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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 14, 2013 6:00am-9:00am EST

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would you miss crocs if they went out of business? we're tight on time. mostly negative, but we did have some pro crocs. one is miranda, i think the real fashion horror is not crocs, it's when they wear socks with the crocs. and i will agree. "morning joe" from d.c. starts right now. you apologized to your family, to the council and the people with respect to your behavior at the air canada centre. you said that conduct would not be repeated.
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every episode that has occurred that has caused commotion in the city has been -- >> i'ved a m >> i've admitted to my mistakes and said it would not happen p again and it has not happened again at the air canada centre. >> of all things that we could start the show with. good morning. we're in washington. it is thursday, november 14th. and with us onset, we have senior political editor sam stein. >> i can't stop laughing. >> former treasury official and morning joe economic analyst steve rattner. white house correspondent for the associated press julia pace.
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and al hunt, met your producer last night at politico. nice guy. we started the day in politics and proez prose, you had a sold out packed house. >> they not sam stein was going to be there. >> and there were a lot of republicans there. you're drawing a republican crowd. >> this is politics and prose. usually when i tell people, use my marxist joke, they all laugh. last night, they stood up and applauded. so you're reaching out to a new republican party. >> it was amazing. there was even a republican who voted for obama who stood up proudly and said that. >> that doesn't happen so much. used to say how many
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republicans, how many democrats. like in 2009, shield say and how many republicans who voted for obama. and there would be like ten people applauding, be really proud of themselves for being transformative and having the courage to cross party lines and make a difference. that doesn't happen so much anymore. there was one last night, though. >> that's my neighborhood and one your year when my kids were young, saddam hussein and georg bush. saddam got more candy. >> honestly, i don't know how you do this. the night continued over at the may flower with politico, one of their cocktails. and i cannot believe they were in the balconies and you had a great audience. >> do you know what they were asking, where is sam stein not
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here. >> it will never end. >> but there were a lot of good questions. and the most interesting thing, and i think the rope these crowds are so big is that the timing for the book is unbelievable.rope these crowds are so big is that the timing for the book is unbelievable. it really is hitting a nerve. so we'll get to that more with the politico boys later. but a wonderful night. and congratulations. >> and thanks to everybody for coming out. really it was a record crowd there. and made us feel really, really good considering sam stein couldn't go across the street. hurt me right there. rob ford september nt me a telt. >> and it continues today. all right. here we go. >> would it be easier if i read this? >> no, i got it. there is a lot to cover here. a lot of incredible guests today by the way. >> so fearing their political futures are on the line,
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congressional democrats are giving the white house until tomorrow to fix the problems with obama care. that's what members of the house are going to be voting on a bill to address the issues that concern the millions ever americans who have lost their plans because of the law. and today harry reid will be meeting with white house officials. this is following a very contentious meeting between house democrats and administration officials yesterday and one proposal includes allowing americans to keep their current insurance plans regardless of the affordable care act up the end of 2015. >> that would help, but it appears more americans have lost their insurance than have signed up for it. with close to 850,000 applications completed, just over 106,000 people have actually selected insurance plans through federal or state run exchanges between october 1st and november 2nd. that includes over 79,000 enrolled through a state based
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exchange accounting for 75% of all the signups. more than 26,000 people are now getting their health care coverage through the federal program, that breaks down to just 1% of the estimated 48 million americans without health insurance. california, a state run exchange, has the largest enrollment numbers at about 35,000 people. florida which runs a federal program signed up just over 3500 people. and north dakota has the least amount of enrollees with exactly 42 accounts successfully created. >> isn't that like half of north dakota? >> congressional budget office expected 7 million officials to sign up for obama care in its first year. in september the white house said it expected over 3450,000 people to sign up during the program's first month. doct doctor. >> and for president obama, there is no relief when it comes to public polling. 55% of americans feel the
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president was not being honest when it came to obama care. 50% believe the president knowingly lied when he said americans would keep their plans and 58% says they thought his apology was to political reasons. >> al hunt, the president obviously facing so much problems incoming from the website, but do you suspect that this broken promise is -- that most americans think was a broken promise, is that the great challenge? >> it's a huge challenge. but they had mull kip he will challenges. they have to get things working so they can improve the numbers if they possibly can. the credibility of the program has suffered. the kret akd credibility of thet has suffered. what bothers a lot of democrats is did they learn anything from this. i think this was a complex problem to begin with. it wasn't going to go smoothly. it would have gone much better
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if it hasn't been the white house in-so he rarity. >> why didn't they do that? >> because insolarity is the buy word of this administration. steven rattner who it a fabulous job with the automobile industry could have run it. but they don't turn to outside people because they are so insul lar. >> why is that? >> it's an interesting question. wh >> greatest example is when you had james baker trying to beat ronald reagan in the primary and second reagan ended up winning and he turned to baker and said run high cmy campaign.
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>> in the beginning it looked like there was some with this at administration. it didn't work out very well. they are more insular than ever. it is a problem that just absolutely infuriates testimonitestimondemocrats. >> they don't listen to republicans that much. will they listen to the house democrats who are angry and giving they will an ultimatum? you guys either fix this fast or we'll go in our open direction and support these bills that will force to you keep your promise. >> and this will come to a head very quickly. you'll have a vote on friday on the upton bill in the house and a lot of the democrats are saying to the white house we want you to come up with another solution. please give us something else, whether it's administrative, legislative. and as of yet, we haven't seen that from the white house. you'll have the senate meeting today. i think you'll see a lot of push back from democrats in the senate, as well. >> it will be interesting. >> push back to the white house. >> push back to the white house. and again on a similar line from
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what we're hearing from house democrats which is give us another option. we're asking for you a fix. you tell us you're looking at it, but we haven't seen anything yet. >> or shall sort of assurance that this will be fixed. steve and sam, latest snapshot of the 2016 race isn't looking good for vice president biden of all people. just 25% of people in a new quinnipiac poll say joe biden would make a good president. 54% say hillary clinton by comparison could ham the job. the poll also shows chris christie and hillary clinton neck and neck. and while clinton leads with women, christie with men. independents go to christie by a margin of 16 points. yesterday, this is interesting, senator rand paul took a shot at his possible 2016 opponent, new jersey governor chris christie, for federal spending on sandy and for including himself in post-storm tourism ads. >> you call him a moderate a couple of times. what do you base that on? >> well, i think that his victory was in large form based
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on that he got a lot of -- >> we just lost if. >> you called him a moderate of a couple of times. what do you base that on? >> well, i think that his victory was in large form based on that he got a lot of federal money for his state. the problem is that there were some of us who said, yeah, we do have federal funds available for disasters, but really we ought to spend it one year at a time and if we have to increase the budget for disasters, we have to take it from somewhere else. unlimited spending is sort of -- you can call it moderate or even liberal to think that there is unlimited amount of money even for good cause. >> you have the governor running in 25 million bucks stronger than the storm, using that through a political campaign. that's taxpayer money. >> it should be against the law for any politician to put their image on tv at taxpayer expense. really we have a 9% approval rating, politicians do, because
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people are unhappy about taxpayer money being used. and particularly when it's one thing if you want it put your image on tv and say i'm going to give a million dollars of my money. but you're getting somebody else's money. if you're doing that, should you take part of that money to promote how good you are at getting somebody else's money to come to new jersey. >> okay. so, joe, with all due respect to your party, but we were talking about whether democrats will learn their lesson. talk about not learning anything. come on. >> we'll see what happens. rand paul obviously -- he said you shouldn't ever use taxpayer money to get your image in front of your constituents, which what that means is rand paul is probably the exception to the rule. he must be the only member in the house or the senate that doesn't do franking. franking is where you send, you know, letters to your constituents that put your face in front of your constituents. >> with taxpayer money.
