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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  May 24, 2019 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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down? >> it was always very fraught. they weren't big fans of one another, to speak to local u.k. press on the eve of a speech by the prime minister and he criticized the prime minister and that's a chilly relationship coming to an end. >> thanks for your time this morning. >> thank you. >> that does it for us on this friday morning. i'm yasmin vossoughian alongside geoff bennett. "morning joe" starts right now. >> just take it easy, man! >> i said to everybody before i walked in, i said i'm going to be very calm. >> i'm perfectly calm, dude. >> yeah, waving the [ bleep ] gun around? >> i don't want them going out to the press and saying i was anything but calm. >> will you just take a easy? >> i was extremely calm, very much like i am right now. >> i'm calmer than you are.
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>> oh, wow. that's pretty good, guys. i like it. >> i'm very calm, man. >> good morning. welcome to "morning joe." along with joe, willie and me we have political writer to the "new york times" and msnbc political analyst nick confessore. national political reporter hei heidi pryzbyla, donny deutsch, chairman of the democratic national economy michael steele is with us and anchor for bbc america katty kay joins us. we pulled you in because of the breaking news across the pond, the news that theresa may will be stepping down on june 7th. that is just like one or two days after trump visits. so interesting timing and we'll talk about all the ramifications and impacts of that coming up in just a moment. but first, whoa, what a day
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yesterday. president trump continued to erupt last night because the house speaker said that he threw a, quote, temper tantrum, tweeting after 9 p.m. last night the president shared a video edited to show nancy pelosi stammering during a news conference with anchors suggesting the speaker is in a mental decline. fake videos of pelosi altered to make her sound as if she is slurring her words has spread online in recent days. interesting. wonder what that's about. >> well, we know what it's actually about. >> we've been around this block before personally. >> the president during the campaign, we've said it, people closest to him told us that they feared that he was in mental decline. people very close to him told us that that he feared he was predementia, that he had changed. you watch donald trump in the
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late 1980s, even in the 90s, you watch him now, he is completely changed. i know nancy pelosi and have been working with her since 1994 -- >> i interviewed her this week for 90 minutes. >> a quarter of a century i've known nancy pelosi. i can tell you nancy pelosi is tougher today -- >> sharp as a tack. >> -- than she was 25 years ago. the difference between nancy and donald, not even close. he knows he's slipping and so now they're -- it's incredible, they're doctoring videos, that the president is sending around doctored videos of the third ranking constitutional officer of the united states of america. that's where we are. >> the day i went to washington to interview her, she had just gotten off a plane from boston to do huge awards ceremony where she spoke in front of thousands of people. she rushed back to washington, did the 90 minutes of headliner,
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m msnbc with me, question after question after question and then she was off to the contentious meeting with her own caucus with democrats pushing for impeachment. that went into the night. this woman never stops. >> and unfortunately the president is always projecting, i think it was heilemann that said the president is either confessing or projecting. last night the president sent another tweet with commentary that claims pelosi cannot put a subject with a predicate in the same sentence. of course this is because the speaker rightly questioned the speaker's leadership and competency earlier in the day. >> sometimes when we're talking to him he agree said one time who's in charge here because you agree and then all ? what goes on there? who's in charge? and he says he's in charge and i
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suspect that he may be. and i suspect that he may be even more since yesterday because i don't think that any responsible assistants to the president of the united states would have advised him to do what he did yesterday. the president again stormed out i think, what, first pound the table, walk out the door. what? next time have the tv cameras in there while i have my say. that didn't work for him either. and now this time another temper tantr tantrum. again, i pray for the president of the united states. i wish that his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country. >> reporter: your comments suggest your concern for his well being. >> i am.
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and the well being for the united states of america. >> it was sad when i watched nancy, all the mumt of the hands, that's a person that has some problems. crazy nancy. i've been watching her for a long period of time. she's not the same person. she's lost it. >> reporter: if they're still vetting, will you raise the debt limit, will you sign a budget? >> woe'll see what happens. i'm a very capable person. i'm going to see what happens. let them get this angst out of their belt and when it is, we can do things so quick, your head will spin. i haven't changed very much. been very consistent. i'm an extremely stable genius. >> oh my god. >> again, willie, we've all known him for well over a decade. he has changed. i know he was always selfish and
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self-consumed and embarrassing at times, but he's changed a great deal mentally and psychologically, emotionally he's much more frail and fragile. he just is. and again, it's so funny, whenever we say this, people are like you're acting like a doctor. i'm not acting like a doctor. look at donald in 1988, 1989 and himself "today" show clips. look at him now. he can't say sentences without repeating himself. when we talked to him during the campaign and transition, he would sit there for an hour and repeat the same stories over and over again. and nancy pelosi, is probably the sharpest, most effect of speaker probably since sam rayburn. history will surely mark it down that way. i don't know if he's projecting,
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confessing or whenever he's doing but it looks especially bad on donald trump. >> what a sad state of affairs when you have two of the arguably most powerful people in the country just trading insults of who is crazier. nancy pelosi responded saying when the extremely stable genius starts acting more presidential, i'll be happy to work with him on infrastructure and trade and other issues. so you've watched the theatrical entrance and exit from that meeting going out to the rose garden with the prepared signs and literature to hand out. you have nancy pelosi and the president arguing over who ises will well mentally. what do you think about the state of where we are right now. >> just jumping become for trump's mental health, i was looking at an hour interview i
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did in 2007 with trump and there is even in 2007 a difference in the cadence. you could see it, you could see it in his eyes. joe, to your point, not playing doctor, that is a guy who has lost a lot. back to nancy pelosi. what's so great about nancy pelosi is she's not running for president but she is to me even more so than any of the candidates the greatest weapon in the world. if that back and forth tens through 200, are she will do more damage to him than any other confidence. there is a competent, bright, strong woman against a frightened, frail, weakened, clearly out of it man. this is nancy pelosi, now 2-0 versus trump. if we go back to the shutdown, that was trump's most stunning, clear -- the more he engages with this superior advocacy, the more she paves the way for the candidates to come in. i love you, nancy pelosi.
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>> you know what's interesting, donny, is that donald trump for all of his emotional frailties and insecurities and, yes, for his mental lapses, he usually just tactically, the animal instincts in him tactically helps him make the right choices. what he's done though here is he's punching above his weight, going after somebody who will always get the best of him and then here's what's so interesting, what you just said and i know donald's watching so if you want to take this free advice you can because i know you have nobody smart or brave enough around you to tell you the truth is he gotten into a fight or a ring with a bear that he can't win. he also going to be battling joe biden. he's opened up a two-front war that he cannot win. i know there have to be some
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conservatives and republicans that understand that nancy always gets the best of him. she's not a cowing dengs candidate, no. nancy' done this her entire life. this is a horrible political s miscalculation on his part, isn't it? >> it is. if you watch him, you can tell he actually respects her and looks up to her. >> he actually likes nancy pelosi. that's the strange thing here. >> he respects that strength and she punches with a velvet glove. it's interesting, mika, with your book "earn it," with your book, you really -- everything -- >> thank you, donny. >> i've watched women in power and there is such a still in art
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form where women are tightroped. she is the most brilliant tactician of punching so hard but with an elegance and i don't know if that's the right word that she is to me the ultimate street fighter but in a way in a still in this day and age women have to fight. they still can't fight the same way men can. mika, you know this better than anybody. she has perfected that art form. >> well, and you know what, she has one thing that a lot of women that are just jumping in right now at the mid terms don't have she has been speaker of the house, second in line to the presidency twice. she is definitely battle tested and she's known to america as someone who represents the people, the country, and the constitution the united states. and michael steele, do you
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remember the backlash when he tried to give me a name and tweeting about me bleeding badly from the facelift. literally the backlash was from around the world, democrats and republicans, people from all walks of life. he got pummelled for that. there is, quite frankly, there are certain differences for gender politically that are hard for women, there are also things you can't do and he just courthoused that line politically, don't you think? >> i do. and i i thit interesting how donald trump deals with women of influence and women in power. and they represent two different battle front. certainly someone like yourself and others in the media space who have a following very much like at president, who have a voice very much like the
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president represent a particular type of challenge, but then, which he thinks he owns because he's been in that space the the longest. then he moves into this new space in politics where he's confronted by a woman with equal stature, just behind the vice presidency who gives as good as he dishes out. and that's the part that donald trump has always seemed to have a problem with, with women of influence and power. when they step into his space, look him in the eye face to face and pushes back against his narrative, he then becomes like the little school kid. he becomes emotional, he becomes reactive and he's not as dismissive as he is with the men, where he just kind of sloughs it off and move on. he wants to dig in a little deeper and he wants to make that point to stick ands that one of
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the biggest frustrations that he has. >> what's interesting, willy, is probably last week donald had a couple of good days and i said he was looking young and viable and younger than a lot of democratic candidates because he did. >> oh my god. >> he did. he was back looking confused and quite frankly, flustered and just old yesterday. whatever he had gotten off of his mind a week or so ago when he seemed to be having fun no, evidence of that the past couple days and he's back to his same old pre-mueller report release self. >> we haven't even gotten to the scene yesterday where he went around the room at a briefing and asked all the members of his staff to talk about how calm he had been in the meeting, including members of his staff who were not in the meeting with democratic leadership, who went on to say, yes, sir, you were very calm sir, but they were no
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the not in the meeting. >> i want to get heidi in here. the president is ordering intelligence agencies to tell them everything they know. yesterday the president directed the cia and 15 or intelligence agency, to cooperate with the review, granting barr the authority to unilaterally declassify documents. the move came after president trump declared that those who led the investigation committed, get this, treason. >> reporter: who specifically are you accusing of treason?
