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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 13, 2018 3:00am-6:00am PST

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>> jim, i know you're sticking around. you'll be on "morning joe" in just a little by. we'll be reading axios a.m., as well. >> that does it for us this morning. "morning joe" starts right now. and nobody wants me to talk about your other senator who is weak on borders, weak on kicrim so i won't talk about him. nobody wants me to talk about him. no one knows who the hell he is. >> president trump wanted jeff flake out of office in arizona. >> he is. >> now he's got a democrat there, instead. good morning. welcome to "morning joe." it's tuesday, november 13th. along with joe, willie and me, we have mike barnacle, eugene robinson, heidi the prisbella
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and jim van dehei is with us. >> you know, mika, it's really something. you talked about arizona and this race between mcsally. we've seen, unfortunate, so many negative things over the past 2 1/2, 3 1/2 years, bringing people together, he could have exploited it. >> could have raised millions of dollars about being a victim of liberal pop culture. he chose, instead, to show grace. another really great example of that came last night and it came, actually, from martha mcsally. and it was just a short video that she made. but my gosh, it spoke volumes
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and it was the type of character that we just need to see in our leaders and we saw in her last night. >> nbc news has declared kyrsten sinema the winner over martha mcsally as the final ballots broke heavily in the democrat's favor. mcsally appeared in a video posted to social media where she's saying to her supporters and took note of sinema's barrier breaking win. >> everybody, i just called kyrsten sinema and congratulated her. i wish her all success as she represents arizona in the senate. and i want to say thank you to everybody who supported me in this campaign, my staff and volunteers and everybody who voted for me. i'm so grateful to you as my
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wingman and woming women in thi jurisprudenceny. as i traveled around this state, i was so inspired by the many people i met and i am convinced that arizona is the best state in the country and our best days are still to come and i'm going to continue to pray for our success. >> in this election year when so many women won races, you see arizona martha mcsally setting a far better example for some of our daughters and sons than some of the gop men who won their races. yesterday mcsalary gracefully conceded in defeat to democratic congresswoman sinema for arizona's seat. mcsally put aside part is anship
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and personal ambition to give the people to their state what they need. contrast that graceful behavior with the shameful rhetoric of rick scott in florida. who is in his own contested senate race, throwing out baseless allegations of fraud and crime and trying to quesque a full and fair recount. unlike the president and rick scott, she puts america first and shows us all true character. on one of the toughest nights of her life. what a great example for all of us as we get through this strange and difficult time. >> a strange and difficult time, but a time, willie geist, that several runs over the past week
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have shown just may be okay. dan crenshaw was written about by david french and david french said if this is what the future of the republican party lax like after donald trump, guess what? we're going to be okay. last night, mcsally facing pressure from donald trump, the.republican -- the head of the national republican party. and also people in her own state saying, hey, you've got to fight this out. .you know how those calls were going. hey, if you want any future in politics, you have to fight and show people that you're tough now. i've heard that nonsense before. but actually, mcsally showed the character that voters will remember if she decides to step back up and keep serving her country like she has already. >> i think the reason both of these felt so good, and feel so good to the american people, both lieutenant crenshaw's apology, the accept kwans of the apology on snl and colonel mcsally's concession last night is because there's so little of
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that grace in the public life right now. we see so little of that on tv and our culture. so it's refreshing. it feels good to see someone do that and something that these two have in common is that crenshaw is not just congressman elect, he's lieutenant commander crenshaw and mcsally is not just congresswoman mcsally, she's colonel woman mcsally, a trailblazing air force pilot. they know what it means to put country first and that's exactly what they did over the last couple on of days. >> it is. and it is inspiring. jim van dehei, if you look at the results, you take a step back and look at the results from this race, this is another race that has tipped the democrats' way. and it's been this slow roll since tuesday night. you know at 8:00 on tuesday the nig night, republicans were were feeling pretty good.
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now other own steve kornacki says, no, republicans may pick up two in the senate when they had all the structural advantages going their way. and in the house, steve is looking at maybe 38, 39 pick ups in the house of representatives in an off year election that is usually more conservative, more white, and more republican. how does that bode for 2020? >> i think this is really bad news for donald trump. i don't understand the republicans who are looking at this and even some democrats saying donald trump is in pretty good shape heading into 2020. those election results were terrible for the election party. when you have texas, arizona, georgia, all now looking like tossup states, where you have democrats if not winning, way outperforming what they've done
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in the past. you have midwest states like wisconsin, michigan, pennsylvania, basically reverting back to form once you take hillary clinton off the ticket. then you add into that, trump is about to get hit with investigatio investigatio investigations from three different angles. we're in the longest recovery we've been in in this nation. most economists think year going to hit a pullback sometime before the presidency. the problem for the republican party for some time has been you can't be a mostly white, mostly male party and thrive long-term in this nation. you can eek out some wins now, but if you look at demographics, they don't lie. this nation has a shrinking
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white population. the more they harden as the white male party, the more long-term republicans should be worried. >> gist, you brought up a great point earlier. donald trump can't afford to lose any votes. he didn't get that many votes in 2020 and as we've been saying forever, he ain't going to have hillary clinton to run against in 2020. because if you go back to those 2020 results, it wasn't that donald trump was a great candidate. it was that a lot of wisconsin voters stayed home. didn't you point out that mitt romney got more votes in 2012
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than donald trump got in 2016 in wisconsin. >> that's true. and people didn't pay enough attention to this. it was so many democrats just weren't quizzed by hillary clinton. so what we needed to see from the 2018 elections were was 2016 a fluke, basically, did these states revert back to form? every indicator is yes, they reverted back to form. the long-term threat to the party was that those states were concerned from republican states to purple states to potentially democratic states over time. just like we saw unfold over the last decade in virginia. you just talked about that arizona race. you should be really, really scared that you won by two points that means texas, georgia
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with and arizona are all now doing what all demographers thought would happen. they would little by little move more democratic. if that happened, republicans are in a lot of trouble. it's why that you a -- autopsy said we have to do comprehensive immigration reform, we have to win back hispanicser or we're done. they're didn't do that and, in fact, they've done the opposite of that. >> they've gone the opposite direction and it leads us to arizona and to nevada. you would have to be a political fool to not understand that calling hispanics beaders and talking about a caravan of leprosy was going to lose you races in arizona and nevada and make texas tight. which is exact hadly what happened. donald trump did more to help
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the democrats in two years than the democrats could have done in a generation. well, the result is kyrsten sinema is going to be the first democrat electsed in an open seat in arizona since 1976 in the senate. let's take a look at what she said yesterday. >> senator john mccain stood for everything we stand for as arizonans. fighting for what you believe in, standing up for what's right even if you stand alone. he taught us to always assume the better in others, to seek compromise instead of sowing division, and to always put country ahead of party. senator mccabe said, but we have always had so much more in common with each other than in disagreement. if only with we remember that and give each other the benefit of the presumption that we all love our country, we will get through these challenging times.
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>> mike barnacle, we free market conservatives always look at east germany and west germany as a perfect laboratory test for what sort of economies work and what sort of economies do not work. well, we have almost a laboratory experiment in the state of arizona. that has been ground zero for donald trump's immigration fear mongering. i mean, let's just remember. as greg sergeant said yesterday, it was a kind of ground zero for trumpism. he gave his big immigration speech there in 2016. remember during the campaign, he actually -- that's where air pieo got pardoned and then, of course, mike, as we all know, he completely hammered jeff flake, completely hammered john mccain and decided he was going to
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remake this party in his own image and arizona was the place he was going to do it. he's now done something that no republican president has been able to do since 1976 in an open seat, elect a democrat. >> and not only in air, but state after state where he appeared, he said on the ballot. he said i am on the ballot. you have to vote for me. not the candidate for senate or house or whatever, i am on the ballot. so he was on the ballot in arizona. and it was an interesting aspect that's been going on out there. i can we don't pay enough attention to it. that is this, one of the elements mark sanford calleds for for the republican party to try and reclaim is civility. we just saw civility with martha
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mcsally and with crenshaw on "saturday night live." >> and, you know, willie geist, what does mark sanford and jeff flake have in common? weren't good enough for donald trump. they were not loyal enough for donald trump. they didn't balance enough for donald trump. even though they voted with him 90%, 95% of the time. now trump drives them out and he has two democrats in south carolina and arizona that he's going to be dealing with for the next two years. >> yeah. waits interesting in june when mark sanford lost his primary and we asked him about advice and he said don't cross donald trump. he said that was his advice. he wasn't willing to do that and he lost his seat because of it, he thinks. if you look at what happened in arizona, though, martha
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mcsally's message last night was all the more important when you consider you had the president of the united states with the loudest and most powerful voice in this country calling that election corrupt in a tweet saying should we vote again? we have to protect our democracy. and here comes the person, the woman who is directly affected by this, the woman who will or won't have a job saying no, don't listen to all that. sinema won fair and square, basically blocking out the president's argument. >> who was the mature adult in that transaction? obviously, the president was speaking vial nonsense. there is no indication of any corruption in arizona and mcsally could not have been classier. a lot of people are thinking she could end up being senator mcsally, anyway. the other senate seat, of course, of arizona right now is held by john kyle, appointed to
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fill the rest of john mccain's term. who knows how long he wants to do that. if he wants to resign, say, the republican governor looking around at whom he might appoint, i think number one on his list would have to be mcsally, especially after that gracious concession speech. it came very close in this election. so arizona could end up with two women senators. it's not just the fact that there are more latino voters. but from this election, we saw latino participation increased and, you know, i think we'll go back into those numbers, but it really looks like more -- a higher percentage of latinos are
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voting now. and that should really strike terror in the hearts of republicans because latinos have always sort of underperformed at the ballot box if they start performing at a rate of, say, african-americans, the republican party is toast in a lot of this country. >> yeah. heidi, we're going to go way deeper on florida coming up, but i still can't really get my arms around rick scott's behavior and the behavior of some other republicans throughout this entire presidency. when you look at results like these in arizona, isn't that a snien that imitati-- sign that p is ultimately latching on to a loser? >> this is a slow-rolling wave, mika, but it is a wave, indeed. this is the message i think that some republicans are now starting to digest is that this was a round rebuke of trumpism.
