand to the closest allies who are sons and daughters have fought abroad and give embraces the most
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totalitarians in the world. >> i'm not sure he knows that. you've taken a look at that. why don't you tell us about it, and take it to the senator. >> sure. it's certainly not unusual for a u.s. president to have to make a deal with sort of an unsavory character for strategic gain. the president even said at one point, yes, it's pretty rough there, but it's pretty rough in a lot of places. that sort of moral equivocation seemed to be abandoning america's role as leader. so, actually, senator two parts. first of all, should human rights been a part of this discussion, we know of the oppressive conditions in north korea? and then secondly, what did you think of the summit? did the president get enough from this? did he get anything from this? >> well, your second question, first, this is the most anemic agreement i've ever seen. the 1994 agreed framework had a
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lot of substance and a process. the 2005, 2006 party talk has a lot of substance to it. you know, we say trust, but verify. there's nothing to verify in this agreement to enter into trust. ultimately, there is nothing, including at least, i would have considered it successful, if at least there would have been an agreed definition of what denuclearization is. for us, that means a total irreversible verifiable dismantling of north korea's nuclear weapons infrastructure. it's nuclear weapons and its missile, intercontinental missile technology and launch. all of that, at least from the beginning, we were talking about the same thing. we didn't get that. what kim got was going from international pariah to seeing like he's a military statesman. the military exercises cancelled
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by the president, using the rhetoric of the narorth korea, d it has to be unnerving for our allies. at the end of the day, this is a lot of sizzle but no steak. as it relates to the question of human rights, yes, it should have been there. and it needs to be part of it. the president says he's honorable and he loves his people. well, there are tens of thousands of people in north korean prisons. thousands more are starving as a result of kim jong-un's policy. so, it needs for stability in the long term, it needs to be part of the discussion. >> senator bob menendez, thank you very much for being on the show. >> let's go to final thoughts. mike barnicle. >> my final thoughts, setting johnson was just on here talking about the separation of children as part of american policy. again, i'd like to see the current homeland secretary, or even attorney general on with
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tim russest on "meet the press." that's not going to happen. but i miss it. >> yeah, me too. >> you. >> you know, you just look at those pictures, again, now, it's been 24 hours. you look at those two together, and you think about what did the united states get? nothing. what did kim jong-un get, pretty much everything he wanted. and just as a game theory thing, the guy walked in with a bunch of obstructions and he got more than he could have hoped for and we got zero. >> mika, there's no reason for him to do anything, though. he got the summit. he got the position on the world stage. now, just delay. >> and the symbolism here is -- i think it's -- well, i want to be careful and measured. but beyond sad. i'm at this point, i'm concerned that we are going in the wrong direction. on a number of levels. and read madeleine albright's book.
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>> president's tweet sure sounded like mission accomplished from george w. bush about the iraq war. that's a worrisome admission. >> if they submit this as an executive action, republicans say you can abrogate that with the iran deal. there's nothing here on paper that will survive this presidency. >> that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> thanks, mika, hi there. i'm stephanie ruhle, look where i am live, in washington, d.c. this morning, a lot to cover. starting with sizing up that summit. the president returns to washington fired up after his deal, i guess that's what you would call it with kim jong-un. but his greatest challenge convincing congress and leaders from around the world that it was money just a glamorous photo op. >> i hope we get to the point where he abandons his nuclear weapons. abandons his missiles and takes the country in a different direction. i'm just is not

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