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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  August 27, 2019 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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leading the way in, and i really call them bungalows. do believe that the wheels are they hold from 50 to 70 very coming off this administration luxurious rooms with magnificent know, tour de nonforce, that and, unfortunately, the american rooms. we have incredible conference people are going to be paying rooms, incredible restaurants. appearance yesterday, the whole for it and we'll see what world got to see what we're happens to donald trump's it's like such a natural. the ballrooms are among the accustomed to seeing, actually, re-election. donald trump getting in front of a microphone and telling lie >> i'm going to end on, just as biggest in florida and the best. after lie, winging it, showing his obsessions, his knew roses it's brand-new. and my people wanted it. really struck by catalina cruz from my stand point i'm not in that interview about the doing to make any money. women who ran and won. much more on her at know your i don't want to make money. value.com. thanks everyone for joining us. i don't care about making money. and his inadequacies and his that does it for us this >> yeah, but how is the stunning in -- ignorance. morning. chris jansing picks up the chocolate cake? >> well, it's a good thing he coverage right now. >> isn't it great, mika, to have doesn't care about making money we see it a lot. and the world got to witness this conversation about these just who was in charge of the women doing things and moving because as has been reported forward and making policy? doral is in steep decline. it is a whole new world. the revenue is way down. it lost 69% revenues over the thank you. past two years. i am chris jansing in for >> so maybe he's not trying to stephanie ruhle. united states and the economy. the great world power that now it is tuesday, august 27th. profit. he's trying to like get it above water, who knows? here's what's happening. good morning. >> again, he doesn't care about this morning president trump is facing new questions about profits. as everybody has been saying is whether his big trip to the g7 you look at all of the essentially on the sidelines. for the united states to be actually moved us any closer to basically ineffective, solving the collection of big bankruptcies. he's given $400 million, he and growing global threats out there, particularly when the president's focus on his
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drives that into the ground and reputation as a deal maker becomes $9 billion in debt and ineffectual and not there in a seemed undermined by the lack of here we go again. but mika, this was such a bizarre news conference meeting of the g7 is a stunning, any actual deals. in fact, the president's remarks, particularly his yesterday, a bizarre weekend. stunning thing. yet, we can expect nothing 68-minute press conference that capped off the summit, raised the lies. i mean, all over the place. different as well as donald yesterday morning, when the president said we're going to trump is president i think and the other leaders consider doubts about whether he has a themselves fortunate that there was no sort of disaster at this clear grasp of those problems take to richard haass in a let alone a clear vision of how second about this, but just to to solve them. here is some of what he said. frame this show, yesterday morning when he said we got meeting and their whole attitude >> the united states which has calls from the chinese. >> china called. >> china called. never collected ten cents from >> right. >> now, that was a lie. china will we said it was a lie yesterday was let's get through this, morning without even having to we'll get on with our business hear from the chinese government and get on the best we can and there's a limited amount they can do without the united states that, no, they actually had not made phone calls to donald and that's how they have to proceed right now. trump. but he backed himself into that >> richard, we conservatives corner. criticize barack obama for talking about leading from he spent the entire weekend trying to get out of the corner behind. this is something completely because he figured out that he's different. i mean, we're not leading from the front. we're not leading from behind. we seriously have put ourselves actually -- his day trading has put america and american workers in a bad position and that's on the sidelines, on every going to put him in a bad significant issue impacting the position next year and he lied g7. >> and on the sidelines on about so many things. so many bizarre claims. trade, sidelines on climate. one of my favorites that melania has really grown to really like
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sidelines on russia. we have an approach to north korea that other people shrug kim jong-un -- their shoulders at. >> yeah. >> they have a wonderful this is a fundamental departure. relationship. of course, they had to be reminded that actually melania again, donald trump came into office you know this, joe, he believed two things has never met kim jong-un. but one bizarre claim after passionately. he believed that the entire set another. we'll go through all of those in of commitments he inherited a minute. we still though have to -- we wasn't worth it. that the price was much greater have to try to figure out why it than the benefit and he was against trade. the other people sitting around this table, they survived by is that donald trump pushed -- spent this weekend pushing so hard for vladimir putin and those commitments the united doing vladimir putin's bidding states has historically made. they're allies who cast their behind closed doors to such a degree that he made everybody else uncomfortable. security and put it in their you know that lie that he put out in a tweet claiming that hands so the fact they're dealing with the first -- this is the first president sindoesn everybody over here is saying how great america is, they just don't know why the press is so negative toward me and the foundations of post world war ii american foreign policy. he doesn't believe in the alliance structure. country. he doesn't believe in free trade well, that was a lie as well. or multilateralism. he created as kellyanne conway so this entire meeting is based said very early on, alternative facts, alternative reality and
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he did it on the world stage on now a divergence between where he really did hurt america and our closest allies. that's why it can't work. >> can you imagine the relief -- must have felt with the empty america's reputation and chair? >> that would have been credibility. >> with us we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle. embarrassing. national affairs analyst for the equivalent of trying to negotiate a communique. there's no consensus so couldn't msnbc and co-host and executive producer of showtime's the circus, john heilemann. succeed. >> as alex said in my ear, not president of the council on leading from me hind, leading from an empty chair and elise, one of the great disappointments foreign relations and author of is that we all have a president the book "a world in disarray" now who relates more to richard haass. pulitzer prize winning columnist autocrats and right wing and associate editor of "the washington post" and msnbc nationalists in central and political analyst eugene robinson. eastern europe and across the and from the school of foreign globe than he does democratic nations that helped us win the service, elise labott. good to have you all on board cold war and helped us win world war ii. with us. >> that's right, joe. i mean, look, it used to be the president trump is back in washington after returning from g7 that it was the g8 with the g7 summit in france capped russia kind of the odd man out. by what "the washington post" is now it's the g6 with trump the calling 68 minutes in biarritz, odd man out. he does kind of -- you know,
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a glimpse into trump's unorthodox mind. >> a polite way to put it. appreciate leaders like putin, >> yeah. the president closed out the leaders like erdogan in turkey, gathering of the world leaders by speaking for more than an hour in which he trashed his predecessor, bragged about his leaders in north korea, everywhere around the world where there's no opposition. he can do whatever he wants. personal property, suggested again, this is the presidency that trump wants in his mind. he'll hold next year's gathering where there's no opposition. at doral, the paper adds how the he's lauded by his people. he can do whatever he wants and speech was riddled -- with is kind of a god like figure riddled with false or dubious like you said. he's the chosen one. and so, you know, the problem is statements and as peter baker points out the trade war on china resulted in whiplash for that this meeting, the g7 and fellow world leaders. they're talking about china, he baker highlights how on friday, did have a real opportunity to trump claimed that china's lead on the china issue. president xi was the enemy, but i think, you know, the idea that by yesterday his view of xi was much rosier. you should push back on china, you know you know better than anybody, joe, that the whole >> i think president xi is a great leader. idea of pushing back on the who happens to be a brilliant tariffs, currency manipulation, man. on intellectual property, does and he can't lose 3 million jobs have merits. but this is the big disappointment i think of some in a very short period of time and that's magnified many times
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supporters of president trump that the instincts to disrupt and, you know, maybe shake over. in the meantime, the united things up a bit he just disrupts states which never collected the it and leaves it on the floor and walks away for someone else 10 cents from china will be over to clean up the mess. $100 billion in tariffs so i think they want to make a deal. very badly. ironically this issue of china was something the g7 was meant to deal with. >> you have recently been saying had he said, you know, listen, that china wants a deal, but this trade war with china, you you're not necessarily ready for a deal and you like the tariff revenue that's comin deal for t know, has a purpose we have to get china back to following international norms he could have led. states. but instead he alienated the otherwise, i will not make a deal. we have billions and billions coming in and i think we're european allies, talked about doing to get there. tariffs on aluminum and cars in germany and just alienated all it's not a question of behavior. i think they want to make a deal the allies and i think this is a and if they don't make a deal big disappointment. it's going to be very bad for china. it's the same -- people are and i very much appreciate the fact that they came out very joking about greenland for instance. it's not stupid to want more control of the arctic. late last night and said they but you don't go by saying i'm want to make a deal. they wanted it to be under calm going to buy greenland. circumstances. it was a different kind of a statement. i thought it was a beautiful you talk to denmark and say, lie statement. >> except a chinese foreign
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ministry spokesperson said he in the arctic let's build it up was not aware of the phone calls together and that gives u.s. a trump mentioned. you could hear it, joe, china sphere of influence there against china and russia. but throwing the mess on the floor and walking away, you know, i think that's -- it's called and his eyes -- i guess impossible to harness any good the president doesn't understand instincts that president trump that things can be verified. has productively. >> that actually people will actually ask -- >> at least someone in the white >> right. house can confirm this call took and, you know, mika, it's -- you place. >> whether they actually called look at green land, that's a or not. one other thing and it's becomes great example of a day trader. he tweets something about -- about greenland. a little laborious but we have and insults our ally. to keep saying it. he's talking about billions and billions of tariffs going to and then decides not to take the take from china. meeting. never occurring to this day it comes from you, the american trader that actually if you want to move forward and purchase taxpayer. greenland, probably the best the chinese do not pay the thing to do would be to go over, tariffs. you pay the tariffs when you go take the meeting, be diplomatic, shopping, when you go grocery shopping. when you go to walmart. be polite, build that relationship and figure out what when you go to target. they really need and then you work toward that goal. but, you know, elise really got whenever -- when you go to the mall. you are paying the tariffs, the american consumer. it right.
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again, not exactly sure who he thinks he's fooling. i don't think his supporters are there are problems, we have had problems with china for years. it's something that nancy pelosi and i, it was the one thing we stupid. i guess he thinks they're stupid agreed on in congress. which is sort of insulting but we fought against china stealing tariffs aren't paid by china. intellectual property, against the tariffs are paid by the human rights violations back in the 1990s, but donald trump's american consumer. john heilemann, i want you to problem and richard and give us an overview before we go everybody else would agree with this he's a day trader. to richard haass and get the there's never any strategy. specifics on the foreign policy. your father literally spent a his performance this weekend was generation studying the soviet just extraordinarily unmoored. union and how to weaken the worse than ever. i think everybody agrees donald trump is getting worse. soviet union. he made it his life mission. he began the weekend on friday he made it his life mission to by ordering u.s. companies to get out of china, ordering they work to figure out how to open would and then on saturday up china. he made it his life mission to study and methodically work saying that he had the legal authority to do it. through a middle east peace plan, to help jimmy carter and in fact citing a federal statute. become the architect of the camp bizarre statements through the weekend, a bizarre defense of david accords. vladimir putin. donald trump does it by tweet, just a bizarre obsession. by fiat, a statement here. no planning and with no it's really sad and emasculating
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that donald trump is so obsessed planning, no strategy, we end up nowhere with a president who's with barack obama. it's -- it makes him look so, so put the united states of america small but that obsession on the sidelines. >> elise labott thank you for continued as he attacked a former president while defending your making your "morning joe" an ex-kgb agent. then from all reports when he debut. come back as soon as possible. thank you. still ahead on "morning joe," new polling is painting an was inside private meetings, just completely obsessed with entirely different picture of the democrats race for president. bernie sanders and elizabeth warren are in front of joe biden. getting vladimir putin in the and the former vp's campaign is room with him. what are our allies to think of pushing back on that. it and how in the hell can steve the rage kornacki, he's majorly mad this morning. he breaks down the numbers. republicans watch him promoting next on "morning joe." hmm. exactly. doral on the world stage, a property that is collapsing, and liberty mutual customizes your car insurance, so you only pay for what you need. to little more write op-eds than nice. but, uh... what's up with your... partner? saying about donald trump is write about purchasing not again. limu that's your reflection. greenland, and he canceled the only pay for what you need. ♪ liberty, liberty, liberty, liberty ♪ meeting with greenland with denmark because they wouldn't sell him greenland. >> yes.