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arizona is a model not only in the way that mcsally was so graceful in her defeat, but also in the way that the state level republicans conducted themselves when trump started fanning suggestions of voter fraud, i believe it was the republican secretary of state there who spoke out and said there are no indications of voter fraud, we're counting a ballots, we have a lot of mail-in ballots for our system. that was a model for republicans. we'll see if more imitate that. but to the point of arizona, i think this is so important to the analyze right now because this is something that we really missed in 2016 amid the scramble to explain trump's victory which is that many states with arizona out front, but also including georgia, hillary clinton really came close. she came within three points. so that was the early indication there that these states, the democrat graphics is destiny was
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starting to kind of set to take hold there. if democrats actually gotter their voters out, which is something that didn't happen in 2016, but did this year, those states are forever changing and being moved soundly into the purple to blue column. now to california where more residents are being allowed back into their neighborhoods this morning to see if their homes were spared from deadly wildfires raging across the state. for others, there is nothing to come home to. the camp fire is now the so-called deadliless wildfire to hit that state. it comes after ten more bodies were found in burned out homes in the leveled town of paradise. that fire is now 30% contained. 117,000 acres have been burned. nearly 6500 homes have been
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destroyed so far and more than 5,000 personnel are currently fighting the fire. in southern california, mandatory evacuation orders were lifted overnight for parts of the west hills of los angeles and the west lake area of thousand oaks. that's where crews have been battling the woolsy fire. we're told progress is being made there with 30% containment. last night, the president tweeted that he has approved and expedited major disaster declaration for california, freeing up federal funds to help those affected by the wildfires. let's bring in bill karins for a look at conditions facing these firefighters. bill. >> good morning to you, mika. climate change is a huge part of it. this is supposed to be the rainy season in november and california. what the firefighters are saying is it's almost a year-round season now for them. the rainy seen is arriving later and leaving earlier. so for today, another very dangerous day. yesterday was windy, but we
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didn't have any new fires for them, so that was great. we're going to play that game again today. we have extreme fire conditions possible in the mountains outside of los angeles and san diego. overnight, we've had winds gusting up to 85 miles per hour. let's hope we keep it that way during the day today. still, scary times for all those firefighters and everyone else in that area. in the northeast, it's a mess. heavy rain through northeast and boston. snow is continuing from binghamton, new york, through the northeast. 8:00 a.m., new york city, a miserable morning commute. but noon today, rain is over in new york and philly. still raining in boston. for the evening commute, we get rid of that storm. it's a very active weather pattern and we'll be watching the potential for a nor'easter with snow is in the northeast thursday and friday. more details on that, later in the show. still ahead on "morning joe," it could be a reckoning
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for the nation. the u.s. is on pace to spend more on debt than defense. what it means for america's financial future. plus, we knew jeff sessions was headed for the door. now it looks like nielsen may be just behind. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. u're watchi" we'll be right back.
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i believe the best technology should feel effortless. like magic. at comcast, it's my job to develop, apps and tools that simplify your experience. my name is mike, i'm in product development at comcast. we're working to make things simple, easy and awesome. cindy heitsmith says she has nothing more to add after her controversial comments. here is a reminder of what she said. >> i would fight fundamentalism. >> on sunday, hyde-smith put out
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a statement in a xhocomment, a referred to accepting an invitation to a speaking engagement. i used an exaggerated expression of regard. then six times yesterday she deflected suggestions that she was accepting endorsement from the national right to life committee. >> i'd like to ask the senator about the public hanging comment. >> i put out a statement yesterday and we stand by that statement. >> can you expand to it, why you said it, what you meant by it and why people in the state should not see it as offensive? >> we put out a statement yesterday and it's available and we stand by that statement. >> are you familiar with the history of michigan lynchings? >> i put out a statement yesterday and i'm going to stand by it. >> can you at least -- >> i put out a statement yesterday and we stand by the
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statement and that's all i'm going to say about it. >> is that phrasing in your everyday lingo, in your vocabulary? >> i put out a statement yesterday and we stand by the statement. >> governor, we're going to continue to ask these questions unless you, with all due respect, address the statement. have you ever been to a public hanging? what in the public hanging -- >> we did address it yesterday. thank you very much. >> i mean, it's not this that hard to say i'm deeply sorry if anyone was hurt by what i said. i wish i hadn't done it. it was over the top. i re-grgret it. >> she doesn't want to do that. >> she doesn't care. >> what is it? >> she's got her reasons for not wanting to do that and only she non knows that. but hyde-smith, former congressman mike espy, a black man, reacted last night on
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"hardball." >> i mean, i heard what she said. i have to confess to you i've never heard that type of colloquialism. i can't reach into her heart and determine why that came out of her mouth, but it was wrong. these comments have harmed our state. >> you know, gene, you and i are both sons of south. obviously, your experience is far different than mine. but we both went to public schools. with we both went to football and basketball games. georgia, alabama, mississippi, florida, i lived in all of those states. people didn't walk around talking about i like billy bob so much that i'd take a coca-cola and a hot dog and watch a public hanging with him. no, that's just like monkeying it up in florida. isn't it something that we have
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two black opponents and then we have two southern white politicians and somehow these racially charged terms make their way into these campaigns and they act like it's nothing. oh, i talk that way every day. no, they don't. >> i've never heard that expression before and in mississippi, mississippi, which was, you know, the state arguably the worst state in terms of lynching of african-americans, there were public hangings in mississippi. they were grotesque sort of celebrations almost of the murder of black men and women. it's just astounding. it sounds incredibly tone deaf, of course, but it's not tone
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deaf at all. she obviously meant to go say it and she won't apologize for it. which is just absolutely astounding to me. that in this day and age, she would sort of go there and not only go there, you but stay there. >> stay there. that's it. >> it's amazing. >> and she's saying there for a reason. just like what desantis said. he had a reason wanting to remind voters that their opponents are black. and it's such an snault when you have republicans and other people going, oh, they didn't mean anything by i'd go to a public hanging with him or oh, monkeying it up. desantis, i think he's even younger than me. nobody went around in polite society talking about monkeying
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things up. i lived in georgia, alabama, mississippi, northwest florida, for 45 years. never once did i hear anybody talking about public hanging in a positive way, that i like jimmy so much, you know what? i may just meet him one night at a public hanging. >> nor did i ever hear anything like that. and i grew up at a time when people were were fighting for voting rights, people were fighting for, you know, against segregated accommodate additions. there were parts of my state where my family -- you know, my father wouldn't drive. he just wouldn't go down certain roads because it was -- they were known as sort of klan country. and even then, the idea that anyone would speak like that about a public hanging and try to pass that off as some sort of colloquialism, some sort of, you
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know, southern, you know, folkloric color, it's just ridiculous. and it's insulting and, you know -- but there it is. and it's obviously deliberate. >> well, listen, i love mississippi. and we went down to mississippi, what an extraordinary place and extraordinary college, oxford, mississippi, even barnacle, the yankee from boston, talked about how oxford, mississippi, was one of the best places he'd ever been. it's a remarkable mays. and the good people of mississippi deserve a lot better than that. let's go from mississippi to florida. jim van dehei, you know, i don't really understand -- there's so much i don't understand with about rick scott, but one of the main things i don't understand about rick scott is that unless a meteor, like, strikes either and destroys a lot of republican ballots across vast stretches of
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the state, rick scott is going to win this thing. he's up by 12,000 points. they're not going to -- machine recounts aren't going to put up more than 12,000 ballots. this race is effectively over. i know it can't be called yet, but bill nelson ain't going to pick up 12,000 plus votes. yet rick scott is basically -- he's spinning conspiracy theories that have no basis, in fact, that his own monitors are saying are not true, that his own state police are saying are not true, that everybody on the ground is saying is not true, yet he's still spinning it up when i don't see any gain for him. what is he doing? what's going on? >> other than him taking the cue, the president was out there early saying there's rampant fraud now in the election process in florida. other than taking the cue, i don't understand why, either.
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but since the election results came in, trump himself said it about arizona, he said it about florida, he's said that votes that were cast after the election should be brought in and used in florida. a lot of those were military votes. a lot of people, even in the republican party the last couple of days, are just like, tone it down, right? there are votes that need to be counted. florida now going back 15, 20 years, super close. you have close elections. in all likelihood, it ends up in your favor, but in this environment, everyone assumes a conspiracy. every assumes they will get screwed in the end. that might happen. at that point, that's when you raise it. >> yeah, except they aren't going to find 12,000 balance the yots for nelson that way. but anyway, jim van dehei, thank you very much. we appreciate it as always.
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willie, i'll ask you, do you have any insight on -- you look at what rick scott is doing and he's spinning these conspiracy theories. he's going to win the election most likely, yet he's trying to undermine his own state's confidence in the electoral system in florida and yet marco rubio several days ago launch ago conspiracy theory because they found a box that ended up being filled with stickers, pencils and erasers. for marco rubio, that proved a conspiracy that the democrats and martians were coming to steal the elections. >> maybe the governor knows something about the votes that we don't know. i don't know. but if it stands the way it is now and the votes that are out there, he would win. by a slim margin, but he would win.
