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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 25, 2019 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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they're angry. he has to confront them, they're confronting him. there's already questions about his questions to appeal to minority voters ares so this is sort of his first crisis test. he is still going to show up at the debate is our understanding. even though there is a crisis back home. his advisers think he's rising to the moment and that people will look at how steady and how clear he is and in a difficult moment which is true. but if he continues to have a backlash at home from democrats, from minorities, that's a huge problem. >> yeah. it's also a challenge that people who happen to be mayors and governors who run for these -- run for office tend to have. i mean, he has to juggle dealing with the job he has versus for running for the job that he wants. so it -- >> especially when you're a mayor, you're a mayor of a relatively small city, you're young so you're making the argument i'm ready to be president. well, this about as big of a crisis as you'll see in your community and you better solve
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it effectively and there's no way you can make that argument on a national stage. >> great point. see you on "morning joe" in a bit. we'll be reading axios a.m. some time soon. that does it for us on a tuesday morning. i'm yasmin vossoughian alongside jeff bennett. "morning joe" starts right now. the president called fbi director james comey and invited him to dinner that evening. >> priebus told the president something like don't talk about russia, whatever you do. >> and the president promised he would not talk about russia at the dinner. >> according to comey's account at one point during the dinner the president stated -- >> i need loyalty. i expect loyalty. >> comey did not respond and the conversation moved on to other topics. >> but the president returned to the subject of comey's job at the end of the dinner i need loyalty.
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>> you will get honesty from me. >> that's what i want, honest loyalty. >> if you're not going to read it, they are. >> that's good. that was the star studded cast -- >> i think that's great. and my goodness. if people aren't going to read it, why don't we have robert mueller read it as well. >> i would love to hear it from mueller. that was a live performance, reading of passages from the mueller report. the investigation, a search for the truth, adapted and condensed portions of the special counsel's 448 page report on his investigation and annette bening narrated the live one night only performance and john lithgow and kevin kline took center stage as trump and mueller respectively. good morning, it's tuesday, june 25th. we have former aide to the george w. bush white house elise jordan, former treasury official
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and economic analyst steve ratner. pulitzer prize winning columnist and msnbc political analyst, eugene robinson. the cofounder and ceo of axios is with us. we have a development on the story we led the show with yesterday. department of homeland security officials tell nbc news that almost 300 migrant children have been removed from a border patrol detention facility in texas after reports of dirt and potentially dangerous conditions. we'll get a full the update on that situation in a moment and gene robinson is writing about that issue. we'll read from his piece in the must read opinion pages. but first, we're -- >> by the way, that's good news. obviously. >> good news that there was action. the whole thing is -- >> yeah. >> it was quite abhorrent we are even in this situation. >> it is. i just -- it makes you wonder, willie, what about all the facilities? how often are the lawyers able to go to all of the facilities
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to make sure -- >> what more is there? >> that what happened there isn't happening in other facilities. >> well, it is and has been. and the fact that this took media reporting, these children would not have been removed and put in safer and cleaner places if not for media reports frankly from the associated press and nbc news and this is going on at the border. this has been going on for over two years, you have to continue reporting because clearly this is not an administration that's willing look into it on its own. >> we are one day away from the first democratic debate and new polling suggests that joe biden's controversial comments about working with segregationist senators has had little impact on the race. the morning consult weekly tracking poll last monday through sunday shows biden with 38% and 19 point lead from the week before.
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bernie sanders remains in second place with 19% and elizabeth warren is up two points to 13% with pete buttigieg at 7%. kamala harris at 6%. cory booker at 3%. a sub sample from the early contest states even found biden gaining three points up to 43%. bernie sanders at 21%. warren at 9%. buttigieg, harris, booker, o'rourke and klobuchar trailing. what do you make of those numbers? strong for biden. >> again, really strong for joe biden. >> amidst -- >> going into the debate where -- well, i'll talk to you about it. i called you yesterday, not only because i love talking to you in the -- >> you guys talked for a long time. what is that? i don't talk to anyone that long. >> while having my mint julep and smoking my cigar. >> you guys don't have the time
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for this. >> i make him call me big daddy. what you hearing on the line? panama hat. >> okay. >> really weird though, because i'm in a co-op. >> yeah. >> upper east side. >> laying in bed talking. >> i've got my bucks on. look. >> there you go. >> look at that. >> i'll tell you what, so anyway, i called you yesterday because i have been hearing throughout the day growing concerns about joe biden. and he's not up to it. he's too old. the remarks last week. and yet, it seems you look at what reverend al and what john lewis and what jim clyburn and a lot of heroes -- a lot of civil rights heroes said about him, they're fine with him. it looks like voters in the
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early states are fine with him. >> yeah, as i mentioned to you i was at the event a week or so ago when he made the now famous remarks and i thought he was on his game. as i said to you, ironically i think in a way trump lowered expectations. he's sending out all the tweets about sleepy joe and we went in with somewhat lower expectations and i think he delivered. he was crisp. he gave a stump speech. i don't think anyone walked out and said, wow, that's the greatest thing i ever heard and he was fine. then he had a couple of remarks in the middle which obviously blew up. as you said, what i'll call the black establishment for lack of a better word seems to have rallied around him and basically said -- even cory booker said the other day, when he was asked do you think joe biden is a racist? he said absolutely not. he said a couple of unfortunate things so i think he's playing his game. so far, so good. we'll see how it runs --
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obviously we have a big week ahead of him. we'll see how it goes. >> yeah. elise, obviously trump is helping joe biden's cause by attacking him every day. >> shows how weak. >> do you want to hear more on this? >> play it. play it, then go -- >> hold on. alex is saying that we have to read a script. alex, this is "morning joe." >> i know. >> we don't do scripts. and we like -- >> blame it on dan next to you. that's the better thing to do. >> don't you have -- >> it's dan's fault. >> don't you have -- >> all right. >> hold on. >> we have to set it up. >> they read the mueller report. >> he wants you to set it up. >> lithgow. >> i get it. >> president trump is renewing the attacks against joe biden and -- you see i'm reading, at the former vice president's mental health. he said it's declining. the president made the claim during his interview with the hill. without providing any evidence
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to back it up, adding that's the real reason why former president obama has not endorsed biden. >> how he doesn't get president obama to endorse him there has to be some reason why he's not endorsing him. he was a vice president. they seemed to have gotten along and why president obama is not endorsing him is rather a big secret. if you know the answer, please let me know. there's something going on in that brain of his. >> i'll tell you -- >> that brain of his. >> it's such projection. >> as long as donald trump -- >> all i have -- >> confession. >> keeps talking. >> so bigger point is when democrats see that, they're thinking oh, donald trump's scared of joe biden. and it's just like with elizabeth warren before. i think elizabeth warren's doing well now because she took a hit from donald trump and she survived that hit. and she keeps going up.
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>> yeah. >> now when people go back to it, that feels like that ground has already been walked over and hashed and rehashed and then with joe biden donald trump is doing him such a favor because when donald trump is making crazy comments about joe biden, no one is noticing that joe biden isn't actually talking to the press and giving interviews. >> yeah. >> and is letting actually his bad comments overtake the news cycle when why doesn't he just get out and say new things and start a new dialogue. >> well, clearly the subtext from donald trump is that joe biden is old. he's playing on a seed of doubt. the president of the united states a couple of weeks ago turned 73 years old. >> right. >> no spring chicken. >> just 73? >> everybody that running america is in their 70s. donald trump, mitch mcconnell. he's 79. bernie, 78. >> are you sure that trump is 73? i thought he was older. >> just had a birthday.