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so the tom cotton thing you're referring to is just so sad to watch the united states senator -- >> it is. >> sucking up to the president in a ridiculous way when it's been clear that greenland is not for sale. so all arguments about its merits or demerits are totally irrelevant. >> and again, john, the world is on fire when he's -- >> literally. >> over at the g7. literally, and you can look at what's happening with russia, what's happening with china and with our closest allies, and your answer is to go back to last week and go, well, you know it's a really good idea to purchase greenland. another trump apologist doing the same. how do they ignore the fire in front of them? >> i believe the words are sycophant and toady. but look, the thing to focus on because trump's performance was quintessentially trump and the republican reaction is quintessentially republican in the sense they ignore what he's doing. they suck up to him. they have given up any pretense of having a position that's not
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completely in his possibility. i think the relevant thing to look at and i think richard will talk about this more than i will, but to me the main thing you look at over the course the weekend all the things you laid out. the most -- the image that summed up the whole thing was the notion to your image of the world on fire. the amazon is on fire. and the most urgent meeting of the weekend in some respects was the meeting on climate change where the spire -- entire industrialized world recognizes now the threat that the climate change poses. it is vividly on display as we watch the amazon, you know, burning in a way that is going to potentially create ecological havoc, that will take hundreds of years to correct if it ever gets corrected and at the session on the climate change the president did not show up. there was an empty chair and the empty chair symbolizes i think where we are now.
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we are fully there. we're the -- the president of the united states -- >> but his excuse was a lie. his excuse for not being there -- >> yes. >> it was even proven to be a uh, well, this will be the kitchen. lie. everything he did all weekend and we'd like to put a fire pit out there, was an alternative reality. and a dock with a boat, maybe. >> for sure. he said he was off doing bilateral meetings with i believe with india and maybe why haven't you started building? germany and of course those leaders were actually in the well, tyler's off to college... room. so yes, he lied again. and mom's getting older... and eventually we would like to retire. yeah, it's a lot. but td ameritrade can help you build a plan for today but i think the bigger story is this story of abdication. we talked about how president and tomorrow. great. can you help us pour the foundation too? i think you want a house near the lake, not in it. trump was ceding the leadership come with a goal. and we have the full abdication leave with a plan. of leadership and the heads of td ameritrade. ♪ the other g7 nations which in every other big transnational and international meeting have tried in one way or the other to wheedle trump, to cajole trump, to push trump, to offer blandishments to trump. and they have given up. some things are too important to do yourself. ♪ it's how do we keep the arsonist get customized security
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with 24/7 monitoring from xfinity home. from burning down the house and awarded thfessionally installed system by cnet. then go about our business simple. easy. awesome. call, click or visit a store today. because america is no longer the leader of the free world. that's what you saw over the course of the weekend and that's what we'll remember this summit for. >> and of course it's just a realization, richard haass, of what angela merkel told germans a few years ago when she said we can no longer rely on the united states of america. >> the measure -- it's interesting. the measure of a g7 now is not what you accomplish. it's what you avoid. in this case it was avoiding a major blowup from the united states, and from the get-go emmanuel macron decided the last thing you needed was a communique because it would be impossible to get one that the united states could sign on to so a new monmouth university that would be substantive. poll claims the democratic race
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for the presidency in a virtual so i think john is right, three-way way to senators bernie sanders and elizabeth warren at abdication is the world i have 20% and former vice president used. america is now the principal disrupter. the problem for the europeans joe biden at 19%, but biden's and the japanese and others is they simply lack the capacity to campaign pushed back on the poll and they cited the real clear substitute for us. they do what little they can on $20 million for amazon fires which is a literal drop in the politics show biden leading bucket. but without the united states in sanders and warren by 11%. and there's another poll more in the driver's seat. we don't make a lot of progress. line showing biden with a 13 to the contrary, the gap between the challenges and the international responses is growing. and that's the historical judgment about the g7 which looks like an awfully tired gathering. point lead. that survey showed biden with i think the two immediate though things i would highlight are the 33% of the vote and bernie in president walked back two big issues. he walked back the trade war for second place and let's bring in national political correspondent the moment with china. for nbc news and msnbc author of and he walked back the threat of "the red and the blue" steve actual war with iran. in both of those, i think there kornacki and former chief of was a change from where he showed up in france and where he staff to the dccc and a former director of strategic
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ended. >> well, richard, do you agree that the president after having communications for hillary clinton's campaign, adrienne elrod. steve, is there any reason to a tantrum publicly on friday, on believe that the monmouth poll is anything more than an outlier? >> well, no, i think you go to twitter, and then again on the poll average and even saturday, do you think the factors in the new morning president realized that he had consult you put up there, about 27, 28% for biden still about ten points ahead. boxed himself into the corner. i think the thing for his campaign to worry about though that xi is president for life is given the trajectory of this race, given some of the dynamics and that he figured out that that have emerged, is the china can wait him out and that monmouth poll the future? donald trump is going to cave and he's going to crumble. do we not find ourselves in a is that where this is heading place now where trump has for joe biden because when you look inside the numbers there on the monmouth one, what you really see are some of the blinked and now he's going to have to crawl back to the table weaknesses that we have already identified, that we have long and get the best deal that he seen in polling when it comes to can under the worst of joe biden. the weaknesses get a lot worse circumstances for himself for him in the poll. politically. for instance, in the monmouth >> i think the economic reality of the last week if you look what happened when jay powell and the other federal bank heads poll, if you look at democratic voters under 50 years old we have seen him struggling with met in jackson hole, wyoming, that group the entire campaign. it's essentially what they were in the monmouth poll he's down to 6% with them. all saying, we have done what we he's tied with andrew yang. can. interest rates are at historic maybe he's not down to that
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level in reality yet but that's lows, you can tweak them a little bit. but the biggest overhang over the u.s. economy and the world a place where he's been economy is u.s. trade policy. struggling and that's what the and the growing confrontation race suddenly looks like. that's the big -- that's beyond -- not what central >> of course though adrienne in bankers do. so for donald trump he finally the morning consult poll and reached that fork in the road or that cross roads where his every other poll out shows joe biden with a comfortable lead. how do you -- you obviously have been around democratic politics for quite some time. biggest calling card, economic how do you look at the monmouth growth was endangered on life poll? >> yeah. well, joe, it's interesting because obviously steve just support by the other calling card which is hostility to trade. something had to give. mentioned the biden campaign has i think essentially what you saw been pushing back against this was that he's pulled back from poll showing it's an outlie e the brink on trade. the question is whether we can saying that the methodology conducted in the poll is not on par with the standard poll, i design and negotiate with the think those are fair points but chinese so i think they feel what steve mentions is true. they have a lot of leverage. a trade agreement that the which is look biden's name i.d. president can defend. is 99%. it won't be a big, ambitious he doesn't have a whole lot of room to grow, so if this is -- agreement. we won't get the chiendz to say, if this actually becomes a future, that's a problem for him. but i also think it's interesting, joe, to look at the you know, we have decided we fact that bernie sanders and wanted a different economic elizabeth warren combined have model so the question is whether you can get a more narrow or 40% of the vote. again, we'll see if that trend modest trade deal and what the
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president then has to worry about he'll be attacked for continues. you know, there is some thought among democratic party selling out, he'll be attacked from the china hawks and from operatives and pollsters that if the trump economy goes into a the possible democratic candidates. but that's where he is, can he recession, if the economy position a deal that reassures actually continues to sink that democratic primary voters are more willing to take what they the markets and to get global economic growth back on the may consider to be a risk in terms of determining the trajectory it was on six months ago. >> and as we said president trump also used his final nominee. that would be at the detriment of joe biden. remarks at the g7 summit to so i think it's interesting to see if the trend continues. of course tomorrow august 28th advocate on behalf of russian president vladimir putin by announcing he plans to invite is the deadline to qualify for the third debate so we'll have a feeling in next three days who him to the 2020 gathering of is on the debate stage. world leaders. i think the third debate is going to be very important to as "the washington post" framing, you know, who goes forward. stresses trump will host it amid where people stand. cory booker's campaign shout out warnings that russia is actively to cory they're excited about this poll because he's really at a solid 5% now. trying to interfere again in the you're not seeing that just in election. this poll. but you're seeing that in other take that in. polls. and the president slammed former they feel like they have this incremental improvement over the president obama claiming he was course of the summer, starting outsmarted by putin. with that second debate that has been very positive for them. >> why do you think it's appropriate to invite russia to the 2020 g7 and it might hurt so we'll see what kind of growth
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he has there. but a very interesting poll. i think the big picture is this the trend going forward or is this just an outlier? you politically because it's only a couple months before the 2020 election? >> i don't care politically. a lot of people don't understand this. i ran one election and i won. >> yeah. you know, cory like elizabeth is doing a lot of things right and it's why we said around the happened to be for president. table that of all the people i don't care politically. i'm going to run another sitting at 2% about a month ago, election. look to cory booker to possibly i think i'm winning based on polls that we see. be the one that breaks out of whether i win or not i have to there. but john heilemann, i noticed do the right thing. so i don't do things for yesterday the monmouth poll. political reasons. when you saw biden at 19% and is it good, probably not. a lot of bad things happened with president putin and said, well if this is the president obama. one of the things that happened future, the 19% could become was as you know what happened in -- with a very big area, a 15%, could become 12%. i don't think is, but look, other than biden, i mean, very, very big and important warren, a progressive. area in the middle east where the red line was drawn and then sanders, progressive. harris, progressive. booker, progressive. buttigieg, progressive. president obama decided that he yang, progressive. was not going to do anything castro, progressive. about it. i mean, joe biden is the only you can't draw red lines in the sand, you just can't do it. and the other was in ukraine having to do with a certain moderate in the field. section of ukraine that you know it's interesting what happens as we move forward and the very well where it was sort of
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taken away from president obama. progressive vote continues to be not taken away from president split among nine, ten other trump. taken away from president obama. people and biden is sitting president obama was not happy there as the only moderate in the field. it shows just -- it just shows that this happened because it was embarrassing to him, right? it was very embarrassing to him. where the democratic party has gone over the past four to eight and he wanted russia to be out years. >> yeah. of the -- what was called the there's no doubt about that. i'll say a couple things real quick. one of which is that the thing g8. and that was his determination. that -- i think the monmouth he was outsmarted by putin. poll is obviously an outlier and he was outsmarted. president putin outsmarted i agree with steve and adrienne president obama. is how does that work? does it foretell the future or >> misleading statement that not, but it's a real problem for the biden campaign in this respect. they have staked so much on this russia outsmarted president obama -- >> but he did. >> the reason that russia was electability argument. the notion that the first ad kicked out is because they last week was broadcasting poll annexed crimea. numbers early in the race, for a >> i know you like president front-runner to be making the obama, but it was annexed during president obama's term. if it was annexed during my term i would say sorry, folks. polling strength part of your pitch to voters is unheard of and it puts you in a position i made a mistake, sorry folks. where when a bad poll comes out, president obama was pure and simply outsmarted. you suddenly have to push back they took crimea during his against the poll. the fact they were spending time term. that was not a good thing.