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it's another thing entirely to call the entire democratic system into question and to have the president of the united states coming in and saying we should just make scott -- the just put him in office. stop this whole shenanigan and get him seated. to have the governor of the state, senator rubio participate in that, as well, jeb bush hasn't done that. he's been more specific in his criticism. but we're in a place now where the president of the united states and other high ranking national officials are saying, you know what? the foundation of this whole thing we're doing in america, the voting process itself is corrupt and you can't trust the people counting the votes, that's an entirely bigger and i think much more destructive way to approach your criticism of this election. >> willie, i'm so glad you brought up jeb. je jeb had some criticisms on point. there have been problems year after year after year in broward county. if you want to say they're
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incompetent, sloppy, they're not keeping up with the laws for reporting and counting votes, that's one thing. you can say that. that is what jeb said. that is completely within bounds. but to alleged a conspiracy theory, willie, and that they're going to steal the election, that's just unfortunate, very, very unfortunate. >> and as you say, to what end? if scott wins the race, anyway, it's still damaging the system. still ahead on "morning joe," while the nation took time to honor veterans and their sacrifices yesterday, president trump was absent from a wreath laying ceremony at arlington national cemetery. we'll be john by former cia director john brennan when we come back. ctor john brennan whe come back.
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welcome back. joining us now is john brennan. great you have to with us this morning. >> good morning. >> i want to talk to you about the president's performance in france and yesterday here at
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home with the observance of veterans day. yedz the president did not go to arlington national cemetery as has been tradition for presidents. we're trying to figure out why. these are easy ceremonial things presidents do and he's proclaimed himself as a great advocate for the military throughout the campaign. what is your hunch about why he's participating in some of these and hasn't gone to a war with zone in almost two years as president? >> it is puzzling because he puts so much emphasis on the military. these were relatively easy to the events both in france as well as here. i don't know whether or not he gets in moods and just soent of s -- sort of sulks, but it is one of the more puzzling aspects of mr. trump's performance.
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>> mike. >> my first instinct is enormous sadness that we have a president of the united states who doesn't get the historic legacy of all of these traditions that he has avoided both in paris and yesterday at arlington. but i was thinking about one of his -- maybe his own appearance in langley at the cia standing in front of that wall with the stars on it of people, former agency employees and -- who have lost their lives. and he doesn't get it. and i think he has no sense of history about almost everything other than his own life. he's so narcissistic, he's so self-involved, that he doesn't get the meaning of the cemeteries, the american cemeteries overseas, he doesn't get the tomb of the unknown and the tradition of the president laying the wreath. i don't know. >> i think as you pointed out, he doesn't have a sense of history. because anybody who knows and loves this country and knows all the sacrifices that men and
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women over so many years have paid from world war i, world war ii and onward, you want to make sure that the pay homage to that and give the appropriate deference to it. so you want to make sure you send a signal to people that this is important, their legacy must be remembered. but donald trump is so absorbed in himself. if it's not directly relevant to him, i think it takes second and third place to it. this is quite disappointing. i think to so many veterans around the and ycountry and aro the world that it should be part of his legacy. >> on his paris trip, the failure to attend the cemetery due to the rain, in your experience, would there be a backup plan? >> there would be a backup plan and a backup plan and that is
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something no president i have ever worked for would want to miss. not just to send the signal that this president is paying this homage to them, but to be part of the allied effort, those countries that worked so hard together in world war i and in subsequent wars. but everything we see right now is donald trump wants to be this separate, individual person and not be part of a larger gathering. he wants the spotlight to be on him and him only. >> he's had a rosy view of what's happening in north korea. he wants to present himself as having brokered some great deal. although that's not in the agreement that was put out in public. a private report that was released yesterday shows 13 offen of an estimated missile bases in north korea are still working. where are we in this relationship with north korea and why is it important that we're getting information that
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contradicts what the president is saying? >> the only thing that has changed over the last year is thes escalatory rhetoric. but from my perspective, jim congress union's missile program and his nuclear ballistic missile program have not scaled back at all. i know mr. trump has said that the summit in sing pore was a great success. i have not seen any success at all. i think kim jong-un has been wonderful in the way he hasp duped president trump. >> there was an intercept of a call that the united states now has heard, "new york times" great recording, after khashoggi was killed, call to saudi arabia to riyadh saying tell your boss that it's over. that they, in fact, assassinated mr. khashoggi. what's your view of what's going
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on now and what ought to happen now? >> by everything i know about saudi arabia in terms of my time there and working with the saudis as well as now, there's no way this killing could have taken place by these individuals closely affiliated with the crown prince without the crown prince's authorization. so i think we're seeing them identifying scapegoats. and i don't see the pressure being applied on saudi arabia from the white house. it is clear that gina haspill and other intelligence officers in other countries have listened to the tape and it's very clear that this was a horrific killing that needs to be addressed. but until the white house, until mr. trump clearly says that the crown prince bears responsibility for this, i think that the saudis are going to continue to circle the wagons and they're going to try to deflect and deny and hope this
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is just going to go away. >> some analysts suggested this relationship is a good one to re-evaluate what the united states has done in terms of backing the war why yemen and perhaps and pull back its support of saudi arabia where there's casualties in yemen and mass famine. is it a good time for the u.s. to pull back? >> absolutely. this war has been going on much too long. the saudis have not given the appropriate consideration for deaths of civilians. over the weekend, susan rice, myself and a dozen half or so former obama officials called for cessation of all military support. clearly the iranians have been trying to exploit the situation in yemen for a number of years, but the saudis have overplayed the military card and the carnage, the bloodshed, the destruction of yemen has been
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awful and there's a humanitarian disaster there. donald trump and pompeo ought to make it clear to the saudis this must stop. you don't have a blank check to continue to use military assistance and support. correct called for an immediate cessation. >> with the benefit of hindsight was it a mistake of the obama administration to support the saudis in yemen. >> at the time the crown prince was defense minister and not the crown prince. we hoped he would treat the issue with the appropriate care it needed but he has not. so it was a mistake early on? i think if we had a choice to do over again we would put many more limitations on support to saudi arabia. >> john brennan, always good to talk to you. coming up we'll talk to
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democratic kirsten gillibrand who is thinking of running for president in 2020 and then we will also speak with debbie stabenow. debbie stabenow ♪ ♪ ♪ the united states postal service makes more holiday deliveries to homes than anyone else in the country. ♪
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former first lady michele obama sat down with abc news to discuss her new book "becoming" on sunday and was asked about the tradition of former first ladies lending a helping hand to their successor. >> i know that laura bush reached out to you and said if you need any help i'm a phone call away. you wrote about how, have talked about how you extended that same courtesy to melania trump. has she reached out to you? >> no, she hasn't. >> nbc reached out to the office of the currents first lady and her spokesperson shared this statement. mrs. trump is a strong and independent woman who has been navigating her role as fares
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lady in her own way. when she needs advice on any issue she seeks it from her professional team within the white house. >> that makes sense since they've all served in the white house and knows what it takes and the challenge of being a first lady more than somebody who actually was a first lady. you know what? here herein lies from the president to the first lady the white house staff the big problem and that is a built in arrogance and as we've learned time and time again they don't. >> coming up florida republicans rick scott and ron desantis take two different approaches to the recounts in their state. one went statesman, the other one went trump. >> that's unfortunate.
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there's a lot of lessons to learn here. not just that the left and right can still agree on some things but also this, americans can forgive one another. we can remember what brings us together as a country and still see the good in each other. this is veterans day weekend. which means that it's a good time for every american to connect with a veteran. say thanks for your service. i would actually encourage you to say something else. tell a veteran never forget. when you say never forget to a veteran you're implying that as an american you're in it with
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them. not separated by some imaginary bar engineer between civilians and veterans but connected together as grateful fellow americans. >> everybody i just called kirsten csinema. i want to thank everybody who supported be in this campaign. i'm grateful to my wing man. we wish it came out with a different result. we're that you feel for you. as i traveled around the state i was so inspired by the many people i met and i'm convinced arizona is the best state in the country and our best days are still to come. i will continue to pray for our success. >> two mid-term candidates who prevailed and one who didn't showing grace. >> what does that tell you about the state of the republican
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party after tuesday? >> these two candidates, and i'm sure there are many more if they want to rise up, they can show that this party is bigger and better than trump. in every way. >> i think more importantly there's actually a future beyond donald trump -- >> absolutely. >> -- if the future looks like dan crenshaw and martha mcsally. let's be blunt instead of people like rick scott and people in the white house who lie every day for a living and do it without shame. >> welcome back to "morning joe". it's tuesday, november 13th. along with joe, willie and me we have msnbc contributor mike barnacle. pulitzer prize winning columnist, eugene robinson. nbc news national political reporter heidi przybyla. political reporter for "the
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washington post", robert costa. good to have you all on board this hour. we have florida, we have arizona. we have a lot of stories to talk about this morning. >> and mississippi. >> my lord, what happened. the democrats were at a deep structural disadvantage heading into tuesday night. take a look at the numbers. in the senate democrats had to defend 26 seats. they lost three of them with one undecided while the republicans only had to defend nine seats and lost two of them. a comparative analysis of the exit polls by the data firm catalyst found electorate was actually older than it was in 2016. voters age 18 to 29 dropping by five points by going up seven points among voters 65 and older. >> the young people didn't come out again. >> again. and they don't. >> i said in 2004 -- >> can't get them to get up in the this morning.