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>> 73. his old doctor said he was 46. >> i don't know. >> think about this though. this is crazy. we've got a guy donald trump -- i'm working here. it's not easy. i'm tired. 73. and then mitch mcconnell i think he's 79. 77. >> a little less, i think. >> pelosi, 79. >> exactly. only getting better. >> joe biden, 76. clyburn, 78. all in their 70s. >> but chuck schumer is a kid. only like 68 or 69. >> -- standing next to joe biden at 73 years old. >> if you can't figure out ju just -- >> i don't know. >> how long they have been alive, just about every one of them if not not mistaken i figured this out one night, they could have gone to high school
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with buddy holly. >> think about that. that was a long time ago. >> gene robinson, we can go to age if you want to. but maybe somewhere else would be better. if you look -- if you look at the polls, joe biden's numbers and the field's numbers seemed to have hardened in place despite the week that joe biden had. i'm curious for your take as a south carolinian in the early states and in the poll morning consult, joe biden's support among african-american voters ares hasn't changed either. he got the support of john clyburn and john lewis and many others -- of the men he had worked with in congress over a generation or two now. what's your view of joe biden's last week and the way he handled it? >> well, first of all, let me back up for a second. this show has a script? >> no. >> a script? >> sometimes. >> no, it doesn't. >> nobody told me -- the decade i have been doing the show, but
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anyway, i digress. i'm stunned. so look, african-american voters are among the most sort of pragmatic and real politic voters there are. and i think what's going on is that a lot of people still think he's the guy that can beat donald trump. especially given the fact that donald trump keeps attacking him. i mean, it's an absolute gift to biden and people in south carolina and african-american voters and other voters there and african americans elsewhere know joe biden. he continues to benefit from his eight-year collaboration with president obama. but he's been around. and as, you know, i noted in the column and others have noted i don't think anybody would say that joe biden is racist. there are people who would say that joe biden is, you know, 76
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years old or whatever. and that the reference to the segregationist senators was more than unfortunate. i mean, he could have picked a bunch of conservative republicans to talk about how he worked with them and got along. don't go all the way back to james eastland and herman tall image. but i think he's over it with the most important constituency especially older voters. now, if there's any reaction it would be among younger voters who don't know him that well, who haven't known him over the years but that doesn't seem to be showing up in the numbers. >> all right. president trump claims that the latest woman to claim him of sexual assault decades ago is totally lying and he adds this disgusting statement. she's not my type. which has so many things wrong
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wit it's hard to even say it. writer e. jean carroll says that trump forced himself on her at bergdorf goodman 23 years ago. during an interview with the hill in the oval office, trump said, number one, she's not my type. number two -- >> that's with great respect? with great respect? by the way, that's -- that is really -- that's where you start? she's not my type? >> it's typical donald trump being absolutely disgusting when it comes to talking about women. >> talking about rape here. so what is his type? >> your guess is as good as mine. it seems like he likes anyone he can grab. he said what he likes to do and carroll told a story that's in keeping with the behavior
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pattern that donald trump described in his own words. >> you really kind of actually crystallized it. we're talking about sexual assault, talking about actual rape and the president said that she's not his type so i guess the follow-up question is since you have a type, when it comes to rape, what's your type, donald trump? and is it any of the other women who claimed that you raped them? >> you know -- >> what is your type since you have a type. that you would rape. >> thank you for saying rape because this is rape. what was described in that story was rape. >> george conaway said this in an op-ed, willie. we republicans brought up juanita broaddrick all the time -- >> yeah. >> there were differences, juanita broaddrick denied it for quite some time and denied it under oath and there wasn't an on air confession the way that donald trump had and it does
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line up with what happened here. all that said, there were a lot of democrats out there are saying, wait a second. joe biden placed his hands on a woman's shoulders and that got more press coverage on every sunday show than donald trump -- the allegation that donald trump raped somebody. the allegation that joe biden made somebody feel uncomfortable got far more press conference than the credible allegation of rape. and the question is, why? and by the way, let's just put candidate "a" and "b," take it away from joe biden and donald trump. why is it that candidate "a," he may survive this, because there's somebody who said he placed his hands on their shoulder and it made her uncomfortable versus candidate "b" who has rape allegations -- credible rape allegations. >> it's a good question to ask
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and the allegation by e. jean carroll fits with other behavior that the president has been accused of. not just accused of but he described on the "access hollywood" tape which is to force himself on a woman and saying if you're famous, you can do what ever you want to do. there have been so many allegations and so much baked in -- i'm not defending this, but so much baked in to donald trump and his sexual misconduct and the allegations of rape that they go oh it's another -- >> no, the problem is republicans and the republicans in congress and the senate who are supporting this president, who will not say anything to defy him i'd like to put this to you. i'd like to say you have a president who has gone on national television and said he would accept dirt from a foreign government and put our country at risk. he has proved himself with his words to be a national security risk. and now he has said when accused of rape that this is not the woman he would rape. i want to know why you can go back to your constituents and
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say that you support this man. and why you would put your political future on the line for this man. i need to know why all of you are so weak and so spineless that you would actually stand up for a man who says this is not the woman i would rape, she's not my type. meaning he would rape another woman. you explain to me why that's okay and why you go on every day looking in the mirror and doing your job and thinking this is the president you should support. so trump went on to add that his accuser is quote, totally lying. i don't know anything about her. i know nothing about her. she is -- it's just a terrible thing that can make people -- that can make statements like that. carroll responded to trump's denial shortly after. take a listen. >> i love that i'm not his type. he's denied all 15 women who have come forward. he denies, he turns it around and he threatens and he attacks. >> yeah. you know, gene robinson, he
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does. and mika was talking about his past behavior. but also the press coverage and the public's reaction. as willie said, baked into the cake. i remember saying after the "access hollywood" tape came out and everybody said that was the end of his campaign, i said this is guy who went on howard stern and said he'd like to have sex with a princess because he likes her skin. baked into the cake. this is a guy who basically said he'd like to date his daughter, that she was hot. this is a guy who rated women on a scale of one to ten talking about different parts of their anatomy. it was all on tape. all of the evangelical christians, all these christians, they know, it's all out there. it's not fake news. donald trump has spoken in a way that --
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>> not my type. >> spoken in a way that all of the evangelical christians have been teaching their children from the time they were 5 not to speak and how not to act. so it was all on the table. they didn't care after "access hollywood." so the question is, why would they care now? even after the rape allegation. >> yeah, i mean, it's breathtaking. i mean, that was where i was going to go. i was going to ask what about the evangelicals, what about vice president pence? how does he sit there, you know, every day, he stands in the corner with this sort of pious look on his face and there's your guy -- there's the guy who says -- effectively says, mika is absolutely right. well, you know, if she were a different type, i'd -- absolutely, i would definitely rape her. i mean, it's just incredible and you can't really bake rape into the cake. whatever cake --
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>> unless we hear from republicans today. >> whatever obscene kind of cake it is, my goodness. >> do you know who baked that into the cake? democrats and juanita broaddrick baked that into the cake. i'm sorry. not to throw cold water on this parade, but juanita broaddrick -- >> i don't disagree, we don't need to go there, thank you, bill. for donald trump. no, i'm sorry. i will say -- >> i'm just trying to complete his sentence. >> well. juanita broaddrick had very, very specific and very credible rape allegations and i can tell you not a single democrat that i worked with in congress gave a damn. they were in power.
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they wanted to stay in power and when it came time to speaking out against the president, they wouldn't do it. the shoe now is on the other foot. this is not a condemnation of democrats or republicans, it is just how sick politicians in washington can be when they think their side could move forward. >> can i just add to what mika was saying and i think part of what's upsetting you so much because i feel it very viscerally. what trump is saying is this woman wasn't even worth raping, wasn't worth -- it's the low regard that he holds so many women. and it's behavior, his attitude towards women that permeates everything he does in his entire life. >> he has done this before. the not my type defense is one trump has used when taking on another accuser. here he is in 2016 talking about
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"people" magazine journalist natasha who claimed trump forced himself on her at an interview at mar-a-lago in 2005 and jessica leeds who accused him of groping her on a plane in the early '80s. >> she is doing this story on melania who is pregnant at the time and donald trump, our one-year anniversary. she said i made inappropriate advances. take a look, take a look. look at her, look at her words, you tell me what you think. i don't think so. i don't think so. i was sitting with him on an airplane and he went after me on the plane. yeah, i'm going to go after her. believe me, she would not be my first choice, that i can tell you. you don't know. that would not my be my first choice. >> and the crowds are howling.
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still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> obama had a lousy economy. it was a dead economy. nobody was working. the whole place was a disaster. my economy is phenomenal. we have now the best economy maybe in the history of our country. >> steve ratner has charts to fact check those comments by the president from his "meet the press" interview. and axios has reporting on the economic trouble in trump country. we have that ahead on "morning joe." we'll be right back. >> to quote juanita broaddrick, hillary clinton threatened me after bill clinton raped me. she's been struggling to get the media to pay attention to her for many, many years. so last night i decided we would expose the hypocrisy of the clintons and the media and our politicians to the entire world. . every day, visionaries are creating the future. ♪ so, every day, we put our latest technology and unrivaled network to work.
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jim vandehei of axios is
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looking at the economic trouble in trump country. what are you find? >> yeah, there's slightly over 200 counties that voted for president obama twice and then flipped to trump. so those are the counties that basically gave us trump. in those counties the economy is not doing with what it's doing in the rest of the country. you have a much slower rate in terms of the new jobs, far fewer businesses. half of the counties have seen their population shrink, and really most alarming of all it's -- you see this continued trend that over the last decade 93% of those counties have lost primetime -- prime age working americans. when you don't have people who have jobs that want to be in your community to have a job, you lose your vitality. not just the economic vitality, but i think the long term vitality of these communities. i think the big question for
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2020 is can trump continue to win these voters even though the conditions there aren't getting better? that a lot of the promises he made aren't materializing on the ground or can he convince them, listen, i inherited a mess, it will take me a lot longer to fix it. >> you know, jim, if you go out and talk to a lot of those trump voters they will tell you the same thing evangelicals tell you which is, yeah, well, you know, sure, i can be concerned about a, b and c, but still i like him. he's shaking up washington. i'm going to vote for him again. >> yeah. and if you actually link it back to what you were talking about before the break, if you wrote the chapter of this phase of the trump presidency and america, the title would be numb. right? people are numb to trump. i think there's a lot of people who are comfortably numb. i think a lot of evangelical christians are comfortably numb because they love all the things he's doing with the courts and abortion. i think republicans in congress
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are comfortably numb because they like power and they don't want to stand up to trump. i think a lot of people who voted for trump are comfortably numb. they're not fazed by what he does or fazed by the attacks because they don't -- they believe in the vote that they put in him. they believe in the change that he promises them. and so i don't know. it's interesting because we had another piece this morning where broadly people are numb to trump. suddenly people are less interested in reading about him, 30% decline in the number of people that are reading stories about him online. when he tweets you're getting about half as much interaction with those tweets than you did a year ago or 18 months ago. something's happening out there. there's now a backlash to our trump obsession. interesting to see how that plays out. >> steve, you have some charts about the economy, the president talked about how great it was on "meet the press." what say you in your magical charts can.
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>> well well, here's the first statement, obama had a lousy economy, it was a dead economy. nobody was working. the whole place was a disaster. okay. so we were there. people -- >> wait, wait, hold on. there's like a six year recovery? a seven year recovery. yeah. >> i'm standing on my treadmill and i see this statement. i almost fell off my treadmill. it was the most extraordinary thing i had ever seen. so let's just show a couple of facts. >> okay. >> perhaps slightly disproving what mr. trump said. let's start with hiring, hiring has been slower under mr. trump than under obama in the last 29 months in office. we had steady job growth but actually slightly higher. >> so you're telling me that barack obama -- that the pace of hiring of working americans was higher under barack obama than donald trump? >> last -- comparing 29 months
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to 29 months last to first, 219,000 jobs a month under obama, 195,000 jobs a month under trump. >> well, i'm not good in math, but that's over 20,000 more jobs per month under barack obama so why is it that -- every time we turn on the television set you have news hosts and reporters just as -- just assuming that donald trump's economy is so much stronger than barack obama's when it's not -- i mean, the numbers tell you it's not. >> that number tells you it's not. let's look at wages, wages are kind of important, right? people care what they earn and so if you look at wages what you can see is the same -- is essentially the same pattern. that wage growth has been slower under trump and when i say wage growth i mean after adjusting for inflation. because that's what matters, what people take home in their pocketbooks. so you can see here, you can see here if you look closely that has dropped a bit. under trump, it was 0.65% per year. real wage growth.