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it could have been stopped. could have been stopped with the right whatever. yesterday pushing back against an outlier poll is not a it could have been stopped. but president obama was unable position where any campaign to stop it. wants to be and certainly not where a front running campaign wants to be. i want to talk to steve about this because we were talking about it off camera before which is you know there's this >> just -- it's insanity. misconception that people have >> yes. it is. which -- i'm not saying you have >> first of all, vladimir putin did not take crimea from an a misconception but this notion american president. that sanders and warren are competing for same vote, i think the one thing that the monmouth poll reveals that's true is that vladimir putin took crimea from ukraine. just like he took georgia from bernie sanders and elizabeth warren though they're obviously both progressive are competing for a very different set of voters and they're not chewing georgia. those invasions were invasions into each other. sanders' strength ine of vladimir putin. a man who is still trying to vote tells you something about the fact that the axis of disrupt and interfere with competition between the two is american democracy according to more about class than it is about ideology. donald trump's appointees to the fbi, cia, everybody. so again, it's extraordinarily elizabeth warren is a one track unbecoming of a president to talk another president overseas
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in defense of a -- well, of a candidate. she's competing for the college white voters and bernie sanders is for downscale progressive voters for sure. but the two of them could very dictator. easily -- not like a zero sum an ex-kgb agent who has now invaded two countries over the game between the two of them. past decade, and who is still they can go deep into the democratic fight. >> it's fascinating how similar invading the united states in the cyber war and who donald trump's own intel chiefs and messages can matter to different factions. if you looked at the monmouth military have warned is posing a poll, sanders was doing well direct threat to american with moderates and democrats and democracy. >> right. unlike warren so far you have >> this, mika, is the man that seen the polls sanders has gotten some traction with black voters. with african-american voterser donald trump goes to the mats who more likely to call for every day defending and the question remains why. themselves moderates in the polls. i think when you play this out a i asked last week, republicans little bit, look, iowa, who and donald trump apologists, sycophants they don't like the dominates in the iowa caucus. you have blue collar and you have liberal voters though. answers -- the questions that have been asked of donald trump. sanders and warren in particular i think could score in iowa. so i need to hear their theory. if either one of them scores in what is their alternative theory? >> that's the question i have iowa where does the contest move for elise labott. but you have to understand, joe, that one of the patterns that next?
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eight days later, new hampshire, you might say many are tracking sanders already got 61% of the vote in new hampshire. in this presidency is the undermining of the media and the warren, the track record of massachusetts candidates in the undermining of the truth, undermining of the journalists. iowa primary if one of them can the more you do that, the more break through in iowa it's hard you think you can live in the to see them not continuing and dream world and make up stuff winning new hampshire. and if you win iowa, and you win like that and pretend you were new hampshire, -- at meetings and when we show the picture of the meeting -- >> either way it works for joe biden. biden -- if the electability >> merkel and moda in the argument for biden you come in second or third in iowa what happens then? >> yeah. middle. we showed the picture before. they're sitting right in the i have to say, mike barnicle, middle of the meeting when donald trump said, oh, no, i though, you can make the argument about biden. wasn't at the meeting, i was if biden wins iowa he's in a position where say barack obama actually -- >> i don't think this is him being mr. magoo. i think that there is a huge was in 2008, where barack obama knew if he won iowa he was off effort on this president's part, to the races. my concern is that he is and with biden, in er -- an devaluing the truth and early win in iowa i say this to devaluing our standing on the say everything they said is true. iowa is more important this year world stage every single day than before. that he opens his mouth. because first of all, you have elise labott, my question to you two basically hometown
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though is with this putin candidates with sanders in connection, this putin envy, vermont and warren suburbs this desire for some reason to obviously of boston. right on the new hampshire line. just obsess over russia and putin in a way that's beyond inappropriate and beyond but biden is so strong in south reflecting where we have been over the past 10, 20, 30 years, carolina and biden is so strong against -- across the deep south that a win for biden in iowa, people like my father who know deep, deep inside information propels him past whatever results he has in new hampshire about how this has all come together, strategic and lines him up where his strength is right now and where it's been and that's with black partnerships, concerns about our elections, how is it that nobody voters in south carolina and in the white house and no across the deep south. >> well, that would certainly be the case, joe, if he did win republican except finally rick iowa, but iowa according to santorum speaking -- i mean, everyone you speak to is totally where are these people and what planet are they on? organized far and ahead in terms what could be the strategy for any trump supporter to stand by this relationship? of organization by elizabeth >> i mean, i think, mika, you warren and anecdotically, adrienne, separate the polls. anecdotically, all you hear in put it exactly right. this primary so far is talk it's kind of he has this envy of president putin and he will not be deterred. about elizabeth warren. that's all you hear. you know, there's been a lot of it dominates every conversation. whether putin has something on they might start with joe biden, a good guy, i like him, he's a
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him, whether he's bribing him or moderate, i'm kind of in the middle, but wow, what about what, i think it's the putin elizabeth warren? it's amazing. >> yeah. envy. it is amazing, mike. you know i talked to a lot of he doesn't have a real constituency in the country because he does everything kind people not just folks from of by fiat and force. arkansas, where i'm from, democratic operatives here in that's the kind of leader, no washington, d.c., around the protest, no acrimony from the country. doesn't matter what you talk to, people, that's the kind of where they are regionally a lot leader president trump wants to of people have said you know, be and the reason why the elizabeth warren just continues republicans don't say something to grow on me. i think is pretty simple. i like her plans. i think they're just putting i like that she's got a plan and party over country and, you ideas for everything. and i think that she is proving know, it's a pretty sad thing. you would think some of the from poll after poll, time after conservatives, the party of time, that her plan for ronald reagan, would say incremental growth in these something more about, you know, polls and just getting out a country like russia which they say out loud is interfering in there, pressing the flesh, talking to as many people as possible, taking as many selfies as possible, it's all starting the u.s. elections. it's interfering in world to pay off. also, mike, to your point, she elections, you know, across the notoriously has the best ground game in iowa. that is something that's widely globe. so it befuddles the mind to ask why these people aren't saying anything. recognized by all the campaigns it's possible that some of them out there. that she got in early. do in private but i think it she had staff in iowa in 2018 goes back to back to what joe helping some of the iowa down and what richard were saying in ballot candidates which is now terms of this summit was really paying off.
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i still think this is joe interesting in terms of the tale of two summits. biden's race to lose because of there's the one in president his entrenched support among trump's mind where he's winning african-americans and other key the trade battle with china, he's the strongest president in constituencies in the democratic primary. the world. but elizabeth warren is gaining he's an enviromentalist. ground and her campaign he's done so much. operation, the organization we'll see how that pays off. but iowa is a state that i think and the summit that was in she will do very well in. actuality he felt like the odd and i agree with joe that iowa man out and he realizes that the matters more in the primary leaders, the fed, are process than it ever has because questioning whether his policies are affecting the world economy. which in turn could affect the u.s. economy. and so i think he felt like the of the stakes and the fact that odd man out and it was kind of obvious he felt inadequate and joe, i think that's why he new hampshire may be a little on see let's and iowa is a big deal this time around. cowered on iran. >> she has a convincing, i think that's why he cowered on authentic message and just anecdotically you hear of people china. because he's starting to -- you who go to her events who might be on the fence, who end up know, i think president trump had as close to an aha moment as being all about elizabeth warren being convinced by her. you could have when he realized also, her crowd sizes. you know he's not winning. >> yeah. you have to look, like tens of you could see that actually thousands show up to hear what she has to say at times. saturday morning when the
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president woke up to understand steve kornacki and adrienne that the chinese are going to elrod, thank you. match him tariff for tariff. johnson & johnson must pay move for move. half a billion dollars for its and he's been outsmarted yet role in oklahoma's opioid again. epidemic. and the landmark decision could be the first of many to come. this is a guy who wrote "the art we'll talk to oklahoma's attorney general about that of the deal" and he lost more ahead on "morning joe." money according to the irs deals more than any other american and what he did for his own business is driving them into the ground. $9 billion. he's now doing to america and the question again is why republicans are saying nothing. why this weekend donald trump kept lying on the public stage, oh, wow. you two are going to have such a great trip. thanks to you, we will. on the international stage. and actually used america's this is why voya helps reach today's goals... authority, used america's good ...all while helping you to and through retirement. name to actually lobby around can you help with these? we're more of the plan, invest and protect kind of help... the clock in front of cameras voya. helping you to and behind closed doors for an and through retirement. ex-kgb agent and republicans and her saturdays are a never- ending montage of comfort. [tv sfx]: where have you been all my life? trump supporters are writing but then anne laid on a serta perfect sleeper.
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and realized her life was only just sorta comfortable. op-eds and tweets about greenland? not just sorta comfortable. hey, gene, speaking of envy your serta comfortable. latest piece is entitled trump's obama envy is getting even so, every day, we put our latest technology worse. one of the things that generally and unrivaled network to work. seems to matter to trump is comparing himself favorably the united states postal service makes more obvious with his predecessor. no matter how delusional the e-commerce deliveries to homes than anyone else in the country. rationale. russia was kicked out of the g8 in 2014 after putin sent military forces in to neighboring ukraine to seize and annex the crimean peninsula and in trump's fanciful version, it was taken away from president obama. those are donald trump's delusional words and he blasted the record of creating jobs and claims to be doing much better. but in fact, facts, and journalists listen to this too because you keep talking about donald trump's great recovery. e-commerce deliveries to homes actually, that's my buick.. your buick doesn't have a roof rack! under obama, the unemployment this is my buick. rate fell from a high of 10% to how are we gonna fit in your mom's buick?
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easy. just 4.7%. i like that new buick. -me too. also, by the way, obama created i was actually talking about that buick. more jobs the last 2 1/2 years i knew that. -did you? of his term than trump has buick's fresh new lineup is full of surprises. created. trump also blames obama for current eligible non-gm owners and lessees being soft on illegal get 20% below msrp on most 2019 buick encore models. immigration yet he deports fewer undocumented migrants than obama did, by the way. also illegal crossings, 50 year low under barack obama. enterprise car sales and you'll take any trade-in?rom they have sky rocketed under that's right! great! donald trump. facts, stubborn facts. here you go... trump seems terrified that well, it does need to be a vehicle. but - i need this out of my house. history will look more kindly on (vo) with fair, transparent value for every trade-in... obama's presidency than on his enterprise makes it easy. own. on this point, he couldn't be more right. mike barnicle, it was staggering to see an american president attack another american president on the world stage. i have never seen it before. in defense of an autocrat who said the greatest tragedy of the 20th century was the soviet
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union collapsing. >> well, no one has seen this before, joe. no one has. and it's odd that -- i guess we're in a stage now where people don't realize that history never stops and you had an odd portrait a mixture of resentment and envy on trump's part talking about barack obama. but you also, gene, seem to have really on the world stage this u
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probably it will cost me anywhere from 3 to $5 billion to be president. >> imagine opening the world's greatest collection of donald trump's lies. >> first lady has gotten to know kim jong-un. >> dozens of beautiful fabrications, exaggerations and insults. you'll remember defending america's adversaries. >> president putin outsmarted president obama. >> for just $26.99 you hear all of the president's hair brained schemes and even his walk-back on the trade war. >> i think president xi is a great leader. who happens to be a brilliant man. >> but wait, use your credit card for a very special offer. trump's apparent confusion about the uk.