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>> they didn't again. mika, if you're a republican and you hear that older voters are going to actually be on the rise, you're thinking we got this covered. structurally this could not get any better. >> the group voting was slightly whiter in 2018 than in 2016. up two points. a look at the results in mid-term elections show how badly the house is stacked against democrats who had a seven-point victory in the popular vote and will likely gain 38 or 39 seats in the end. while republicans who won by a slightly smaller margin in 2010 picked up 63 seats. and still democrats managed to make major gains at the federal and state levels. >> bob costa, it's hard to really spin this if you look at the fact the democrats are likely going to pick up mo more house states, more
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governorships since i got elected as a 31-year-old guy back in '94. that was a long, long time ago. and i think as mika was pointing out republicans had every advantage structurally they could ever imagine having and still they got pounded. what's the reaction on the hill? is there an understanding finally by republicans of just how bad this was? >> mika's point about the state level, your point about gubernatorial races so important, often overlooked. you think about the democratic party, wiped out in 2010 at the state level, wiped out again in 2014. you lost a whole generation of potential democratic stars. now the democrats not only rebuilding their congressional majority in the house, but rebuilding at the state level. to try to get some of those people into the state senate to
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help redistrict come the time of the 2020 census. that's going to be so important for the future of the entire party not just this year but the coming decade. >> willie, you look at arizona. we talked about an electorate that's older and that's whiter, a lot of young voters did not come out. you look at a state like arizona that is as red as it could be. it's now gone democratic. nevada went democratic. but that arizona seat, especially, has got to be tough for donald trump because he invested so much in the state from the partpardoning of joe ao and john mccain and what does he get after these battles in arizona, on the border even in 2016. he gets a democratic senator. >> arizona is interested. voted for trump, voted for obama
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twice. but they never had this, never be considered blue. red perhaps, a little bit purple. kirsten sinema first democrat going in 20 years. and it's more democratic than republican. six republicans, five democrats. so something is happening there. heidi przybyla you have in addition to all of that 2.1 million latinos in the state of arizona which make up a third of the population. so donald trump has got to be looking at that place, the state of arizona and thinking about the argument he's made against immigrants coming to this country, for family separation and wondering if that was the right play there. >> i don't know that he's going to reverse course on any of that, willie, because despite the wins this president is dug in on a lot of his immigration policy, but, yes, that's the analysis that he should be taking away because instead of going back to the 2016 playbook,
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he should be looking at what happened in 2016, which is that he won but only by a hair and the reason why and it was not just in arizona but across the midwest, the reason why he won is because his voters turned out and the democrats did not. and so i think that even if the president doesn't change his playbook, the republicans are going to be in a self-imposed period of self-reflex hself-ref because what we'll have on the hillis definition of gridlock. democrats will try to work with recognizes on areas like health care and infrastructure. i hope i'm wrong. instead what will happen there will be a spotlight on the strong contrast between what's happening at the state level between republican run states and democratic run states. we already saw some of that with
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ballot initiatives like in michigan where they are changing the way they do redistricting. we'll see legislation moving to increase access to health care. we'll see legislation on gun control. there will be this stark contrast. we'll roll into 2020 and see if what happened in 2018, indeed, is indicative of where we're headed in 2020. >> mike barnacle, you look at the 2018 numbers, though. and they confirm what we've always said. didn't expect it to happen this year. but every mid-term election we always say the voters are going to be older, they are going to be whiter, and more conservative. and this data that we just put up, i mean my gosh, again, young voters didn't come out. down five percentage points from 2016. you look 65 and up, a 7%
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increase. and voters overall were whiter than they were two years ago when they elected donald trump. how would you like to be trump's political guy trying to figure out how donald trump wins in 2020, because as we used to say in the south, you can't get there from here. >> first of all, joe, you wouldn't want to be that guy or that person, his principle political adviser because you couldn't tell him the truth. the truth has to be off those numbers and other data is there's something going on among the electorate, among our citizens about donald trump. they are making a judgment about him on a daily basis. part of that judgment is fed by his behavior, i would submit. bob costa, i want to ask you about that judgment. i want to cite a couple of specific things. the original tweet coming out of the white house when he's overseas in paris over the weekend basically criticizing
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the firefighters for land management over the firefighters. then his inability to drive through or fly drew the wane to appear at an american cemetery something american presidents have always done. yesterday his inability or failure to drive across the bridge to arlington, to the tomb of the unknown to do something that nearly every president in my memory has done on veterans day lay a wreath at the tomb of the unknown. is there anybody in the white house aware of what happens to a perception of the president when these things occur in such fluidity. is there anyone in the white house capable ever going to the president and saying, mr. president you are crushing of any hope you have of re-election in 2020 by your behavior. >> it's a different world inside of this white house. there's an awareness about all of it. all the things you laid out right there.
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but also an acceptance that nothing is likely to change. two years into this presidency, when you talk to the people closest to donald trump they say he is who he is. they wake up expect him to shatter another norm about the american presidency. but they also add that he's convinced when he looks at the political map that his base of energized this time around. that he was able to keep the senate. he doesn't feel he needs to move to the center to appeal suburban voters in any kind of conduct way. if he goes to the center in the coming year it will be to try to cut a deal on infrastructure or prescription drugs but not in terms of his behavior or act more presidential. >> okay. let's see how that works for him since it went so well for him in 2016. let's bring in mark who writes for politico. first of all, we'll talk about the crazyiness that happens in our state. but before we do that, we've been talking about donald trump,
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republicans losing the house, donald trump having trouble in the industrial midwest, donald trump having trouble in arizona, nevada. one thing we can say on the election after 2018, florida really is still seen as the one swing state that donald trump makes a difference in. >> right. florida is trump country. we saw it in 2016. people said maybe it's a fluke. in twoimt he had his hand-picked senate candidate rick scott and his gubernatorial candidate in ron desantis. both of them are going to win after the recounts are over. so to the earlier point about the president not feeling a need to moderate his tone or change, he made florida his, you know, big fire wall. and he won here. he didn't get burned. expect more of the same. >> what is it? you know florida politics as well as anybody. explain to the rest of america why is it that donald trump's
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behavior may offend in wisconsin, may offense in michigan, may turn voters off in the suburbs of philadelphia, but in florida, florida voters stick with him. >> foreall the attention we paid to the growing hispanic vote and puerto rican vote after hurricane maria. florida is a retirement mecca. it was made that way more so by governor jeb bush way back when, when he eliminated the stocks and bonds numbers. older white retirees tend to vote and have voted and strongly voted in this last election republican. they in the end were a key here for donald trump's victory through ron desantis and rick scott. >> let's talk about the recounts that are taking place right now in the state of florida. governor scott has weighed in on that. he's overseeing a race in which
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he's participating. what exactly for people watching at home and don't know the ins and occupants of what's happening in broward county what's the bottom line and is there a chance that either of these outcomes can be reversed. >> it's florida and you never want to definitely say something will happen. if you look at most of the majority recounts that happened not just in florida but throughout the nation they seldom have a switch of leader and the margins in the senate race which is smaller than the governor's race are big enough on the order of thousands, less than 12,000 in the samuel alito's race, more than 13,000 in the governor's race. it's more than likely it will be senator rick scott and governor ron desantis. in broward county what we saw there that we can say for sure was an election supervisor who time and time again has presided over a department over an office which has repeatedly busted
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deadlines, has kind of failed to properly or timely post election results, which has had other problems concerning the handling of ballots. and there's a very strong case to be made, in fact governor bush made i want yesterday after he wrote a story about it the brour coun broward county supervisor is incompetent and should be removed. but so far despite the rhetoric from governor scott, despite the rhetoric from president trump, and to a degree from senator marco rubio, there's really no evidence of fraud. the florida department of law enforcement was asked to look into it. so far they said nothing. a judge yesterday said in court, i don't see any fraud. so we don't see much evidence of that there. we do see a lot of incompetence especially in broward county. >> explain to us because i don't
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really understand -- a lot of conservatives said i've never seen anything like this before in my life. you have others that find this all very curious. i understand being frustrated with broward county. i was on the ground, as you know, in the 2000 recounts. i don't understand the conspiracy theories and why in the world would rick scott continue to be spreading this nonsense when chances are really good he's going to win. i don't think nelson is going to pick up 12,000 votes. so back off that nelson is trying to steal the election bit. >> your guess is as good as mine. put aside the fact people when they are nervous and fear they are going to lose, they will lash out. let's put aside their sentiment is genuine. as i said before president trump won here. president trump in the 2016
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election when things started to look remotely bad for him would cry foul. what's interesting here in florida is two days after election day it was governor scott not president trump who first started talking about fraud. stealing the election. what i mean first talking about i mean as far as being a florida leader. he said it at a press conference two days after the election, thursday night. he went on hannity, on fox and at 9:38 p.m. the fox watching president trump then started tweeting about voter fraud, voter problems in florida for the first time. so it looks like scott kind of put this in motion and really a story i wrote today is that governor scott is morphing into the washington politician. and desantis has refrained from talking about missing votes and election fraud and stealing the
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election and desantis is talking about unity. saying hey look let's follow the law and let's get through this and come together when it's all over. in part desantis knows a 30,000 vote or so lead he'll definitely win. >> mark, thank you very much. as always we love having you on talking about our crazy state. >> thank you. >> great to see you. gene, it makes a lot of sense for rick scott. a guy that will go into a chamber where you have to do deals with democrats. makes less sense for rick scott to be spinning crazy conspiracy theories when his own monitors are saying there's no fraud. for him to be lying on national television, for him to be lying on sean hannity show, for him to be lying for the president so the president can pick up the lies and spread the lies himself. that's one thing if you go
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to tallahassee, he's going to be in a chamber where that lack of character will follow him around. people won't know whether to trust him. it's like if you're a lawyer in a small town you know the character of everybody else that's practicing in that small town. it's a small boat everybody is rowing in. if somebody shows you their true character you never forget it. that's exactly what rick scott has done here. i don't see how this helps him in washington over the next six years. >> it's called getting off on the wrong foot and he's definitely guesting off on the wrong foot in terms of his likely almost certain with colleagues in the senate. you know, there is practically speaking 12,000 vote margins don't get overturned. certainly not by machine recounts, and almost certainly not by hand recounts if one has to be undertaken.