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>> you're using taxpayer money to do what he said. >> but you -- i'm not happy about it, but such a time of opportunity given what's happening with health care. >> this is not the time to be out there criticizing your fellow republicans. >> especially because this fix to obama care is not going to be simple. the upton bill julie referred o to, even what president clinton said is hard toi implement. if the president comes up with some solution that requires legislation, he happened it is to the senate, maybe they pass it. hard to imagine the house passes it. and this is what the republicans should be doing purely political standpoint is they should be doing obama care, obama care, obama care, not shooting at each other. >> obsessing at a race that is still three years away. if you're one of the key players in that, and it keeps going back to sandy, this is also very
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interesting when kentucky is hit with a natural disaster, we'll see whether rand paul asks for support for the good people of kentucky or just 1sits back and nothing. >> with the exception of tom coburn where he says he doesn't think the government has that big a role to play, i think to rand paul's credit, he was probably goaded into that by the question. it wasn't as if he just decided to jump in with the christie criticism. i think you're right, at this moment in time, republicans would be wise to basically just get out of the way. what we're witnessing now is probably the lowest point politically for president obama, a continuous stream of bad news. and steve hit the nail on the head which is that even though there are these legislative suggestions for how to fix this law, they are exceptionally short term political fixes that would cause policy disruption five, ten years down the road. ed it gut the exchanges. it would created a verse selection in the exchanges and could potentially derail health care. so president obama has to figure out what he can get done
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legislatively in a divided congress that wouldn't necessarily tinker too much with the law, but would at least give democrats a bit of space. >> i agree with all that except i would say it's not five or ten years down the road. it's by next year. most of these solutions would -- ba obama care, each piece rests on another piece. you pull one piece out, the whole thing could collapse. >> and there is the political problem that people are getting cancellation letters. that could be solved somewhat if people were able to go on to a website and say i can get this option and this tax credit. they can't do that right now. i talked to a private industry source last night, private industry, not government, who said he wasn't worried about the numbers. what he's worried about is the numbers in six months time. the question now is can they make to six months time. i'm not sure if they can. >> put this in perspective for us. we showed some poll numbers yesterday which were pretty stunning that barack obama is where george w. bush was three months after katrina, the same
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approval ratings. put it into perspective. what does this crisis remind you of? and of course we're not saying there is any moral equivalence, but politically, obviously it impacts the impact of katrina. iran contra. where does it stand and what does the president do to turn it around? >> i think katrina may be the best analogy. what is remarkable is that each party seems intent on throwing the other a lifeline when they're drowning. in early october, there was already some problems with obama care. so what do the republicans do? they had a shutdown and through a lifeline to the democrat. then republicans at their lowest point ever and what has obama done, he's thrown a life long. both parties are in trouble, but he's the president and this will be very hard to come back from. >> we'll be asking a lot of questions to a big roster of guests this morning on how to fix this, if it can be fixed.
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coming up on morning skroe o"mj senator joe manchin will be here. governor mcdonnell will be here. we'll talk to claire mccaskill. and later, a live interview with john kerry. up next, we'll preview the brand new political company magazine. john harris joins us. a news piece describes the obama cabinet as a fun house mirror filled with communications breakdowns. >> where is the hat, man? first here is it bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning to you. it's a cold morning as advertised. pretty much everywhere east of the rocky, but the good news is we're past the peak and now it war warms up from here let's take you into this morning. temperatures as advertised again 30 in atlanta, it is chilly out
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there with that cold all the way down into florida. but this afternoon should be nice. temperatures warm up in a hurry. look at the 24 hour temperature change. all the warm air coming from the middle of the cup and headiount heading to the east. you'll be 50 in chicago, same for new york city, about 5 to 10 degrees warmer. d.c. at 57 this afternoon. should an nice day after a cold start. friday, we get warmer, some showers in florida. much of the east coast by the way should have a gorgeous weekend. so after a cold chilly start, what a beautiful afternoon with perfectly blue skies in can t.c..
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time too take a look at the morning papers. the "chicago tribune," secret service reassigned two supervisors after allegations of inappropriate conduct involving women. one of thing a accused left a bullet in a woman's hotel room. he reportedly tried to go back to retrieve it. both are also suspected of sending suggestive e-mails to a female colleague. and for the first time, the united states is producing more crude oil than it imports. it hit a 24 year high while foreign imports at a 17 year low. still the u.s. imports about 35% of the petroleum it uses.
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expect that number to keep groping. >> "l.a. times," photo messages service snap chat has allegedly turned down a $3 billion offer from facebook. they declined the offer because mull will tip he wiltiple inves interested. they believe facebook is trying to engaging younger losers. >> i'd take it sight unseen. and the toronto star asking embattled mayor rob ford to step down. yesterday the council voted to ask him to temporarily step down, though it has no actual authority. ford declined. he admitted to using and purchasing drugs over the last two years. >> counselor, it was not the reason i trank or did drugs was
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not because of stress. it was out of shear stupidity. that's all it was. >> and a "new york times" painting -- the "new york times" writes a 1963 painting by andy warhol sold for more than $104 million last night. that's the highest price ever paid for any warhol work. it's only been seen once in public. second time in two days that a painting from the '60s sold for more than $100 million. >> kansas city star, they say ignorance is bliss. and that may apply to the mcdonald's mcrib sandwich. a photo allegedly taken by an employee of a frozen mcrib went viral. >> is there no shame? >> mcdonald's says the pattie is
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formed in the shape of traditional ribs, they flash freeze the meat before subpoena sending it out to the restaurants. >> yikes. that picture -- i mean, that hits me about the same way that "time" cover, is god dead. >> and there you go. do you eat that? >> no. it's awful. >> why would you eat it? >> it tastes g s delicious and good for you. joining us, john harris and gladden thrush. they are launching the brand new politico magazine. inside the magazine is glenn's piece titled locked in the cabinet, a revealing look at president obama's cabinet. and this looks amazing. >> this is something to be excited about.