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>> i asked boris, where's england, what's happening with england they don't use it too much anymore. >> the ultimate blunders, g7 edition, is available right now. satisfaction guaranteed. >> i don't -- mika, i don't have to listen to "grease." my kids don't have to listen to "grease 2" soundtrack anymore as we're driving around that's beautiful. >> you think our producers have way too much time on their hands but that was put together in an hour. >> you can tell. >> and yeah. kind of catchy. i'm definitely buying one. >> richard haass, you know, we laugh so we don't cry, but actually the rest of the world did see the president again lie about everything. that seemed to matter to him. make up stories about calls from china. make up excuses for not attending the climate change meeting. we can go on and on and on.
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so i guess the question is, how do we after donald trump put this back together again? what do you hear from our allies especially in the g7 about what they're expecting from the united states in the years to come? >> it's actually the most frequent question i get which is what comes next. i think it's a big difference by the way if he's a one or two term president, joe. one thing for americans to vote for him once. a lot of europeans are saying if you re-elect him, then it's not simply about him. then it's about you, america. so i think that would have a much more profound effect. also if he were not to be re-elected, there's a big difference between him being succeeded by a joe biden who kind of has a traditional american foreign policy as opposed to say bernie sanders who would contribute a lot of trumpism without the tweets when it comes to trade or afghanistan or places like that. but i think the bottom line is
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there's no going back to we were. if it happened once, it raises doubts about who the united states is and what we are and these other countries as we talked about before have cast their lot with us. i think this raises questions. i would think if you're the national security adviser of any other country in the world that's dependent upon the united states, you have now got a yellow file that basically says what are our alternatives if we can no longer rely on the united states the way we could? and whether they'll start cutting deals with strong neighbors or start thinking about expecting more self-reliant and self-sufficient and we're beginning to see this around the world. india is starting its open path much more say with pakistan. we see japan and south korea going at it. china feels it has pretty much a free hand with hong kong. what we're beginning to see is what fareed zakaria and others have called a free world and we're still out there and wife not playing the role like we did
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and others are discounting american interests, discounting american influence. >> you know, gene robinson, for eight years we heard conservatives and to be fair we did hear former democratic diplomats complaining about barack obama quote leading from behind, not being as aggressive as he should be on the world stage. in fact, being far more passive than past american presidents and not just -- not just bush, not just bush and cheney. but that being said, we find ourselves now in a position where i think there's a presumption among americans that we're in 2000 and the world stands alone on the stage and is the sole dominant power. we have china moving into the middle east. and africa and you name it.
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china's following behind us with every frayed relationship and going in and making new strategic partnerships. they have been doing that now actually for the past 18 years. but it's certainly amping up now and you look at russia who is in the middle east for the first time militarily since 1973 in syria, donald trump has said he's willing to cede afghanistan back to russia if they want it. this is -- we're not just talking about a one four-year term. we're talking about relationships that have been frayed and opportunities that we have given our chief protagonists on the world stage. >> absolutely. meanwhile, we have a president who stands at a podium and asks in all seriousness, where's england? i mean, it's -- it's one of the stunning moments from yesterday for me. you know, the rise of china is a
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major world historical event that we're living through right now. and both china and russia and in their different ways are using soft power throughout the world to expand their influence and power and to bolster their economies and to chart the way forward and donald trump has no understanding of the power and doesn't understand the relationships he doesn't understand how to build them, how to sustain them. and he's -- he is leaving us on the sidelines. it's an abdication really of the united states position in the world, and i agree with richard haass. i don't think you can put all of this toothpaste back in the tube after trump. assuming he's defeated in 2020 and a new president takes over, assuming it's not bernie sanders and someone who would be at all
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trumpy in foreign policy. i don't see how if you're sitting in any other capital you can assume that the united states is going to go back to playing the role that it played in the post-war years. i think we're in the post, post-war era now. >> well, richard haass, mike barnicle, john heilemann, gene robinson, all still with us, and joining the conversation, senior adviser at moveon.org and an msnbc contributor karine jean-pierre. and director of domestic policy studies at stanford university and research fellow at the hoover institution, lanhee chen joins us. let's get to the moment of the g7 that many see as encapsulating the problems of trump's performance at the entire summit on the world stage. president trump did not attend a meeting of world leaders to discuss action to address climate change before the close of the g7 meetings in france.
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but after the session concluded, trump insisted it was actually later in the day that he would be there. >> did you make it to the climate session? >> i'm going -- in fact, it's our next session. so we haven't had it yet. >> do you have a message that you would like to deliver -- >> no, i want clean air and clean water and we're having the cleanest air and the cleanest water on the planet. >> white house press secretary stephanie grisham then explained trump's absence. saying the president had scheduled meetings and bilaterals with germany and india. >> okay. >> so a senior member of -- >> those are two important countries. >> okay. >> i get it. okay. >> the only problem with that alibi is that both german chancellor merkel and indian prime minister modi were in the climate change meetings so that's a complete lie. and have we seen -- she's the
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white house press secretary. >> yeah. >> i haven't seen her. where are the press briefings and -- >> i don't know. >> is there -- >> i don't know. but -- >> is there anything she can do to inform the american public, because i think she works for us. >> i don't know. but merkel -- >> what's doing on in the white house? >> and modi, john heilemann, were at the center of the table. >> yeah. >> there we go. >> they're there. it's not like they're hiding in the back, drinking fresca. >> there's the spicer thing about the crowd size. >> wow. so john, it's just one more example of how of course not only americans and republicans should recognize that the president lies, but obviously people in the world stage understand the man lies all the time. he's not good for his word and there's no deal that you can enter in with the united states, with any confidence he'll keep it. >> also, joe, just think about this. you know, the amazon is on fire. right?
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and the president is saying when asked about climate change, i want clean air and clean water. i mean, i think if you're a leader of another country you look at the guy and just think in addition to being a pathological liar, you think he's a simpleton. like in an incredibly complex existential threat to the planet that everyone whether they're a scientist or not understands is not about like i want clean air and clean water. yes, we all want clean air and clean water, but the president's grasp of the scale of the problem is i think part of the issue of why he doesn't show up at the meeting. you know, this is a guy who we just had reporting that he wants to nuke hurricanes. like a person who is just intellectually -- he's not a serious person and he's intellectually not capable of beginning to get even a rudimentary grasp of the scale of the problem. so in addition to that, if you add to that pathological liar to that, you understand what the world is dealing with and why. although it's symbolically
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horrifying to see that empty chair in that meeting for a lot of these leaders and it might be for the best that the chair is empty because having him in that chair would only make things worse. >> you know, lanhee, we can show the clips of the president's misstatements, his distortions, his lies and we can snicker a little bit because we're sitting here fairly comfortable. we all make a good living, all of that stuff. but it's not funny. we are watching, are we not, the public unraveling of the president of the united states and thus the further disruptions in answering the question around the world -- what is america today? >> well, you know, there's a particular concern here i would say around the u.s./china relationship which i know we have talked about this morning. but what you see in this relationship, what you see in sort of the back and forth, the changing of the opinion about the best way to deal with china, that has very real implications for the u.s. economy. very real implications for
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american consumers. it has very real implications for people's living in america's heartland. you see the feedback that we are getting from iowa, for example. farmers have been hurt by u.s. tariffs. but the u.s./china trade conflict so the changing nature of u.s. policy particularly with respect to an important country like china what you're seeing is the impact that has on america. we can talk about the intellectual elements of foreign policy and we can argue ago -- argue about whether the united states is in the leadership role or not and when you talk about the nature it's changed and changed back again over the last few years that has real implication anns that we should talking about. >> and the white house is also clarifying one of the remarks president trump made during a news conference at the g7 summit yesterday where he suggested that first lady melania trump knows north korean dictator kim
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jong-un. >> kim jong-un, who i have gotten to know extremely well, first lady has gotten to know kim jong-un and i think she'd agree with me, he is a man with a country that has tremendous potential. >> you know -- >> that's more than a suggestion. >> by the way, that's so revealing, that moment is revealing that is a guy who inherited $400 million from his father. surrounded himself with yes men his entire life. he was able to create his own alternative reality and all of the yes men around him and all of his caddies, all of his workers, would agree with him and go, yeah, boss, yes, boss. it's like saying china cult. okay? you never -- never dawned on donald trump that the chinese would actually fact check that statement. never even dawned on donald trump while he was lying about the great legalship --
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relationship between his wife and the dictator in north korea that actually it was very easy to fact check the fact that he was lying. he lies and still for some reason doesn't think he's going to get called out on it. >> white house press secretary grisham wrote, president trump confides in his wife on many issues including the detailed elements of his strong relationship with chairman kim and while the first lady hasn't met him the president feels like she's gotten to know him too. >> oh, wow. >> wow. great job there, steph. are you kidding me? >> yeah. karine, i feel like i have gotten to know elton john through my friends that met backstage at a concert. he's a really great guy. seriously, it's ridiculous. again, this is on the world stage and i completely agree with lanhee. if you're talking about the real
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life implications of what donald trump is doing and what he did this weekend, look no further than the farmers in iowa and across the midwest. but statements -- a collection of statements like that make our allies far more hesitant to ever believe they can count on the united states of america again as long as that guy is sitting in the oval office. >> that's exactly right, joe. look, what we saw at the g7 in france the last couple of days from this president is embarrassing. it's just an embarrassing performance. and once again on the world stage. not only does he abandon our allies, but he also embraces dictators. you know, like vladimir putin in talking about bringing him back and turning the g7 back to g8. i mean, this is what he does. i mean, he sells himself as a disrupter but this is not disruptive. this is the -- this is really a destructive. he's destroying how the u.s. is
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perceived on the world stage. and it's incredibly dangerous. it is to what others were saying how do you put the toothpaste back in tube? you cannot. so this is going to have a long lasting effect. when you think about the climate change session that he missed, you know, he was able to tweet about fox news polls and make time to tweet about regis, he was able to make time to tweet about nuking hurricanes but he could not attend a climate change session while the amazon is literally burning and when we talk about that empty chair at that meeting it really symbolizes not only that trip but the presidency. it is abandoned leadership that is what we're seeing from this president of the united states. and that's frightening because once again, it's not disruptive, it's destructive. >> well, richard haass, let's go back to what lanhee was talking about when you look at our relationship with china, the
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impact it's having on american consumers especially farmers and especially working class americans, you look at the tariffs and those taxes that are going to disproportionately hit them and you have donald trump i believe on friday calling the president of china an enemy on monday calling him a great guy, you have him on friday talking about higher tariffs, on saturday talking about second thoughts. later on sunday, doubling down saying his only regrets are that he didn't raise -- talk about raising tariffs even more and then sunday and monday playing good cop/bad cop. when we were talking about it china, deng xiaoping when asked about the revolution it was too early to tell. this is a country that thinks in
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terms of centuries and here we have donald trump who thinks about his twitter feed every 15 minutes. it just sends a terrible message and a weak message to our trade adversaries. >> yeah. a couple things i wanted to ask lanhee a question. john heilemann was talking about, the president is clearly confusing pollution with climate change. climate change is something global and systematic so the europeans and others watching that say -- would say, wow, the president of the united states simply does not understand what climate change is. that's simply one takeaway. two, on china. right, all over the place. the president had a revealing moment in the press conference where he said that's my negotiating style. he's all over the place. i guess the question is, others come up against it like a china, does that put them on the heels, does that make them feel like they have to be careful around this guy or for someone like a
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xi jinping who is there forever does this give him tremendous leverage because his basic reaction is this guy saul over the place, i'm going to wait him out. he's got political challenges. i don't. >> yeah, i think there are two ways to look at it. first of all, if it were a one-time strategy, that's an interesting strategy. that's something our adversaries and trading partners around the world need to contend with. when it's quite clear from the chinese perspective at this point in time they are perfectly content to play the long game. you know, as joe mentioned this is a country -- this is a leadership that thinks in terms of millennia. u.s. history goes back to 1619. the chinese history goes back 1600 years. so that difference in perspective i think suggests that they are more than happy to wait out this president or any other president for that matter. so the notion that unpredictability, the notion that we're going to surprise them with a point of view, i
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think is misguided because the chinese will say that's fine. you can do what you like to do. we'll hang out until we get the deal we want. and what that does for both sides is it makes it less likely that we're going to see a deal that improves both economies and yes, the chinese economy is hurting but our economy going to feel the impacts of this very soon if not already. so the challenge here is you can deploy unpredictability once. maybe twice. but when you deploy it four or five times, people sort of look at it and say, yeah, not so much. >> that said, still ahead on "morning joe," two developments inside joe biden's presidential campaign. first, reaction to the new poll that shows him trailing his progressive rivals. and a brand-new campaign ad just out this hour. how he's aiming to manage the message. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. tyler's off to college... and mom's getting older... and eventually we would like to retire. td ameritrade can help you build a plan for today and tomorrow. come with a goal.