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doesn't sound like a lot but it's positive. under obama it was 0.8% wage growth. >> gene robinson i'm confused again. it seems like wage growth was higher under barack obama than donald trump. >> yeah, it seems, you know -- i seem to recall we had a very long multiyear economic expansion under barack obama that he actually saved us from the jaws of the great recession and got the economy working again and that was inherited by donald trump. you know, trump continues to tell this lie. it is -- it's one of his three or four central lies that he has brought us this magical economy when what he's done is essentially surfed the wave, the wave that was generated in the obama years. and that, you know, in terms of adding jobs and adding wages has
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even declined a little bit. it's not roaring the way it was under obama. >> yeah. steve, again, it's remarkable that because donald trump promotes his economy in a way that barack obama refused to. in fact, he overcompensated in the other direction. not talking about how good it was. voters believe it's better and of course think, again, the press -- just assume, yes, of course donald trump is doing well because the economy is doing so much better. no, it's not. he's riding the obama wave. and doing it well. >> can i show you one more incredible chart we have -- >> yes. >> do you want me to read the next statement? >> this is -- by the way, this is cocoa puffs versus lucky charms. >> my economy is phenomenal. we have now the best economy maybe in the history of our country. steve? >> well, you don't have to go
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back very far to find that this is not necessarily the best economy in the history of our country. if you go back just as far as bill clinton, you can see that under bill clinton, you had all of this growth. you had all of this growth, even more growth than donald trump had in his first two years and actually donald trump's growth in the first two years is only a 0.2 faster than the growth that president obama had. >> hold on a second. which is the big blue one and which one is the red one? >> the big blue one is bill clinton. >> okay. >> the big, tall blue ones. >> that means the taller they are -- i'm just doing this for my media friends and people that get -- that are hosts or have guests there. so you're telling me the big blue ones, that those are bill
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clinton's and that means it's better? the higher it is means it's better? stay with me. answer my questions. >> 3.9% per year under clinton. that's better. >> bigger is better, if you talk about the economy. and gdp growth, okay. then the little red ones, what are those? >> those are 2.5%. >> so that's almost a point and a half lower than bill clinton's economy. >> and even barack obama who he trashes every day was 2.2%. >> yeah. so he's a lot closer to barack obama than bill clinton. i bring this up, willie, because i do it in such a condescending manner because i get so sick and tired of so-called experts and pundits of course, you know, the reason why they're putting up with rape allegations is because the economy is better than it's ever been. or because it's -- no, it's not. you can look. it just -- whether you talk about black unemployment, white
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unemployment, latino unemployment, the gdp, wages, look, it is all on a seven, eight year glide path. and unemployment, 10, 11% it has been steadily going down like this. so i just -- it's -- i expect donald trump to say it. baked into the cake. but my god, can reporters stop being so lazy? can hosts stop being so lazy? can talk show hosts stop being so lazy? and stop saying that this is like the trump miracle. >> parroting him. >> a snapshot of the economic moment, the economy is doggrelltively well. but as you point out it's the by-product and the end of a long process going on for a decade. remember, one of the big narratives in the campaign, i alone can fix this. i inherited a mess he says again and again. which isn't true. the real mess was inherited by
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barack obama in 2008. right in the middle of the great recession, he inherited a mess and helped us build our way out of it and the president of the united states now donald trump having not inherited a mess needs to portray that mess. he needs to say, yes, here's the story that i'm going to tell you which is that the country was a disaster. he said it again with chuck on sunday. and i rode in on my white horse and i'm saving the country. i'm making america great again. it's not based in fact as steve has laid out, but the story he needs to tell to portray any sense of success of his presidency. >> and this morning's sports analogy, because i know you need a sports analogy, mika. team obama takes the ball on the five yard line, drives it the length of the field to about the ten yard line. the other ten yard line. and then the team trump takes it over the goal line after carrying it ten yards and says,
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oh, look how great i am. the people that took it 85 yards are lousy. i mean, the question is, could trump have a 6.5, 7 year record of economic growth? we'll never find out, but i doubt it. >> it's worse than that, because trump is actually on the verge of taking the ball and throwing it into the grand stand. the economy is getting very weaker as we sit here today. you see manufacturing starting to go down. you see things weakening all over the economy and it's directly really attributable to the trade war and to all of the other economic policies that are really -- we could have a recession very easily in the next -- >> and jim vandehei a lot of businesses and ceos are giving money to donald trump because of the economy. >> they are. like to your broader conversation, the unfortunate thing you go back to '08 and you had -- you basically did you had republicans and democrats save the economy from the economic collapse. then you had basically that
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cheap money ever since, we had tons of liquidity from here, europe and other places and during that time we haven't had a conversation that goes back to the chart that ratner had which is even with a tiny increase in wages, most people were still looking at a 20, 30 year run where, yes, the rich are getting super rich. so ceos are killing it but most people are getting a puny raise if anything. that is structural. there's something going on with capitalism going on right now that deserves a serious debate. with all of the money we're pumping out, yet the average worker is still getting screwed. that worker is part of the trump base. and there has to be more discussion about how the hell do you get it to the point where everyone else can benefit from capitalism and benefit -- >> there's the insanity. the insanity of trump's success and the obama trump counties is that you remember his final
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2 1/2 minute ad that bannon put out that international bankers basically and -- you know, one world economic system, world bank that's leaving everybody behind. well, donald trump said and steve bannon said he was going to change that and his policies were going to help the people that are fleeing trump counties now. all we've gotten is -- we have gotten tax cuts that help multinational corporations and i mean, hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars of tax cuts for the biggest corporations on the planet. amazon.com. i think tammy baldwin said that amazon paid less -- she said amazon actually paid no taxes last year. >> no taxes. >> so amazon gets more of a tax cut from donald trump than the entire state of wisconsin. i mean, that's the world we're
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living in and yet they're still sitting and going, donald trump is shaking things up. no, he's going to mar-a-lago and telling his billionaire friends i just made you all a lot richer today by signing the tax bill. that's not shaking things up. that's feeding -- >> kind of what we have seen. >> that's feeding, you know, millions of dollars into the mouths of your billionaire buddies. >> and not to be a total downer but like a reckoning is coming. a reckoning is coming. we have ten years of growth that just doesn't last. like at some point we're going to hit a recession, some time in the next one to three years and we'll hit a recession at a time where we have really, really high government debt. so there's not that much you're going to be able to do on the stimulus side and you can't lower the interest rates lower than they are right now. they are good times by historical standards but they're not going to roll forever. when that reckoning comes my fear is that it's those
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communities that get hit the hardest. the ones that didn't benefit from the wave and from the lift. >> all right, jim vandehei, thank you very much. coming up, president trump is blaming democrats for the crisis at the border. but today the house is expected to vote on an emergency aid package that will address the humanitarian crisis. we'll talk to gene about his pointed piece concerning the reality of trump's america. "morning joe" is back in a moment. hmm. exactly.
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>> all right, jim vandehei, reality of trump's america. >> all right, jim vandehei, reality of trump's america
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what's happening down at this texas border patrol station and specifically because this is breaking now where you're moving 300 children. what is going on there? >> well, i have to refer to the secretary of homeland security because those are his
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facilities. when i get if kids across the border and we put them in shelters while we work quickly to try to place them with sponsors here in the united states. usually family members that they already have here in the states a and get them placed there. >> health and human services secretary alex azar was speaking yesterday and telling nbc news that almost 300 migrant children have been removed from a border patrol detention facility in texas after reports of dirty and potentially dangerous conditions. the children who were removed were being held at a border station in clint, texas. according to the director of the immigrants rights clinic at columbia law school, some were wearing dirty clothes, covered in mucous or urine, teen age children were stained with breast milk. and no soap and they had not
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showered or bathed since they crossed the border. some of them more than three weeks ago. there was a stench that emanates from some of the children because they haven't had an opportunity to put on clean clothes and to take a shower. dhs officials tell nbc news the children have been taken to a tent detention camp in el paso, texas, where they'll remain under the custody of border patrol until they can be placed with the department of health and human services. >> gene, your latest piece for "the washington post" is entitled this is the reality of trump. it's crossed the line from gratuitous cruelty to flatout sadism. perhaps he enjoys seeing innocent children warehoused in filth and squalor. perhaps he thinks that's what america is all about. is he right, trump supporters, is he right republicans in congress? is this what you want?
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this is a humanitarian crisis of trump's making. a president who panders to his base by seizing billions of dollars from other programs to build the big, beautiful wall also panders to his base by cruelly treating brown skinned migrant children like sub humans do not like away. this is the reality of trump's america. deal with it. >> so gene robinson let me ask you the question that joe was posing yesterday which is what exactly does donald trump get out of this? if this is his idea of looking tough at the border, is this his idea of being tough on illegal immigration? is this his idea of showing the base he's delivering on promises from the 2016 presidential campaign? why would he -- i understand some of the moves, he wants to talk about the wall and pretend the wall is happening. pretend he's delivering on that promise. but to have children, 300
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children in dirty diapers and unshowered and their mothers having to have other children take care of their kids, what does the trump administration get out of this? >> i think all of the above. i think -- look, the administration has been treating migrants and asylum seekers and their children as roughly, as badly, as disgracefully as they possibly can as a potential deterrent. they think it's a deterrent. it's not working, it's not a deterrent. it's obscene. i mean, every once in a while something gets to you and this one really gets to me. the descriptions of the conditions that the lawyers who saw this facility found these children in is just appalling. this is the united states of america. you know, land of the free, home of the brave. my goodness, this is -- this is
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obscene. "the washington post" columnist rezaian who was kept in russia's worst prison for more than a year he had toothpaste. he was taken to have a shower every other day. this is -- this is not the way people treat prisoners in third world countries and it's not the way people treat children anymore. it is obscene and this is what people are supporting and allowing in this country. it is -- it is just appalling and it is imperative that we and others stay on this story. it's not just that facility in clint, texas. there was another report over the weekend from a different facility in mcallen. a doctor gained access to the children there and said they're being held without adequate food, without adequate medical attention. with epidemics of flu and head
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lice in the camp -- in the place. and something she likened it to conditions of torture. i mean, we're torturing children. this is just incredible. this is our country? >> yeah. and elise, if the idea here as gene suggests is deterrence. if the trump administration believes this makes them look tough it's not working. last month for the fourth consecutive month the border patrol announced it had broken a record at the apprehensions at the border. if this is looking tough and i don't know in what universe this looks tough, it's not working as a strategy. >> you know, i'd hope that even if a republican with the hardest of heart when it comes to border security would be moved by the incredible suffering of innocent children on the border, and i think it's time that in the media we start asking who's making money off of this? who's profiteering, what are the companies that have set up these
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camps and are contracting from the government, a company that john kelly left the white house and joined the board of one of the very companies and we need to be asking those hard questions about who's profiteering off of this suffering. >> and how remarkable that you actually have trump supporters saying, it's not my problem. their parents shouldn't have brought them there, as if a 2-year-old should walk around in a diaper that -- it's dirty and have mucous smeared all over him and her at 2 years old because of something their parents did? >> joe, i'm getting those -- i'm getting those emails and those twitter replies today from -- >> does that make them -- does that make them sleep better at night? it shouldn't let them sleep better at night. the sins of the parent shouldn't be passed down to the children.