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what a story to start with. >> we are very proud of it. pli politico trying to go deeper in addition to living in the moment. and thrush here has taken us deeper than anyone has ever taken us. >> where is his hat? >> i don't know. i've never seen him this way. i didn't realize he was bald. >> so let's talk about your look at the obama cabinet. there's a description of a fun house mirror that has this idiosyncratic lurching management style. explain. >> i think we've seen it pretty much played out over the last six weeks with the obama care rollout. but essentially the president started off in 2008 telling joe klein he wanted to have a team at the top bob gates, hillary clinton, tim geithner, he had that. but when you got below the headlines with that cabinet, they were systemically marginalized, people who didn't really necessarily have a lot of
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access to the president. and by and large as you drifted closer to the 2012 campaign, the management particularly from guys like david plouffe really mandated a crackdown on more or less everything. people had to clear their schedules. and i think in the most -- one of the most telling problems that they had is that they clogged up a lot of the obama care regulations that were necessary to get the website going for months and months. >> so chaotic management style? >> not so much chaotic management style. it's a her met particularly sealed management style in which you have a west wing and white house that functions i think fairly competent tently. didn't necessarily seek output from the outside. that doesn't necessarily hold true just for people on the outside. it also holds true for these massive cabinet departments that control enormous amounts of the federal government. >> one thing that gets me, they have in this cabinet throughout the five years a lot of people who faced voters.
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i don't think any of the white house staff has ever faced a voter. maybe an exception or two. and this is a political town and yet when it comes to politics, those people who actually have faced voters are excluded and those people who never faced voters are making all the decisions. that's a disconnect. >> absolutely. and one of the reasons i think by d biden had influence earlier on. >> you have incredible quotes from people. it's a surreal experience sitting with bob gates, hillary clinton and leon panetta. like do i really blopg here. that's arne duncan. but who is this? explain this. sometimes i feel like january either is touching me. just to see if i'm still warm. >> that would be attorney general eric holder. >> excuse me? >> who i feel -- harris does that to me. >> oh, my gosh. >> but anyway, when you have a situation like this where there is maybe a half step people who run the cup and they're all in
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the west wing and all that because of their closes ness because of their closes nes to obama, you don't have talented people who want to stay in those situations. i think we'll see a real flight of talent at all levels throughout the federal government earlier than we see it in the second term. >> because they're so clexclude? >> why stay. people are typically in government for the right reasons. they like to make a difference. and if you're not making a difference, you're being kind of systemically humiliated by the 35-year-old white house aide, the most talented people won't stay in those circumstances. >> and it really is amazing that you do have all of these talented people that have won locations and understand politics, and then you have a bunch of young people that are making all the decisions excluding you simply because of their proximity to president obama. >> and i'm curious, glenn, if you found a difference between the way that people like hillary clinton and lee on that panetta
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were treated versus someone like a steven chu who didn't have the national profile. >> exactly. hillary and gates flew first class, every else was not even coach, i would say steerage at certain points of time. this is a trend you see in a lot of white houses. you heard a lot of similar complaints even in the clinton white house, certainly the bush white house. if for no other reason than a lot of these guys don't have to face the congressional scrutiny. >> was there a difference as to why hillary would fly first class? >> to a certain september, hillary always represented a political thread internally and there was always that 2016 time frame. >> the exit interview that i still can't figure out. i mean i can -- >> gates, we seem to forget back in 2008/2009 time frame, before they agreed on the afghanistan surge, there was a tremendous -- that was principally what voters
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were questioning obama on. and without gates during those two first years, obama would not have credibly ban abeen able toe up his -- >> but even hillary was cut out of a lot of policy matters. for all her political clout, a lot of for policy decisions were made in the white house. >> and i don't think she and her team necessarily objected to that. i think we're starting to see now with the rather phrenetic kerry secretaryship a way different approach. >> why wouldn't they object to that? most secretaries of state, along with the secretary of defense and other key national secure figures, they're competing to get in on the action, to be on the forefront of major initiatives and moves, foreign policy moves. why wouldn't you want to be in the middle of it all? >> who was on the sunday shows? >> not hillary.
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>> who took the fau ofll after gad zi? >> you don't get involved, you don't get dirty so you can run later? >> i think that's a little reduct accou reductive, but there is some truth to it. at the time when people asked why hillary wasn't available for the benghazi sunday shows, we were told that she was tired from a foreign trip. i was told differently, that she had sort of a standing objection to doing those and really didn't want to be the face of -- >> do you think the items lasolf the west wing is getting better than previously or no change? >> i think mcdonough, obviously the jury is out and the obama care thing has distorted whatever view one would have. but mcdonough seems to have empowered he's guys more. he's doing these cabinet coffees where you basically sits down --
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>> get to know your cabinet. >> and let me ask you really quickly, how does the fun house that you talked about, how does this all feed into the affordable care act and the problems that they have, the insulated style you write about how they were people that saw problems coming and actually went to sebelius and said, hey, we need to bring in outside help and she said no thanks. and you said that that's indicative of the larger problem. >> i think there is an he estrangement, there is a sense of micro managing. but i think there was a sense that you kind of let everybody do what they're doing until they get trouble. the paradox of the entire obama presidency is the guy who has presided over one of the largest expansions of the federal government doesn't necessarily have a tremendous interest in the way that it works. doesn't like to get under the
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hood in the same way that bill clinton did. >> politico's john harris, glenn thrush. thank you. >> we're proud of it. ahead, secretary of state john kerry will join us. also virginia governor bob mcconnell.
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time for a little sports here. a little nba where the rivalry seems to be brewing with the thunder and the clippers. thunder up six in the second. blake griffen gets tangled up going for a rebound and it gets a little nasty. a little pushing, a little shoving. technical foul, both tossed out. griffin got the t. despite 33 points from did your rapt, clippers take the victory. yankees need help in the bull pen, but there is one guy who says he's not interested. brian cashman telling reporters cross brian wilson off the list. after his agent said wilson has no intention of shaving that beard. the yankees have a strict facial
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hair policy, neatly groomed mustaches only. you may remember wilson reportedly turned down a million bucks to shave his beard earlier in the year. finally, what does it take to get people to see a pre-season college hoops game? how about free beer. that's right, louisville women's basketball coach buying a beer for the first 2500 fans who attend tonight's pre-season game against ls uflt. he says it's a sign of grat tite to loyal fans. lucky for him,s's two buck beer night. it will come out of his own pocket, so that's $5,000 for free beer. >> hope it was worth it. brian, thank you. joe is back on the road by the way today for his brand new book the right path, he heads to the university of chicago's institute of politics to sit down with david axelrod. tomorrow we'll both be in connecticut. check out out website for
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details. there is more ahead next week. we are definitely on book tour. matt lewis joins us next for the must read opinion pages. how are you? >> great. >> we'll be right back. la's known definitely for its traffic, congestion, for the smog.
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it's like a beach boys song. he gets away, right? his hands are all -- i love you! >> stop. >> doesn't matter if you're a man or woman, he's all over you. unbelievable that guy. he's like an octopus. >> you love him.
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>> i feel your pain! who doesn't love bill. >> you should see the two of them together. it it's disgusting. i love you, you have the best television show. i know, mr. president, and you look good. you're so slim. i know my hair looks good. oh, yours does, too. i know it does. let's look in the mirror together. >> i impeached him, you know. >> yeah, you did. >> that was my only defense after that. talk about losing cred trying to sell a republican book. >> might want to think about that. >> so funny about that guy, you go around, we give a lot of speeches and usually you ask questions have you you all met president fill in the blank. and there will be one or two people in the crowd, we had like 1200 people there, you have one or two people raise their hands.