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so joe biden's presidential campaign is out this hour with a new ad on health care. airing across iowa, starting today. let's take a look. >> i was sworn in to the united states senate next to a hospital bed. my wife and daughter had been killed in a car crash. lying in that bedroom my two surviving little boys. i can't imagine what it would have been like if we didn't have the health care they needed immediately. 40 years later one of the little boys, my son beau, who was diagnosed with terminal cancer and given only months to live, i can't fathom what would have happened if the insurance company had said for the last six months of his life you're on your own. the fact of the matter is, health care is personal to me. obamacare is personal to me. when i see the president try to tear down and others proposing
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to replace and start over, that's personal to me too. we have to build on what we did because every american deserves affordable health care. i'm joe biden and i approve this message. >> all right. joe, what do you think? >> i think it's an extraordinarily powerful message. not simply because of the pain that he's endured and the suffering he's endured throughout his life. but it really brings home the message that actually john edwards talked about in the 2004 campaign, that when it comes to health insurance, when it comes to so many other issues there are two americas. >> that's right. >> you sit there of course john heilemann, and you look at joe biden and you just assume that when tragedy befalls joe biden he's going to be taken care of like you and your family members are going to be taken care of, like my family members and me are going to be taken care of.
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and yet, for 40 million americans, 50 million americans, that's not the reality. i think that's a very strong message for joe biden. he of course whispered to president obama that it was a big deal, passing obamacare. he believed it then. he believes it now. i think that should be the central message of his campaign and in a year that democrats care most about health care. >> it's a good ad, and i certainly -- an ad i like more than talking about his poll numbers because health care is a central issue and democratic voters care about it more than anything else and there are many democratic voters who are deeply troubled by some of the proposals on the left side of the party, to take away or abolish private health insurance. so where biden is coming from this in this ad it's not just an important issue to a lot of
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democratic voters but where he's where the mainstream of the party is don't abolish my health care and let's build on and modify and improve the affordable care act. so lanhee, given that's where i think -- again, just as an empirical matter it's where the mainstream of the party is, is that a message that joe biden can by focusing on a laser like way is that a message that can help him stave off the challenge, the very energetic challenge he's facing from some of the candidates on the left of the party where they may have smaller overall number of supporters on some of the issues but they're a very energized portion of the democratic electorate right now. >> i see energy in the volume. the biden campaign has to walk a tight rope but i think what worked about that ad was reminding people about the leg so i have obamacare which
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remains very popular amongst the primary democratic voters and obamacare's popularity has remained steady through all of the debate in 2017. i think what biden and the biden campaign are trying to do, look, we have a contrast here. you have other democrats who want to start over, tear it down and start over as the ad said. you have the biden team that wants to essentially take obamacare and strengthen it and tweak it. and that's a message they think will work in a primary and a general. the question is, all of that energy you have seen it on the debate stage, over and over again, where the medicare for all crowd, the crowd that wants to take the health care system and essentially blow it up, take away private health insurance, that position is becoming increasingly popular among the far left and if it's biden versus let's say warren or sanders or someone from the progressive wing of the party, then it really becomes a where is the party's heart at? is that position one that essentially says we're doing to improve our obamacare, not destroy it and start over. is that position one that's
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going to be tenable? i think biden is banking on the answer that yes, it is. >> karine, we heard lanhee use the word heart. if you watch that ad, it seems to me to be sort of a building block of an ad. based upon a couple of things. obviously, health care and it's a big issue in america. but also the underpinnings of the ad have to do with loss. joe biden understands loss. and it also enhances something that joe biden has tried to provide on the campaign trail that's sorely missing in america, empathy. and i'm wondering your thoughts on seeing the ad and those two words -- loss and empathy. >> that's such a great analysis there. because what i see from that ad is joe biden uses something that's really personal. his own personal story and then he weaves it into this ad. and talks about health care something that's incredibly important to tens of millions of
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people. and so that ad is incredibly -- it's powerful. it's smart. and i think it's good that the biden campaign is talking about issues and in particular health care as people have discussed, which is the issue that will be the most important issue for many americans. instead of not talking about electability. i think electability works to a point but people want to see that. they want to see like you just said, they want to see empathy. they want to hear him talk about his own story but not just that. but how is he going to move the country forward on an issue like health care? he talks about that at the end and what he wants to do with obamacare and building on obamacare. so yes, that ad is incredibly personal which is why it works because it's joe biden. this is the joe biden that we know and we hear about all the time and he's able to bring that empathy forward to the american people and i think it's smart that -- it's a smart ad. smart that they did that. >> you know, for those of us living in the bubble of news
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24/7 following twitter 24/7, to say that people want to see empathy, want to see kindness, that people want to see bipartisanship, that of course would be laughed at on twitter and perhaps laughed at on a lot of news shows. but in fact, there is a great hunger and a great desire. i mean, i believe they want leaders who can get along, especially after four exhausting years. you know, republicans at this point are starting to understand according to axios that they are in deep trouble in the suburbs. there's no way they're going to be able to survive in the suburbs except under one circumstance mike allen just reporting this morning that republican operatives are hoping that whatever democratic nominee
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ends up winning goes after obamacare, wants to destroy obamacare and replace it with a health care system that does away with private insurance. that is according to republican operatives the only way they believe they can win back some of those women in the suburbs. >> yeah. i think that's definitely -- that looks to me like a tough sell in those suburbs that tended democratic in 2018. that previously were thought of as perhaps republican or at least up for grabs for republicans and now seem to be heading democratic. and those voters might be turned off by the idea of getting rid of private insurance. so i think that's something that if one of the democrats who has
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that as a big platform point like an elizabeth warren for example is the nominee it's something that she is going to have to -- she's really going to have to finesse. you know, so it's -- there are two sides to this campaign. i mean, you're looking ahead toward the general election but you're also running in a primary when the democratic party clearly has moved to the left in many ways. and you've got to get nominated before you can get elected so it's -- you're going to see these candidates walk this tight rope and some will walk it more skillfully i think than others. bernie sanders is just like my way or bust, basically. i think warren will be a bit more subtle. >> yeah. yeah. i think you're right. >> more subtle, but we'll see. >> we'll see. but you know, richard haass,
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what's interesting about this debate and of course people say you're a former republican, what do you know ago democratic -- maybe i don't know a whole lot about the democratic primary right now but i can read and i can look at poll numbers and i can look at data and the data i show is that not only is private insurance and obamacare popular with the majority of americans but obamacare is extremely popular within the democratic party. the last time i checked what 70, 75% of democrats support obamacare. so i don't really see it as a purity test, trying to destroy obamacare and creating a new system. >> that was my question coming back to the ad by vice president biden, whether it went hard enough against the democrats who basically want to have medicare for all. it talked about the president
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disrupting the health care system and it seemed subtle going after elizabeth warren and bernie sanders with the new proposal so i had a personal reaction. the loss he had the deal with, what you called empathy, joe, but the question is whether it soft pedalled the debate in the democratic party and to reach the general you have to get through the primaries. and whether he's got a dilemma there, which is how hard to go after those who want to do away with the current system. >> i wouldn't go, mika, hard against anybody personally. if they're supporting medicare for all. obviously bernie and elizabeth believe it in their heart and it's not something that they tested. market tested. but i would say if you're joe biden, on this issue, i would hammer this issue harder than any other issue and talk about how he and president obama and every democrat fought heart and
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soul to pass the affordable care act, to pass obamacare. despite the fact that every republican voted against it. despite the fact that donald trump is trying to destroy it. and i would have that as the centerpiece of my campaign. don't end it, mend it and if i get elected you can guarantee yourself that obamacare and the affordable care act will be stronger eight years from now been. that's a winning message. not among just republican suburb voters. that's a winning message among democratic primary voters. >> i agree completely. lanhee chen, thank you so much. coming up, only one day to the deadline for the democrats to qualify for next month's democratic debate, new york city mayor bill de blasio could be left off the stage. he'll weigh in on what it means for his presidential campaign next on "morning joe." every day, visionaries are creating the future.
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candidate new york city mayor bill de blasio. mr. mayor, thank you for being with us. i'm going to play the role today of jonathan lemire. >> you're aspiring to that high role. >> yeah. that's a high role. but i've got a headline, i saw a headline break yesterday that involves new york city. it's something that concerns me not only somebody that loves new york, but also i love america. and i love the best and the brightest that new york city has sent to america. whether it's in the field of technology or whether it's in the field of health care. whatever field it's in. i think you know where i'm going right now. i saw this breaking news headline that a panel that you put together is suggesting that all gifted programs in new york public schools be eliminated.