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>> i think a number of people. they have unsuccessfully tried to take down the wrong person. if you look at comey, mccabe, at probably people higher than that, if you look at strzok, his lover, lisa page, the two lovers, they talked openly. they didn't use their private server because they didn't want to get caught so they used the government server. that was not a good move. he talked about the insurance policy just in case crooked hillary loses. that didn't work out too well for them. you look at them. they wanted an insurance policy that should she for any reason lo lose, 100 million to 1 or 100 million to nothing, we'll have an insurance policy and get guy out of office. that's what they said and that's what they meant. that's treason. that's treason. they couldn't win the lebs and that's what's happening right
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now without the treason word, i guess. but that's what's happening now. they don't field they can win the election. can stabbing, if you look for $40 million dollar i would think that bob mueller and his group of 18 killers have gone offer moo tax ond my -- and they weren't even discussed or brought up. i have great statements. >> donald is obviously melting down. it must be those court rulings, the federal court rulings that are railroad no doubt he's every bit as unhinged as he was during the mueller investigation. nick confessore, we've been talking about how this guy is an auto democrat in training. we yesterday had donald trump
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talking about charging a form are fbi and when told that could lead to his death and lead to other fbi agents' deaths and executions, said, yeah, and just kept going. even after the elections are over, he goes back and and if donald trump had his way, up just heard him, they'd be executed. >> well, joe, this is a watershed moment in a presidency full of them. he has been calling for the prosecution of his opponents for months and months, years now. he's final lich getting what he wanted. what we now have here is the full weight of law enforcement of the u.s. government being deployed against the president's perceived enemies. that is a really big deal and the guy who is in charge of the investigation is somebody who has already shown that he knows
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how to may an inside game in washington to select i this entire investigation is coming out of a conspiracy about peter strzok. in some way he's probably the best friend that donald trump ever had in washington politically and now he's accused of treason. he was doing he is job and almost all it and william barr, why he hasn't been impeached already in the house and convicted in the senate for being caught lying under oath. this a guy who went on tv, had
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an interview and actually had the nerve to lie about the beginning of the mueller investigation, saying the president had every right to call it a witch hunt. he called saying it he knows he's a liar when he calls the mueller investigation a witch hunt and says the president has a right to call it a witch hunt. a can down all, we could talk about fisa judges who were republican a pint donald trump is a rule ignorant man when it comes to the law, to the government, to the u.s. constitution, when its could to the procedure. welfare reform why conducting a
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witch hunt and hiding, again, a witch hunt where donald trump is talking about treason and the possible execution of an fbi director, and fbi agents who -- and i know this doesn't matter to a lot lot donald trump supporters but if they watch this on the youtube channel. it was comey that elected donald trump. it was peter strok and the hillary clinton e-mail investigation that elected donald trump. vladimir putin did not elect donald trump. it was jim comey ten days before the election who did that. that's who he wants to convict for treason and possibly execute. >> you can see that in the numbers, joe. we a that from statisticians who showed that the numbers actually moved in those late moments and
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it dangerous for democrats because we sill haven't heard from mueller. it appears now in congress is still in a knock down, drag-out fight with barr over declassifying and now you combine this with the news from last night from house judiciary chairman jerry nadler that mueller is likely to on testify behind closed doors, you see here where this campaign of misrepresenting the report is picking up speed in a way that is actually dangerous in terms of sources and methods as well if barr is now going to be
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declassifying information that could be really harmful to some of the people who were cooperating to help get this information before the american people. >> yeah. it's unbelievable. willie, as -- >> oh boy. >> -- you know we talk about philosophers, aristotle. >> willie, be careful! >> there's no doubt about it. but there's a philosopher who had a great insight that i saw yesterday on television. it was patrick starr who told sponge bob when sponge bob thought that he was ugly and depressed and patrick starr said doesn't worry about being ugly, sponge bob, people will want to be around you because it will mack them feel better about themselves, right? as always, patrick starr, brilliant. here we are feeling badly about
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our selves, badly about our government and thinking it could get no worse and how humiliating it is to have a government in this much disarray. but then we think like patrick starr, ah, but we could be great britain. >> oh. i didn't know if we were rolling a clip of sponge bob. >> no, no! >> i told you to be careful. >> step into the void! so you go to katty kay, i say that -- let's try it again. we'll edit this and cut it and put it in the final. willie, it could be worse, we could be -- hold on, we got to do it again. but, willie, it could be worse. we could be great britain. >> well said, joe. well said. katty kay, the breaking news just in the last hour or so british prime minister theresa may announcing she will step down as head of the conservative
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party, two weeks from today on june the th. this is all about brexit, is it not? >> i wish hi some fantastic sponge bob analogy for you. >> walk away, walk away. >> leave it? brexit has now claimed its fourth conservative party british prime minister, margaret thatcher, john major, david cameron, add now today theresa may to this list of british leaders could not sort out did did vision and in tear tess end of this speech that she gave where she tried it say, look, i are have tried and, by the way, to my successor, compromise because if you go hard line on this you'll never carry the country with you and then leaving saying i'm britain's second female prime minister, i
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will not be the last female prime minister and she turns around and walks on to downing street. we are america's major ally in europe around the world, and we have been politically dysfunctional for the last three years. the question now is somebody new comes into office and inherits all of the problems, the poison chalice, if you like that, is trying to sort out brexit and can they do it? they've only got five months. the european union gave us an extension of service i don't know months and we've used two. we've got five more months to sort this out. >> the speculation has begun but as you say, the problems that come once that next prime
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minister walks in the door of 10 downing street remain, which is what to do about brexit. it was voted on in a referendum by the british people and yet they cannot arrive at a deal in parliament to make that happen. >> it was specific a question. do you want to be in or out of the european but this has really been an exer sooz in and in thousands of complicated ways. it's really, really hard, it turns out, to step become from the process of globalization. the person who succeeds treats a may, but trying to carry. the fundamentals are exactly the
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same, whoever is prime minister. >> so, catty, is there a chance -- is it lookly that we will see prime minister bores johnson? >> osh this is the man who ld the leave campaign. hooves in the a have somebodiful it will be somebody more on the brexit side of the conservative party. he will blame the european union for the fact that we have not got i don't know a good deal. european union blaps britain for asking for too much saying you can't have better -- the clock
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will kick from now until october. all of the reporting if we leave the european union with no deal points to miles of long traffic in the streets, potentially having to bring the troops out on to the streets of england to keep the peace, no food, no medical supplies in the shops. that's the scenario being painted by economists if we leave with no deal, at least in the short term a certain amount of chaos. but that's where the brexiteer side will push their new leader. >> in 016 donald trump said, quote, i love wikileaks. now that group's founder is facing serious new chargings for publish secret did. and the meaning implications of those charges straight ahead. a lot going on on this friday. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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the department of justice announced 17 new charges against wikileaks co-founder julian assange yesterday. he's accused of persuading chelsea manning to send assange hundreds of thousands of classified documents and then publishing materials that included the names of confidentconfident the new charges include a move to charge assange with obtaining and publishing classified material under the espionage act, which could pose challenges to the first amendment. joining us now, nbc news emergencies and national security courter ken dilanian.
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ken, what was behind the decision and break down the charges a bit if you could. >> sure. we have 17 new counts tacked on to the one kound thcount that c assange with conspiring with chelsea manning to crack a password. the new charges accuse assange of inducing manning to leak and helping her steal these hundreds of thousands of classified iraq and afghanistan war logs and state department cables. but the charges cross a very important line when they also charge assange with a crime for publishing that information. so this is the first time that the u.s. government in recent memory, in modern history, has charged a nongovernment employee with disseminating classified information and it's very concerning to advocates of press freedom because they fear today assange, tomorrow the "new york times," nbc news.
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publishing classified information is what journalists do every day. i was on a conference call with justice department officials yesterday about this and they assured reporters they were not targeting the press, they believe that julian assange is not a journalist. they charged him with publishing a nair other subset of documents that included the names of confidential sources whose lives were put at risk. we all agree with that and what move was widely criticized at the time and continues to be but the issue is there are many occasions when nbc news and "new york times" and others classified public information that displeases governor officials, including the names of covert cia operatives. we feel that we have good reasons to do that and this opens the door for the government to decide whether to prosecute us, and aclu and others are very concerned about this. >> the deployment of the
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espionage act in this case worries a lot of people. it strikes at the heart of the first amendment because they you have the government deciding what can and cannot be published. are those well-founded concerns? >> they are. the plain language of the statute allows for prosecution of outsiders, people downstream who simply receive information willfully, even whether or not they disseminate it. just retaining it can bring criminal liability under the statute. so the mere fact that the governor says don't we're, we don't plan to prosecute journalists because the next attorney general, subsequent u.s. attorney general in the futurier might interpret that statute quickly there is a question about whether or not julian ascension will there's a
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track record in the british government of not releasing people to the u.s. who have been kajed just for computer hacking, which was the original conspiracy, he'd been helping with tutsier hacking. so there a been questions if the u.k. about wr assanges -- and i wonder whether these new charges have been apolice department to hip in order to they've reopened the case into sexual assault charges against july within sang and they would like to get to sweden to answer questions as well. there as a real are and donald trump talking about loving weather center as much as he
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did. it was a constant everybody on the right who hated weather center back five, sex yearsing a, now so the government is saying he did two things. well, he helped. let just use the pentagon papers as an example and as a is they are saying is not only did he publish, but they also are saying that the rand corp -- not the rand corporation, that assange basically did the equivalent of breaking in -- helping to break into the rand corporation to get the pent given papers, right? and for that obviously there would be liability but not so for the publishing. >> that's right, joseph. those parts of the charges
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people in the media are more divided about those. press freedom advocates are disturned by those because they say those aren't inappropriate. we certainly give that instub, do no sill is it illegal acts. can you receive classified information or stolen information and publish it. and that's most of the 17 counts. it's the publishing that's got pop ksh did it say he also demanded technical advice on how to do it? >> absolutely, that's part of
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it. and then i go to the password hacking karjs the charges involvings have publishing really crosses a line because publishing is what we do. >> ken dlanen and danny solve and coming up, new polling on the 2020 democratic contenders and which are the oful plus, one of those candidates essentially calls president trump a draft dodger. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ this is the couple who wanted to get away
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welcome back o "morning joe." it's 46 past the hour. mayor pete buttigieg accused president trump of faking
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disability to get out of military service during the vietnam war during an interview yesterday. it was a reference to a long-disputed diagnosis of bone spurs that trump says kept him from serving. >> i don't have a problem standing up to somebody who was, you know, working on season seven of sleb celebrity apprent when i was packing my bag for afghanist afghanistan. at the end of the day it's not about him. >> do you have an opinion about not serving in vietnam if. >> i have an opinion on him faking a disability to avoid going to vietnam. i don't man to trivialize disability but i think that's exactly what he did.