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so he should be the statesman right now. after all he is the governor of the state. he's undermining confidence in the election system of the state where he has pledged to faithfully execute the law and all they are doing is what the law says to do. and, you know, it's not being done in a particularly competent or graceful way in broward county but it's getting done and there's no fraud. he ought to acknowledge that. i don't know what sort of game he's playing except cozying up to trying to be trumpier than trump which maybe he thinks is a good idea. >> good luck with that. >> roberts costa your. certificate reporting that donald trump is looking into getting rid of homeland security secretary kirstjen nielsen, what would be behind that move? she was defiantly protective of his separation policy. >> inside the white house, mika,
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the line has been donald trump wants to be his own spokesman when it comes to matters of the press. there's a line on him he wants to be his own democratic homeland security secretary. he wants to be the one managing policy, managing the wall, talking about the caravan, talking about child separation poli policy. kirstjen nielsen has been outside of that conversation. she's defended him. she's executed his policy. she can't escape she was part of president trump's immigration policy but never an insider of insider. she was closer to kelly. the president is ready to make a change. >> roberts costa, thank you very much. stimulus ahead on "morning joe," in donald trump voters elected new york democrat to the white house. will they do it again with a different candidate in 2020? senator kirsten gillibrand is
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considering a presidential bid. >> she will remain a new york democrat. >> we'll talk to her about that straight ahead on "morning joe". i just got my cashback match, is this for real? yep. we match all the cash back new cardmembers earn at the end of their first year, automatically. whoo! i got my money! hard to contain yourself, isn't it? uh huh! let it go! whoo! get a dollar-for-dollar match at the end of your first year. only from discover. we've frozen out...out... and forgotten... by a white house and washington
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my name is mike, i'm in product development at comcast. we're working to make things simple, easy and awesome. joining us now democratic senator kirsten gillebrand of new york. she's the author of the new children's book out today entitled "bold and brave ten heroes who won women the right to vote." welcome back to the show. great to see you. >> thank you. >> let's talk about the book. the timing is amazing. with all the women that chose to run and all the women who won. and you bring us back to a time where we didn't even have the voice to vote. talk about the inspiration of the book, if you could. >> this is a book about ten extraordinary women who did very brave things when they were young to make sure that women had a voice in our government. to make sure women had the right
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to vote. each story is about bravery, about courage, about doing something that was very hard to do at the time but persevering and never giving up. that's why we should be protecting voting rights and make sure every vote counts. >> well, also given this presidency, i think some women may be concerned that the president has misogynistic tu towards women. talk about how you've seen through the past two years, the president has attacked you publicly many times over. do you think we've made a step forward, or have there been steps back in light of president trump? >> i don't think president trump ovals women. i think it was clear on the campaign trail. i think it's clear since he's been president his attacks on women, attacks on women of color is really shocking. so i think for america's women
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this were fed up. they really took this moment, this election as a moment to be heard. and that's why we saw so many women turning out to the polls. so many women protesting, marching, be heard in every way they possibly can. and women to be running. 120 women coming to congress this year is extraordinary. and then to have two new women coming to the senate, krysten sinema, one of my dear friends and i'm excited she just won. we have a lot to be grateful for and a lot has to do with how many women turned out to vote and had the courage to run. >> so you talk about women who were fed up and decided to run. how do you feel? are you fed up? are you deciding to run in 2020? is this something that's in the realm of possibility for you? do you think it's time for someone just like you to step up and run? >> well, for me i think it's a moral question, mika. i think, you know, i really
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believe that each one of us have to ask ourselves what can you do to push against this horribleness that president trump put into the world. as i travel new york, as i travel the country the hate, the divisiveness the anxiety he's created as called me to fight as hard as i possibly can to restore that moral compass. the truth is we've always cared about one another. we always had this empathy for one another. we always believed in the golden rule. we should care about other people's kids as much as we care about our own. i'll give it strong consideration about whether that is something i should do. but i think each one of us have to decide what will we do at this time to fight back as hard as we can because what president trump has done to this country is destroying the fabric of who we are. >> willie, she's not ruling it out. >> i think that's fair to say. you said a little under a year ago when this group of women came out and accused the president of the united states
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of sexual assault that he needed to resign. do you stand that. do you still believe he should resign >> yes he has a dozen of credible allegations of sexual assault. this president has, again, torn at the fabric of who we are as a country and i think he is being held accountable right now by the electorate. the fact that all these voters have been marching and protesting since he was elected and took it to the ballot box in 2018. that's why 2018 was an important election for all of us. it was a wake up for america to fight for what you believe in and restore america to its foundings. >> the second part of what you said he should resign but if he doesn't we'll hold him accountable. >> yes. >> now the house of representatives has the power to do something about that and to hold him accountable. in your eyes what does that mean? how does the household him accountable? for example impeachment proceedings or what else? >> first of all, we need to
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protect the mueller investigation. the most important thing that the senate can do is pass our bipartisan bill that will preserve the investigation, making sure documents can't be destroyed. making sure if he's fired, he's fired for cause. if it's not for cause have mueller be restored. that's first for our work. then in the house they can do their oversight. we've heard from three or four committee chairman they plan to do oversight and accountability on a whole host of concerns whether it's the self-dealing and self-lining of pockets of the administration, of cabinet members. whether it's voter fraud. whether it's collusion. whether they are concerned about the remaining allegations with the russia investigation. those are all things that many of our house colleagues are looking into and i think this election was about creating oversight and accountability over this president and what he's done in office. >> you're not alone in thinking the president should resign among democrats p.m. nancy
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pelosi has been careful not use the word impeachment. she's not pushing that. do you think impeachment is a good idea. >> that's why the mueller investigation is so important. you can't get to that work the house has to do until you have the facts and what mueller has been asked to do is develop the facts. he's already done all the indictments on the russian whose did try to interfere with our election. he's done the low-hanging fruit of fraud of some of president trump's inner circle. the question is what are the other types ever crimes that are related to collusion because collusion is a collection of crimes. looking at each one of those crimes separately and whether there's an obstruction of justice. until we have that investigation completed we won't know what the house will do then next. >> your book is out today. we have just seen a massive number, record number of women on the ballot running for office. a record number winning office.
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do you believe that there is a tangible difference that a woman brings to a campaign whether it's a local race or national presidential campaign that a man doesn't bring to the table? >> it's not always that case but what women often bring to the table is this passion, this heart felt desire to make a difference to help people. this empathy. this emotional intelligence. this determination to do whatever it takes to change what's happening in their local government, in their state or in washington. i'll just give you one example. lucy mcbath just won this house seat in the outskirts of atlanta. she ran because she wanted to end gun violence. she lost her son to gun violence. her passion and her personal story was so compelling that she was able to win that seat despite spending tens of millions of dollars. it's a difference between, i think, the intensity and this
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authenticity that rang true for candidates. krysten sinema ran on who she is. the sacrifices she made. she grew up and was homeless at times. she at one time in her life lived in a gas station. she has always been someone who will fight to her community and she understands why that social safety net is important. each one of these whom showed brilliance in their campaigns really have that personal story about helping others because of what they've been through personally. >> why do you think it's often the case women have a higher sense of eq than men? >> it's nature and nurture. it's a little of both. i think it's something that propelled a lot of people to stand in the breach that president trump has created. we've seen this division and tearing apart of our country and so many women said this will not happen in my community. i'm going to stand up. when president trump and his republican allies put out that hate into the world -- look at
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danica rome. the person who wrote the transgender anti-bathroom law it was transgender women who beat him. that's the kind of just determination that these candidates showed over the last two years. so it's inspiring. i have to tell you. like i'm very inspired that so many people decide to run, so many women decide to run for governor. i'm still holding my breath for stacy abrams. i think these candidates are extraordinary. it's the moment of the times. i do think it was very much brought by what president trump has put into the world. >> i'm grateful that you're still inspired. the new children's book out today is "bold and brave ten heroes who won women the right to vote." senator kirsten gillebrand thank you very much. good to have you on. and still ahead we'll talk to one much senator kirsten gillebrand's democratic colleagues senator debbie stabenow of michigan. "morning joe" will be right back. back - [narrator] meet the ninja foodi,
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about the country's long term
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financial picture. the headline, "u.s. on a course to spend more on debt than defense." as the article notes in the past decade u.s. debt held by the public has risen to $15.9 trillion from $5.1 trillion. along that path the government is expected to pass the following milestones. it will spend more on interests than on medicaid in 2020. more in 2023 than it spends on national defense. and more in 2025 than it spends on all nondefense discretionary programs combined from funding to national parks to scientific research to health care and education to the court system and infrastructure. the "journal" adds by next september a divided congress will need to decide whether to extend a budget agreement that boosted federal spending while later considering whether to extend president trump's tax
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cuts which are set to expire in 2025. >> you know, mika, this is actually, believe it or not, this is why i ran for congress in 1994. i talked about it. i talked about demographics with destiny. we had entitlement programs at some points were going to be maxed out and damage and harm our senior citizens, social security, medicare, people on medicaid. we're getting there. for americans who don't understand this, this isn't a republican or democratic issue. both sides are to blame. the national debt doubled under george h. w. bush from 5 to 10 trillion. almost doubled under barack obama from 10 to almost 20 trillion. getting even worse by the day under republican donald trump. as we continue down this path, everything that americans think of when it comes to government, whether, you know, whether it's education, whether it's
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infrastructure, you name it, it's called nondefense discretionary spending. we'll be spending more in interest on the debt than everything else that we spend in government in that area in five years. it's getting worse. social security, medicare, medicaid, those programs are growing at such an extraordinary clip and now they are being burdened by record high spe spending. the pentagon buying weapons program that the pentagon doesn't even want. of course the trump tax cuts. it's just absolutely devastated this country's budget scenario. and what do we get for it? well if you look at the stock market, not much. we're about where we were a year ago when those tax cuts that were supposed to create
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explosive growth in the markets were passed. and now, mika, we're stuck with the debt and getting worse by the day. democrats and republicans have to work together responsibly to take care of this or we're all going to face an economic meltdown sooner rather than later. >> at least we have troops at the border. oh, wait. okay. up next we'll talk to the democrat who wording to the ap european seated long time california congressman dan rohrbacher who has been called vladimir putin's favorite member of congress. favorite member of congress. ♪
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i am a techie dad.n. i believe the best technology should feel effortless. like magic. at comcast, it's my job to develop, apps and tools that simplify your experience. my name is mike, i'm in product development at comcast. we're working to make things simple, easy and awesome. orange county, california is the birth place of richard nixon and is often called the cradle of reagan conservatism. it's long been considered a republican haven. voting for every gop candidate for president since fdr. that is until donald trump. and since last week's elections
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democrats have picked off one republican congressional seat in the county and possibly two. in the race for 15 term gop incumbents dana ap has called his opponent. that candidate is harley ruda. he joins us now. congratulations. tell us what you ran on. you're a republican turned democrat. did the issue of your opponent's potential ties to russia as well as the president's potential ties to russia come up in the campaign? >> the reason i decided to run i was frustrated with both parties. i was frustrated with the party first country second mentality. our founders expected us to reach across the aisle and put country and community first. we decided to jump into the ring
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20 months ago. i'm thrilled that we have knocked off my opponent after 30 years. the russia was certainly an issue, one of many issues. he's publicly stated that people shouldn't have to sell their homes to gays and lesbians and that we should train and arm high school students to address potential gun violence in schools. >> what was the issue that seemed to connect to the voters the most in orange county? >> i think it's an issue that we're seeing across the country. people are tired of the partisan bickering. most americans believe in fiscal responsibility. the vast majority of voters are fed up with it.