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these are legendary schools that have not only contributed to new york city, but have made america and the world a better place. can you give us some insight on your view on that recommendation? >> yeah, joe, it's literally a recommendation that just came out and i'm going to assess it in my -- and my school chancellor is going to assess it and we'll come back our thoughts on it. look, the panel was put together to address an issue that's facing american education, how do we diversify our classrooms in our communities that obviously affects our schools and at the same time, i always say the central mission we always have to keep front and center is to keep improving public education. and we just had test scores come out for new york city six years in a row, test scores have been going up. graduation rates going up. we see a lot of improvement i have to tell you early childhood education, pre-k for all is
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making a huge difference for those the kids, helping us to close the achievement gap between the white kids and kids of color. how do you strike that balance? we want kids to learn together in diversity. we want to break down barriers and we want to make sure we have academic strength and we're positioning kids for their futures in a world where education dictates more in history. i'll come back with my thoughts on how best to handle them. >> by the way, i spoke to somebody that talked about your pre-k program an and they said it made a great difference in their life and how education in new york has improved over the past five or six years. i just want to make sure that you -- of course, we're both red sox fans. you don't have to agree with me, but you would agree with me though that these new york city
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schools for gifted students -- schools that would never even let me approach the front door, so this is not personal to me at all. other than i know the contribution they have made to new york, america and the world. you would agree that those schools, those gifted schools are extraordinary educational institutions. >> yeah, two things, joe. one, they are. we have some of the finest public high schools in particular in america. and we want to keep them great in every way, but there's not a contradiction between ensuring fairness in admissions and diversity in the classroom and also having great academics. one of the things that i have been fighting for is to get the high stakes tests out of the admissions equation. i think it's something you're seeing all over the country. folks want to look at the whole child, the whole student, and determine, you know, what think bring to the equation. i think you can do that, i think you can have more diversity while keeping the academic
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standards high. but the second thing is to recognize, joe, the -- really the future is in addressing the great missing link in new york city and in american public education which is we have started too late. the time when children learn the most is between birth and 5 years old in much of america the first time a child goes to full day score is when -- day school is when they're 6. one of the things that needs to come out of the national presidential debate is an agreement that america will focus on the early childhood education and what we're doing here in new york and a big scale here, even 3-year-olds were given full day education and it's unlocking tremendous potential. if you do the early childhood education part of the equation properly that's really where our investments should go. that's where you'll get the biggest bang for your buck. then those great schools later on, they are going to be available for more and more kids of greater and greater diversity and continue to perform that
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role you're talking about. just churning out great talent for our society. but if we don't get it right on early childhood education and that has to be a federally led initiative, local school districts won't be able to do it and afford it, if we don't get it right on early childhood education which should not be surprised if the future children will not be ready. this country has to double down on early childhood education. >> i couldn't agree with you more on that. >> sorry. isn't the logical -- >> i was going to say, richard, richard, i couldn't agree more, richard with what the mayor said on early education. because again, my family can afford it. and everybody around the table's family can afford it. every american should be able to send their children to school at an earlier age, because richard, i think we found it makes a big difference in how our children
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perform in first grade, second grade, third grade, moving forward. >> and i'll just say one thing before turning to richard. the democratic party -- a proud democrat should stand for early childhood education. this is a kind of thing that's being missed as the kind of appealing, meaningful, tangible vision that would attract independence, that would attract republicans and attract folks in urban and rural areas. in fact, when i'm out in rural iowa one of the greatest frustrations people have is school districts and schools consolidating and fewer and fewer options for their kids. we'll have a vibrant role in america, you have to have early childhood education available. you certainly know in a lot of urban america it's been a huge missing link in terms of the public schools. think about the democratic party standing for something that would literally be unifying and attract a lot of -- especially younger americans across the spectrum to say, hey, that's
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something that would change my life and make it better. joe, what you said about this city i have had folks of every stripe, every background, every belief come up to me and say that universal pre-k changed the life of their child and their family. saved them a lot of money. that's made a huge difference and we should be looking at that for the whole country. >> so it's tied up to children at 16, so one chance to make everybody is exposed to one certain thing, whether it's civics. isn't it to not to change the schools, but like your investment to give it time and you get a funnel of talented younger people who are more representative of this city and then you have arrived where you wanted to get. what's the rush to change the formula of the successful schools? >> a couple of things. yes, i understand that logic for sure i think as early childhood education has more of an impact
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you're going to see something we have never seen before. we never had a moment in this city or this country where every child started at the same starting line. it's been the education was divvied up according to economic reality and the wealth of a family. imagine the society where every child actually gets that fair start. i think that's going to be very exciting. but on your question, look, the one thing i would say about those very high quality high schools is the notion that kids are getting into them based on a single three hour test, you know something about the ivy league. you don't get into harvard on a single test. i think it's outmoded and how you judge the fullness of the young person and i want to get rid of that. but the university of texas really gave us the inspiration for this idea. they recognized that lots of high schools in texas weren't sending schools to the university system. it's split by income and race. they came one a simple system, every high school is guaranteed a certain number of kids and those who perform the best on
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multiple levels give them a chance to get that university education that's created a lot more diversity and opportunity that's what we're talking about wanting to do here in new york. i think you're right. early childhood education is one of the big difference makers but admission systems have to be carefully constructed so they don't inadvertently create separation. >> a large part of what you're talking about is not a new york dilemma, but a national dilemma, urban school dilemma. are you prepared for the distinct policy that you eliminate the tests and the testing schools it's hello westchester and hello fairfield, because parents would take their child and move out of the city? >> it's a fair question but that's a much greater concern in the past than it is today. new york city public schools are moving forward. i want to give a lot of credit to our educators. they have helped move this system immensely. and there's a lot of great high
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school options and i think one of the goals of course is to keep expanding them. create more and more great high school options for the public schools. but no, if you have admissions based on testing, grades, multiple measures, a lot of kids are going to do great under the system. bluntly a lot of kids who are not great test takers but are really smart, capable kids are going to have that opportunity now. and i think other kids are going to find other great opportunities in a lot of high schools including specialize in performing arts, science, technology. we have a whole range. we are at the highest population we have had in new york city. we have the most jobs we have had. i don't see an exodus. i see people wanting to stay here. >> hi, mayor. this is corinne jean pierre. >> hi, corinne. >> how you doing? >> good. >> wanted to switch a little bit to 2020 debate -- presidential debate on health care. i don't know if you got to see
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biden's new ad -- iowa ad that talks about health care. he really at the end tells a beautiful story about his personal story with health care but he talks about building on obamacare. i know you have been a proponent for medicare for all and we have been having this discussion. can you tell us more about it? i think in polling, voters are confused about medicare for all. there is not a clear distinction about what it is. can you to on that, please? >> it's an important topic. it's nice to have the conversation outside of a debate with ten people. look, i think it comes down to this. i believe in obamacare, in the affordable care act. democrats believe in it, fought to protect it. i led mayors around the country in fighting to protect it when trump tried to attack it. so i would argue some of the rhetoric that i have heard, you know, folks wanting to destroy
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obamacare, i think that's inaccurate. this is a great achievement. i give president obama tremendous credit. we need to protect it. the question is, is this all we aspire to or is there something more? the reason i believe in medicare for all is to say, okay, look at the reality of an insurance system based on private insurance. what do we know is the real experience of working class and middle class americans? a lot of things are not covered -- mental health care not covered the wayviously, a l physical health care needs aren't covered sufficiently and families if they have a serious health care problem between the deductibles and co-pays and hidden expenses run into a problem. god forbid a really serious disease can lead to bankruptcy. that's not an ideal health care system. obamacare was a huge step forward. there is a whole other place we have to go as a country. we should say, hey, what is the kind of health care every
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american should have and the kind of security they should have? i would say this is about the fact that working class and middle class americans don't feel secure economically, personally at this point in history. a lot of them are literally one paycheck away where they feel tremendous concern about something going wrong. they also don't feel they are getting all the health care they need when they need it. i believe in medicare for all because i believe it is the next step in evolution to a truly universal inclusive system. i'll tell you here in new york we got so sick of seeing people go without health care because they didn't have insurance in new york we have a plan to guarantee health care for the 600,000 people in the city who do not have health insurance to give them a health care card. they get a primary care doctor assigned at a public clinic or hospital. they get care when they need it, not when it is too late and they go to the emergency room. until we solve that kind of conundrum in this country we should aspire to something greater. >> mr. mayor, here we go.
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>> yes. >> let's talk about politics and this debate in a concrete way. there is the qualifying deadline for the next debate is upon us. >> yes. >> you are not going to qualify, i believe, for the third debate. there are two elements i want to ask you about. one is -- you're going to like half this question and hate the other half. >> at least you told me in advance. you're a gentleman. >> is it not insane that the democratic party for the first time in modern history that i know of is putting the thumb on the scale and intervening rather than letting the campaign play out applying arbitrary standards driving the democratic senator from colorado, the mayor of the biggest city in the world, driving them out of the race? talk about that. then second, given that it is what they are doing is your campaign not dead now? how do you reach a national audience if you are excluded from debate stages going forward? >> very fair questions.
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there is another bite at the apple in october. just like june, july debates were the same standard and obviously one candidate, steve bollock didn't get in to june but did in july. i can still get into october, well before any voting. we have seen the debates be vibrant but really not move much in terms of polls. what else matters? televised town hall meetings. i had one on cnn sunday night. the major media appearances of all kinds the candidates do. the cumulative impact. bluntly, in this conversation already i have had more time to talk to the american people than i did in the first debate, literally. it was five and a half minutes total for me. i think there are many ways to get a message out. i think the next debate is a crucial opportunity. i'm going to fight hard to get into it. i would say the reason no one should count out any candidate who has something serious to say and serious qualifications, i certainly think my colleagues
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you mentioned fit in that category, is because in america today in the age of social media, you can go from being obscure to famous in 48 to 72 hours. any moment, any idea might catch fire. any moment, authentic moment might take off and change the way people see you. any world event might change the discussion. i think if i were looking back 20 years in time i might have seen this differently. we're in a more open context than we have been in. the democratic party did things i agree with and things i disagree with in terms of structuring the debates. one thing that's progress is the notion that small donors, even giving $1, help to determine who gets on the stage. it's not the money you raise, it's how many people. if you agree with the things i'm saying, anyone out there go to bill de blasio.com and give at least a dollar. it helps. it's small d democracy to say how many people want to hear from you? that's progress.
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the reformers in the party fought for it to be not about how much you raise from high donors or the early polling which you know early polling is often not instructive, not accurate. but bringing the grassroots element is helpful. that's my job to fight for that. i left him speechless. mika, he's speechless. >> they just said we're out of time. >> you never listen to cues, i'm glad you did. >> see? >> a great moment. >> still ahead, we are breaking down all of president trump's bizarre claims during this year's g7 summit, from mixed messaging on china to skipping a climate meeting and claiming president obama was outsmarted by vladimir putin. there is a lot to talk about on where we stand in the world. plus, oklahoma attorney general mike hunter joins us on the heels of a major court decision that points the blame at johnson & johnson for the
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next year's g7. you dropped hints about miami, doral and hosting at your property. what reassurances can you give the american people you are not looking to profit off the presidency? >> with doral we have a series of magnificent buildings, we call them bungalows. they each hold from 50 to 70 very luxurious rooms with magnificent views. we have incredible conference rooms. it's such a natural. the ballrooms are among the biggest in florida and the best. it's brand new. my peopl wanted it. from my standpoint i'm not going to make any money, in my opinion. i don't want to make money. i don't care about making money.
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>> how's the chocolate cake though? >> good thing he doesn't care about making money. as has been reported doral is in steep decline. its revenues are way down. it lost 69% revenues over the past two years. >> maybe he's not trying to profit. he's trying to get it above water? who knows? >> again, he doesn't care about profits. look at the bankruptcies. >> right. >> he's given $400 million in today's profits by his father. he drives it into the ground and becomes $9 billion in debt. here we go again. this is just such a bizarre news conference yesterday. a bizarre weekend. the lies. all over the place. yesterday morning, when the president said and we'll talk to richard haas in a second. just to frame this show, yesterday morning when he said we have calls from the chinese. >> china called. >> china called. that was a lie. we said it was a lie yesterday
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morning without even having to hear from the chinese government that, no, they actually had not made phone calls to donald trump. he backed himself into a corner. he spent the weekend trying to get out of the corner because he figured out that his day trading put american workers and america in a bad position which is going to hurt him. >> i don't think he cares about that. >> next year. he lied about so many things. so many bizarre claims. one of my favorites that melania has really grown to really like kim jong-un. >> oh, yeah. >> they have a wonderful relationship. of course they had to be reminded that melania has never met kim jong-un. one bizarre claim after another. we go through all of those in a minute. we still have to try to figure out why it is that donald trump spent this weekend pushing so
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hard for vladimir putin. doing vladimir putin's bidding behind closed doors to such a degree that he made everybody else uncomfortable. you know the lie he put out in a tweet claiming that everybody over here is saying how great america is. they just don't know why the press is so negative toward me and the country. well, that was a lie as well. he created, as kellyanne conway said very early on, alternative facts. an alternative reality. he did it on a world stage where he really did hurt america's reputation and credibility. >> with us we have msnbc contributor mike barnacle, analyst for nbc news and co-host and executive producer of showtime's "the circus" john heilman, author of the book "a world in disarray" richard haas,
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columnist and associate editor "the washington post" eugene robinson and journalist in residence at georgetown school of foreign service, elise labot. good to have you on board with us. welcome. president trump is back in washington after returning from the g7 summit in france capped by what "the washington post" is calling 68 minutes in biarritz, a glimpse into trump's unorthodox mind. >> that's a polite way to put it. >> the president closed out the gathering of world leaders for speaking for more than an hour in which he trashed his predecessor, bragged about personal properties, said he'll hold next year's g-7 gathering at the doral golf course in florida. "the new york times" peter baker
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points out trump's comments on the trade war with china resulted in whiplash for world leaders. baker highlights how on friday trump claimed china's president xi was the enemy. by yesterday his view of xi was rosier. >> i think president xi is a great leader who happens to be a brilliant man. he can't lose 3 million jobs in a very short period of time. that's going to be magnified many times over and break down the chinese system of trade. >> in the meantime, the united states which never collected ten cents from china will in a fairly short period of time be over $100 billion in tariffs. so i think they want to make a deal very badly. >> you have recently been saying china wants a deal but you are not necessarily ready for a deal and you like the tariff revenue that's coming in. are you now ready to make a deal? >> only if it is a fair and good deal for the united states.