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we found every time you ask how many people have met bill clinton, everybody raises their hands. >> everybody. >> it's like a beach boys song. he gets around. >> he is a social machine. time for the must read opinion pages. that was a great group last night by the way. they were really fun. an honor to be there. "wall street journal," conservative alternative to obama care. there has been fear among some republicans that proposing an alternative would give democrats a target and distract the public from the expected and now real failures of obama care. but the an sense of a credible alternative has been the gop's greatest weakness and probably why polls show that even many who are skeptical and concerned about obama care to not support full repeal. defenders of obama care are using the absence of republican
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alternative to suggest their law is the only answer to the grave problem of american health care. and that without it, millions of americans would continue to lack access to coverage. it's time for republicans to take it away. >> matt lewis, back when hillary had her health care plan in 93, 94, republicans had three alternatives. we had an alternative to the clinton budget, we had an alternative to the crime control plan. everybody had all these ideas. isn't it time for republicans to come up with one big idea? >> i think absolutely. you don't necessarily have to dwchlt make a big target to have your plan attacked. but i certainly position republicans and conservatives need to come together on a
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framework. there are ideas being floated out there. for example, rather than having mandates, you could have some sort of tax incentives in the tax code that would incent advise getting insurance. if you're young and healthy, you don't have to sign up for the best plan, but you could be protected in case of the catastrophic disaster. so i think republicans need to have a conservative solution that they can agree on. and that's the hard part. >> people criticize newt gingrich all these years later, but newt when he decided it was time for republicans to take over congress, he had alternatives to everything. >> like employer and individual mandates. >> oh, my gosh.
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where have i heard that? >> i think they're right, but it's tough. sounds easy. what do you do about people with pre-existing complains, how do they balance the insurance company. steve rattner can probably address this better than i can. it's easy to and i you ought to have an alternative when you start to frame it and craft it it's much more difficult. >> where we'll start, we'll start by telling americans that if you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan. i'm serious. that's where you start. >> but again as i said earlier, the whole thing has to work together. and the way that many people who have pre-existing conditions, many people whose insurance would go up for one reason or another, it will now go down because you'll enroll a the lot of people who are healthy and young and who will pay a little more.lot of people who are healthy and young
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and who will pay a little more. am wasn't johe wasn't joking wh employer mandate was a republican idea. p let's not forget romney care. >> very quickly, with the keep your plan thing, the op-ed talked about basically shifting away from the employer sponsored insurance which is more disruptive than what is happening in the obama care. but the bigger point is obama will be president until 2017, so any plan you're talking about won't happen until three more years. so it makes sense to work within the confines of the obama plan. >> i think first of all we have to go back -- read the book and he talks about the sense that we can't control everything. that the world is too complex.
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and really this is the fatal con seat, the idea that they can create this grand scheme where if you pull one they think out, the whole thing collapses. this is the danger that it will collapse under its open weight. so i do think conservatives need on have an alternative. and the truth is, yes, some of them did support the individual mandate, but i think it's simplistic and accurate to say all conservatives supported it. >> i'll give the last board to anyone who says the fatal conceit of liberalism. matt lewis, thank you so much. >> thank you, matt. appreciate you being here. >> willie exams serious journalism with the help of a decidedly unserious journalist. sfx: oil gushing out of pipe.
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everyone's favorite anchorman, ron burgundy, is heading back to the big screen next month. in the meantime, you can visit the newseum here in washington to see anchorman the exhibit. >> are you kidding me? >> yes. the knnewseum has this and will geist experienced it. >> reporter: you've seen the trailers and rewatched the original. >> i don't know how to put this, but i'm kind of a big deal. >> reporter: america's number one fake anchorman and his many leather bound books are back. >> i'm going to to the thing that god put ron burgundy on this earth to do. have salon quality hair and read the news. >> reporter: anchorman 2 doesn't open until next month, but the channel 4 news team stars in a new exhibit at the newseum in washington, d.c.. in a museum that showcases the
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best of serious journalism through the years, the anchorman exhibit shows off, well, something else. in a lighthearted celebration of '70s tv news. >> even new see ups can have a sense of humor. and they should because i think sometimes learning happens a little bit better with laughter involved. ♪ >> reporter: nbc got an exclusive look at some of anchorman's most famous props and costumes. as with any great artifacts, certain precautions had to be taken. >> you have to put on gloves. >> to touch one of his suits? >> absolutely. >> you're in the messing around. >> no. >> reporter: with my gloves on, i began to explore history. >> and a half the finest polyester. >> i'm a better anchorman for having touched this. >> will is ron burgundy's jazz throughout that he plays so
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expert expertly. >> this is the whip are one of the rival anchors. >> reporter: visitors to the exhibit even get their open shots at being ron burgundy. >> who would have it thunk? a cat that juggles. that will do it from us. we'll send it back to the studio and you, willie, you sexy son of a gun. >> pretty good, willie. you know, i never knew where he got that line. >> i'm kind of a big deal? >> yes, that one. >> you know where i got it, probably from the t shirt that you bought me that says i'm kind of a big deal. >> up next, senator joe manchin and virginia governor bob mcdonnell join the table. i'm beth...
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♪ there is no question that the dysfunction in washington that the american people have seen is taking its toll on everyone. and while the president's ratings are low for him, they're sky high in comparison with congress and in particular
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republicans in congress. >> top of the hour, live look at the white house. welcome back to "morning joe". we're here in washington. joining us now, we still have steve rattner and julie pace. joining the table, democratic senator from west virginia, senator joe manchin. and republican governor of virginia, governor bob mcdonnell. good to have you on board. >> bob's for jobs. >> we still talk about your campaign because it was such an example in so many ways. >> it really was. obviously, bob, you've had a lot of problems, ethics complaints, people coming after you from all sides. that's why on election night this poll surprised a lot of people in the media so much. it was your approval ratings versus president obama's approval ratings in the state of virginia. 52% for bob mcdonnell, only 41% disapproval rate aing. and polling six points better
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than president obama. we'll get to the ethics challenges in a minute. but first, why are your approval ratings still so high? >> i think the rope is that we're focused on trying to solve problems and get things done and bring republicans and democrats together in order to address kitchen table issues, whether it's transportation or pension system reform or education reform. had four surpluseses s ies in . just trying on get problems solved. a lot tougher in washington. >> what is the state's unemployment rate? >> down it 5.8%. lowest in the southeast. created about 180,000 jobs. people are working together. if they're working and have greater access to the american dream, they feel good about the state. >> so you were painted in 2009 as a right wing extremist. you went there, you stayed conservative. the reason why even last week mika and i were talking about how you're a role model i'd logically for conservatives, small government conservatives
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that figure out how to work together with the other side. we see scott walker doing it, we see chris christie doing it. what is the secret of doing that, how do you do it without people on your own side saying you're a traitor to the cause? >> you wrote about it in your book. you said principle conservatism along with clear eyed pragmatism. politics is the art of the possible. fight hard for your principles, but you have to have the right tone. i smile a lot. >> and being a happy warrior, it goes a long way. >> it does. and the kitchen table issues. what people want to know is what will you do for me and my family, give me greater access to a bright future. and the better you make your roads, your schools, your pension system, your budget, your tax burden, the better that will be for people. and it's been a great formula in virginia and we're the number one state in the business -- number one state for business according to "forbes magazine". that means more jobs. >> that's something. >> so let's go with the ethics
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challenges that you've been facing. obviously the latest is the ceos of this firm that you were working with and i guess the bottom line is it looked like quid pro quo, a lot of other things, expenses run up. what do you regret, what would you like to say? >> i said that i would do things a little differently now having the benefit of hindsight. i've worked hard tirelessly for 37 years to serve the people of america and virginia. i'm not perfect. i've made some mistakes. i acknowledged those. we returned the gift, paid back loans. and get up every day and do the best job i can. >> do you agree it looks like you abused the position? >> absolutely not. i love the office. >> how would you characterize it? >> i followed the law. i accepted gifts, a lot of other governors have done the same think. but in retrospect, i understand it undermined the trust of the people in me and that's why i made the changes that i did and why i apologized and why well
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recommend ethics reform changes in the law. >> that would certainly clarify it. if you follow what the law of virginia has been in the past, and yet you still have all of these ethics charges filed against you and now you have the feds talking about wanting to come in, you do need to clarify. those ethics laws need to be clarified. >> i think they do. we have some of the more lax laws in the country. we have pretty open finance laws, as well, where we don't have any limits on either gifts or financial contributions. we just have full disclosure. we're a sunshine state. and for the most part -- looking back through my open situation a own situation, some of the things wren have been inaccurate or one-sided, but i don't want anyone else to go through this, so we'll have a series of reforms that we can recommend.