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>> when did you change parties? >> i left in the late '90s. i remember when republicans believed in environmental stewardsh stewardship. that's been put on the back burner by the current administration. we >> one thing republicans also were supposed to believe in was fiscal responsibility, fiscal conservatism, small government conservatism. we talked about how in five year years we're going to be paying more interest on america's debt than we do for all the domestic programs, the discretionary non-defense programs out there. and we'll also be spending more on debt than we do on our defense. what do we do to change that course?
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>> the tax plan that was passed is going to create $2 trillion in additional debt at a 2% interest rate. that's 40 billion dollar a year in additional interest costs. to put that into perspective we could have provided a free college education to half the 18-year-olds in america. i'd rather put my money on our kids than on the top 1%. >> there is a ten-point voter registration advantage for republicans there. so you must have had some republicans flipping to vote for you. indeed we saw this in a number of traditional republican strongholds like here in virginia. do you think that this is a realignment in u.s. politics?
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>> certainly there are demographic shifts, but there's also a certain shift of the republican party to the right. that is causing a lot of moderate republicans to move to the middle. we had lots of republicans supporting our campaign. in fact, we had a lot of people putting yard signs out that said republicans for harley and who were doing digital shorts to promote our campaign. with the current direction of the republican party, i would expect them to continue to decline in numbers as we have seen in california where they are now the number three party in california. new overnight a democrat will represent arizona in the senate. for the first time in a generation, while the republican in that race just gave a master class in how to concede a long, hard fought race. we'll have the latest from
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and nobody wants me to talk about your other senator who's weak on borders and crime. so i won't talk about him. nobody wants me to talk about
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him. nobody knows who the hell he is. >> president trump wanted jeff flake out of office in arizona. >> he is. >> now he's got a democrat there instead. >> good morning. welcome to "morning joe." it's tuesday, november 13th. we have mike barnicle, associate editor of the "washington post" eugene robinson. hei heidi. >> you talked about arizona and this race between sinema and mcsally. we've seen unfortunately so many negative things over the past 2 1/2, 3 years in american politics. when you actually see great examples of character, dan crenshaw on "saturday night
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live," bringing people together. he could have exploited it. >> for years and made money off of it. >> could have raised millions of dollars about being a victim of liberal pop culture. he chose instead to show grace. another really great example of that came last night. it came actually from martha mcsally. it was just a short video that she made, but my gosh, it spoke volumes and it was the type of character that we just need to see in our leaders and we saw in her last night. >> it gives us so much hope. for the first time in 30 years arizona has elected a democrat to the united states senate. nbc news has declared congresswoman kyrsten sinema the apparent winner over her republican colleague martha mcsally. ignoring republican party leaders' baseless claims of corruption, mcsally appeared in
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a video posted to social media where she thanked her supporters and took note of sinema's barrier breaking win. >> everybody, i just called kyrsten sinema and congratulated her on becoming arizona's first female senator after a hard fought battle. i wish her all success as she represents arizona in the senate. i also want to say thank you to everybody who supported me in this campaign, my staff and volunteers and everybody who voted for me. i'm so grateful for you. we sure wish it came out with a different result, but i'm so thankful for you. as i traveled around this state, i was so inspired by the many people that i met. i am convinced arizona is the best state in the country and our best days are yet to come and i'm going to continue to pray for our success. >> you know, in this election year when so many women won races, it is a woman who lost. arizona woman martha mcsally is
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setting a far better example for our daughters and sons than some of the gop men who will likely win their races. yesterday mcsally, a congresswoman and retired air force colonel gracefully conceded in defeat to democratic congresswoman kyrsten sinema. republicans in washington urged mcsally to continue to churn up conspiracy theories and contest the results. but mcsally put aside partisanship and personal ambition to give the people of her state what they need, a clear result that everyone can have confidence in. contrast that graceful behavior with the shameful rhetoric of rick scott in florida, who is in his own contested senate race throwing out baseless allegations of crime and fraud and trying to squelch a full and fair count of the vote. in defeat, mcsally showed class and dignity, allowing voters to
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have faith in our democratic system. unlike the president and rick scott, she puts america first and shows us all true character on one of the toughest nights of her life. what a great example for all of us as we get through this strange and difficult time with this president. >> a strange and difficult time, but a time, willie geist, that several republicans over the past week have shown just may be okay. dan crenshaw was written about by david french. david french said if this is what the future of the republican party looks like after donald trump, hey, guess what, we're going to be okay. last night mcsally, facing pressure from donald trump, the head of the national republican party and also people in her own state saying, you've got fight this out. you know how these calls were
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going. hey, if you want any future in politics, you've got to fight and show people you're tough now. i've heard that sort of nonsense before. actually mcsally showed the character that voters will remember if she decide to step back up and keep serving her country like she has already. >> i think the reason both of these felt so good to the american people, both lieutenant crenshaw's acceptance of the apology on snl and colonel mcsally's concession last night is because there's so little of that grace in the public life right now. so it's refreshing. it feels good to see someone do that. something these two have in common is crenshaw is not just congressman-elect. he's lieutenant commander crenshaw. and she's colonel mcsally, a trail blazing air force pilot. they know what it means to put country first and that's exactly what they did over the last couple of days.
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>> it's inspiring. if you look at the results, you take a step back and you look at the results from this race, this is another race that has tipped the democrats' way. it's been this slow roll since tuesday night. at 8:00 on tuesday night republicans were feeling pretty darn good, the white house was feeling pretty darn good. every day it's another race that's falling as these ballots are being counted. now republicans may pick up two in the senate when they had all the structural advantages going their way. and in the house, steve's looking at 38 or 39 pickups in the house of representatives in an off year election that is usually more conservative, more white and more republican. how does that bode for 2020? >> i think almost every leading
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indicator right now that you saw from the election, that you see happening in realtime is really bad news for donald trump. i don't understand the republicans who are looking at this and saying -- and even some democrats who are saying donald trump is in pretty good shape heading into 2020. three things are working against him. those election results were terrible for the republican party. when you have these formerly conservative states like texas, arizona, georgia, all now looking like toss-upstates where have democrats, if not winning, way outperforming what they did in the past. you have michigan, wisconsin, pennsylvania, basically reverting back to form once you take hillary clinton off the ticket. trump's about to get hit with investigations from three different angles where you're going to start to see all the details in public, robert mueller, the state of new york and tons of investigations coming from congress. and then three, we're in the longest recovery that we've been in in this nation. most economists think you're
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going to hit a recession sometime before the presidency. i don't know how republicans don't look at those results and freak out. the problem for the republican party for some time has been you can't be a mostly white, mostly male party and thrive long-term in this nation. you can eke out some wins now. but if you look at demographics, they don't lie. this nation is having a bigger chunk of hispanic voters, asian voters and a shrinking white population. the more they harden as the white male party, the more long-term republicans should be worried. >> you brought up a great point earlier. that is that donald trump can't afford to lose a single vote. his party lost in wisconsin, your home state. they lost in michigan. they lost in pennsylvania, got routed in pennsylvania. all of these industrial swing states that were supposed to be donald trump's sort of ace in
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the pocket. but as you point out, he didn't get that many votes in 2020. as we've been saying forever, he ain't going to have hillary clinton to run against in 2020. because if you go back to those 2020 results, it wasn't that donald trump was a great candidate. it was that a lot of wisconsin democrats stayed home. in fact, didn't you point out that mitt romney got more votes in 2012 than donald trump got in 2016 in wisconsin? >> that's true. people didn't pay enough attention to that. it really was that so many democrats just weren't jazzed about hillary clinton. no kcentrists really moved her way in those states. not just those stated reverting back to form, the long-term threat to the republican party is that a rising hispanic
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population in arizona, georgia and texas turned those states from republican states to purple states to potentially democratic states over time, just like we saw unfold over the last decade in virginia. the results show you. you' talked about the arizona race, you talked about cruz's very narrow win. that is texas. yes, you should be happy that you won. you should be really scared that you won it by two points. this is texas. you have a rising hispanic population, shrinking white population and they would little by little move more democratic. if that happens, republicans are in a lot of trouble. the reason that autopsy, when the smartest people in the republican party after that romney defeat looked at the data, they said we have to do comprehensive immigration reform, we have to win back hispanics or we're done.
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up next, why there was a lot more riding in arizona than a senate seat. if the state was kind of a ground zero for trumpism, what does that say about the gop's procespect going forward. >> it's going to be another dangerous day with high winds. yesterday we didn't have any rapid fire spreads or new fires to track. the camp fire is still burning, the woolsey fire, the same thing. the most devastating fire we've ever had in california history as far as structures, over 6,000 and now the deadliest fire too. it's just incredible scenes and incredible devastation.