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would they hope their children would be treated better than this? >> do they ever crack those bibles they keep by the bed stand? and they swear to believe and do they ever open them up and read them and by the way, these children are classified as unaccompanied minors. most of them are arriving with a sibling, with an aunt or uncle. some other relative. they're taken away from them and they're -- and they're held together and you get the situation where in clint, texas, 8-year-olds are trying to take care of 2-year-olds because there was not adequate supervision. it's just -- it's just not -- >> it's unhuman. as you said, the iranian treat their prisoners better than this. >> last week we talked about trump's refusal to apologize to the central park 5 and who were shown to have been wrongly accused. it got us thinking about trump's
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relationship with the african-american community, pandering when it suits his purposes and flat out racist when it suits his needs. that "morning joe" investigation is just ahead. we're back in two minutes. t ahe. we're back in two minutes. biopharmaceutical researchers.
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on the supreme court will you put forward a nominee between now and the election if there's an opening on the supreme court? >> would i do that? of course. do you have any recommendations? >> well, you have a big long list? >> yeah, i have a beautiful list of great, very talented people. absolutely. >> but do you square that with garland? >> no, i have a lot of respect for judge garland, by the way. >> welcome back to "morning joe." tuesday, june 25th. eugene robinson is with us and joining the conversation we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle, former adviser to president george w. bush and executive producer of "the circus" on
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showtime, mark mckinnon. and now an msnbc news analyst claire mckaskel is with us. and from wbur in boston and msnbc contributor kimberly atkins joins us as well. we're one day away from some of the 2020 democratic candidates taking the stage for the party's first debate. isn't it two days? is it one day away? it's tomorrow night. >> tomorrow night. >> okay. >> exciting. >> we'll be there. >> this is -- >> my gosh, we're headed there tomorrow. >> like spring training is over. >> that's it. yes. a number of the candidates have been busy leading up the contest, preparing to face off with their fellow candidates. according to "the new york times," former vice president joe biden has been studying for the debates for weeks. according to people familiar with his preparations, "the times" says he has been reading through briefing books and engaging in rehearsal sessions. the paper adds that some of the former vps closest political
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allies have urged him to do his best to avoid arguing with other candidates, even if they attack him. meanwhile, "the times" sources say that senator bernie sanders has been the least interested of the candidates in participating in intensive predebate drills. the paper says that sanders has been reading written policy briefings prepared by advisers but has resisted certain kinds of debate drills as his advisers discussed whether to aggressively go after biden. sources close to senator cory booker tell "the times" he has been holding extended study sessions, breaking up the preparations by doing push-ups and even getting one practice session into a car ride between washington, d.c. and his home state of new jersey. >> very specific. >> really doing push-ups, come on, guys. >> you have to -- >> push-ups, i'm saving a baby. >> and telemundo, tomorrow and thursday night, starting at 9:00
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p.m. eastern. new polling released suggests that joe biden's controversial comments about working with segregationist senators has had little to no impact on the race. >> the morning consult weekly tracking poll from last monday through sunday shows biden with 38% and the same 19 point lead from the week before. bernie sanders remains in second place with 19%. elizabeth warren is up two points to 13% with pete buttigieg at 7, kamala harris at 6. beto o'rourke at 4. >> a sub sample from the early contest states found that biden gained three points from last week, up to 43%. bernie 22 points behind at 21%. warren at 9%, buttigieg, harris and klobuchar is trailing. >> and joe was doing push-ups while reading that. amazing. >> you know -- >> yeah. >> no, i don't need that detail.
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so anyway, willie, biden. no impact by last week's dustup. in fact, in the early states he picked up three points. >> he survived his two biggest challenges so far, the first was a couple of months ago when the women came through and said he had made them feel uncomfortable over the years. survived that in terms of polls anyway and again last week. the numbers have really hardened up and down when you look at it. biden about 19 or 20 points ahead with bernie and elizabeth warren sort of clustered there. then falls off the table after that. >> elizabeth warren is really the story in the past month. you have joe biden, bernie sanders and now elizabeth warren right now is in third place. and that seems to be -- those are the front-runners right now in just about every poll. >> as you talked about it, mark, in the context of the debates coming up in first night when joe biden is not on the stage, it's really elizabeth warren who's in that first page. you have beto o'rourke on there
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and cory booker as well, but really only elizabeth warren in the first group. how does she -- she doesn't get a chance to directly address joe biden. how does she handle those questions on the stage when it's really the people next to her who aren't at her level at this point? >> well, but that's exactly the point. they aren't at her level and she can show through the policy dominance and being assertive about her experience. she can dominate the stage. i think it's a real advantage for her actually. the point about the debates they are a big deal. yes, we're a year and a half out and people aren't paying attention. but there's really three times during a campaign when you have an opportunity to move the dial in sort of a wholesale way. when you announce it's during the debates and when you have the convention, your convention speech. this is a huge opportunity and, you know, somebody is going to dominate the news cycle for days or a week or so. >> so let's take amy klobuchar. we can talk about just about every other candidate, 5% or less. you're going up against a guy who's polling in the high 30s,
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low 40s. if you're in amy's spot or cory or beto's spot and there are so many people up on the stage, what are you thinking today about how you break through in the little time you have to break through in the debate? >> well, i think the challenge is how do you try to swing for the fences. >> right. >> without making a fool of yourself. >> but you have to -- >> or even worse, just really a measly tiny pop up to the picture. >> let's face it, even a hard hit single if we'll stick with this metaphor -- it does you no good at 2%. >> what the polling should show people it's not enough to go after biden. cory booker didn't move at all. >> it hurts you at all. >> people know him. >> it causes crowds -- it makes the crowds uneasy. they don't want you go to go after biden because he may be the guy that has to beat trump. >> that's right. part of the problem is that these candidates below even
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including elizabeth warren, i would say this is my advice to her too. is you need to get america comfortable with who you are. because america doesn't know you very well. they aren't sure who you are. they aren't sure where you came from. i would think it would be more important -- you know, the reason that bernie and joe are so far ahead of everybody is because america knows who they are. they don't know who the rest of the candidates are. >> how do you swing for the fences? >> i think you have to swing to the fences with humor, swing to the fences with people being comfortable that you're in command of the policy. but not so in command of the policy that you're not relatable. that's elizabeth's challenge frankly sometimes. you know, she comes very close to that professor i just wanted on the quiet. like i read the material, i get it, quit lecturing me. she has to be relatable and warm and all of them do. if they can come out of this distinguishing themselves from
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the others by virtue of promoting who they are as opposed to -- i don't think they'll move it by going after joe. i think it's obvious. >> and going up to the batter's box and beating the hell out of the pitcher. >> you have been in the campaigns so what do they do? >> you have to punch up. i think there are three ways to do it. punch up trump in a big way. if you punch up on biden will get you headlines. the other thing is to take on the party which is sort of a -- you know, a hickenlooper talk about where the party is going. those are the three big targets that can get you some headlines. >> mike? >> i think a lot of the democrats should stop looking at twitter and looking at the candidates and this is someone who has been on the ballot so she knows and what she just said is -- people know joe biden and they like joe biden. >> yeah. >> and i think there are four candidates who will see over a period of two nights who are well known in this country to a certain extent.
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and they are biden, bernie, elizabeth warren to some extent and mayor pete to some extent. they don't have to worry about the one vulnerability that might occur in both of these nights to all of the 20 candidates and that's the money spigot. if they don't do well, the money lessens and they're gone. they are gone. they'll be off -- they won't be at the next debate. several of the candidates. that's one thing that everybody has to factor in to. >> and that's why kimberly atkins, you know, people are saying, oh, it doesn't matter. you know, tell beto that this debate doesn't matter or tell cory or tell other people who are going to be having their fec reports coming out very soon. if they don't do well, if they don't have an excuse to call the top donors and say, hey, i deserve your money, a lot of these people, kimberly, aren't they going to be out of the race in a month? >> yes, i mean, we are going to be seeing several of these folks
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this week for the first and last time on a debate stage. this is going to serve i think the most important thing about this first debate is that it will be the first factor that starts whittling this very wide race down to a smaller number. i mean, frankly a lot of voters have not tuned in yet. it's the middle of summer and i don't think that it's going to be something that could break someone if they give a wrong answer. but if they don't connect with voters, if they don't intrigue voters, don't give them a reason to check them out and give them a second look it can be really fatal. but i'm going to disagree a little bit about how joe biden doesn't really have to do that much here. i think especially on the night that he's on, he is going to be -- he has the support of a strong plurality of democratic voters who have tuned in so far. which is not a huge number of people. he's got to get a lot more folks on board if he wants to the oval office. he's going to be stand up there representing one side of the democratic party or just about
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everybody else around him is representing a different part of the democratic party that is far left. and i think his number one job is not to look like, you know, the old dated guy in the room. and i think that will be a challenge. that could be a challenge for him particularly if everybody else on the stage is pointing that out. >> gene, also on the stage on thursday night with bernie sanders and joe biden and mayor pete is a name -- a united states senator, kamala harris, whose name we keep hearing from people. i talked to people around president obama who ran those campaigns who say don't bet against kamala harris and yet she's sitting around in the mayor pete range, in the new poll, 6 or 7%. what can she do on thursday night? >> this can be a big, big moment for her because she needs to break -- break out of that sort of stasis there into the upper ranks if she's to have a chance.