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>> i want to talk for you about terry mcauliffe. ? irish catholic man with five kids. >> maybe that explains it. joe manchin, just sitting here listening to bob mcdonnell about the state he took over, most prosperous state for business, didn't that make you miss being governor? you're in a place right now where you're not the rewarded for action. >> well, bob and i had a chance to work together because i was cycling out when bob was coming in. so we have one town in our state down in the middle of the streetses blue field virginia, blue field west virginia. so it's really quite a dynamic place and we've met there before trying to work together. and governors can do something.
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the tenth amendment is very clear. states have the rights to sovereignty. and i think that the experimental labs that we have there, we can show the federal government. i don't think our founding fathers ever, ever designed for this thing to be run out of washington. they designed for us to be able to do what we needed to do to show them that we are different, but we're all one. and i think it's done extremely well. and i'm probably the biggest defender of state's rights. being former governor, there are 11 former governors in the senate right now and we have a governor' conference. >> and all of them miss being governors. >> yes, we do. >> well, what are you doing to help meet things forward? you're constantly trying to pull republicans and democrats together. >> i think we have to find commonalty. >> what about with the health care plan? >> first of all, are you somebody who has been vote to go repeal it for 40 shall times or do you want to go back -- i
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don't want anybody in west virginia to have one catastrophe as far as health problem away from bankruptcy. destroying their lives. i don't want a person that has had a pre-existing condition not to be able to get it. i'm willing to work through this and i've put some things on the table and i would hope constructively the white house will look at that. and i've said, listen, you had a rollout problem. that's fine. we all have those problems. it should be a transitional year. you can't just keep putting it off. i said just don't put a crime or a fine to the bill this rear. let's work through it, get the products right. there is a lot we can do if we're working from a positive position. >> is the president disconnected from the senate and from the house? >> everybody has a different style. >> is the president disconne disconnected? come organization brothn, broth. >> i don't have that much -- if you're asking me -- >> when is the last time you met with him at the white house?
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>> the student loan bill. the one time i met -- >> you met with him one time time? but calls you -- how many times do you talk to him on the phone? >> i'm sure he's very busy. >> stop it. enough. >> so bob mcdonnell, this is the thing that fascinates republican and democratic governors. we asked chris christie early on why the success. he goes it's simple. even when i was at war with the public unions, even when i was at war with democratic interest groups, i made sure that i met with the democratic leadership once a week, would have breakfast, we'd sit and talk for a couple of hours and we became really good friends. and we worked through these tough issues. but that didn't seem to happen in washington. >> i don't understand, joe would have a better perspective, but i think there are so few days that people actually meet. in the general assembly and legislature actually under one roof debating the bills, everybody is together, you listen. there you're rarely together in
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the same room. i think the relationships like tip o'neill and ronald reagan had or newt gingrich and bill clinton, those kind of relationships are gone. i think it will take stateslike joe to rise up and say we have to do things for the common good. and joe is right, i think what will save america are two things. one, restoration of mr. mason's tenth amendment to realize that the power should reside in the states, not in washington. and secondly, a balanced budget amendment. until money is managed in washington like it's mappinged in people's homes, we won't get our fiscal house in order. >> and in most of the states. >> 49 out of 50 balanced budgets. >> i'm struck by something that the senator said because this is a senator who is a democrat who can talk to republicans and 067 plays the middle ground here. you say that you haven't been to the white house since you were discussing the student loan bill. you indicated that you may not be getting weekly calls from the president. does that frustrate you, do you feel like more would get done if he was reaching out to senators
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on a more regular basis? >> bob told you how he governs. we're involved. in the executive branch, i had to work with him every day. and i enjoyed that. i really enjoyed finding out -- and i took constructive criticism very well. and i tell them, i says i don't have all the answers. i'm not always right, but i'm not always wrong. and i don't have all the ideas. and what we're trying to do is discuss this. i says i see the big picture. if i'm governor. the president sees the bigger picture. that i might not be privileged to. i'd just like to be able to give him my thoughts. i want our president to do well. we all should. whether republican, democrat, male or female, this is our cup and this is our president. and i would hope that he or should would look at the same input as trying to be helpful. sometimes they insulate and draw back. you take 11 governors, we is been through the wars. we can bring an awful lot to that dialogue i believe.is been
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through the wars. we can bring an awful lot to that dialogue i believe.been through the wars. we can bring an awful lot to that dialogue i believe. and the governors in our caucus are very productive wanting to be involved. so i think there is a lot to be learned here. but yeah i'd never been against something unless i had a better idea. >> and then in terms of reviving the economy, i want to get your insight, forbes.com named virginia the best state for business in 2013. >> thank you for bringing that up again. >> and there were a couple of reasons why. what do you think the success, economic success, of your state, what do think you accomplished that you're most proud of? >> i think managing through a very tough fiscal time and the uncertainty in washington. we've had four surpluses in a row totaling $2 billion. on a bipartisan basis, we got transportation accomplished, bill first time in 27 years.
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fixed that in northern virginia, worst traffic in the country. 44 republicans, 43 democrats. i think my last thing i'm most pleased about is major education reform with 100,000 new degrees for our kids, tuition is only 4% this year as opposed to 10%. major k-12 reforms, more options for young people, more school choice. so i think listening to democrats and republicans in a split legislature, we've been able to move the ball forward and just solve the kitchen table issues. back to your question, turn down the rhetoric, solve problem, share credit and smile a lot. >> so what aone of the big kitc table issues obviously health care. and you're still debating whether to accept the medicaid expansion in the state the of virginia. so here is the chance to have the federal government pay between 90% and 100% of the costs of medicaid for -- of the cost of obama care for some of your medicaid recipients.