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when, i mean, when you think about the way somebody can exploit the system and needless to say the way he has treated and mocked disabled people is just one more example of the many affronts to just basic decency that this president has inflicted on this country, but manipulating the ability to get a diagnosis -- i mean, if you were a conscientious objector, i'd admire that. but this is somebody who i think it's fairly obvious to most of us too advantage of the fact that he was a child of a multi-millionaire in order to pretend to be disabled so that somebody could go to war in his place. and i know that that dredges up old wounds from a complicated time during a complicated war, but i'm also old enough to remember when conservatives
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talked about character as something that mattered in the presidency. and so i think it deserves to talked about. >> so powerful. >> mikele steechael steele, wha pete said was so powerful there. also, the facts are particularly damning for donald trump. he can't really fight back that he dodged the draft and used his father's v.i.p. doctor and lied to get out of vietnam. y can-- he can't do that. he can't hide the fact that on the day that he graduated from an elite ivy league school that his his father got him into that 40 men died in vietnam that very day while donald trump had spent the last four years being a maybe on campus, playing golf,
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tennis, football, doing another thing also that probably shouldable troubling for donald trump is the fact that bone spurs don't go away, unless you have an operation and treat them. >> was there a surgery? >> if there was a surgery, perhaps you you can see records of that or evidence of that. we know he never had any surgery because he never had bone spurs and he did, in fact, allow another working class american to go fight in his spot. 40 people died just the very day he graduated from college. >> yeah, i think perhaps him a
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new medical record on that. what i appreciated about what we just saw with mayor pete of the measured, precise argument as a veteran, talking about a difficult war, a complicated war at a complicated time, not with histrionics, not with, you no, the kind of stabbing accusations, but just laid out the case. and i think that's one of the interesting challenges as mayor pete begins to rise up this democratic primary ladder for his opponents how do this meet that would you coming off capping he has been very measured. th sort of deep rest enons in
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himself voice and he's not afraid to, quote, go there. and i think it's a very interesting call ng for not just president trump but one inside the democratic primary process as this mayor sort of carves out a very unique space among all the other democrats, including. >> i want to put up bo, donny. this show joe biden at 33% now, up six points, bernie sanders at 15% and both snorz harris and warren climbing up into when i looked at buttigieg and you see buttigieg clearly having really ton -- and her strength as i
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watched her prosecutorial chop pao when trump started calling biden sleepy joe. now you mentioned a few weeks ago that donald trumps did not we're in slb so you take a guy that basically already -- the first time out, oh, he was fresh, he was calling his add ver tear -- add vr series those facts bode very, very, very troubling for donald trumpkp
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when we interviewed him in south carolina that he was not good at possible you go through the mistakes that happened. you go through the fact that the fbi director really kept exporker's you promised universal health care for all. and ended up highing that their coverage would be be better. >> m that you were going to
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focus on work blah. >> sfrchl to be extraordinarily hard for donald trump to defend when those 30-second ads start rolling on tv that she what he said in 2016 opinion oh, and by the way, not only did mexico not and though they didn't go to washington for the first two years. >> this is why -- she want the campaign to be about tease issues and these policies and to be a referendum on the president's performance in office and not a account rahal wall or a battle over his
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impeachment. the most important numbers in those polls you put up there is warren up by 5. she is rise and sanders is falling. >> i love it! >> and so mayor pete is still a second tier candidate at this point. he's great at creating these viral moments in politics, he's great at getting coverage. he's incredibly good at gotting the and that is going to got a serious roo responsible to we said we hadn't understood why l bob mueller they seem to be three and four in these races. >>they're strong. >> bernie keeps dropping. we can dig into the polls more and find out exactly why that
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is. no mek and he's is only at 6% and he's not getting the support of black democratic voters right now. we have al sharpton coming up and we'll ask him why. >> also, we'll talk to one of the 2020 democratic hopefuls when congressman tip ryan join the conversation, talk about his campaign, how he plans to win over the blue collar voters that helped trump win the white house. plus, much more on the escalating war of words between president trump and house speaker nancy pelosi. and the praise the president essentially forced his staff to heap on him. it was so embarrassing to watch. did it it he did it and we'll
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the greatest privilege in my life is to serve as vice president to the president. he's keeping his word to the american people and assembling a team that's bringing real change. >> what an incredible honor it is to lead the department of health and human services at this pivotal time under your leadership. i can't thank you enough for the privileges you've given me and the leadership uch shown. >> mr., thing you for your. >> i want to thank you for getting this country moving again. and also working again. >> thank you, mr. president, with psh and an even greater to be here set and we thank you for opportunity and to serve your agenda and it's so painful i
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actually felt ser and humeily wait $ $or. >> but he -- i mean, it's such a humiliating, damning reveal of somebody's character that they would have to have other people and them do that and that he could sit there smiling and bask in it. and willie -- >> that shows a need that is filling something that is void. >> well, yeah. you know, it's -- it's only -- if somebody is running around talking about how strong they are, you know they're weak. if somebody has to talk about how smart they are all the time, you know -- you know how ignorant they are. >> how virile they are. >> if someone has to go around talking about how rich they are,
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they're weak. if they go around talking about how virile they are, yes. >> take a look. >> here we go. >> i said to everybody before i walked in, i said i'm going to be very calm because i don't want them going out to the press and saying that i was anything but calm. so i was extreme lip calm, very much like i am right now. kellyanne was what was my temperament yesterday? >> very calm, no temper tantrum. >> m. >> no, you were very very direct. >> larry, you were there. what was my attitude at the meet persian gulf. >> kellyanne is right, you were very calm. you laid out the case. >> sarah, we were just talking about the ming yesterday. what was my tone at the ming? >> very calm.
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i've seen both. this was definitely not angry or ranting. >> oh, my god, it like -- it just johnny, you are going to die. boss, was i calm? ? yes, you were calm, you were calm! >> what is this? is this a mob dinner? i don't know how they do it. allin allinin and reflect the glory the leader in the room. that was based on the meeting where nancy pelosi has started this debate i guess can you call it or public fight with the president of the united states but how he walked in the room, spoke for three minutes and walked out. she called it a temper tantrum. that's why the media went into
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this riff about how faulk he had been in the meeting and called on people who were in the room and some of the people not in the room, to describe his level of calm that day. >> it's unbelievable. donny is the host of "saturday night politics." i cannot believe this, 47 million people tune in every week. and if you count of course -- >> i actually like it. >> armed forces -- you have to include armed forces in that, yeah. >> you're massive in guam. but the numbers out of guam so you have be you have are i find it hard to believe and my and started do that, be -- stop.
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no, i don't need you talking about me. this is -- there's no ceo. there's no effective manager who would ever do. my we add mrl. and the line at the mess hall at the end of the day. up are the leader, you eat last. and if there's no food at the end, that's fine. is this he is the antithesis of
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everything a great ceo does. ceo, surrounds himself with people opinion, a great ceo is direct and honest, a great ceo has empathy, has great strategic focus. just like you talked about fake virility, fake wealth, he's a fake ceo. he did not run a big organization. he ran a little mom and pop licensing company with about 25 people and a tattered beat up office. >> hey, donny, donny, let's just say he ran that $419 million to start that little business that
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he ran into the ground. >> and that he lost twice as much as any human being over ten years, he lost a billion doll s dollars. he's actually a stunning business failure. even -- i've met some of the top 50 ceos in the world. he was a coke to still with us we have nbc correspondent heidi pryzbyla and we have michael steele still with us and joining us at the top of the hour here, the reverend al sharp ton, john podhoretz and -- >> john podhoretz, what makes mika so great? >> well, she puts up with you. >> all right, mika -- >> i'm going to allow, i'm going to allow.
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here is. >> sometimes when we're talking to him, he agrees and then i said one time who's in charge here? because you agree and then all a what goes in karj? he said he's in charge and i suspect that he may be even more from yesterday because i don't think that any often would the president again stormed out. i think first pound the table, walk out the door. next time, have the. that didn't work for him. now this team no pr.