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otherwise i will not make a deal. we have billions and billions coming in. i think we are going to get there. it's not a question of behavior. i think they want to make a deal and should make a deal. if they don't make a deal, it's going to be very bad for china. i very much appreciate the fact that they came out last night very late and said they want to make a deal, want it to be under calm circumstances. it was a little different kind of statement. i thought it was a beautiful statement. >> except a chinese foreign ministry spokesperson said he was not aware of phone calls trump mentioned. you could hear it when he was like, china called. his eyes were -- i mean -- i guess the president doesn't understand that things can be verified. >> well, actually people will ask foreign ministries whether they actually called or not. of course one other thing and it becomes laborious, but we have
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to keep talking about billions of dollars that tariffs are going to take from china. it comes from you, the american taxpayer. the chinese do not pay the tariffs. you pay the tariffs. when you go grocery shopping, when you go to walmart, target, you are paying the tariffs, the american consumer. i'm not sure who he thinks he's fooling. i don't think his supporters are stupid. i guess he thinks they're stupid which is insulting, but tariffs aren't paid by china. the tariffs are paid by the american consumer. john heilman, let's take a step back. i want you to give us the overview before richard haas gives us the specifics on policy. his performance this weekend was extraordinarily unmoored, worse
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than ever. everybody agrees donald trump is getting worse. he began the weekend on friday by ordering u.s. companies to get out of china, ordering them. then saying he had the legal authority to do it. a bizarre defense of vladimir putin. just a bizarre obsession. it's really sad. he's so obsessed with barack obama and it makes him look small. that continued as he attacked a former president while praising an ex-kgb agent. when inside private meetings, from all reports, obsessed with getting vladimir putin in the room with them.
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what are our allies to think and how in the hell can republicans watch him on the world stage promoting doral, a property that's collapsing and do little more than write op-eds saying donald trump is right about purchasing greenland without mentioning he cancelled the meeting with greenland, with denmark because they wouldn't sell him greenland. >> yeah. the tom cotton thing you're referring to is so sad to watch a united states senator -- >> it's pathetic. >> -- sucking up to the president in a ridiculous way when it's been clear that greenland is not for sale. oral arguments about its merits or demerits are irrelevant. >> again, john, the world is on fire when he's over there g7. >> literally. >> literally. look at what's happening with russia, china, with your closest
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allies and your answer is to go back to last week and say, well, it's a good idea to purchase greenland. doing the same. how do they ignore the fire in front of them? >> i believe the word you are looking for is psysycophant and toady. because trump's performance was quintessentially trump and the reaction was quintessentially republican. they ignore what he's doing, suck up to him. they have given up the pretense of not being in his pocket. we'll talk about it but the main thing over the weekend, all the things you laid out, the image that summed up the whole thing was the notion, to your image of the world on fire, the amazon is on fire. the most urgent meeting of the weekend in some respects is the meeting on climate change where
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the entire industrialized world, the rest of the world recognized in a way now that it has never before, climate change is vividly on display as we watch the amazon burning in a way that's going to potentially create ecological havoc that takes hundreds of years to correct if it ever gets kreekted. in the session on climate change at the g7, the president didn't show up. there was an empty chair which symbolizes where we are now. we are fully there. the president of the united states is abdicating. >> his excuse was a lie. his excuse for not being there was even a lie. >> yes. >> everything he did all weekend was an alternative reality. >> for sure. he says he was off doing bilateral meetings, i believe, with india and germany and of course those leaders were in the room. yes, he lied again. the bigger story is the story of abdication.
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we talked about how donald trump was seeding american leadership on the world stage. now we have the full abdication of leadership and the heads of the other g7 nations which in every other trans national, international meeting over the last two and a half years have tried one way or the other to cajole trump, to push trump, to offer blandishments to trump. they are giving up. how do we keep the arsonist from burning down the house, keep him from doing damage and go about our business because america is no longer the leader of the free world. that's what you saw over the weekend. in the long arc of history that's what we'll remember the summit for. >> of course, it's just a realization, richard haas, of what angela merkel told germans a few years ago when she said we can no longer rely on the united states of america.
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>> the measure -- it's interesting. the measure of a g7 now isn't what you accomplish. it's what you avoid. in this case it was avoiding a major blow-up with the united states from the get-go. emmanuel macron decided the last thing you needed was a communique because it the united states could sign onto that would be substantive. he was very smart. he cut his losses. i think john's point is right. abdication is a word i have used. essentially the united states has gone from being the principal architect and general contractor of world order to becoming the principal disruptor. the problem for the europeans and the japanese and others is they lack the capacity to subjects du substitute for us. they do what they can. $25 million for amazon fires which is a drop in the bucket. without the united states in the driver's seat we don't make a lot of progress.
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the gap between the challenges and the international responses is growing. that's the historical judgment about the g7 which looks like a tired gathering. i think the two immediate things i would highlight are the president walked back two big issues. the trade war for the moment with china and the threat of actual war with iran. there was a change from where he showed up in france and where he ended. >> still ahead on "morning joe." >> they took crimea during his term. that was not a good thing. it could have been stopped with the right -- whatever. >> yeah. with the right whatever. we'll run through the president's strategic analysis of geopolitics next on "morning joe." with all day comfort for all day fun...
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a lot of bad things happened with president putin and president obama. one of the things that happened was, as you know, what happened with a very big area, a very, very big and important area in the middle east where the red line was drawn and then president obama decided that he was not going to do anything about it. you can't draw red lines in the sand. you just can't do it. the other was in ukraine, having to do with a certain section of ukraine you know well where it was taken away from president obama. not taken away from president trump. taken away from president obama. president obama was not happy that this happened because it was embarrassing to him, right? it was very embarrassing to him. he wanted russia to be out of the -- what was called the g8. that was his determination. he was outsmarted by putin. he was outsmarted. president putin outsmarted president obama.
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>> why do you keep making the misleading statement that russia outsmarted president obama. >> he did. >> when other countries say russia was kicked out because they annexed crimea. why keep repeating a clear lie? >> i know you like president obama, but it was annexed during president obama's term. if it was annexed during my term i would say, i'm sorry, folks, i made a mistake. sorry, folks. president obama was pure and simply outsmarted. they took crimea during his term. that was not a good thing. it could have been stopped. could have been stopped with the right -- whatever. it could have been stopped. but president obama was unable to stop it. >> it's -- it's insanity. >> yes, it is. >> first of all, vladimir putin did not take crimea from an american president. vladimir putin took crimea from
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ukraine just like he took georgia from georgia. those invasions were invasions of vladimir putin, a man who is still trying to disrupt and interfere with american democracy, according to donald trump's appointees to the fbi, the cia, india, everybody.xtordy unbecoming of a president to attack another president of -- of a dictator. an ex-kgb agent who has now invaded two countries over the past decade. and who is still invading the united states. who donald trump's own intel chiefs and military warned is
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posing a direct threat to american democracy. this, mika, is the man donald trump goes to the mats for every day defending. the question remains, why? i asked last week. they don't like the questions that have been asked of donald trump. i need to hear their theory. what's their alternative theory? >> that's the question i have for elise. you have to understand one of the patterns that you might say many are tracking in this presidency is the undermining of the media and the undermining of the truth, the undermining of journalists. the more you do that, the more you think you can live in this dream world and make up stuff and pretend you were at meetings and say you were with certain people when we show the picture of people at a meeting where he was not. >> right in the middle. pick somebody on the side.
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we showed the picture before. they were right in the middle of the meeting when donald trump said, oh, no, i wasn't at the meeting. >> i don't think this is him being mr. magoo. i think there was a huge effort on this president's part, my concern is that he's devaling the truth and devaluing our standing on the world stage. >> he is. >> elise, my question to you is with this putin envy, putin connection, the desire to obsess over russia and putin in a way that's beyond inappropriate and beyond reflecting where we have been over the past 10, 20, 30 years, people like my father who know deep, deep inside information about how this has all come together, strategic partnerships, concerns about our elections, how is it that nobody
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in the white house and no republican except finally rick santorum speaking. where are these people and what planet are they on? what could be the strategy for a trump supporter to stand by this relationship? >> you put it right. he has this envy of president obama and he will not be deterred. there's been a lot of whether putin has something on him or whether he's bribing him. it's just putin envy. he's a strong leader, doesn't have any real constituency in the country. he does everything by fiat and force. that's the kind of leader, no protests, no acrimony from the people. that's the kind of leader president trump wants to be. the reason why the republicans don't say something i think is simple. they are just putting party over country. you know it's a sad thing.
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you would think some of the conservatives, the party of ronald reagan would say somewhere about a country like russia which they say out loud is interfering in the u.s. elections, interfering in world elections across the globe. so it befuddles the mind to ask why people aren't saying anything. it is possible some of them do in private. >> coming up, we'll pick up with gene robinson's new column, trump's obama envy is getting worse. "morning joe" back in three minutes.
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crimean peninsula. in trump's version, however, crimea was taken from president obama. those are donald trump's delusional words. trump blasts the obamacare administration's record of creating jobs and claims to be doing much better, yet -- journalists listen to this, too, because you keep talking about donald trump's great recovery. under obama, the unemployment rate fell from a high of 10% to just 4.7%. also, by the way, obama created more jobs the last two and a half years of his term than trump has for being soft on illegal immigration yet deports fewer undocumented migrants than obama did, by the way. also illegal crossings. 50-year low under barack obama. they have skyrocketed under donald trump. facts. stubborn facts. trump seems terrified history will look more kindly on obama's
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presidency than his own. if that's the case on this one point he couldn't be more right. mike barnacle, it was staggering to see an american president attack another american president on the world stage. i have never seen it before. in defense of an autocrat who said the greatest tragedy of the 20th century was the soviet union collapsing. >> no one has seen this before, joe. no one has. it's odd. i guess we are in a stage where people don't realize history never stops. you had an odd portrait, a mixture of resentment and envy on trump's part talking about barack obama. you also, gene, seem to have a very dangerous portrait of instability for the first time really on the world stage this
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year and the portrait is of donald j. trump. >> yeah. you know, in that 68-minute tour du nonforce -- i don't know what you call it, that bizarre appearance yesterday. the world got to see what we are now pretty accustomed to seeing. donald trump getting in front of a microphone telling lie after lie, winging it, showing his obsessions, neuroses, resentments, insecurities and inadequacies and his stunning ignorance. we have seen it a lot. the world got to witness just who was in charge of the united states and its economy, its military, this great world power that now as everybody has been
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saying, is essentially on the sidelines. for the united states to be basically in effective, ineffectual and just as well not there at a meeting of the g7 is a stand-unning thing. we can expect nothing more while donald trump is president. the other world leaders consider it fortunate there was no other disaster at the meeting. the attitude was just, let's get through this, get on with our business, do the best we can. as richard said, there is a limited amount they can do without the united states. but that's how they have to proceed now. >> coming up on "morning joe," a pharmaceutical giant is fined a half billion dollars. remarkably, its stock goes up. we'll talk about the lawsuit against johnson & johnson and its role in the opioid crisis. "morning joe" is back in a moment.