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so why not accept that? that's a way to -- >> i'd be shocked if they can keep that promise. the federal government is $17 trillion in debt, i'm not sure they can do it. >> do you think they wouldn't write you the check? >> they might for a year or two and then times get of ittougher they have to balance the budget. but here is the real reason. what we said in virginia is we're not opposed to it philosophically, but up we have dramatic reform in the medicaid system that has grown 1600% in 30 years from 5% to 21% of the total budget of virginia, up we have significant reforms and deal with dual eligibles and co-pays and other things and self help on your open health care, it wouldn't be responsible to do that. it's busting most budgets. you know that. and so water down the path of reform now. we've made a lot of reforms and there may be a time when that happens. but we're not there yet. >> and if i could say one thing. a lot of governors at the time
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this was going into effect, most of us were less than 50% coverage to the people who qualified. and they went right to 133. we had a hard time understanding. we said 100% would have been a lofty goal. so some of that, you know, there should be more waivers involved. so what works in virginia might not quite work in west virginia, but we might be able to find models that work. and that's what we're looking for, that flexibility. and the traffic in alexander is still pretty rough. >> we just passed the bill. it will take a while. people complain about construction, not congestion. >> it is kind of rough right now. but you took a lot of grief for that transportation bill p but i'll tell you what, people that commute in traffic in northern virginia, it will mean the world to them. let me finish by talking about ken coupuccinelli. there have been a thousand people blamed for his loss.
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we heard the ethics complaints, this will be a drag on ku cuccinel cuccinelli. we've heard women's issues. terry mcauliffe just beating about the head on abortion and several other issues. the cuccinelli camp seemed to be blaming ted cruz and the shutdown. said that did more to destroy their momentum. what do you think was the bigge biggest drag on cuccinelli's campaign? i thought the race was still a wh winnable race. >> polls were showing 10% to 12% at the last. maybe all of the above. i don't think you can put it on one thing. i do think that when that government shut down occurred, which was really not smart tactically on my party, i didn't think the president led, but i didn't think our team was smart in trying to defund obama care.
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which was they evnever going to. that last five weeks of the campaign had solely been a referendum on obama care and all the problems with the implementation, e i think that might have tipped it in his favor. but the shutdown didn't accomplish anything. >> and where do we go from here, do you agree with bill clinton that the president should keep his promise and tell all americans if you like your health care plan, keep your health care plan? >> we've all said things i think we'd like to take back. >> i do that every day. >> and i think on this situation here, it's pretty clear as many times as every station i've ever watched has played it, if you have it, you can keep it, if you like your doctor, you can keep it. and all we're saying myself and mary landrieu, we'll work through this. they have more than a rollout problem. there is a product problem. we have to make sure the products are there. and the market will determine that product. it's a lofty goal to try to get
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quality health care for every american. and if we can do that and afford it, that's great. but we have to work through and i've also asked that no crime and no fine for the one year. it will be a transitional year. all these things have to be done and work through and i think people working -- but those are people who don't want the bill at all. i said tell me what you'll replace it with. give me something. and i haven't seen that. >> look at these guys, two of my favorites here. smile for the camera. they're great. >> we used to be the same state 150 years ago. >> we didn't leave. he left. pe stayed true to the union. let me just say one thing. people have to lock in in the political arena. and that's what bob is doing, his numbers showed that. and terry mcauliffe will do a great job. >> we'll see. we love terry. we'll see. hey, nick saban, your buddy,
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your brother. >> my brother. >> tell him to stay in tuscaloosa until i tell him he can leave. p. >> i'll tell him. >> joe manchin, bob mcdonnell, always good to see you. coming up, a live better is view with john kerry. and up next, we'll talk to mike doyle who gave white house officials apearful yesterday about the problems with obama care. we'll ask him about that closed door meeting. plus nbc news political director chuck todd and former white house press secretary join the discussion. [ imitating car engine ]
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the u.s. getting blasted. >> two groups say they have new evidence u.s. drone strikes have
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killed dozens. >> grown strikes could amount to war crimes. >> this has been great for the local pack tap any economy because of the constant presence of circling drones. sales of sleeping tablet, medicine to treat anxiety have soared as well as pills for erectile dysfunction. yes, there is a reason thoeeaso couple is sitting outside in bathtubs because that's all that's left after the drone blew up their house. >> joining us now, mike doyle and chuck todd. and former white house press secretary, robert gibbs also at the table. okay. wow. where to begin. i guess i'll start with the meetings yesterday. fwifr give us a sense of what happened
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behind closed dwooroors. >> there were frank discussions going on. >> what do you mean by frank? >> i'm from pittsburgh. where i come from, we're rather plain speaking people people and yesterday there was a lot of plain speaking going on with the administration. i support the bill. i fought for the bill. my committee helped write the bill. i watched many of my colleagues give up their seats for this bill because they thought it was the right thing to do and i still believe that. so you can imagine the frustration level that many of us have from this rollout. and i think what happened yesterday was an expression of that frustration and many of us feel that we told the american people if they like their insurance, they can keep it and we need to honor that. >> we understand the frustration. do you feel it was received in a way that makes you feel hopeful, gives you confidence? >> well, let me say this. on friday, there is a bill on the floor which isn't by any
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means a good bill in my opinion, but it's a bill on the floor that says will you allow people that like their insurance to keep it. and the miles an hoamerican peo what they see. it will be some members of congress only chance to be on the record as to whether or not people should keep their insurance. what we said is if you don't give us something else before friday, i think you'll see many democrats as a wave sending a message to the american people and the white house that we believe that needs to be fixed and it needs to be fixed now. >> robert gibbs, what would you do at this point? is it a communications problem here or a functional problem? >> it's a policy problem, not a communication problem. >> politics are always perfect. >> only meetings i was ever in was a communications problem.
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afghanistan, iraq -- i'm joking. here is i think one of two things that probably has to happen today and it's exactly what the congressman just said. either the white house announces a legislative or administrative fix and i think that's probably hard or supports either -- probably comes out in support of something like the landrieu bill in the senate. because one of those two things has to happen or exactly what the congress map said will transpire tomorrow. huge numbers of democrats will come out in support of the upton bill even if they don't believe that's what solves the problem. that's what people think will solve the problem. therefore that will create a lot of momentum to do something in the sghat. so i think the white house has to come out and do -- >> the train has left the station. there is nothing they can do anymore. >> are you talking about the latest polls on the president? >> no, i'm just saying on this issue. they might as welcome out and support plan trlandrieu, becaus too late. i think the message today is at
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this point we don't trust that you guys are going to have a magic fix. we want to -- what the congress manage just said, we want to be on the record. we want to -- we have to be on the record. they need to be on the record that they did this. not that they sat there and we had a meeting and a stern talking to. no, no. they need a vote. white house has to get out of the way. >> last week when you would talk to administration officials, they said we're looking at an administrative fix. suddenly yesterday, it was wedding who be hope to legislative or administrative. >> i think it's just a matter of time. >> i told the white house said, members of congress aren't judged by administrative fixes. they're judged by their voting records. and people want to be on the record that we made a commitment to the american people that they could keep their insurance if they like it and we want to fix that. >> is there a logistical way that the promise can be kept without undermining the law overall? >> everybody i've talked to says
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it undermines the law. the architect, professor who put the whole thing together, he said the landrieu bill is less bad than the upton bill, but essentially there are winners and losers. there were always going to be losers here. young healthy people were always going to be asked to pay more. it's just that nobody said it. and nobody was comfortable saying it very loud. but it was the only way this was going to work. how else do you bring down the cost for people with pre-existing conditions? >> i still think the huge 98% of the problem is the website. 98% of the problem, because -- >> you better hope so. >> it is the portal by which people go in and change their policy, get a new policy. that's what they have to fix. we've lessened the window now by a month. if cbo estimates 7 million people will sign up, we're now 6.8 -- i can't do the math.