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again, i pray for the president of the united states. i wish that his staff would have an intervention. >> it was sad when i watched nancy all moving, the movement, and the hands and the craziness and i watched i'll tell you what i have been watching her for a long period of time. she's not the same person. she's lost it. >> if they're still investigating, will you raise the debt limit? will you sign apps in them get this angs out of there bell it is, we can do things that will
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your head spin. >> i'm an extremely table genius. >> willie this is what a choold. >> that is the equivalent of what donald trump is doing. again, child he's a guy who knows that he's lost more than a few steps. >> and your comeback is she's crazy and waves her hands a lot. that's not a high-level contact between two of the most powerful people in the country. john, what do you think when you watch the back and forth between him and nancy pelosi? >> look at his face! >> yesterday i was reading the number one best seller in the country, this howard stern collection interviews. in middle of the book is their
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is a long transcript of a one contra trump between i mend t s thisand thinking this man president of the staes. and whether ancht j. benz is going to come and till him. it's a total horror show. and what strikes me is that the trolling, his being a troll, was present then in 2001. he just spent the entire interview needling benza until benza blew up. this is an old thing in his play book. he wants nancy pelosi to blow up. >> that's correct. >> he doesn't mind her attacking him. the theater aspect of this so
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just -- it's all theater. >> that's not good theater for him. >> okay. butting in nothing is good tee are for him. of morning joe talking about whether or not you're crazy because you don't mind that the subject is whether or not you're crazy, you just want the coverage. >> a there is a lot of theater and there is theater you win. this is the theater that he loses. nancy is a very different leading actor than anybody else. >> eagree with that. >> reverend, al -- i remember back in may of 2016 i think it was reading donald trump and his interview with the "washington
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post" editorial board. and he went on and on about his hands for about ten minutes. and he said, you know, people look at my hand and they're beautiful hands. i go around and campaign event and they shake them and there will be a woman who will stop and she will look down at my hand and say, oh my gosh, i had heard that you have small hands. actually you have very large hand and they are beautiful hands and literally went on for ten minutes. i said to mika, i said look at this, this guy is insane. and mika said, no, he's not insane. he would much rather talk about this than quantitative easing and the other policy issues he knows nothing. so if we are talking about this feud, then we're not talking about the fact that oo never built the wall, that mexico paved for the wall, that he never gave the universal health
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care costs that coverage isn't embassy pansive, that the manufacturing jobs have all come back, that he was going to get work for the working class. all the things he promised, all the lies in his first campaign. we're not talking about that. we're talking about a fight he concocted nanny pelosi. so maybe he is crazy like a fox. >> i absolutely think you hit it on the head. he knows thatty he doesn't know policy. he knows he's not even tried to improve his lack of knowledge. so he diverts it with these little side fights. the fact of the matter is donald trump knows in his heart of hearts that nancy pelosi is smarter than him. he reminds me of bully went to commonwealth that the way he tried to pla, is to always pick on the smarter girl in the class
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that was going to pass the test with flying colors. he knows she's smarter than him. here's a man that floonged in business, father build him out over and over again. he flunked then. he was an out of borough guy that the elites in his field look down on. he as a deep insecurity. now he sits up at the white house, not knowing much about tollcy, won't put people around him that can operate that way and he h-- i'm a stable jeanne genius, i really am, i really am. he's trying to convince himself out of deep insecurities. i've wrestled with donald trump for years. i became cordial with him going it fights and all, the way we all learned how to deal with donald trump in new york, if you know his insecurities and stroke
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his insecurities, that's the key to him, he's very simple. he is not as smart as he pretends, which is why he as to asewer america but he's really talking to himself. i'm a stable genius. >> but the woman he's talking to is twice smarter than him and wrapping him around her finger while the stabl yeen just is talking. >> i don't think that when he does this he is doing this for this or for the new york -- washington leet. he is doing this to reinforce with his base certain ideas. scott adams, the guy who writes the del birt comic strip wrote this piece, trump uses the tactics of neurolinguistic and you reinforce the same thing
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over and over and over i was calm, i was calm, you say i was caulk people who want to believe him say, i don't know, he was totally calm in that meeting. they weren't even in the meeti meeting. >> he's really also talking to himself. he trying to get this internalized and hyped in his own mind this is what i've got to believe and then make my crowd believe it. so, yes, he wants them to say he calm and he want to convince himself she -- can i just dissend for a moment? >> we're watching the same station for the past two years and no reality show, name one because and if this lines up perfectly with what his
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supporters say that sick and his appearing like he's an amateur and a child. and the thing about she knows how to press his buttons. and when you're bullying a woman, whether it's lingering stereotypes or whatever, it's just different when you're doing that to a wamp. and she are you tonight and i'm just waiting for her to use the word time-out. time-out, go teak a nap the polling shows the it turns out the speaker of the house may be
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a a tougher sad ver sayery than a.j. >> we over the past 20 years have heard republicans attacking nancy, and they think that they get a lot ot of that. the fact is, actually her brand has changed dramatically over the past year. hundreds of millions of dollars was spent by republican trying to tiend. that was the republican party's effort to try to save the house of represents. how did that campaign turn out? >> it was the biggest vote total loss in the history of the reeb. gop lost by a greater margin and bringing in the extremes in more
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and, john hardwood, want and donald trump distracts to hide his ignorance of policy, of economics, of foreign policy. nowhere and donald trump keeps talking about the money that he is getting from china because of the tariffs, when somebody and we all know that that money comes from the pockets of work class and middle-class americans pry errol. >> well, you're sm d -- let me step back and deal with a couple of points that were made.
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john is right that president trump is trying to reenforce his base and however, the key point is his base is not large enough. quinnipiac had a toll this week. 354% of the american people said they will definitely not vote for president trump. this is somebody who -- when you think about who voted for 2016, who voted for donald trump? the lat fum -- than he going to gain by reinforcing the blue collar whites who are his base. so he needs to grow, he needs to get bigger and he's not doing that. and the economy, the turbulence in the markets is to the helping
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him. we know that the economy is slowing down. he fell just short of that 3% growth in 2018. he did have a strong kwa two-thirds through the second kwar the so if you have a slowing economy, a president guess kbb can in a way he needs, even with some favorable layout in the electoral college in terms of a distribution of vote. it's not enough for him right now to but he's mott getting them right now. >> and also yesterday, all this deflecting that we saw yesterday, his behavior. we saw him talking about his hands so he didn't have to talk to a major newspaper editorial
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bird boar have to wonder, michael steele, when you have those many different oversight efforts be efforts to get document from returns clesing in on this pr in terms of trump's behavior, that he'd as the walls close in and the kurt enis being pulled back on the wizard. >> absolutely. he does not do wellnd pressure at all. and he will mind a a but can he stop the process of getting the papers? can me stop the process? if he goes to the court and different avenues.
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he has been trying historically to deflect. what he has now is something he didn't have in the first part of his administration and that is sycophants and others who will do his dirty work for him. from bill barr on down, you're beginning to seem this the favor, to give him the ledge roojcourts and certainly in the justice department to on it and the mat lol at that is and leaking out to the public and getting out in the blackpeer and just how stable this genius isn't. if i could just go back real quick to nan is where the power
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center reside at 1600 pennsylvania avenue. that is not necessarily the case. it wasn't in 2008 with it it. it was on capitol hill. similarly right now the power center in chachlt is he's up against a very formidable opponent in the speaker of the house, who will take no prisoners and give as good as she gets. >> so, john, we're talking about obviously the battle, the political battle betweenin often dkt courts are going up, they're going to make some decisions on of toes overmight who i is the constitution an be i don't
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think --ions so or the executive branch under any presidentst and it's up for the public to push back and to ultimately have this threat of impeachment in its back pocket. one of the things that was not noted this week was the justice department and the house judiciary committee actually came to some kind of a deal over some of the mueller documents. this was sort of not in anyone's theatrical interests to promote that, you know, some sort of back channel negotiation ended up with the justice department backing down on this effort, the sort of globalist effort throughout the executive branch
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to deny congress materials from the executive branch, that it has the constitutional right to request for this it does not have the right for is for white house officials to cop separate -- that's where the fight over whether mcgahn should or should not testify i think has more merit than a lot of people gave it credit for. i think so far things are holding up. i think the thing that make this all unprecedented issy have a president who doesn't want to make a deal. . you know what, we have to cancel the meeting, we're too far apart. you don't make them come up to the white house and yell at them for three minutes or be very calm with them for three minutes and storm out of the room. that's what you do when you need to keep your negotiating irons
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in the fire. and he clearly doesn't want to make a deal. so we have 18 months more in which he's not going to want to make a deal. we've never had this before so god knows where this goes. >> well, we shall see and to use joe's words, this ends badly. >> john podhoretz, thank you very much. >> and we talked about a profile of blue collar workers in ohio, which reports that democrats are still as out of touch with that region as they were in 2016. democrat tim ryan represents battleground ohio. he heard that discussion and wanted to jump in. the 2020 presidential contender joins us next on "morning joe." or other child. or their new friend. or your giant nephews and their giant dad.
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you know reliable support when you have it, and that dependability is what we want to give our customers. at comcast, it's my job to constantly monitor our network. prevent problems, and to help provide the most reliable service possible. my name is tanya, i work in the network operations center for comcast. we are working to make things simple, easy and awesome. welcome back. earlier this week we talked about the recent profile of blue collar workers in ohio that says the democrats are still as out
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of touch with that region as they were in 2016 and that those voters intend to stick by president trump. "the new york times" notes that trump still has a, quote, tight bond with voters there who were once staunch democrats and that the current democratic party is pitching the wrong message. as the former democratic chairman tells the paper, the democratic party has lost its voice to speak to people, that shower after work and not before work. ool he's saying i'm fighting china to get you better job. he added while democrats in washington harp on president trump's unfitness for office, his taxes and possible impeach, the president is solidifying blue collar support through an aggressive trade war with china, even if his tariffs mean economic pain in the short term.