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so for today, we have critical fire weather and extreme fire weather in southern california. it's going to be windy again, topping out at 35-55 miles an hour. it's just a matter of are we going to see a new fire form? if it does, it will rapidly spread. in the northeast, la guardia, heavy rain. rain will be ending in new york city shortly. it's a messy morning from hartford through province back up to boston. dallas at 19. oklahoma city has a windchill of 6 right now. bitterly cold day from chicago to minneapolis all the way down to dallas. the attention is already on the next storm that is coming. this one is going to quickly move to the eastern half of the country wed, thursday and friday. a lot of moisture available with this one. we'll be watching this be a rain
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event in the southeast. watch out thursday night into friday. we could be dealing with significant snow and ice interior sections of the northeast. looks like i-95 corridor maybe a burst of snow and changing over to rain. more updates on that tomorrow, including a snow forecast for a lot of areas that don't want to see it already. washington, d.c., most of your heavy rain is over with. the remainder of the day should be dry. remainder of the day sho be dry life was tough in cuba in the 60's. my mom was fired from her job, so she started making cakes to support us. the first account that we opened was with bank of america. since then, we have grown exponentially. to me, food is love. and i think food brings people together. everything in life is about giving back. you're only as good as what you leave behind, when you leave this world.
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[ready forngs ] tchristmas?oodi, no, it's way too early to be annoyed by christmas. you just need some holiday spirit! that's it! this feud just went mobile. with xfinity xfi you get the best wifi experience at home. and with xfinity mobile, you get the best wireless coverage for your phone. ...you're about to find out! you don't even know where i live... hello! see the grinch in theaters by saying "get grinch tickets" into your xfinity x1 voice remote. a guy just dropped this off. he-he-he-he. democrat kyrsten sinema is now headed to the u.s. senate. the senator-elect reflected on john mccain. >> senator john mccain stood for everything we stand for arizona
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a arizonans. he taught us to always assume the best in others, to seek compromise instead of sowing division and to always put country ahead of party. senator mccain said, but we have always had so much more in common with each other than in disagreement. if only we remember that and give each over the benefit of the presumption that we all love our country. we will get through these challenging times. >> mike barnicle, you know, we free market conservatives always looked at east germany and west germany as a perfect laboratory test for what sort of economies work and what sort of economies do not work. well, we have almost a laboratory experiment in the state of arizona.
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that has been ground zero for donald trump's immigration fear mongering. let's just remember, as greg sergeant said yesterday, it was kind of ground zero for trumpism. he gave his big immigration speech there in 2016 during the campaign. that's whe as we all know, he just completely hammered jeff flake, completely hammered john mccain and decided he was going to remake this party in his own image and arizona was the place he was going to do it. he's now done something that no republican president has been able to do since 1976 in an open seat, elect a democrat. >> as he basically said not knowledge arizona but state after state where he appeared is, he is on the ballot. he said, i am on the ballot. you've got to vote for me, not
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the candidate for senate or house or whatever. i am on the ballot. so he was on the ballot in arizona. there's an interesting aspect that's been going on out there. i think we don't pay enough attention to it. we're talking about it today a bit. it is this. mark sanford has a pretty interesting op-ed in the "new york times" today. one of the elements he calls on the republican to try and reclaim is civility. we just saw civility with martha mcsally. we saw civility with mr. crenshaw on "saturday night live." people have a yearning for civility in politics that has been missing for two years or more. i think it was in evidence in everything we've seen and talked about this morning out of arizona. >> gene robinson, martha mcsally's message last night, the republican who lost the race and conceded was all the more
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important considering you have the president of the united states calling that election corrupt in a tweet. saying should we vote again? here comes the person who's directly affected by this, saying, no, don't listen to all that. kirstyrsten sinema won fair and square. i'm stepping aside, let's move forward, basically blocking out the president's argument. >> who was the mature adult in that transaction? obviously the president was speaking vile nonsense. there's no indication of any sort of corruption in arizona. mcsally could not have been classier. a lot of people are thinking she could end up being senator mcsally anyway. the other senate seat, of course of arizona right now is held by john kyle, appointed to fill the rest of john mccain's term. if he wants to resign,
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republican governor looking around at whom he might at point, i think number one on his list would have to be mcsally, especially after that gracious concession speech. arizona could conceivably in the fairly near future end up with two women senators. mississippi's u.s. senator is given a chance to clean up her comments six separate times. she did not. the latest fallout from her remarks about a public hanging. remarks about a public hanging oh, milk. another breakfast, another dilemma.
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mississippi's senator says she has nothing more to add after her controversial comments that she would be on the front row for a public hanging.
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>> on sunday hyde-smith put out a statement. quote, in a comment i referred to accepting an invitation to a speaking engagement. in referencing the one who invited me, i used an exaggerated expression of regard. any attempt to turn this into a negative connotation is ridiculous. six times yesterday she deflected questions at a news conference where she was discussing her endorsement from the national right to life committee. >> obviously i'd like to ask the senator about the public hanging comment. >> we put out a statement yesterday and we stand by that statement. >> could you expand on it then, why you said it, what you meant by it and why people in the state should not see it as if i have -- offensive? >> we stand by the statement. >> -- mississippi's history of lynchings? >> i put out a statement yesterday. that's all i'm going to say about it. >> you said it shouldn't be
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viewed with a negative connotation -- >> i put out a statement yesterday and we stand by the statement and that's i'm going to say about it. >> is that phrasing in your everyday vocabulary? >> i put out a statement yesterday. we stand by the statement. >> we're going to continue to ask these questions until you address the questions. we're asking what context did you say that in and have you ever been to a public hanging? what is a public hanging in your context? >> we did address it yesterday. thank you so much. >> i mean, it's not that hard to say i'm deeply sorry if anyone was hurt by what i said. i wish i hasn't done it. it was over the top. i regret it. >> she doesn't want to do that. >> she doesn't care. >> she's got her reasons for not wanting to do that. only she knows that because she won't talk to the press about it. hyde-smith's democratic opponent, former congressman
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mike espy a black man reacted last night. >> i heard what she said. i have to confess to you i've never heard that type of colloquialism. these comments from a sitten u.s. senator have harmed our state. >> gene robinson, you and i are both sons of the south. obviously your experience is far different than mine, but we both went to public schools and football and baseball games. we know the colloquialisms of you, south carolina, me northwest florida, georgia, alabama, mississippi. i lived in all of those states. people didn't walk around talking about, you know what, i like billy bob so much i'd take a coca-cola and a hot dog and watch a public hanging with him.
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no. that's like monkeying it up in florida. >> i've never heard that expression before. mississippi, which was the state arguably the worst state in terms of lynching of african-americans. there were public hangings in mississippi. they were grotesque sort of celebrations almost of the murder of black men and women. it's just astounding that any -- it sounds incredibly tone deaf, of course, but it's not tone deaf at all because it's very deliberate. it's not a common expression. she obviously meant to say it and she won't apologize for it. coming up on "morning joe," we've already talked to senator kirsten jill gragillibrand this.
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we'll talk to debbie stabenow next. stabenow next ♪ ♪ ♪ the united states postal service makes more holiday deliveries to homes
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in many parts of the country, women propelled the democrats' success in the midterm elections. michigan was no different. the state saw women candidates sweep statewide offices at the top of the ticket, flipping two u.s. house seats, winning both seats on the state supreme court. democratic u.s. senator debbie stabenow attributes the success to highly qualified candidates rather than the novelty of an all female slate. i agree. >> thank you. i knew you would agree.
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first i have to say this was historic in so many ways. we had the largest voter turnout for a non-presidential year in 50 years. no question people came out. as i wrote in the op-ed, what i think is historic and is taking us the next step is that we had a woman win for governor, a woman win for attorney general, a woman win for secretary of state, i won reelection. and that wasn't the headline. the headline was these great people won, but it wasn't this novelty. there wasn't a debate on how many women can you have at the top of the ticket. i remember when we had those debates. as you know, we used to have those discussions regularly. so we've taken the next step. >> trump did win your state two years ago. >> he did. >> was this somewhat of a reaction? can he win there again?
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>> it's interesting. donald trump won michigan by a little over 10,000 votes. i won reelection by 268,000 votes. it was very interesting in the city of detroit. he won 6% of the voters in detroit. my opponent won a little less than 5% even though he's african-american. but he embraced trump. he said he was with them 2,000%. and he was widely rejected for standing so close to donald trump. so we're still a very divided state, like every other state, no question about it. but there was a wide rejection of the divisiveness, the bracis. >> debbie, what was the
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difference between 2016 and 2018? what do you think made michigan swing back blue? >> i think there were two things, joe. first of all, we had much higher voter turnout. so we had over a million more people show up, not all democrats but certainly many more democrats than republicans. so people showed up. the second thing was they gave very strong messages they're sick of the divisiveness and the fear mongering and so on and they want us to get things done. they also very much reject the way this president is constantly dividing people. so they want to get things done. it's no joke. health care for people is personal. it's not political. and they took it very personally, the evideffort to t away their health care, to stop
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covering preexisting conditions. in michigan we are a very practical bunch in the midwest. folks just want to work together, put your head down and get things done. they really reject the way he's pitting people against each other and causing the inability to get things done. >> moving forward then with the goal of putting your head down, working together and getting things done, what is the pathway forward for a republican senate and a democratic house to find common ground in health care and get something done that protects people across the country? >> joe, there is a way to come together on common ground. i mean, the highest cost driver in health care is prescription drugs. the president has said he wants to do something about it. actually right before the election susan collins and i
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passed a two bill package signed by the president to at least allow pharmacists to tell you what the best prices at the counter. they were being banned from doing that in many cases. so there's a way to come together around prescription drugs. the best thing would be to let medicare negotiate the best price. but we know that the pharmaceutical lobby certainly is opposed to that. i also think there's common ground on infrastructure. this is something that everybody cares about, roads, bridges, water, sewer systems, high speed internet in rural areas. if i were advising the president, i would say you need to go back to some discussions with us. senate democrats put a proposal on the president's desk the very first month he was elected on infrastructure and said let's work together on this. i think there's certainly interest in doing that. so i'll continue to work across
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the aisle, as i do in the senate to get things done. our side wants to govern. we actually want to work together to be able to do things. and the president is going to decide what approach he's going to take. does he actually want to get things done or continue to use the divisive rhetoric that he's used so far. >> thank you so much and congratulations. >> thank you. good to be with you. president trump is defending his decision not to attend a memorial service marking the end of world war i. he posted on twitter this morning when the helicopter couldn't fly to the first cemetery in france because of almost zero visibility, i suggested driving. secret service said no, too far from airport and big paris shutdown. speech next day at american cemetery in pouring rain. little reported fake news.