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6.84 million -- >> not hard since there are only 100,000. >> basically 6.9 million people with a month left. that will put tremendous strain on the website. the website is a giant mess to begin with and it has to be fixed. the good news for the administration is in the figures released yesterday, 846,000 people completed an application covering 1.5 million people. right? they haven't yet selected an insurance plan. the 106,000 have. so there is demand for this. there is curiosity, there is demand for health care. that's not surprising. we had tens of millions without health care. the question now is there a vehicle, the website, for them to actually do this. and if they don't tigs that, that's the big problem. >> don't you fear a narrative sets in about the website that impacts the policy?
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maybe they go back to the website and it's not working, so they never go back and finish. >> yes, except remember there are pen alties at the back end. at the end of the day, you have to show by the end of march that you have proof of insurance. >> and i think in the end these numbers, it's for the surprising that the numbers are 100,000 at this point. people have been told the website's not working properly. three times as many sign ups in the state exchanges as in the federal exchange. but once the website starts to function as we intend to function, i agree with robert, i think a lot of this starts to go away. >> i hope so. mike todoyle, thank you so much. great to have you on the show. stay with us. up next, we'll be joined by a lot of different guest hosts. liz cheney is out with the first television ad in her run for u.s. senate.
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tell us something you don't know about chris christie. >> he likes to text me his am approval ratings. >> how often some. >> every time they come out. and they're all good. especially among women. >> everybody texts mika. i don't take it personally. nobody texts me other than my two oldest sons. >> i text you. >> dad, can you make a transfer, you know. >> that was fun at the politico cocktail hour yesterday. liz cheney is rolling out the first tv ad of her u.s. senate cam been in wyoming. she tackles one of the issues that critics are quick to hey light, criticism that she lacks long standing ties to the state. >> our daughter grace is 13 and we can't keep her off a horse.
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it's little wonder why. she and her four siblings are fifth generation wyomingites. 20 years ago, we were married here and today we're raising our kids here on the same wyoming values i grew up. when i was 12, my dad ran for congress and we campaigned together. we learned a lot about what it means to he were the vote one person at a time. i'm running for the united states senate because it's time for a new generation of leaders to step up to the plate. i'll fight hard, i'll fight smart and i'll get the job done. i'm liz chain any and i cheney and i approve this message. meanwhile polls show the would-be senator is in trouble. mike enzi leads 69% to 17%.ppro. meanwhile polls show the would-be senator is in trouble. mike enzi leads 69% to 17%.this. meanwhile polls show the would-be senator is in trouble. mike enzi leads 69% to 17%. chuck, what do you make of that and what do you think about the
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race? >> i'm always a little nervous. wyoming polling is a very difficult state. you would think the smaller the state the easier it would be to poll. we would say just go get a cheyenne phone book. but it is actually a very hard state to poll. i'd be very wary of something like that. i mean it's clear that she's behind. it's obvious her biggest problem which is proving that she's from wyoming. >> there was a 25 year -- >> she shez wouldays way oweays in 30 seconds. >> because that is the easiest way for enzi to go after her. >> is hillary clinton from new york? >> exactly right. and i remember when paul ryan ran for congress, he had the same issue.
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he was a staffer. he did an ad through the cemetery of his family to say five generations of ryans have lived here. >> that's pretty creepy. >> but it was trying to give him -- look, people want to know your roots. i ultimately think if she wins or loses, it won't be because of she's a carpet bagger. she's doing the generational thing which is smart. i don't know how 1450she'll -- >> clinton, the democratic establishment of new york wanted clinton to run for that seat. here she is running against the establishment. >> remember new york has a huge democrat registration. once hillary clinton became the nominee, it was almost certain she'd be a u.s. senator. this is trying to top ple a very
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popular republican. >> she always thought that enzi wasn't running again.ple a very popular republican. >> she always thought that enzi wasn't running again. she tried to force the issue and the more she did, he said, no, i'm not done. but i think that now she's caught herself in a primary. she never thought she would have a primary. >> up next, what really happened that day in dallas? te time magazine is out with the 50th anniversary issue on the kennedy assassination featuring never before seen pictures. we'll reveal the cover next.
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and then there's a mesh network that takes this information sends it over the internet so you can go find exactly where those open parking spots are. the collaboration with citi was important for providing us the necessary financing; allow this small start-up to go provide a service to municipalities. citi has been an incredible source of advice, how to engage with municipalities, how to structure deals, and as we think about internationally, citi is there every step of the way. so the end result is you reduce congestion, you reduce pollution and you provide a service to merchants, and that certainly is huge. joining us now in new york, mappinging editor of "time" magazine, nancy gibbs, here to reveal this week's issue of "time".
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>> we looked at specifically why it is that even all this time later we still do not agree with what happened that day. it's a remarkable thing that after millions of documents and thousands of books and papers and committees that a majority of people including the secretary of state you're about to be talking to do not think that the official version of events is the accurate one. it is as though suspicion is now our reflex. and that is a remarkable thing to be true about one of the most important turning points in recent american history. >> absolutely. a lot of questions. never before seen photos. moments from that day. and also raising a lot of questions still today. >> nancy, it's almost like you peel back ever since then everything is a conspiracy theory and it all started with kennedy. right? this is sort of where we lost our innocence. >> well, in a way conspiracy
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theories are been part of the american dna forever. but it did accelerate after kennedy where first it was the cubans because in the 60s kate those we those were the enemies. and then the american military complex, and then the god father movies, it was the mob that huff done it. and now it's lyndon johnson. there are so many theorieses. and the fact that there is more and more information. the more we analyze, the less certain we are. >> nancy gibbs to robert gibbs. >> hello, nancy. will we ever know? i thought what was interesting about what you said is we know probably -- we're less sure because of all the information
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that has come out. will we ever 100% know the answer to this? >> i don't think so. and when the warren commission official report came out in 1964, two thirds of people did not accept it. by 2001, 81% of people did not think that the official report was true. so actually with more data and more facts and more evidence and we analyze the bullets and take apart the photographs and the fill and you still have fewer and fewer people thinking we had the actual answer. i don't think this case will ever be closed. >> so in the same vein, you alluded to secretary kerry's comments which i found remarkable weighing in on the kennedy assassination and disputing the warren commission report and then refusing to talk about it anymore when he was asked about it the following sunday on "meet the press". so do you have any insight as to what is in his head and why that popped out and what he is thinking? >> you know, i think it all starts with the fact that many
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people always believe oswald was just the wrong villain, that a monstrous crime requires a monstrous cause. even jackie kennedy at the time said her husband didn't even have the satisfaction of having been killed for civil rights. that instead it was this selly little communist. the idea that it was oswald just didn't sit well with people who thought surely it must be some bigger villain. but for secretary kerry and for many other people, the minute you start heading into the thickets of the conspiracies, you will get lost. there is no way out of that forest. so i'm not surprised that he at the present time want to get into any detail about who he thought the real culprit was. >> nancy, thank you. the new cover of "time" is the moment that changed america. nancy gibbs, thank you. coming up as i said, we'll talk live to secretary of state john kerry. also senator claire mccaskill will be here. and up next, a higher mission.