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in a landmark ruling involving pharmaceutical giant johnson & johnson, an oklahoma judge ordered the company to pay more than half a billion dollars for pushing doctors to prescribe opioids while downplaying the risks of addiction. prosecutors say it helped fuel the state's opioid epidemic and led to more than 6,000 deaths over nearly two decades. johnson & johnson denied any wrongdoing. joining us now oklahoma attorney general mike hunter. also with us is danny savales along with corinne jean pierre. mr. attorney general, congratulations on this. >> thanks. >> explain to us what exactly was the argument that you want?
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>> well, the promise was honestly pretty clear. this company, johnson & johnson was the originator of the oversupply and overprescribing epidemic in the country. they got together with partners in the mid 90s and came up with a scheme that doctors needed to treat pain as a fifth vital sign though there is no criteria for that. they bought a poppy form and supplied 60% of the ingredient for prescription opioids in the united states. they misrepresented the addictive qualities of the drugs, promoted the sale of all opioids in this country including their own. they collaborated, conspired with their industry partners to head off policy changes that would have helped abate the
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epidemic. as far as we are concerned, when we use the term kingpin to describe their activities it wasn't hyperbole. >> yeah. >> we proved it and the judge's decision in a way that's absolutely inarguable established their cull pablt for causing the epidemic in our state. >> how did they misrepresent the addictive quality of opioids? >> they fiendishly used pseudoscience, misrepresented studies, hired key opinion leaders with degrees and credentials to go around the country and, again, deal with this misinformation in a way that began to change attitudes on the part of prescribers about opioids. so they spent millions and millions of dollars on this campaign brainwashing prescribers.
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>> general hunt, given the fact that oklahoma isn't unlike a lot of other states where the epidemic has ravaged the population, i assume there could be more than one defendant in a case like this. why was johnson & johnson the only defendant? >> we settled with two other defendants earlier this spring. purdue pharma and teva. so cumulatively we have been able to get almost a billion dollars from the companies to start dealing with the epidemic in this state. the conduct of opioid manufacturers in this country is indivisible as far as i'm concernl conce concerned. >> we have danny savales with us. he has a question. >> you used a relatively novel theory of public nuisance law which is usually a person's use
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of property interfering with another's use of property like loud noises or noxious orders but oklahoma law as written doesn't require that the nuisance be tied to use of property. >> right. >> other states do. is it true, a.g. hunter, that had the case been brought in one of those states that tie s nuisance to property you couldn't have won a case like this? >> i believe in federalism. i believe in the ability to have states to conduct their own business and to have legal systems that protect their citizens. oklahoma's public nuisance law is unique. it is powerful. it gives me as attorney general and judge bachman, as the judge in this case, the authority to abate a public nuisance when there is significant harm occ occurring to a population, when you can demonstrate causation you have the ability then in court to abate the epidemic.
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novel, yes. when 6,000 oklahomans die as a result of the conduct of this defendant when we have perhaps 100,000 oklahomans addicted, we used a legal asset available to us to deal with what's going on in the state. i have no apologies, nor do i think it is a theory that isn't going to be upheld in ap lpella courts. we know what we are doing and we are ready for appeals. >> to me, the most astonishing and saddest sentence in the opinion by the judge is essentially this one. it's that the defendants apparently used a phrase called pseudoaddiction meaning something that's false, to convince doctors that patients who exhibited signs of addiction were not suffering from addiction but instead were suffering from undertreatment of pain and the fix for that was
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more opiates. this should be the leading line in every interview you give. this is the saddest sentence in the entire opinion. i want to get your comments on the pseudoaddiction concept. >> shameful. i don't know if there are words that are sufficient to describe the recklessness, the irresponsibility, the cold-bloodedness of trying to convince physicians that it wasn't an addiction and they should prescribe more. the money johnson & johnson made is blood money. the ceo needs to step up, write the check in oklahoma so we can deal with problems they caused. >> general hunter, the check that's going to be written after the appeals are all through, how is the money going to be distributed? where does the money go? >> most of the money will be principally dedicated to dealing
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with counseling, rehabilitation and treatment for around 100,000 oklahomans who have become addicted to opioids in many different forms. there is also money that will be made available for education and prevention and law enforcement. so the judge has done a good job in ensuring that we are dealing with from a to z the different ways we need to, again, abate the epidemic in oklahoma. >> all right. oklahoma attorney general mike hunter, thank you so much for being on the show. >> thank you. >> congratulations, huge. let's get to the business angle in the wake of the ruling against johnson & johnson. the company stock jumped yesterday and it appears shares will continue to climb today. domenic chu of cnbc joins us.
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explain why that happened. >> it comes down to expectations. the johnson & johnson shares are higher on the news largely in part because the $572 million ruling you spoke about was far less than the $17 billion oklahoma was looking for and less than some analysts had forecast. we had seen ranges from $500 million to $5 billion. nothing close to $17 billion, but still it came in less and that's the reason johnson & johnson, with a little bit more certainty here, incrementally -- not a lot. the appeals process is in place, but look at teva pharmaceuticals, other big drug makers that have some of the painkillers. those stocks on the rise as well given the smaller than expected damage award. markets are stable and opened slightly higher for the day. trade tensions are easing slightly between the u.s. and china. the dow, s&p and nasdaq will try to make two days in a row of gains. the companies we are watching that are the most impacted by
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trade tensions have been ones with a lot of business presence in china. otherwise the manufacturing side of things as well. we are watching apple computer. also chip makers like intel, athletic apparel makers like nike and construction companies like caterpillar because all have significant exposure to china. each of the four stocks members of the dow jones industrial average and they do count china as a key market there. finally, shares of beyond meat rose yesterday. they are higher in trading today. this is the maker of plant-based meat alternatives. it will go beyond patties and sausages and get into plant-based chicken nuggets. yum brand's kfc will test the beyond chicken product at one of the restaurants in atlanta, georgia. the possible roll-out could happen based upon customer feedback. if you are looking for more ways to get alternative meat into your diet, it could be at kfc with beyond chicken. back to you. >> oh, great.
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cnbc's domenic chu, thank you very much. danny savales, thank you as well. last year the record number of women sworn into office changed the face of congress. up next, we'll speak to the author of a new book that looks at the trail blazing female candidates who are changing u.s. politics. as we go to break, a look at what's happening at knowyourvalue.com. we have a feature from sally sussman making the case for young people to consider a career in business. plus, mothers, fathers and the myth of equal partnership. a new look at who does what and why when it comes to raising kids. you can read those pieces and much more. join the conversation yourself at knowyourvalue.com. "morning joe" is back in a moment. what do you look for when you trade?
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caitlin moscatello the author of the book "see jane win" and also with us one of the women featured in the book. great to have you both with us. congratulations on the book. >> thanks so much. >> you started this around the time of the marches. what was the inspiration of the book? >> i started reporting this story in february, 2017. it was a politically bleak time for many women across the country, and there were murmurs at the time. early reports of being inundated with women newly interested in running for office. so, at that time i thought -- i really saw it as the bright light. i was compelled to follow it. it led me to women like catalina and i was able to follow their stories really from even before some of the women decided to run all the way through election
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night. and then in january when they took office. >> hi there. great book. really looking forward to reading it. my question to both of you is, do you think that this -- was this a reaction to donald trump or part of a larger trend? that's the first question. the second question is will we see a repeat of this in the upcoming cycle? more women, more diverse people running in the next cycle? >> i think i've often called it a perfect political storm because you have these new surge of women who not only felt empowered because finally they felt like they had a political platform and a piece of the conversation. what you also had, a new president who continuously worked to silence that. so he gave us that extra push to want to do this. and i'm certainly hoping we'll see a repeat. not just of more women but more women of color, more men of color to take place at the table
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where the decisions are being made. so i'm crossing my fingers we'll definitely see a repeat. >> you were born in colombia. you came to america. you lived in dreamer land for several years, became a citizen, married. why did you decide to run for the new york state assembly? what prompted that? >> i felt like i had a lot of privilege and had not fully used it in the way i could protect and fight for my community. i was a lawyer. i had worked for governor cuomo, worked for the city council. i had all of this experience but i also had this secret of how i grew up. i grew up so poor my mom and i used to collect cans. i grew up so poor that, you know, a piece of the book actually talks about how i had to buy feminine hygiene products at a 99 cents store. that is the level of poverty i had. now i had this privilege of the knowledge, the education, and here i am doing great work at an agency when i could be creating
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the policies, i could be pushing the change that will help protect our community while we weather the storm of this presidency. >> so i'm curious, you're seeing this huge thing happening, this large increase in women candidates, the importance of that chunk of the electorate is rising. we've seen it obviously happened in 2018. people look at the 2020. i'm curious as you look at just texturally, what is different about how women run for off for? as emotionally, psychologically, intellectually, the things at the center of their campaigns. if you compare and contrast the different styles of candidacy? >> yes. well, we're seeing it right now in the 2020 race in a really big way. having more women in the democratic primary already has put really important issues, the equal rights amendment. we're talking about abortion access. we are talking about the wage gap. we're talking about affordable
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child care. these are issues that have been brought to the forefront in the presidential race and, really, the reason for that is because the female candidates in the race have pushed those issues. in doing so, the men in the race have also had to come forward and talk about them and address them much more prominently than i think we are typically used to seeing in races. that's just one effect of having more women in politics. >> all right. >> well, the book is, "see jane win" the inspiring story of the women change having american politics. great concept. catalina cruz, great story. thank you very much, both of you. >> thank you. >> for being on the show today. >> thank you for having us. speaking of powerful women supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg made her first public appearance yesterday since the announcement she is receiving cancer treatment for the fourth time. justice ginsburg was presented with an honorary law degree from the university of buffalo law school.
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ginsburg reflected on her law career and her long-time focus on women's rights. ginsburg's recent cancer announcement did not appear to rattle the 86-year-old, who even joked about her nickname, notorious rbg. >> it was beyond my wildest imagination that i would one day become the notorious rbg. i am now 86 years old. yet people of all ages want to take their picture with me. amazing. >> my gosh. amazing. mike barnicle, thoughts? >> well, you know, seeing justice ginsburg and just having had the conversation about more women running for more offices -- state, local, federal around the country -- that can only be viewed as tremendous progress as well as a gift to america, because the more women we have on the ballot the more women we have in public office,
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the smarter we become. >> that is mike barnicle, a man who is married to an extraordinary woman and knows exactly which side his bread is buttered on but all true. the other thing i'd say is, look. you look at the notorious rbg. literally on friday i think a lot of the world whether you're conservative or liberal, hearing she had another cancer scare, hearing it was related to pancreatic cancer, a lot of people on friday were saying prayers and to see her out in public looking so strong and vibrant in that video just so recently after everyone was kind of holding their breath on friday, kind of incredible relief for a lot of people out there in the country. great to see. >> yeah, incredible relief indeed. look, i'll be a little bit of a downind of
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