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she should be a good candidate. i mean, you know, we know how good she is in a prosecutorial setting. i mean, we have seen her questioning people from the dais at senate hearings and she is -- you know, she's a stiletto, so she could be really good on the debate stage. you know, people have to get to know her. and she has to open up a bit more i think and let people in. that's a criticism i have heard about her. that she's too buttoned down. she needs to be -- i guess relatable is the word. the other person for whom i think thursday night is going to be really important is mayor pete. pete buttigieg is -- you know, a lot of people know a lot about him now but a lot of people don't. one thing people are aware of this week is he left the campaign trail to go home to south bend, indiana, to deal
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with a police shooting there. white police officer shot and killed an african-american in south bend. there's a lot of community upheaval and reaction to this shooting which a lot of people thought was not justified. in their questions about whether -- what he's done and not having done enough to diversify the south bend police department while he was mayor. i mean, the big issue is not just his relationship with african-american voters. but also, he's a mayor of a town of 100,000 people. he's asking to become president of the united states. and so -- >> that's a lot. >> how well you do that job for 100,000 people is totally relevant to how much faith people should put in you to run the country. >> so mark mckinnon, just wrapping up the discussion on the debate for a lot of
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candidates it's trying to make news. but for joe biden is maybe the point to not make news? >> yeah, a bit. i think a lot of what pompeoplee in biden, most people know him better than anybody else. he has to add something else and i think the other thing that appeals with biden for a lot of people, they -- as we were talking about earlier, you know his sort of slogan is keep america calm again and that's a time that we remember, not so crazy. that's the thing, calm, keep it in the box. >> experience. >> that's his strategy. >> mark mckinnon, thank you. coming up, senator dick durbin has been a leading voice on immigration reform. we'll get his take on the president's deadline for deportations and the appalling treatment of children on the southern border.
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plus, the host of msnbc's "a.m. joy", joy reid will join us. she is out with a new book "the man who sold america, trump and the unraveling of the american story." "morning joe" is back in a moment. ♪ ♪ this simple banana peel represents a bold idea: a way to create energy from household trash. it not only saves about 80% in carbon emissions... it helps reduce landfill waste.
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this election is a verdict on whether we want to live in a country where the people who lose an election, refuse to concede and spend the next two years trying to shred our constitution and rip your country apart. if you want to know how the system is rigged, just compare how they came after us for three years with everything they have versus the free pass they gave to hillary and her aides. our radical democrat opponents are driven by hatred, prejudice
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and rage. they want to destroy you and they want to destroy our country as we know it. >> and that is what i have been calling ground noise. >> yes. >> that is ground noise. the sound and fury signifying something and we sit here shocked and stunned and deeply saddened by it but as jim vandehei said earlier it's losing its kick. it's losing its resonance. if you talk up here for three years and talk about hillary clinton, like after a point it just stops. >> yeah. >> sinking through. you hit your 35%. that's it. >> that was a little limp. that was president trump one week ago, officially kicking off his 2020 campaign in florida. our next guest takes a closer look at why trump's candidacy last time succeeded and what it could mean for the future of the
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country. joining us know, the host of "a.m. joy" right here on msnbc, joy reid. joy-ann reid. "the man who sold america, trump and the unraveling of the american story." >> how did it happen? i mean -- so you have written a book. what's -- so putin and comey and -- >> it was a combination. i mean, with donald trump he kind of hit the perfect sweet spot. there was a lot of resentment that built up around president obama's existence, right? there were people who saw in that the physical embodiment of the demographic change that makes people uncomfortable. what happened while barack obama was running the consensus in that summer was touting the fact that america would become a non-white country and this was in the news while barack obama was coming up. so you had a lot of people who see this country as having shifted inexorably away from
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them, white christians they feel they're becoming the minority and are afraid. so donald trump takes perfect advantage of that for a few reasons. one, he was famous, as a famous person he got a pass on him on things that seemed scary or negative or bad. he's famous. that means he's a media guy and he understands this business so he knew how to use the media to get ahead. but i think the main reason donald trump -- >> by the way, he still does. >> he still does. >> every day. every second. >> he tried -- >> we still haven't figured it out. nobody's still figured out -- you look at the interviews this weekend, last weekend. >> yeah. >> still haven't figured it out. >> joe -- >> somebody wrote yesterday, if somebody is going in to the 20 minute interview and you have to cover 100 subjects, and you lie all the time, so many lies that they can't keep up with it, you start that game like 80 points ahead. >> incredible advantage.
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this weekend we were in south carolina for the famous jim clyburn fish fry. he may not read the briefing books but i guarantee you he knew the lineup of what was happening at the convention. you had kamala harris and elizabeth warren speaking. before kamala harris could get four words out he does a press conference about nothing, but he knows that the media's tick is we have to go and listen to him. look at me, look at me. so he's really good at that. and i think the main reason that donald trump is president is immigration. he channels that anger that people have about the immigration changing the country. because he feels it too. >> so joy, a couple of things that i just -- i can't square. first of all, a lot of people that voted for donald trump in some of the midwest areas voted for barack obama. just like a lot of people who voted for george w. bush twice voted for bill clinton. why did they vote for obama in '08 and trump in '16? secondly if you talk about immigration, barack obama was getting kicked around by latino groups for eight years because
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barack obama was really tough on border security. >> yep. >> border security was at a 50-year low when barack obama left office. now, it's out of control again. >> yeah. you know what? i think on the first thing, we interviewed a lot of the people for my show. we went to pennsylvania and ohio and philadelphia and places like that. >> missouri. >> we interviewed union guys that were two-time obama voters who when we left the little focus groups we knew five out of six of the guys were going to vote for trump. >> why? >> there are just voters in this country who tend to vote for the more populist candidate. romney versus obama, the more populist guy is obama. when it was hillary clinton in the primary versus obama, people thought obama. he's the more populist candidate. they vote against what they see as the more establishment candidate. i think with john mccain there was a weird combination of things. he was very popular with the media obviously and he was very popular with certain quarters of the republican party but he was following a republican president who a lot of people blamed for
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the economy tanking. so they were going for the guy who was going to change the economy. >> he was a disruptive force. barack obama was a disruptive force. >> he was anti-the iraq war. he was on the right side of the iraq issue and there were a lot of issues that the small group of people switched. but that was a small percentage of trump's volt. he got traditional republicans people who always vote for a republican. he got people who quite frankly had racial anxiety. a big part of his base. and he got more affluent republicans who wanted tax cuts. >> wow. >> as you write about in the book that people heard the phrase make america great again it meant an america that was slipping away would be reclaimed by the man and their lives are returning to what they were. i'm interested in the other side of it. what do you hear when you hear make america great again? >> i hear white christian men had dominion over everyone else. that's what i mean when i hear it. he's just a republican george
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wallace and that message has been resonant and has been potent for a long time. david duke used that message when he ran for governor of louisiana and george wallace used it. he had a good chunk of the -- at the time the democratic party. richard nixon used it. it's common message because you just do have a quarter, a third of the country that does not like the idea that we're becoming a more multiracial society. where women have a lot of asserted rights and where they're not on top. >> which by the way that's also a time that's associated with unparalleled post-war economic growth. >> that's right. >> all of our competitors economically their factors were all ruined so we had like 50% of industrial output and so the association with the '50s when it was an easier, simpler time and yeah, so a whiter time. a more economic -- >> but the union guys don't care and the middle class -- you
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know, this was about them getting into the middle class. they don't feel that's a very secure place for them right now. all the unions. >> all of the union jobs were kept from black people. people forget the new deal, all of the great war prosperity, black people weren't permitted in. even in the north the unions were white so the idea yes, this post-war prosperity, the memory that people have is of a white country. >> so joy, can you stay with us and we'll have a look at trump's relationship with the african-american community over the years. "morning joe" investigation. we'll be right back. "morning joe" investigation. we'll be right back. ♪ let's get down to business. the business of getting it done. the business of road trips. the business of getting everyone back together.
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and the best lte everywhere else. so you save hundreds of dollars a year on your wireless bill. xfinity mobile has the best network. best devices. best value. simple. easy. awesome. click, call or visit a store today. we wanted to take a deeper dive in to donald trump's relationship with the african-american community. in the 1970s the justice department sued donald trump's family business claiming they had refused to rent apartments to african-americans. and that was just the first chapter in trump's decades long ballencing act between demagoguery and money making. when it comes to sensitive racial issues. here is our report. >> new york city, 1989. donald trump capitalized on the
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outrage over a brutal rape in central park. taking out ads calling for the execution of five teenagers arrested for the crime. their mistreatment and eventual exoneration by dna evidence is the subject of a new netflix series. >> i hate the people that took this girl and raped her brutally. you better believe it. >> reporter: but decades later, president trump will not accept their confessions were coerced. >> you have people on both sides of that. they admitted their guilt. >> reporter: yet when mike tyson was convicted of rape in 1992, donald trump argued to keep tyson out of prison so he could keep fighting. potentially at trump's casino. >> i'm somebody as you all remember that came out with the ad on the death penalty. i believe strongly in the death penalty and i believe in law and order, but this is a case where i think mike tyson can accomplish a lot more and i think the court system can accomplish a lot more by helping
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other people. >> reporter: this is a trend with donald trump. there are times he praises a march of neo-nazis. >> very fine people on both side. >> reporter: yet markets himself to the black community, promoting his brand by socializing with african-american leaders, hip-hop stars who idolized his lifestyle in his lyrics. ♪ ♪ donald trump let me in ♪ resurrection not a real time >> reporter: in the '90s he dated a biracial victoria's secret model. >> i know cara young and she's really great. >> reporter: he was unafraid to call out racism and the reform party. >> david duke who just joined a bigot, a racist, a problem. >> reporter: meanwhile black celebrities and viewers helped turn "the apprentice" into a hit. >> you're fired. >> reporter: bloomberg reports that at his peak in 2010,
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trump's positive "q" score was with black audiences was 27 and among nonblack audiences it was just 8. but he traded that success to make a run at a different demographic. >> you're not allowed to be a president if you're not born in this country. he may not have been born in this country. >> reporter: becoming a birther and gaining a following in the party. >> you have people down there searching i mean in hawaii? >> absolutely. they cannot believe what they were finding. he was perhaps born in kenya. very simple. >> reporter: after he ran for president in 2016 -- >> you know what -- look at my african-american over here. look at him. >> reporter: trump denied any knowledge of the racist leader he once condemned. >> i don't know anything about duke. >> reporter: and tailored a condescending message to african-american voters. >> you're living in poverty, your schools are no good, you have no jobs. what the hell do you have to lose? >> reporter: a significant drop