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my god, this man. it followed a series of tweets where he criticized france. among them he wrote emanuel macron suggests building its own army to protect u.s. but it was germany in world wars one and two. how did that work out for france? they were starting to learn german in france before the u.s. came along. pay for nato or not. >> he also weighed in the country's unemployment rate ending with an all caps tweet, make france great again. today marked the third anniversary of a series of terror attacks all across paris. let's bring our political round table. we have walter isaacson.
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walter, i'll throw it to you. we won't talk about the four days it took for the president to come up with a excuse of not driving out to the cemetery. let's talk instead about his attacks on france, one of our closest allies. how exactly do leaders in his administration and on capitol hill process that? how do we send the message out that this is but an aberration, that the french are still our close allies? >> yeah. i think you have to put this in the broader terms of the steve bannon/donald trump movement to have very nationalist, nativist populist revolts in all countries starting with the u.s. but happening in europe and a little bit in england. i think macron,who is a really great statesman, represents the opposite of that, a person of
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civility, a person who realizes that countries with shared values working together is the best way forward. that's what armistice day at the end of world war i was about. that's what happened at the end of world war ii. and i don't think trump has a feel for the fact that we need certain allies in this world and this retreat into tribalism and nativism has been his message and he's pushing it on france nl. >> the value that president trump has in a relationship is how you treat him. macron said nationalism is a betrayal of patriotism. this is what president trump is reacting to this morning. so you get all these insults again as mika said on the third anniversary of those horrific attacks in paris. today is a day of mourning in the nation of france. what about his approach to france? obviously he's lavished praise
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on macron. he said he is perfect. what's the damage here? >> i think the french understand president trump in this regard and frankly there is quite a close relationship between the two leaders. the french will say that as well. in somewhat of a defense of president trump, however, i think there is some moral import, some importance to the message that he is sending to europe generally about defense spending. as much as armistice day is about remembering a loss, the lesson there is also that multilateral cooperation has to be bonded more to something than idealism. the problem is when you look at the challenge to liberal order,
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it is from russia, china, china in terms of economic imperialism. you see very few nations in europe stepping up to counter that or to spend money on functional defense policies, there's a big problem there. and the big problem vests itself most nearly to europe than the united states. president trump, froeprobably t wrong way to say it, but there is more than we give credit for. >> there does seem to be a bit of a mixed message here where the president is suggesting that our allies need to carry their own weight or carry more of their weight when it comes to defense spending. donald trump took great offense when macron talked about the europeans actually building up a posture regarding their own defense. he's actually attacking macron for doing what we've been asking europe and japan to do for
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years. >> i don't know about that, joe. i think actually what he's criticizing there in terms of president macron is the separate european defense entity. the president sometimes has his little waltzes into the wilderness. make nato the core. on a more optimistic note, we should give president macron credit for increasing defense spending. we've just had this very positive nato exercise with the scandinavians. to the russians are feeling some pressure. >> this is incredible behavior, these tweets, his behavior abroad once again. and yet it fits the pattern of this president's personality. usually when he gets bad news or
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he doesn't like the way something is going, he deflects. it appears that he's fitting the pattern again. would you say that? >> absolutely. you don't have to discern the pattern. he has told us how he behaves. if you attack him, he strikes back. you see that with macron. i think those photos you've been putting up on screen of macron and merkel and the arms around each other at this very poignant moment of 100 years after the armistice. where is the u.s. leader? where is the president of the united states in this moment that should be a moment of american/european solidarity. it is because the president when someone attacks him or if he even perceives an attack, must strike back, whether it's a defeated congressional candidate or a fellow world leader. that is just who he is and what
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he does. i think the critical question is one that joe asked earlier, will this blip -- and i do think it is a blip -- in america's relations with the world cause lasting damage and have lasting consequences? or in a post trump universe can we heal? i think the european leaders understand that it is in their interest and the world east interest to make sure the breach is not so great that once trump is gone, we can get back on normal footing. but he makes it harder and harder every day. >> let's move from international diplomacy. you and i have fretted about the future of american politics, of american democracy over the past few years. but boy, sure did get a shot in
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the arm, a positive shot in the arm yesterday and this weekend from dan crenshaw, who showed extraordinary grace on "saturday night live" and pointed out pete davidson's dad was a firefighter who died at 9/11 and let's look past what he said and unify. and then of course martha mcsally's just absolutely wonderful concession speech last night, somebody who has a future in politics. i had a republican who left the party who said they teared up when they saw that last night and thought oh my god, if there are many people like that in my party in the future, i will change my registration back to the republican party. >> here's something you've been saying, mike barnicle has been saying, mika's been saying, is this country is being divided on many lines, but one of the most
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relevant is between those who believe in some form of civility, that we're one nation and that we can work together to build a better future and those and those who would tend to be divisive, often filled with hate, resentment and uncivil. and i think what you're seeing now is finally a populist saying, hey, you know, let's get out of this craziness we're in and go back to being normal with our neighbors, being civil, and you saw it in arizona. you saw it with dan crenshaw. you saw it when people like debbie stabenow were talking earlier in this block and talking about working with susan collins. i think that's going to happen in mississippi too. i think hyde-smith who made the remarks about hanging or whatever and then couldn't talk about them afterwards, from her heart in authentic way.
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is facing a truly wonderful guy who is very civil, mike espy. he's way behind. it's unlikely a democrat could win in mississippi. but this is a race between people who say, okay, enough of this divisive poison, craziness. >> tom, off of what walter was saying, mark sanford, very conservative member of congress from south carolina who was defeated by trumpism basically had a piece in "the times" today urging conservative elements but the whole party itself to come back to its roots in terms of conservative but sensible fiscal policy. conservative but sensible economic policy and looking at conservation properly. but his big point was a return to civility. what do you think the odds are that the republican party is going to slowly look at the
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results, look at things they were talking about and edge towards civility? >> i think on the time line, 99.9%. the great thing of this country is the ability to re-energize, reform in many ways. growing up in the uk, my dad was an -- that was the thing we were taught, america can always rebuild. whether it's a bloc that forces that change by the necessity of getting back into congress if they lost that many seats. i would also actually add senator stabenow's opponent. young, charismatic. very different to the president trump style of aggression. sort of joking with the senator. obviously he lost. perhaps he made some wrong chases. broadly, the republican party is based on fiscal conservativism, limited government, free trade. i think we'll see a return to that.
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president trump is almost being forced to return to that. we'll see details. but broadly i'm optimistic. i think again, you know, the best example to conclude with would be we elected trump after obama and the convergence, that so many voters could change in that way, is why actually we will see ultimately a change in the republican party. >> all right, tom rogan, and walter isaacson, thank you. amazon reportedly makes a split decision of a location on its new headquarters. that is next. headquarters that is next ♪ the new capital one savor card. earn 4% cash back on dining
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we're all under one roof now. congratulations. thank you. how many kids? my two. his three. along with two dogs and jake, our new parrot. that is quite the family. quite a lot of colleges to pay for though. a lot of colleges. you get any financial advice? yeah, but i'm pretty sure it's the same plan they sold me before. well your situation's totally changed now. right, right. how 'bout a plan that works for 5 kids, 2 dogs and jake over here?
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that would be great. that would be great. that okay with you, jake? get a portfolio that works for you now and as your needs change from td ameritrade investment management. stocks suffered heavy losses yesterday. the dow was down more than 600 points. cnbc's brian sullivan. what does it look like? >> eh. technical term. dow futures are up like 40, but on a $25,000 market. we could go either way. maybe apple sales, the iphone, are going to slow down because a supplier apparently cut orders. decline for the dow jones industrial average. why don't we talk about amazon. about a year ago, amazon said we'll have a second
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headquarters, 50,000 people. 200 cities put their names in. amazon announced it will be combination long island city and crystal city, but it's arlington, virginia, outside of d.c. equally split, 25,000 people in each. it wasn't that price is right moment. you know, a new car. but it's going to be split in half. a lot of tax breaks. we don't know how many. even congress people don't know what amazon offered apparently. >> we heard new york senators concerned about this. they don't know what kind of jobs it will be. brian, thank you. all right, got a few minutes left here, joe, how about some final thoughts? >> well, final thoughts, i mean, let's stay positive. martha mcsally, dan crenshaw, some other republicans showing the way forward for, mike barnicle, a political party.
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republicans had every structural advantage on tuesday and they still lost. trumpism does not work in suburban america or across most of people. >> you know, there's a common theme with crenshaw and mcsally and others who are on the ballot. there are members of the military and you have a purpose. you want the unit to survive. cle clearly, both screen shaw, mcsally, that's what they want for america. >> ruth marcus. >> a little bit more downbead. kudos to mcsally and others for conceding gracefully and not talking about rigged elections and not talking about democratic mobs. but i'm looking for the elected official who is willing to separate himself or herself from trump, not somebody who's a lame duck but somebody who is elected -- martha mcsally could
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have ran differently, but ran closely to trump, mimicking his style. want to see the new republican party. not sure it's there yet. >> mika, final thoughts? >> former head mistress of the school had a motto, function in disaster, finish in style. martha mcsally did that. she finished in style. great for the republican party in my opinion. that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage. >> finish in style. i'll going to take that one with me. starting of course in california where 44 people now dead and so many people still missing in what has become the most destructive wildfire in california history. >> i just wanted to say bye or i love them one last time because i didn't know if i would ever see them

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