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joining us now from youngstown, ohio, democratic presidential candidate congressman tim ryan of ohio. welcome back to the show, tim. >> thank you. thanks for having me. >> so, congressman, you can join the conversation we were having just last segment, as well as last week on this issue. we were talking about how the president will pick a fight with nancy, nancy pelosi or other people and send out an outrageous tweet so he doesn't have to talk to youngstown voters how he promised to a populist president and he cut taxes for his he promised he wassing if all of these issues that mattered most to people in youngstown. talk about that and talk about
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how the to win youngstown, to win scranton, to win middle america. >> that's why i'm running for president. i believe somebody who comes from this area that watched him make these promises over the last couple of years and doing in but distract and not fulfill those promises is the person that can beat him. the reality is, joe and mika, you've had this conversation in just the last fools, the workers are still suffering. i don't know why this conversation, why sometimes democrats are afraid to take on the economy. 75% of people are still living paycheck to paycheck, they're just getting by and surviving and they're sick of it. it's been going on for decades. people want to -- i do think the "new york times" article was a little stated. people like the fact that he's
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punching china in the mouth because they do cheat and this issue with huawei is a real issue, but the reality is woor getti getting -- they're running circles around us in the future of work and fifth generation internet. the president has no plan. so all he can do is distribute and we have a plan moving forward. i have one. you want democrats to represent it be this is a campaign we're going to talk about and deliver for the american people. >> congressman, we talked about it before but let's talk about it again. >> to reach voters in youngstown? did is -- they sometimes vote
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against their own economic interests. this is a guy who passed tax cuts, flew down in air force one and that night sat around and laughed and said i just made you guys a lot of money. but working class american and it's difficult in this environment because everybody does want to talk about his taxes and the mueller report and everything else. we have got to be very, very disciplined and how we talk about the problems that we'll are dealing with and we're still suffering here in manufacturing america. we have to have a message that says we're going to start building stuff again and move
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away from the finance economy. you cut the workers in on the deal and tell these workers, look, i know general rahal motors just got rid think we're going to build electric vehicles, we're going to do everything in our power to dominate the market. china dominates it today, they sell 40%. tim ryan, we're going to have an industrial policy that droufs that. that's manufacturing, joe, moving away from finance. solar panels. chan controls 60% of that mash. if tim ryan is president, we'll figure out how to dominate how do we invest into the research and make this stuff gone? if you go michigan, worcester,
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e eye, people want to build things and they're not doing it with donald trump. >> it's good to see you this morning. of course the 2016 campaign, the promise was that jobs are coming back. the industries will return, steel, auto, coal jobs. he. hope in the hearts of people who voted for him in youngstown, for example. now that plan in and there is some comfort that jobs are coming back. when you give the reality check, what hope do you give? >> you have to have a plan for them. you have to have vision for a new america, that if we come together, if we're not divided, that we actually can drop and the problem is china is
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dominating it. and you've got to go to coletory. tell them you're going to give them their cole job babb. but all of this, this have the growth has to be driven into the older areas of older countries, west virginia, west p.a., old steel, old auto, old rubber and you can use the tax code and the power of the federal government to. when you go to communities like that and explain it, it resonates with them. you say look, these areas of the economy are growing at 25 to 30% of yourwe make that stuff!
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let's bring it to young you talk about how going lift people's quality of life up. >> congressman, want to ask you about this running debate in your own party, if they can chase the white working class voters you're talking about in ohio or should they chase the rising electorate, black and brown voters and i'm wondering if they have to make a choice in this election or if there's a message that can get both groups of people to show up at the polls? >> i don't think you have to make a chos. >> all of these people are important to the country, not just the democrat being party, but the country. when you talk about criminal justice reform and the fact that an african-american kid will go to jail five or six times longer than a white kid for a crime around marijuana and serve a
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sentence that's 20% longer, that's a criminal justice issue, but and then that psh got -- you can talk about criminal justice and how do we get everyone on the field playing for us in the united states -- we only have 330 million people in the country. we're competing against 1.4 billion in china. we can't afford to have a racist criminal justice system, we can't afford to have a broken immigration system. if you frame it that we want everybody on the field, all the forgot i don't know people, all the forgotten communities, let's go. let's go and compete china in a real economic competition. that's how america.
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>> i think it makes a lot of sense. >> congressman, i'm sorry, what was that web site again? >> timeryanforamerica.com, joe. i'm going to look to see if you give me five bucks or not. >> the wb site is saturdaynightpolitics.com. >> no, no, no no. >> folks check out timryan for america.com. okay? >> well said. very well said. when he was trying to sell mr. plow. what's that number again? >> we should point out that
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donnie's web site has been blocked by most corporate servers. >> it's inappropriate content. >> will say any parn that has spyware on their kids' eye phones, it will be blocked. >> up next, the new poll that has joe biden still far ahead of the democrat being field but the very notable movement by some of the other candidates. as we go to break, a look at the new cover of "the new yorker" entitled "the shining." not the jack nicholson film but an infrustration. "morning joe" will be right back. ♪ ♪ you can do this!
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welcome back to "morning joe." you know, rev rend al, you know this very well, we've talked about it before that in politic action always has an opposite and equal reaction. a lot of times if you go too far to the left americans will vote in, let's say the tea party. if you go too far to the right you ool see the sort of election that we had in 2000 18 and i th it's interesting that trump's racism brought the most diverse congress in the history of the public. and i want to read you something that was in the "washington post" this morning mix this morning. it's actually a study from the university of pennsylvania. you'll find this fascinating. that actually trump may be causing researchers are finding, may be causing racism across the
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country to go down and this is what the "washington post" morning mix story says in part. hopkins told the post that the results initially surprised him. upon reflection it's quite conceivable that trump is simultaneously galvanized a small number of americans while also pushing millions to affirm that they are not prejudices. hopkins believes the study provides evidence that the racially incindiary rhetoric and policies issued when trump's white house has actually pushed the majority of americans in the opposite direction suggesting that the quote that martin luther king loved to talk about and i know you've talked about before that the moral arc of the universe is long, but it is forever bending upward. that just maybe the deficiencies of donald trump are pushing americans in the other direction. what do you think?
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>> the rationale behind that and i've not looked in detail at the study is that people may have some natural leanings towards bias, but when you see raw bias you tend to say wait a minute, i'm really -- i'm not like that. i don't want to be like that and it gives people like an alert button goes off and they go the other way. soy think that that study may very well be well founded, because i think that when you look at what trump does, i mean, here's a guy that makes moral ekw ekw ekwif lentss, even people that may have slightly leaned towards some prejudgment, say wait a minute, i don't want to be with that crowd and i think he forces people. the good news as a civil rights activi activist, the good news is if i can find any in donald trump he forces people to make a choice on who they are and what they want their nation to be. >> yes. >> he doesn't give you mid
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ground. either you're with that or you are with a broader, more inclusive society. >> yes. >> and there's no nuance with trump and that's a good thing because i think most people would choose the right way if we put that mirror up there and let them say now, look at you, are you with this or are you with the real deal of where america need to go. >> well and michael steele, we can look at more extreme examples from the 1960s. white americans did not engage in the civil rights movement the way civil rights leaders wanted them to engage. >> right. >> until the terrors of the birmingham church bombing. i'm not comparing anything trump has said so that. i'm saying this is a more extreme example but that made white americans choose sides. you can also look at selma which again shocked the consciousness of america. made americans choose sides and every one of those overreaches by nazis, by white supremacists,
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by clansmen, it was answered by middle americans rising up. now, in our time perhaps even uttering of racist comments, racist tweets, racist sentiments, may just be enough, again, to wake up americans to have them say, wait, no, no, no. not many my country and hopefully one day not in my party. >> yeah, i think that's largely true. certainly white america was slower to the core arguments that dr. king was making in the 1960s. and certainly they were very afraid of what malcolm x was say ago at that time when he was talking about upending the economic system in the country. they were caught between these two perspectives of the black man and woman's place in this country. i think it's -- you know, having looked again at reverend al said closely at this study, but i suspect there's also a little
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bit of what we saw when barack obama got elected. we've elected a black president. we're in a post racial america and so there's this sort of overreaction in a sense to what trump is saying just as we saw an overreaction to the election of barack obama. the underlying root causes are still there. they were there from the 1960s. they have not changed. a black child today still has the same problem that a black child in 1960s had with his encounter with the police. red lining still occurs in black neighborhoods. look at the educational system and how blacks are not educated. the criminal justice system, yes, they're reforms but there's still a lot more work to be done here. so i don't want to take this great leap in saying hallelujah, we're at a space now where donald trump made us recognize how racist we all are and we want to move away from that. there's still an underlining i think problem, joe, that still
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needs to be addressed in so many sectors that white folks an black folks interact in america. >> and what a great point you made that the historic election of barack obama actually brought about a complacency that has been now wiped away. i wanted to ask you, we've talked over the phone about this, about mayor pete. he did very well at your national convention. he's doing very well among white americans, but he is not moving black americans in the democratic party right now. he comes in at 0% if you look at the cross tabs in a recent south carolina poll and even 0% in indiana. can you tell us any insight from what you hear from activists on the ground, why is that the case and also what can he do to -- to get more support among the very people he needs support from the most.
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>> i think that the thing that mayor pete had to deal with first is that he was unknown to the black community. but even more so, then you must also show them you know them, their concerns, their challenges, where there are specific challenges, doubly unemployed even in a good economy, criminal justice issues and other things. and i think a lot of times that who the more liberal progressive crowd, some of them are elite and above the people that they try to talk for, but never talk to. >> right. >> and what i told mayor pete when he went to the soul food restaurant with me is you have to talk to people about their issues. and i see so many people that on cable tv that talk about issues that they never relate to the people, they're never on the ground. they're studio activists and latte liberals. >> latte liberals.
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>> that's always a good term. >> all right. >> all the people said -- >> amen. >> and tim ryan for america or whatever. reverend al, thank you. we'll be watching politics nation this weekend. >> by the way, it's incredible. >> president trump further fans the flames in his public battle with the house speaker, nancy pelosi claiming she's lost it and that he's the one who is the stable genius. while he shares an edited video suggesting a doctored video suggesting pelosi is in mental decline. >> this is what dictators do by the way. >> beyond irresponsible. >> plus president trump gives william barr sweeping new powers in the aftermath of mueller's russia probe just hours after saying his opponents created treason. we're back in two minutes. treason. we're back in two minutes. that karl brought his karaoke machine?