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in black turnout helped seal trump's victory. as even the opposition rallies seemed unenthusiastic. >> i don't have any ill will towards him, but his conversation is divisive. >> reporter: now the president who told lawmakers in the oval office that haiti and nations in africa are s-hole countries and duke gives thanks for that same man has the audacity to ask black voters to thank him. >> the african-american unemployment rate has reached the lowest level. in addition to that, kanye west likes me. >> reporter: it seems it's all just another transaction for donald trump. joy, hard to keep up. i will say -- whiplash. the number that jumps out at you is that at the height of "apprentice" his "q" rating with
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blacks, 27%. with whites, 8%. >> yeah. i mean -- the reality is unless you lived in new york in the 1980s and experienced donald trump, most people had no idea. you know, every friend that i have is black watched "the apprentice" and i didn't because i moved back here as a teenager in '88 and experienced howard beach and ben son hurst and donald trump. those kids were my age, a little bit younger than me, so i experienced him as a horrible man and i never wanted to watch "the apprentice." and a lot of what he did in florida he had all of the rappers, everyone was at his mansion at mar-a-lago because he wanted to put a thumb in the eye of the toni -- you know, the upward people that looked down on him. donald trump has two kinds of visions of black people. one, celebrities and sports stars that he wants to be around. and two, every other black person that he thinks is beneath him. and black celebrities are in one bucket, everybody else is in the
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other. >> so he rolled the dice on race and resentment and became president of the united states. he's president today. so out of this book, how do we undo this damage? >> well, so the bad news -- i interviewed a lot of people for this book. one of the things i wanted to do was to talk to both, you know, legal scholars, smart people from all over the world and just tried to ask them, can we fix this and undo it if we have a different president? and the answer i got back in general was that it's going to be very difficult. just like when you break the supply chains by doing tariffs and pulling out of international agreements, once they're buying soybeans from brazil, they keep buying from brazil. so the economic disconnection is difficult to undo. when i talked to those from south africa, from the congo, from the middle east, they said we don't see you guys the same way. like we always suspected that what you said about america and the song of america, that america is sort of the great,
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you know, uniter of the world, the leader of the world, we always suspected that there was something sinister behind it. that you wanted to take our oil and exploit us. we always suspected that but you guys really sold it really well. and obama particularly -- trump has now disabused the world of that notion. they see us as a lesser country. >> absolutely. our place in the -- you know, the world at this point has been taken down a couple of notches on a number of levels. i wonder if there's polling on exactly where the african-american community stands on trump now. kimberly atkins, what do you make of this relationship that he is balanced over the past second decades between himself and the african-american community and quite frankly that line, what do you have to lose, he was very proud because he felt that line worked. >> yeah. i think one important thing about that pitch that he -- that pitch that he made to african-american voters in 2016
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is that it really wasn't a pitch, right? what did he talk about substantively? he talked about crime. he talked about black people living in poor neighborhoods. he talked about basically living in awful squalor. and needing the federal law enforcement to go in to chicago because that was such -- he was describing black people in a way that was not my vision of how i grew up. i grew up in a tree-lined street in the suburbs. more black people live in the suburbs than in any other area. there are also black people in rural areas but it's just not reality. what it was a dog whistle. it was a dog whistle to people who are uneasy with people of color, who thought they weren't -- the noncolor people who thought that they were getting free stuff under obama and that wasn't true. i'm going to take care of the black people by sending the federal troops in to chicago and city scribe black people in the
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way you relate to and take care of you. it was more of that than an actual pitch to black people and as you pointed out in the piece the black vote was suppressed and we saw a lot of other people who were energized to get out and vote for him so it worked. >> 100%. >> as you look at that piece and you watch donald trump's relationship with african-american voters over the years and just african-americans here in new york city, joy is right when she says yes, he had a relationship with mike tyson maybe. maybe he had a relationship with jay z on and off or diddy or who ever was putting him in the songs. and he was calling for the death penalty for five young men who eventually exonerated. he was happy to do with it with high profile celebrities and singers but in practice he wasn't doing anything at all for african-americans in new york city. >> no, he wasn't. and really, it mattered in new york city. it didn't matter in the rest of the country.
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until really he got in to the whole birther thing. i think that's when people started -- you know, beyond the five boroughs started paying attention to donald trump. black people started to pay attention to him. not in a good way. because he was telling, you know, these ridiculous lies about the first african-american president. in a way that sought to delegitimize him. look, as we look ahead to the election, black women voters are -- if they ever had anything to do with donald trump they're done with him. i mean, he's going to get no votes from black women. he got a few votes from black men last time around. i think he will get fewer. i don't know what that is about. it may be a certain sort of faux machismo that he tries to project and it may be all the bling that he so ostentatiously
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displays in a certain sort of attitude that -- of gangsta that he tries to show. but i think it's basically -- to an extent there was a relationship i think it's over. i think it's over and done with. i don't know if joy agrees but i think it's done. >> yeah, it is done. and i think for african-american men if you go back and you look at the elections over the last even 30 years,s -- republicans have managed to get between 11 and 14% of the black vote going back to running game and that's a consistent built in number. i don't think it's anything specifically about donald trump. part of it is an anti-immigrant sentiment within some of the african-american community that feels that the competition for jobs has -- does have something to do with the immigration. that's not factually true but a lot of people believe that and i think that helped him to get some more african-american votes. there's a combination of that, voter suppression obviously particularly in states like
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wisconsin where 300,000 people were disenfranchised. we didn't talk about the russia angle but part of what they did -- if you read the mueller report it lays it out in detail was an intense social media campaign aimed at black people. aimed at trying to get african-americans to be demoralized. to not vote. to not come out and vote. races like claire mccaskills were impacted by it, that hillary clinton is evil. those messages were being piped in to african-american social media and it was very pointed and directed. people faking and pretending to be black in order to start arguments and conversations that would make people not vote. so there was a campaign. i think one thing we have to realize our racial baggage, one of the reasons i wrote this book is it's -- racism is not just an ephemeral consent but a national security threat to the united states. foreign countries that want to meddle and mess with our elections know the way to get in, race. tap in to racial resentment and target racial minorities with lie. >> the book is called "the man
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who sold america, trump and the unraveling of the american story." joy-ann reid, thank you very much. kimberly atkins thank you for being on the show this morning. still ahead, amid rising tensions in the middle east, president trump says he doesn't believe he needs congressional approval to strike iran. we'll talk to congressman and vice chair of the house armed services committee anthony brown about that next. just a reminder on thursday we're live in miami to break down all of the big moments from the first presidential debate. same thing for friday after another ten candidates hit the stage. also, joe and i will be in coral gables alongside daniella, willie, want to come? we're having a big -- >> can we stop for a second? can we stop for a second? the guy who has the highest "q" rating among all of us -- >> like trump in the '80s. >> he'll be there.
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willie geist is going to be there. >> i love it. >> you know what we'll do since you're coming? we're going to go to the fontainebleau hotel and project your image up on the hotel. just like the saudis projected trump. >> that's helpful. all right. part of another busy -- >> have the sword dance to see if we can get bannon in the middle to make him uncomfortable. >> globe lights. >> part of another busy week for know your value.com. how women can boost your negotiating skills. so come join us this thursday by getting your tickets at know your value.com. we'll be right back. (woman) when you take align,
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compare comcast business to your current provider. my current service provider does not provide half of what you provide. and to know that i could save money? i'd be thrilled. this sounds like a whole business package, which would be incredible. so what are you guys waiting for? let's do it. (laughs) comcast business gives you a full suite of products with great performance and value. get fast, reliable internet on the nation's largest gig-speed network for less than at&t. that's 120 dollars less a year. better, faster. i mean sign me up. comcast business. beyond fast. i like the idea of keeping congress abreast but i wouldn't have to do that. >> sure. nancy pelosi actually said you must have congressional approval so you disagree with her on that? >> i disagree. i think most people seem to disagree, but i do like keeping
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them -- they have ideas that -- intelligent people they'll come up with some thoughts i actually learned a couple of things the other day while we had our meeting with congress which i think is helpful to me. but i do like keeping them abreast but abreast but i don't have to do to illegally. >> president trump says he does not need to get congregational approval to launch a military against iran. joining us now from maryland, a veteran of the iraq war and received the bronze star. he is set is to join a bipartisan position in the house that would prevent a war with iran on the basis of 2001 authorization of the use of military force. >> thank you for joining us. this has been a debate going on 30 years, 40 years. at what point does congress take its power back?
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>> today, i'm joining other represents in an bipartisan effort. we are going to clearly state in this amendment that the 2001 aumf that allowed us to go into afghanistan against the taliban and al qaeda does not a fly if the president makes a decision to introduce force in or around iran. if that is his intention, he has to confer with congress and under most circumstances will have to get authorization from congress. now, we have a growing bipartisan group of legislatures willing to enforce that. i believe we are going to make it happen in the house. i'm a little disappointed about what happened yesterday in the senate but that is our goal. >> congressman brown, what do you anticipate if donald trump had to make the case for war and pass a new aumf.
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would you be able to rally support for another war on another front? >> these are all condition based. if there is an attack against u.s. territory possessions or the armed forces. clearly, he would have support in order for americans. in this escalation in the middle east. the chaos we witnessed last week with the decision to launch a strike and at the last minute to revoke those instructions, he's going to have to make a clear case. he's got to make it first and foremost to congress but he ought to make it feveriously with getting the support. >> help us bottom line what we are watching. i think a lot of people in this country are nervous and have
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fresh in their mind the memory of the iraq war and the faulty intelligence that led to so many deaths in that country there in iraq. what is your level of concern that there might be an armed conflict now? >> my concern is that the president is going to stumble into war. the last few weeks, we received briefings about ma lined behavior. keep in mind, they've been engaged in this behavior for 30 years. with the escalation of the u.s. president, naval vessels, intelligence assets. automatic of this being reported by the administration, you run the risk that he's going to strike against iran. it could be in any domain. that iran, which is very
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unpredictable which would in turn lead to a response. i can tell you that this would be much more costly than it was in iraq. iran and ready and able to respond to military action by the united states, it will be costly. >> congressman, what is the status of the bill. $4.5 billion aid package for the crisis at the border. where does it stand. that is going to have funding
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for the medical needs, adequate shelter need and food addressing this horrific condition. there is a crisis at the border not created solely by the fact that migrants are moving north it is created by this crew policy of deterrents. >> you've reported on it today by the clinton facility. >> no one should vote against this. this is not about supporting the border wall or a more robust i.c.e. or border protection activity. this is about bringing direct relief. medical, food, shelter and need.