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>> i said to everybody before i walked in, i'm going to be perfectly calm. because i don't want them going out to the press and saying i was anything but calm. >> calmer than you are? >> would you just take it easy. >> so i was extremely calm very much like i am right now. >> calmer than you are. >> oh, wow. okay. that's pretty good, guys. i like it. >> good morning and welcome to "morning joe." it's friday and what a week it has been. >> what a week. >> may 24th along with joe, willie and me we have political writer for the new york times, nbc news national political reporter heidi przbyla. donny deutsch, and msnbc political analyst and national
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committee michael steele is with us and washington katty kay joins us. we pulled you in overnight over the news that teresa may will be stepping down on june 7th and that's like one or two days after trump visits so interesting timing. but first, whoa, what a day yesterday. president trump continued to erupt last night, because the house speaker said that he threw a quote, temper tantrum, tweeting after 9:00 p.m. last night the president shared a video edited to show nancy pelosi stammering during a news conference with anchors suggesting the speaker is in a mental decline. fake videos of pelosi altered to make her sound as if she is slurring her words, has spread online in recent days. interesting. wonder what that's about. >> we know what it's actually
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about. >> we've been around this block before. >> the president of course stirring the campaign, we've said it. people closest to him told us that they feared that he was in mental decline. people very close to him told us that they feared that he was in predementia, that he had changed. you watch donald trump in the late 1980s, you watch him in the 90s, you watch him now, he's competely changed. i've known nancy pelosi and been working with her since 1994. >> i interviewed her this week for 90 minutes. >> so a quarter of a century i've known nancy pelosi. i can tell you nancy pelosi is tougher today. >> sharp as a tack. >> than she was 25 years ago. the difference between nancy and donald, not even close. he knows he's sleeping and so now they're actually -- it's incredible, they're doctoring videos, the the president is sending around doctored videos
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of the third ranking constitutional officer in the united states of america. >> let me tell you. >> that's where we are. >> the day i went to washington to interview her she had just gotten off a plane from boston to do a huge award ceremony. she rushed back to washington, she did the 90 minutes with headliners, msnbc with me. we lad to encapsulate her whole life in the interview and then she was off to that contentious meeting with democrats who are pushing for impeachment. that went into the night. this woman never stops and she's just fine. >> and again, it is unfortunately again the president's always projecting i think it was heilman that said the president is either confessing or projecting. last night the president sent another tweet with commentary that claims pelosi cannot put a subject with a predicate in the same sentence. of course this is because the speaker rightly questioned the president's leadership and
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competency earlier in the day. >> sometimes when we're talking to him he's -- he agrees and then i said one time, who's in charge here, because you agree and then all of a sudden something changes. what goes on there? who's in charge? and he says he's in charge and i suspect that he may be. and i suspect he may be even more since yesterday because i don't think that any responsible assistant to the president of the united states would have advised him to do what he did yesterday. >> the president again stormed out i think, what, first pound the table, walk out the door. next time have a tv cameras in there while i have my say. that didn't work for him either. and now this time another temper
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tantrum. again, i pray for the president of the united states. i wish that his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country. >> your comments almost express your concern about his well being. >> i am. being of the united states of america. >> it was sad when i watched nancy all moving, the movement and the hands and the craziness and i watched her. that's by the way, a person that's got some problems. crazy nancy. i have been watching her and i have been watching her for a long period of time. she's not the same person. she's lost it. >> if they're still investigating will you raise the debt limit? you sign a budget? >> we'll see what happens. i'm a very capable person. i can tell you this. let them get this angst out of their belt and what it is we can do so quick your head will spin.
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>>. i'm an extremely stable genius. okay. >> oh, my god. >> classic. >> we've again willie, we've all known him for well over a decade. he has changed. i know he was -- he was always selfish and -- and self-consumed and embarrassing at times, but he's changed a great deal mentally and psychologically, emotionally. he's much more frail and fragile. he just is. and again, you know, it's so funny, whenever we say this, they're acting like they're doctors. i'm not acting like a doctor, i'm telling you to go back and look at donald in 1988, 1999, look at him on his today show clips and look at him now. he can't complete sentences without repeating himself. you know, willie, when we talk to him during the campaign and even during the transition he would sit there for an hour and just repeat the same stories
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over and over again. nancy pelosi, again, probably the sharpest. we've said this long before donald trump said what he said. the sharpest most effective speaker probably since sam ray burn. his stories will surely mark it down that way. he's -- i don't know if he's projecting, confessing, or whatever he's doing but it looks especially bad on donald trump. >> and what a sad state of affairs when you have two oof arguably the most powerful people in the country trading insults about who's crazy and who's flailing their hands more. speaker pelosi responded saying this. when the extremely stable genius starts acting more presidential i'll be happy to work with him on infrastructure, trade and on other issues. so as you've watched this spectacle play out over the last couple of days, the thentrance d exit of the president to the rose gardens with prepared literature to hand out.
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and the arguing over who's less well mentally, what do you think about the state of where we are just now? >> just jumping back to trump's mental health. it's interesting from my new show, "saturday night politics." i was looking at an hour interview i did in 2007 with trump and there is even from 2007 a difference in the cadence. you can see it, you can see it in his eyes, so joe, to your point, not playing doctor, that is a guy who has lost a lot. back to nancy pelosi. what's so great about nancy pelosi is she's not running for president, but she is to me even more so than any of the candidates the greatest weapon in the world. if that back and forth continues through 2020, nancy versus donald, nancy is a democrat, donald is a republican. she will do more damage to him than any other candidate. i love this because there is a competent, bright dynamic strong woman against a frightened,
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frail, clearly out of it man. to me, this is nancy pelosi 2-0 versus trump. that was trump's most stunning clear l on the head courtesy of nancy pelosi and the more he engages with the superior adversary the way she pafs the way for the candidates to come in. i love you, nancy plealy. >> what's interesting is that donald trump for all his emotional frailties and insecurities and yes, for his mental lapses, he usually just tactically the animal instincts in him tactically helps him make the right choices. what he's done here though is he's punching above his weight. he's going after somebody who will always get the best of him and then the here's what's so interesting. what you just said and i know donald is watching so donald if you want to take this free advice you can because you certainly don't have anybody around you or smart enough or brave enough to tell you the
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truth. but donny, what he has done now is he's gotten into a fight with a bear in a ring that he can't win. he is also going to be battling joe biden or whoever wins the democratic nomination, so what he's done is he's opened up a two-front war that he cannot win. and i know there have to be some conservatives and republicans that understand nancy always gets the best of him. nancy pelosi is not a cowering presidential candidate that just fell off the turnip truck last week and said i think i'm going to run for president. no. nancy's done this her entire life. >> yeah. >> this is a horrid miscalculation. just political miscalculation on his part, isn't it? >> it is. and what's interest fg you watch donald if you know him, his reaction to nancy, there's not -- he actually really respects her. >> well, he likes her. he looked up to her and he likes nancy pelosi.
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that's the strange thing here. >> he respects that strength and she punches with a velvet glove. mika, with your book "earn it," with your book, everything you -- there's so much and i've watched women in power and there is such a still an art form unfortunately where women are tight roped and they have to walk. she is the most brilliant tactician of punching so hard but with an elegance and i don't know if that's the right word but she is to me the ultimate street fighter in a way that still in this day and age women have to fight. they still can't fight the same way men can and she can -- mika, you i know this better than anybody. she has perfected that art form. >> still ahead on "morning joe," on twitter president trump can throw around accusations of treason without any accountability. not so much when he is face to face with the press corps. peter alexander asked the
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president to name names of the people he accuses of a capital offense. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. atching "mo" we'll be right back. ( ♪ ) man: you can do this! grab those command picture hanging strips and let's make it work. they're tool free and they hold strong. oh, rustic chic! an arrow angled to point at rustic chic. hmm, may i be honest here? let's take that down, damage free, with a stretch, remove... and look: no marks, no mess. like a pro. command. do. no harm. like a pro. we see two travelers so at a comfort innal with a glow around them, so people watching will be like, "wow, maybe i'll glow too if i book direct at choicehotels.com". who glows? just say, badda book. badda boom. book now at choicehotels.com
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it's a now there's one store that connects your life like never before store. the xfinity store is here. and it's simple, easy, awesome. president trump who's currently stone walling congress on information related to the russia probe is ordering u.s. intelligence agencies to tell justice department everything they know. - night trump gave william barr sweeping new authority to conduct a review of the russia probe directing the cia and 15 other intelligence agencies to cooperate with the review, granting barr the authority to unilaterally declassify documents. the move came hours after trump once again declared that those two -- that those who led the
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investigation committed, get this, treason. >> the constitution says treason is punishable by death. you've accused your adversaries by treason. who are you accusing of treason? >> i think a number of people and i think what you look is they have unsuccessfully tried to take down the wrong person. if you look at comey, if you look at probably people people higher than that, if you look at strzok, if you look at his lover, lisa paige, his wonderful lover, they talked openly, you know, they didn't use their private server because they didn't want to get caught so they used the government's server. that was not a good move. he talked about the insurance policy just in case crooked hillary loses. and that didn't work out too well for them. so you look at them, they wanted insurance policy so that should she for any reason lose, remember, 100 million to 1, maybe he said 100 million to
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nothing, but should she lose we'll have an insurance policy and we'll get this guy out of office. that's what they said and that's what they meant. that's treason. that's treason. they couldn't win the election, and that's what happened and that's what's happening right now because without the treason word i guess, but that's what's happening now. they don't feel they can win the election so they're trying to do the thousand stabs. keep stabbing. leets have a financial. and if you look for $40 million i would think seriously that bob mueller and his group of 18 killers have gone over my taxes, they've gone over my financial statements to a level that nobody has gone over them before and they were not discussed even. they weren't even discussed or brought up. i have great statements. >> donald is obviously melting down. it must be those court rulings. >> yeah. >> those court fuellirulings reg
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that they turn over the documents to the house, but there's no doubt every bit as unhinged as he was during the mueller investigation. we've been talking about, mika and i, about how this guy is an autocrat in training. we had donald trump talking about charging a former fbi director with treason and when told, that that could lead to his death and lead to these other fbi agents' death, executio executions, said yeah, and kept going. to sh is what an autocrat does. he goes back and tries to punish those that he considers to be his political enemies and if donald trump had his way you just heard him, you know, they'd be executed. >> well, joe, this is a watershed moment in a presidency full of them. and he has been calling for the prosecution of his opponents for months and months and years now, he's finally getting what he
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wanted. what we now have here is the full weight of law enforcement of the u.s. government being deployed against the president's perceived enemies. that is a really big deal and the guy who is in charge of the investigation is somebody who has already shown that he knows how to play an inside game in washington so that's what we describe classified materials and you know, kind of paint a picture favorable to the president. this entire investigation is coming out of a fear of conspiracy that peter strzok. he was the guy that led the investigation into hillary clinton's e-mail server. in some ways he's probably the best friend that donald trump ever had in washington politically and now he's being accused of treason. he was doing his job and in fact, almost all of these guys were doing their jobs at the fbi, at justice, augthorized fo the work they were doing. it's a strange thing to watch
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this investigation start. >> coming up on "morning joe," espionage and the freedom of the press. new charges against wikileaks founder julian assange are raising profound questions about the first amendment. that conversation is next on "morning joe." that conversation is next on "morning joe." ♪
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the department of justice announced 17 new charges against wikileaks cofounder julian assange yesterday. in a superseding indictment a grand jury accuses assange of persuading chelsea manning to send assange hundreds of thousands of classified documents and then publishing material that included the names of confidential sources who provided information to american diplomats. the 17 counts were added to a single count which accuses assange of conspiring with manning to crack a defense department pass word. it includes a move to charge assange with obtaining and publishing classified material under the espionage act. good morning to you both. ken, let me start with you.
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what was behind this decision and break down those charges a bit if you could. >> sure, willie. we have 17 new counts tacked on to the one count that charged assange with conspiring with private chelsea manning to crack a defense department pass word. these new counts are much more serious because they involve the espionage act. they accuse assange of inducing manning to leak and helping her steal these hundreds of classified war logs and state department cables. but the charges cross a very important line when they also charge assange with a crime for publishing that information. so this is the first time that the u.s. government in recent memory, in modern history has charged a nongovernment employee with disseminating classified information and it's very concerning to advocates of press freedom because they fear today
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assange, tomorrow the "new york times," the nbc news. i was on a call with officials about this and they assured reporters they were not targeting the press. they believe that julian assange is not a journalist and what they said is they charged him with publishing a narrow subset of documents that included the names of confidential sources whose lives were put at risk and they said no responsible journalist would do that. we all agree with that and that move was widely criticized at the time and continues to be. but the issue is there are many occasions when nbc news and the "new york times" and others publish classified information that displeases government officials including the names of ti operators and we feel like we have good reasons to do that and this opens the door potentially for the government to decide whether to prosecute us and the aclu, reporters for freedom of the press and others are very concerned about this. >> the deployment of the espionage act in this case
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worries a lot of people. some editorials saying it strikes at the heart of the first amendment because then you have the government deciding what can and cannot be published. are those well founded concerns? >> i are. in the 100 year history of the espionage act it's almost always been used against government insiders but the plain language of the statute allows for prosecution of outsiders, people downstream who simply receive information willfully, even if they just retain it can bring criminal liability under the statute. so the mere fact that the government says don't worry, we don't plan to prous kaat journalists means nothing because the next administration, the next attorney general, subsequent u.s. attorney in the future might interpret that statute differently. >> it's a very slippery slope. then is the question whether or not julian assange will ever make it to united states soil, do you believe that will happen? >> well, you have to wonder whether there's new precedent in
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terms of the espionage act and what can be published is being set to try to get him back to the united states because there's a track record in the british government of not releasing people to the u.s. who have been charged just for computer hacking, which was the original -- he'd been helping with computer hacking and so there have been questions in the uk about whether assange's case would follow those previous cases and i wonder whether these new charges of espionage related charges have been applied to him in order to try and beef up the case for getting him out. meanwhile of course there is still the swedish prosecution. they've reopened the case into sexual assault charges against julian assange and they would like to get him to sweden to answer questions as well. so there's a legal tussle going on between britain, sweden and the united states at the moment about where he ends up. >> all right. thank you both.
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katty, thank you as well. and coming up on "morning joe." >> one of the reasons i was elected was because of law & order and security. that's one of the reasons i was elected also. jobs and lots of other things. >> when jimmy kimmel does it it's clearly a joke. when supporters of the president do it they're suggesting it's real. we'll talk about the doctored videos floating around online aimed at nancy pelosi. "morning joe" is back in a moment. ♪ limu emu & doug
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i said to everybody before i walked in, i said i'm going to be very calm because i don't want them going out to the press and saying that i was anything but calm, so i was extremely calm, very much like i am right now. >> how's it going so far? >> pretty well i think. >> i think we need some major sucking up. >> very well, sir. you're not only handsome but a powerful man i could see the second you walked in here. >> what was my temperament in the room sf. >> very calm. >> good morning, mr. griffin. >> it's cloudy. >> one of the worst days i've seen in years. >> mercedes, you're always a straight talker, what was my attitude when i walked in? >> you were very calm and you were very direct. >> good news about the yankees. >> i hate the yankees. >> pack of cheaters. that's what they are. >> larry, you were there, what was your attitude? >> mercy's right you were very calm and you laid out the case. >> i love your tie.
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>> i hate this tie. >> it's awful, it's got to go. >> sarah, we're just talking about the meeting yesterday. what was my tone yesterday at the meeting? >> very calm. i've seen both and this was definitely not angry or ranting. >> but i'm the president. >> the best there is. >> but you just said you hated me. >> but not you the president, the you who said you hated you, you who love, hate yankees, clouds. >> and there it is. the professor of history, walter isaacson and also editor of the "washington post" eugene robinson who has a new piece out could pelosi has trump frantic and rattled again. also political journalist of founder of the digital platform news, not noise. thank you all for being with us. so walter, the back and forth
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between donald trump and nancy pelosi obviously there's some humorous aspects and disturbing aspects but i think the most disturbing is that the president of the united states is sending out doctored videos trying to make nancy pelosi look intoxicated or drunk and it's, again, you take that along with the fact that he is calling for the conviction of treason, possibly to execution of the former fbi director and other people he doesn't like, this is -- we don't have to even say this is like what trostrong men foreign countries do, we can say this is what strong men in foreign countries do, tyrants, autocrats. >> absolutely. this is the way aauthoritarian begins. you can read a book called fascism which shows how this happens each step of the way.
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when you start putting out videos that are totally fake, when you start well coming foreign governments doing things where they're putting out fake news, then when you try to change the meaning of the word fake news and just anything i disagree with is called fake news rather than purposely doctored videos, and then we're in a situation historically we haven't seen before. because when norms got broken in the past, there were always two parties. if it was somebody like nixon who started breaking norms and seemingly becoming unhinged, there was really good conservative republicans like barry gold water who would step in and likewise, they used to be people who worked in the administration. you could count on them, and when you're turning these people in the administration into lackeys and the republicans are unwilling to step up and say something, it is keeping us from
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the guardrail -- i mean, those guardrails that used to protect us from the destruction of our norms. >> and gene robinson, just a point of clarification, donald trump sent out an edited version of nancy pelosi. there are others that actually have been doctored even more dramatically. >> yeah. >> be i you wrote about nancy pelosi. it is very obvious that this woman has constantly had donald trump's numbers. he hasn't attacked her in the past. he's been afraid to for good reason and well, he just crossed the line yesterday and probably made a very bad political mistake. >> i think he probably did. she really gets under his skin in a way that few other people do. maybe it's because she's a powerful woman. i think he has trouble dealing with that. and maybe it's because she's just powerful and smart. and he -- he's afraid of her in
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some primal way because she can hurt him. you know, the flip side of that is, he needs her to get anything done if he was going to get anything done and i guess this week he just decided well, we won't get anything done, and you know, between now and the election and he's going to try to run on that. but nancy pelosi is, in terms of the trump presidency, she's kind of a unique figure. i don't know anybody else who sort of gets to him the way that she does. >> jessica, you've covered capitol hill and nancy pelosi for a number of years. as you watch this back and forth over the last couple of days what do you see as speaker pelosi's strategy here? what's he trying to get out of this, tit for tat with the president of the united states. >> it does seem there's an element where she's now goading him into engaging further. in part she could be trying to rattle him. in part she could be trying to distract from the internal debate in her own party that's
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about impeachment. we're no longer talking about that. we're talking about this. but i also think that there's a challenge here for her because the piece we ooear not always talking about is the fact this is a gender attack too. there is a thing in our nation that women are too weak to be leaders. when she got sick momentarily the trump campaign accused her of being too weak to be president. >> you know, it's funny you should bring that up because i was standing right there the first time they did that to hillary clinton. we were in a coffee shop in upper northwest d.c. and she was trying to avoid answering a question and she kind of shim mied like this. and before we knew it, by that evening, the trolls online had turned this into a seizure which was then being fanned on fox news to the point where we as reporters actually a colleague of mine had to pen an article setting the record straight. no, i was standing right there.