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as we talk through with all members of the caucus and members of the republican conference what we are trying to achieve, more and more are beginning to support this effort. this is not about a border wall or more i.c.e. enforcement. this is about children living in deplorable conditions we need to address immediately. >> one of the things that needs to be pointed out is the way trump selectively blames congress. he doesn't need congress when he needs to build a wall, he just goes in and raids and exerts extreme executive power. then we have children that don't have soap or toothbrushes, he says it is congress's fault because they haven't given me the money. that alone should ignite the congress. how dare he blame congress when he ignores congress when he
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needs billions and billions to campaign on on the subject of the war. >> absolutely right, look. there is disagreement on how we secure the border. president wants a magnificent border wall. we believe we can vest in other technology and 21st century techniques. congress has no objection to. this week, if not today, we will introduce a supplemental appropriation to address the crisis. it is horrific the reports about children in dirty clothes without tooth paste, without toilet paper, without towels. at mcallen, those conditions are bad. what i saw fails as to what has been reported. >> still ahead, joe biden faced
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criticism from hopefuls last week over his comments about working with segregationist senators. the former vp is still sitting at the top of the polls. the number two democrat in the senate dick durbin. we'll be right back. l be right .
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comey and repeated, i need loyalty. >> you will always get honesty from me. >> that's what i want, honest loyalty. >> if you are not going to read it, they are. >> a star-studded cast. >> my goodness, why don't we have robert mueller read there as well. >> that was in new york city last night. a live performance of the reading. the search for the truth adapted portions of the 448-page report. annette benning naturrated the one-night performance as kevin kline and john lithgow took
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part. >> good morning. with el come to our guests. former treasury official, msnbc political analyst. we are one day away from the first democratic debate. a new polling released overnight suggests that joe biden's controversial comments has had little impact on the race. the morning weekly tracking poll last monday through sunday shows biden with 38% and the same 19-point lead from the week before. bernie sanders remains in second place and pete buttigieg at 7%. harris at 6%, o'rourke at 4% and
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booker at 3%. a sub sample even found biden gaining three points up to 43%. bernie sanders is 22 points behind at 21%. warren at 9% with buttigieg, harris, booker, o'rourke trailing. what do you make of those numbers? >> they are strong for biden. i called you yesterday not only because i love talking to you in the afternoon while i'm having my mint julip. >> you guys don't have time for this. that's just weird. that did not happen. >> it is really weird because i'm in the co-op.
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upper east side is all white brick. >> i walk upstairs and he's lying in bed talking to him. weird. >> i tell you what. i called because i had been hearing throughout the day growing concern about joe biden. he's not up to it, he's too old. the remarks last week. and yet, you look at reverend al, john lewis and jim clyburn, a lot of civil rights heroes said about him. they are fine with him. it looks like voters in the early states are fine with him. >> i thought he was hon his game. as i said to you, in a way,
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trump lowered expectations. he sent out all these tweets about sleepy joe and low iq joe. he w he was crisp. it was fine. he had these couple of remarks in the middle. the black establishment, for lack of a better word, rallied around him. >> even cory booker was asked, do you think joe biden is a racist? he said absolutely not, he just said a couple of unfortunate things. we'll see how it goes. >> obviously donald trump is helping joe biden's cause by attacking him seemingly
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everyday. do you want to hear more on this? >> my it and then go on. alex is saying we need to read a script. >> i know, i'm new here apparently. >> we don't read scripts. >> blame it on dan. >> i have to set it up a little bit. >> let's get an actor in here that read the mueller report. i want lithgow. >> president trump is continuing his attacks -- you see i'm reading -- commenting on the former's vice president's mental health adding that is the real reason the former president obama hasn't endorsed him.
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>> there has to be some reason he isn't endorsing him. it is rather a big secret. if you know the answer, please let me know. could be president obama knows something but there is something going on in that brain of his. >> that brain of his. just projection. >> as long as donald trump keeps talking. >> the bigger point is when democrats see that, they are thinking, donald trump scared of joe biden. she survived that hit and keeps going up. >> that feels like that ground has already been walked over and hashed and rehashed. with joe biden, donald trump is doing him such a favor.
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when he is making crazy comments about joe biden. no one is noticing that joe biden isn't actually talking to the press and giving interviews and is letting his bad comments overtake the news cycle, why doesn't he get out and say the things. >> the context is that joe biden is old. planting some seed of doubt, after the president just turned 73 years old. >> everyone running the united states is in their 70s. >> are you sure trump is 73. >> think about this. this is crazy. >> i'm working here and it is
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not easy. i'm tired. 73. mcconnell is 79, 77. pelosi, 79. joe biden, 76, 77. >> clyburn, 78. >> chuck schumer is a kid. he's only like 68 or 69. >> if you can't figure out just how long they've been alive, just about every one of them. they all could have gone to high school with buddy holly. think about that.
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>> if you look at the polls, numbers seem to have hardened in place. i'm curious for your take. his support among african-american voters hasn't changed either. he got the support of clyburn and lewis and men he worked with in congress over a generation or two now. what is your view of joe biden and the way he handled it. >> first of all, let be back up. this show has a script? nobody told me. >> sometimes. >> anyhow, i digress. look, african-american voters are among the most pragmatic and real politic voters there are.
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i think what is going on is that a lot of people still think he's the guy ta can beat donald trump. he continues to benefit he's been around and i noted in the column and others noted, i don't think anybody would say that joe biden is racest. there are people that would say he is 76 years old and whatever. the reference to the segregationist senators was more than unfortunate. he could have picked a bunch of
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conservative republicans to talk about how he worked with them and got along, don't go all the way back there, i think he's over that with this most important con tight uent. that doesn't seem to be holding up in the numbers. >> coming up, a rape allegation isn't enough but then you have the president's response. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. i wanted more from'll be ri.
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she's not my type. which has so many things wrong with it. writer e. jean carroll claims in a new book that trump forced himself on her while in a dressing room 23 years ago. during an interview yesterday, trump said i'll say it with great respect. number one, she's not my type -- >> wait, wait. that's with great respect? that is really --s th that's wh you start? she's not my type? >> that's typical donald trump. >> we are talking about rape here. so what is his type? >> he said what he likes to do.
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e. jean carroll told a story fully in keeping with the behavior pattern donald trump told in his own words. >> we are talking about sexual assault and actual rape and the president said she's not his type. the follow up question is, since you have a type when it comes to rape, what is your type donald trump and to any of the other women. >> and thank you for saying rape. what was described in that story was rape. >> george conway said this, we republicans brought up rani ranita brodwick denied it a number of times.
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there wasn't an on air confession like donald trump's confession that does line up consistently with what happened there. with that being said, a lot of democrats out there saying, wait a second, joe biden placed his hands on a woman's shoulders and that got more press than an allegation that donald trump raped somebody. the allegation that joe biden made someone feel uncomfortable got far more attention. the question is why? let's just put candidate a and b. saying he's going to have to be driven from the race. somebody who said he placed his hands on their shoulder and it
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made her uncomfortable that is a good question to ask. saying if you are famous, can you do whatever you want to do. you may disagree with me. if there are so many allegations and so much baked in on the misconduct and allegations of rape. >> no. the problem is republicans. republicans in congress and the senate supporting this president who will not say anything to defy him. i'd like to put this to you and say you have a president who want on national television and said he would accept dirt from a foreign government and put this country at risk.
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and now he has said when accused of rape that this is not the woman he would rape. i want to know why you would go back and say you dispute this man is you explain why that is okay. you go on looking in the mirror doing your job. trump went on to ad that his accuser is totally lying. i know nothing about her. it's a terrible thing that people can make statements looic that. carroll responded shortly after. take a listen. >> i love that i'm not his type. he's denied all 15 women who
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have come forward. he denies, turns it around, threatens and attacks. >> we know he does. this was the guy that went on howard stern and said he'd like to have sex with the dead princess because he likes her skin. this is a guy who basically said he'd like to date his daughter because she's hot. constantly rating women on a scale of 1 to 10.
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it is all on tape. all of these evangelical christians, christians. it is all on tape. spoken in a way that evangelical childrens have been teaching thirn childr their children how not to speak. the question is why would they care now? even after the rape allegation? >> it is breathtaking. what about the evangelicals? even vice president pence, and there is your guy. there's the guy who says, well, if she were a different type, absolutely, i would definitely rape her.
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it is just incredible. you can't really bake rape into the cake. >> unless we hear from republicans today. >> you know who baked that into the cake? democrats and broderick. >> i disagree. >> not to throw cold water on the rain but. >> i disagree. we don't need to go there. thank you, bill. >> am i on the set of snl? >> i'm just saying, roni
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ronita broderick had very specific allegations. not a single republican that i worked with gave a damn. when it came time to speak out against the president, they wouldn't do it. the shoe now is on the other foot. it is just how sick politicians can be when they think their side can move forward. >> i think part of what is upsetting you. what he's saying is this woman wasn't even worth rating. it is the low regard he holds so many women. his behavior and attitude towards women that permeates everything he does on a daily basis his entire life. >> he's done this before.
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the not my type defense is one trump used taking on another accuser. here he is in 2017 talking about people magazine journalist who claims trump forced himself on her. and jessica leads who accused him of groping her on a plane in the early 80s. >> she's doing this story on melania who is pregnant at the time. and donald trump, our one-year anniversary. she said i made inappropriate advances. look at her, look at her words. you tell me. i don't think so. >> i was sitting with him on an airplane. he went after me on the plane. yeah. believe me, she would not be my first choice, that i can tell
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you. you don't know. that would not be my first choice. can't see what it is yet.re? what is that? that's a blazer? that's a chevy blazer? aww, this is dope. this thing is beautiful. i love the lights. oh man, it's got a mean face on it. it looks like a piece of candy. look at the interior. this is nice. this is my sexy mom car. i would feel like a cool dad. it's just really chic. i love this thing. it's gorgeous. i would pull up in this in a heartbeat. i want one of these. that is sharp. the all-new chevy blazer. speaks for itself. i don't know who they got to design this but give them a cookie and a star.
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>> and children are scared. you are scaring the children of america. not just in those families but their names and the communities. you are scaring the children. >> house speaker nancy pelosi said she urged him to back off on the threat of deporting thousands of undocumented immigrants. she reached out to him as a mother trying to get him to understand. joining us now, the second ranking democrat in the senate. minority whip, dick durbin of illinois. these children at this point. i take it you say they are being used as bargaining chips. it is almost worse. i wonder what congress can do and the senate.