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hillary clinton did not have a seizure, but it set off that narrative which then led to the successive event that you mentioned and i do think that there was a gender aspect to that. and -- but with nancy pelosi, gene, do you really think this is a long-term strategy that's going to be a successful for the president as it was against other competitors when he was trying to demean and debase for instance, jeb bush or ted cruz on the debate stage which it's a very different dynamic between him and nancy pelosi. >> no, i don't think it's going to be successful. number one, she's nancy pelosi. we all know her. she is -- she's sharp as a whole bunch of tacks and she's tough. she has a sense of humor, but she knows how to -- she knows where all the levers of power are in washington. she knows who she is, she's in control of her caucus. it's not going to be an easy
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thing to do a job on nancy pelosi. so i think she'll be just fine in this. you know, the question for her is -- and i think pretty well. she's got to manage her caucus. my guess is that idea will prevail. because she tends to, you know, she runs her caucus. she tends to get things done the way she wants them done. >> when he attacks her, just to be clear, that makes her caucus rally around her and this came at a moment when she was -- let's be frank, facing some fissures. >> totally. >> and walter isaacson, politically how this plays out, whether or not his attacks are gender based, i mean, this is a woman who has led in the united states of decades and people see her as a leader. she's dealt with a lot of babies, she's had five of her
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own as well as she's dealt with men on capitol hill and in the white house for decades. and she's never ever been caught flatfooted. i think actually gender and i wonder if you disagree with this. i think trump's attacks on her will fall flat, because it is so cringe worthy to see someone trying to sort of attack the -- the visual dynamic of a woman or the behavior of a woman especially a woman as elegant, as 79-year-old nancy pelosi who has been speaker of the house twice. >> i definitely agree. however, what the president has done and he's very wylie and this is keep this as some debate in which the spotlight is on him in some reality tv show where he gets to march into a room and try to humiliate nancy pelosi
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instead of having the real issues that people care about especially health care, especially the problems we're having now underlying this economy and the inequality. so it would be good for the democrats to try to get back to the things that people are asking in the town hall meetings. and likewise, it would be good for some people to stand up to a donald trump, you know, the -- keith's line about the worst filled with passion intensity and the best lack all conviction, that's what we're seeing here today. people should be standing up for the norms of our government. >> yeah, there's all -- we talk about gender, there's also an age element to this where the implication of sending out all those videos where they doctor them to make it look like she's slurring her words is the one that the president posted. trying to show she's old and getting a little out there. but all of this is smoke screen.
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there's a huge story that's happening and authorized all the intel agencies to disclose and to cooperate with the attorney general who has proven himself to be an ally of the president of the united states where the attorney general plow can basically declassify information and the intel agencies have to be compelled to go along with it. >> and he wanted to do this earlier and was advised not to because of security concerns and has now reversed himself. so he's basically empowered our own government to investigate its investigators. we're in unchartered waters here and i do think this is an important distraction for him. ford also laid off 500 employees this week there in the u.s. there are plenty of stories that would get traction with the american public and his base that he's drawing the attention away from with this fight with pelosi. >> all right. thank you all so very much. we greatly appreciate it. and heidi, i read -- by the way,
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i read on nbc last night your wonderful words about mika being a mentor and it was quite a story. >> too much. >> and it really is in line with what you've said about earn it. >> that's right, joe. one of the things i learned from that experience was that the sequence of events is first you earn it, first you show your value and then you get your mentor and that is what happened with me. one story that didn't make it in there was after it was all over and mika had helped me through the whole process, i was thanking her on set and she just panned and looked at me and said i'm not being nice and what she meant by that is you earned it. right? >> yeah. >> i wasn't wasting my time on you and first comes respect and then friendship. >> thank you so much. >> mika, wonderful stories also from casey and adrian. >> couldn't believe it. >> i just saw tweet something about you taking time throughout
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the weekend and calling her, walking her through things, because you didn't have somebody to do that, but again, this is not -- not bringing this up because of you, this is actually what you talk about in "earn it" and it's the importance of actually finding mentors and fighting hard to make sure you get to the next step. >> we've got great articles on mentoring and negotiating and that one came up at know your value.com. thank you all so much totally over the top. i'm touched. up next, brexit was intended to separate the uk from the eu, but the only thing it separated so far is teresa may from her job. we'll check in with cnbc on how the prime minister's resignation is impacting the markets. >> also a guy named gene robinson actually spent some time reporting in london. can't wait to get his take when "morning joe" comes right back. "morning joe" comes right back in a new chevrolet. oh, wow!!
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brighthouse smartcare℠ is a hybrid life insurance and long-term care product. it protects your family while providing long-term care coverage, should you need it. so you can explore all the amazing things ahead. talk to your advisor about brighthouse smartcare. brighthouse financial. build for what's ahead℠ > . let's ge to brian sullivan. >> we have a big drop yesterday. good morning, by the way. happy friday. we came back, still finished down 286. the machines are in control at this point. people are still very optimistic. some kind of a trade deal is going to get done. you can talk to insiders. they may whisper. i don't think it's going to get
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done, but the markets still say they are. the other big news is theresa may. 2 1/2 years as the helm of the prime minister of the united kingdom resigning at 5:01 eastern time. short speech, at times emotional. trumping what she did do in her time, but it was what she couldn't get done, which was brexit. she couldn't please the hard-core brexiteers, couldn't please the anti-brexiteers. now the uk is going to have to find a new prime minister. the odds right now are on former london mayor boris johnson. you could get a hard core sort of right-wing, very pro-brex pro-brexiteer in as well. sad day, difficult day for many in the uk. the uk. can i say that on tv?
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>> i think you can say that on tv. >> the poop imemoji? >> absolutely. >> have a happy memorial day weekend. we greatly appreciate it. jay robinson, you were the washington post correspondent there, london bureau chief in the early 1990s. i always love when i hear people going, oh, if only we had a parliamentary system. no, no, no. i don't want to hear that. they took one vote. they still can't get out of it. we have so many checks and balances that, you know, we -- it may go more slowly, but my gosh, britain's still staring over the proverbial cliff. >> i kept asking people when i was bureau chief over there, why don't you write down your constitution? it might help you. you'd have something to refer to. they don't have it written down. you know, the tragedy of theresa may is she didn't support brexit. she didn't like the idea. she wanted to remain in the european union, but when the
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vote went the other way, you know, i'll be the prime minister, she was going to be the one to land the plane. it seems to me landing in a heap of flames and ashes. boris johnson as prime minister, i knew him when he was correspondent, you know, for "the telegraph" and just sort of a hack. and so that's who's going to be maybe the next prime minister. it's a mess. it's worse than over here. >> get ready for the boris years. we've all, of course, heard the name mark zuckerberg. there are many other players in the facebook story as well. >> i honestly don't think you're in any position to make that call. >> i was the u.s. treasury secretary. i'm in some position to make that call. >> letting our imaginations run away with us is exactly what we were told to do, is exactly what you told us in our freshman address. >> that's a clip from the film
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"the social network," the winklevoss twins. they turned from facebook to cryptocurrencies and made themselves a fortune. the story of "bitcoin billionaires." best author, ben mezrich. always great to see you. congrats on another sure to be best seller. >> thank you. >> tell me about -- the winklevoss twins much aligned. how did they make their money in bitcoin and how can joe and i get rich? >> when i wrote "the accidental billionaire "qutd, they were the bad guys. i had to reassess who they were. they bought 200,000 bitcoin at $7 a coin. they now have billions in bitcoin. they were one of the first people into crypto.
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they've been building the second revolution and it made me take a second look at them because you don't get struck by lightning twice. they were at the beginnings of facebook and now the beginnings of cryptoand now worth billions in this new form of currency. >> bitcoin is one of those terms we've heard over the last couple of years. i'm not sure everyone, and i include myself in this, completely understands what it is. what did they see in it and how have they succeeded? >> bitcoin is supposed to be the money of the future. it's digital, i can text you money with nobody in between us. there's no authority, there's not a bank, not a specific government. bitcoin is instantly texted from one person to the other or sent like an email. it's digital. like most money is already digital, bitcoin goes that next step. it's backed by math, crypto. it came out of nowhere in 2008-2009. now it's everywhere.
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>> isn't that what the russians used on facebook to make their purchases, do their business under the mask of bitcoin? >> yes. it started off in a dark place, drug dealers, russian oligarchs, using it for illicit things because it was untraceable. the winklevoss twins are the guys in suit. they are the guys trying to make bitcoin part of the financial system. they're fighting that sort of libertarian, anarchist view of bitcoin that it's just to bring down governments and trying to make it part of the system. >> i thought that was kind of the point of bitcoin, is it has nothing to do with governments. it's just you and me -- >> that's a great question. it's like facebook itself. whether facebook should be regulated. bitcoin, the winklevoss twins think it needs something to keep it regulated but at the same time it doesn't need visa in between it, it doesn't need the u.s. government backing it and
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seeing what's happening with it every step of the way. >> i've talked to a lot of people in silicon valley who utterly depis tspise the winkle twins. >> i think i got them wrong. those are the guys i hid from in lockers in high school. i saw them for the first time in a hotel room in new york. they're like something out of a greek mythology. they walk in a room and i saw every '80s movie i ever saw in them. that's the way i wrote them in "the social network." after revisiting them, they speak multiple languages, they can code almost as well as mark zuckerberg. i think i wanted to reassess them. in bitcoin, they're very smart, whether it goes to zero or 250,000, who knows, i think the price is one barometer. >> they're billionaires.
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the book "bitcoin billionaires." great to see you. thanks so much. joe? >> what a great -- what a great book. i'm sure it's going to be a great movie as well. willie, we're moving towards memorial day weekend. certainly time for us to stop and think about all those who have given so much to this country. obviously next week we'll be in normandy. mika and i will be in normandy remembering the anniversary, 75 years later. 75 years later of what happened on june 6, 1944, forever changed the world. >> yeah, no question about it. on memorial day weekend, i hope all of us do think of places like omaha beach and places like fallujah and think about the families of those in wars of
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american history and the wars of the present left behind and left without a brother, sister, mother, father. those are the people we ought to be thinking about this weekend. >> we talk about the greatest generation. you talked to admiral mccraven, anybody that's been fighting with this country since 9/11, they will tell you this, too, is the greatest generation. >> that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> thanks. hi there, i'm stephanie ruhle. it's 9:00 a.m. on the east coast. we have a lot to get to this morning. our team of extraordinary nbc reporters is here with new details on the stories impacting your life today. starting with this breaking news. after failing to win support for her brexit plan, british prime minister theresa may announces her own personal brexit. >> everything i can to convince mps to back that deal.

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