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>> two weeks ago, i read a letter sent to the red cross. that's how bad it is that we reached out to an international organization. then the president came out with his tweet. nancy pelosi is right. we are getting phone calls at our office in chicago. people are scared to death. is that what this president wants? >> what is the access to where these children are being kept? are you able to see them? why are these stories coming out in fits and starts about appalling conditions? how do we see these children, these human beings being held? >> you put your finger on it. a few weeks ago, i went down to el paso and had access to most
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of the facilities. not the ones holding small children. i saw the inhuman conditions which we are imposing on these people. now, we have to put into the law that is part of the appropriation that is supplemental to giving access to how these children are being treated. we had to put it into law that new position. >> let me ask you then, whom is responsible here. it seems like the buck has been passed out. yesterday, we had the head of hss saying go talk to dhs. who do you hold responsible? is. >> harry trueman was right when he said the buck stops here. look at his history. first he instituted the travel ban, then no protection under
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those with temporary status. he took those children away from their parents now calling for mass arrest. it is the president. make no mistake. we've had four different secretaries over home hand security. that is inexcusable. >> why, senator in a country as wealthy as the united states is, even if it is going to be a detention facility, a facility where there is hygiene, showers, food, diapers. why is that so difficult? is. >> the system has been overwhelmed. i will concede that. but to guarantee to these children basic human necessities, medical care, food, access to a clean shower. for goodness sakes, this is one of the most embarrassing chapters of our history under a
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president who believes if you get tough enough, you'll solve the problem. he's wrong. >> give us an 18 month autopsy why has not the united states senate spoken out more strongly and done things that were more effective than has happened up until now? >> there is no political sentiment when it comes to the leadership to do that. the democrats feel stongly about it. when terms of the republican senators, there are only a handful that can talk about dealing with this in a realistic way. it is my hope i can sit down with senator graham. i hope we can get started on approach. there are five different things i hope we can agree to immediately that can have a positive impact. if they are not successful, let's move to the next stage.
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>> so the senate can send money, billions to saudi arabia but we can't send diapers, tooth paste an soap to children? >> unacceptable. that's a fact. we gave millions to this president in february now we are up to nearly $5 billion in the emergency appropriations we passed last week 31-1. so we are prepared to move and do this but the president has to care. that's why speaker pelosi's message, a human, personal message is so important. >> the president made some incredible and disgusting
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comments about a woman who accused him of rain. the first thing he said, she's not my type as if there were a type that he would rape. i'm not sure why republicans can't be man or woman enough to say this is wrong. is there something they can do to make a collective message that this is not the way you speak and not fitting to the dignity of the presidency. what can be done about what he said which is rude and in some ways shows he's interested in committing a crime? >> i know how strongly you and others feel. >> i can't imagine who would disagree with my reaction.
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>> the president instead of a flat out denial started out saying he's not my type. that's not the first time he's said that. you showed some clips. the bottom line is, we've got to say this is absolutely unacceptable. dehumanizing. i hope some of my republican colleagues will join us. >> senator, i will switch gears going to their ally. locking at the "washington post." you have pompeo with bin salman this week. why do they insist on arm sales
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that congress has overwhelmingly disapproved had and voted against. >> because the trump administration has a personal connection with the regime. you see it when they killed khashoggi. the president made excuses for him all the way through and continue to act as if it is business as usual. we need a glimmer of hope where some republican senators are saying the continued relationship would continue. the president is completely smitten by the royalty in that region. first there was mulvaney and
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now a new acting chief of staff. we'll tell you about those details and about the president's frustrations. "morning joe" is back in a moment. when did you see the sign? when i needed to create a better visitor experience. improve our workflow. attract new customers. that's when fastsigns recommended fleet graphics. yeah, and now business is rolling in. get started at fastsigns.com.
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here we go. thank you. welcome back. in that exclusive interview yesterday, president trump declined to comment on whether he has confidence in fbi director wray. last morks he disagreed with the use of the term spying to describe the fbi's surveillance of trump campaign advisors. trump at the time called wray's answer ridiculous and said barr described the situation
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perfectly. yesterday, the president said he respectfully disagreed with wray and did not elaborate on his performance as head of the fbi. in that interview, president trump said he has the power to fire jerome powell. he said if i wanted to and adds that he has no intention of doing so. and he still has acting in his title. political reported that trump is tiring of nick mulvaney. four country and former senior administration officials say in recent weeks, trump has been snapping with some frequency and expressing greater frustration with him than usual. some express that mulvaney is not in danger of losing his job anytime soon, his treatment still signalsing the slow
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deterioration of their relationship has begun and notes several staffers murmoring. >> last week, he took those white house m&ms a whole handful. >> trump is wary to embark on another chief of staff search. the last one played out with two top candidates turning down offers. remember that young guy that was like, yeah, no. i'm not coming. mulvaney is the third chief of staff in two and a half years. >> stop talking. >> that might have been the end right there. >> this is why the deal with the devil working in the trump white house is a terrible deal. it might seem at the moment it
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is a good deal. >> i'm going to work in the white house. >> it doesn't end well. >> the problem also is that whatever approach you make doesn't work. if you are like nick mulvaney who has sacrificed everything you ultimately believed in. runner of the freedom caucus. he said, my job it to do what trump wants to do. a couple of things that happen once you leave the trump white house. very few people have left with their reputation still in tact,
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general maddox is one. pompeo seems to have figured out trump so far. >> i don't know. >> i think his reputation is completely shot. he knows better. unlike donald trump, he knows better. he knows military and history. i would say, and her name has gotten back in the news in the last couple of days. i would say nikki haley is the only person in the administration that has gone in there and maintained her reputation, her reputation actually as strong or stronger. >> which never happens, which
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shows you just how good of a politician nikki haley is that she's managed to pull it off. the administration loves to float her name because they want part of the glow. they know they sure aren't doing well with college educated women. >> that is an interesting discussion to have at some point, the white house would have never allowed that editorial to go forward. >> that was all part of a plan to float nikki haley out to take mike pence's place. there is a guy who is going to learn more than anything else the cost of the secrets. it is very badly for mike pence. >> up next, president trump with his first supreme court nominee. now the president is commenting on the potential to reshape the court again before the 2020
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prof: maria ramirez mom and dad: maria ramirez!!! to help more employees achieve their dreams. on the supreme court, would you put forward a nominee between now and the election if there is an opening on the supreme court. >> would i do that? of course. do you have any reck monodaomme? >> you have a long list, don't you? >> i have a great list of
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talented people. absolutely. >> do you square that with garland? >> no, i have a lot of respect for judge garland, by the way. i have to tell you that. >> joining us is coral, the author of "confirmation bias" inside washington's war -- >> so carl, what an important book. >> thank you. >> you conclude that the senate's advice and consent power is corrupted beyond the point of no return. >> well, i think that the partisanship that has erupted in these nomination fights and you see a great example of it right there with president trump saying well of course we're going to go ahead in 2020 and mitch mcconnell has already said that as well if there is an opening they would do it after in 2016 let the people decide and we're going to hold up merit garland. i think the nomination process is in real trouble and senator
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durbin was on your show earlier and i think would agree with me. >> where did it start? we conservatives would say it started with boric in '87. a lot of richard nixon's nominees got scuffed up. >> that's actually what got mitch mcconnell so interested in the supreme court. he was a young staffer on the judiciary committee but i also look a lot, joe, at after george w. bush was elected and estrada and the democrats started to filibuster appeals court nominees. what happens in the senate is once one side does something to one side, as soon as the other side gets the chance, they do it more. >> by the way, let's just slow everything down in this age of trump and remember what chuck schumer and what democrats did to miguel estrada because he was a hispanic conservative. what they also did to black nominees because they were conservative high nminorities.
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>> miguel estrada in my book say hey, that was a mistake, we shouldn't have done that. there is people that would be happy to have miguel estrada on the court right now. >> what about harry reid. >> the 2013 nuclear option, which, you know, he was frustrated so mitch mcconnell is blocking all obama's appeals court nominees to the circuit court. he detonates the nuclear option and changes it to majority only on most nominees and mitch mcconnell gets in and the first chance they get, they change it, eliminate the filibuster for supreme court nominee and that changes the dynamic. now you don't need a consensus. what you have is the courts increasingly poll liziz lly pol we'll see this in the next four hours as the court is winding up. they save the most politically charged ones for the end and i think you'll see some -- >> we're talking about lifetime
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appointments and merit garland remains a forever scar on the united states senate. >> the party in power has to take out the other nominee and back and forth we go. they pass on a party line vote without getting votes from the other side. is there any hope of pulling back to a place where it was advice and consent or are we in a death spiral? >> the death spiral. >> really? >> unfortunately. the last chapter of my book is about this. people say we should go back and restore the 60 vote rule but what you're seeing in the debates this week, democrats more focused on the court and they are focused on term limits for the court. let's get rid of the filibuster and expand the court. it's hard to go back, willie, when you get into these. >> the impact of the federalist society, don mcgahn, that's what happens in situations like this. >> right, right, it's funny you've been talking about the
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debates a lot today. the debate, scalia died when in 2016 there was a debate and drove a ton of decision making including mcconnell's decision making to not consider any nominee put forward by president obama. >> well, i'm excited to read the back history but then i quickly as soon as i got my book, i went to the kavanaugh chapters to read through the story of what went down in the fall. we all remember that brutal confirmation battle. don mcgahn really seems like he had such absolute influence. >> yeah, don mcgahn i think of running theme in my book. don mcgahn is a super interesting character because president trump is mad at him right now but the engineer of trump's big accomplishment. don mcgahn from get-go of this administration saw brett cav kavanaugh as their likely second
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pick after gorsuch and did everything he could to get him there and was successful and stuck with him, kept the votes in line and one of the interesting parts of the book is mcgahn and kavanaugh in the seconds before he goes out to testify says you've got to reboot the room here, you know. she did a good job. you have to really go out. this is what all the work you've done in your life is leading up to this moment. he went back and pushed back as we remember and saw on "saturday night live", as well. >> the new book is "confirmation bias" inside washington's war over the supreme court from scalia's death to justice kavanaugh carl. thank you very preciate it. enjoy the debates this week. >> i'm sorry i won't be there. i'll be selling books. >> we will and we will be selling books, too. we'll be in miami starting tomorrow and books and books so -- actually, we're going to getwillie's dad's book in
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there, it's doing well. that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage now. >> thanks so much. good morning i'm step knhanie e ruhle. it's 9:00 a.m. on the east coast and in 36 hours, the first ten 2020 democrats will take the big debate stage in miami. elizabeth warren, cory booker, and amy klobuchar and pete buttigieg, bernie sanders and as they make final debate prep there is no shortage of 2020 drama. pete buttigieg still in south bend facing more pressure from angry residents in the wake of a fatal police shooting of an unarmed black man but will that controversy make its way to the debate stage.

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