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>> i'm very happy that i'm getting a new leg and surgery to make my bones be much better. i don't have to have pain in my leg anymore when i'm walking. >> "morning joe" highlights an incredible organization, the tleb globe and he wial medical relie. we'll show you some of the stories next. for anyone, anywhere. if you look at a khan academy video, they cover everything from basic arithmetic to calculus, trigonometry, finance. you can really just get what you need at your own pace. and so, bank of america came and reached out to us and said, "we are really interested in making sure that everyone really understands personal finance." we're like, "well, we're already doing that." and so it was kind of a perfect match. life with crohn's disease ois a daily game of "what if's". what if my abdominal pain and cramps come back?
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>> children around the world who have been badly injured in wars or natural disasters have an incredible resource in the global medical relief fund. the nonprofit organization literally saves their lives. my daughter amelia who volunteered to mentor the kids bring us their amazing stories. >> the global medical relief fund brought more than 100 children to america for treatment and rehabilitation. >> they are an inspiration. >> she relies largely on the help of the shriner's hospital in philadelphia. >> they have no resources in these countries. we do have the resources and the shriners are my lifeline. >> i volunteered to mentor the children and what i discovered
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was remarkable. he lot of both of his arms after being electrocuted by a power line in a refugee camp. >> how do you control them? >> i use my muscles. >> how does it make you feel? >> it's like real hands and when i go outside, it feels normal. i'm just like normal. >> the shriner's state-of-the-art facility trains patients to adapt to real life situations and they are all free of charge. sarah lot of a leg in the 2010 earthquake in haiti. she has been fitted for a new leg here. >> i am very happy that i'm getting a new leg and a surgery to make my bones be much better. i don't have to have pain in my leg anymore when i'm walking. >> one of the most valuable resources is a global family. >> sometimes i get lonely and it's really great to have kids
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around. >> from playing ping pong to making music, these kids have found a way to thrive. achmed was minded and they forged a friendship through shared love of music. when the children return home, they spread the word about their american experience. >> i like america a lot. i want to be a doctor when i grow up for children. >> they are having a fund-raiser tonight. the children are amazing. what you realize when you spend time with them and they just want to be children again. you can no matter where you are from or what happened, if you give time and you help
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organizations like this, they have a chance at that. >> how did amelia get involved with that? >> she always wanted to help people. she loves working with children. actually we had a couple of different friends, 60 minutes did a great piece. miles is involved with it and they inspired her to get involved. she was nervous at first. she was like how do i make them have fun. it was so easy. they want to be children again after everything they have been through. >> you are struck at how happy they look and relieved i'm sure to be out of the circumstances in those areas particularly. >> they have burns and lot ofs. the most indescribable injuries and the insurance of being in home and feeling alive like a child again, then they go back home to their families and they are like little ambassadors who have a real american experience.
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>> how long do they stay? >> sometimes six months or a year or four months. it's incredibly expensive, but person by person, child by child makes a difference in a lot of ways. up next, the obama care numbers are out and they're ugly. what the pitiful totals mean for the future of the program. the support from nervous democrats on capitol hill. "morning joe" continues after a break. people don't have to think about
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you apologize to the family and the council and the people where the to the air canada center. every episode that occurred that caused commotion in the city has been because you indicated you have been drunk and failed to appreciate that perhaps there is a problem. >> i admitted to my mistakes and said it would not happen again and it never happened again at the air canada center. >> good morning. it's 8 clng a.m. on the east coast and 5:00 on the west coast as you take a look at washington, d.c. back with us we have sam stein, steve ratner, julie pace and al hunt. we started the day at politics and prose after we did the show yesterday. you had a sold out packed house. >> it was packed because they
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thought that sam stein was going to be there. showing pictures. >> what was cool is there were a lot of republicans there. you were trying a republican crowd. >> you believe that now. this is politics and prose. right? >> there was even -- >> usually when i tell people and use my marxist joke and said mika was raised in a marxist house, they laugh. last night they stood up and applauded. you are reaching out to a new republican party that has been bussed in from somewhere. >> there was a republican who voted for obama who stood up proudly. >> how many republicans and democrats? they say how many republican who is voted for obama and there will be like ten people applauding and being really proud of themselves for being transformative and having the courage to cross party lines and
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make a difference. that doesn't happen. >> no one wants to admit to it. >> in politics. >> that's my neighborhood and year when my kids were young went as saddam hussein and george bush. >> there you go. the bully in washington. >> i don't know how you do this, but we kept going and the night continued at the may flower with a politico cocktail and i cannot believe they were in the balconies. >> you know what they were asking, why sam stein, the guy -- anyway. >> the right path. there were a lot of good questions and one of the most interesting thing and the reason these crowds are see big is the timing for the book is
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unbelievable. it really is hitting a nerve. we will get to that more with the political boys later and a wonderful night. thank you so much for having us. congratulations. >> thanks for everybody for coming out. it was a record crowd there. it made us feel really, really good considering that sam stein could go across the street. >> we could talk more about this. there is so much bad news. >> rob sent me a telegram. from the air canada center. >> all right. here we go. when your political future is on the line, they give the white house until tomorrow to fix the problems with obama care. that's when members of the house will be voting on a bill to address the issues that concern the millions of americans who lot of their health insurance because of the law. today senator harry reid will be meeting with white house officials and fellow democrats to talk about how the party should move forward. this is following a very
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contentious meeting between house democrats and administration officials yesterday. one proposal includes allowing americans to keep their current plans regardless of the affordable care act until the end of 2014. >> it appears more americans have lot of their insurance than have signed up for it. with close to 850,000 applications completed, 106,000 people selected insurance plans between october 1st and november 2nd. that includes over 79,000 enrolled in a state-based exchanging for 75% of all the sign ups. more than 26,000 people are getting coverage through the federal program that breaks down to just 1% of the estimated 48 million americans without health insurance. california, a state-run exchange has the largest enrollment. florida that runs a federal
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program signed over 3500 people and north dakota has the least amount with exactly 42 accounts successfully created. >> that's like half of north dakota. >> the budget office expected 7 million to sign up in the first year. they expected over 450,000 to sign up in the first month. >> for president obama, there is absolutely no rewhen it comes to public polling. according to fox news, 55% of americans feel the president was not being honest when it came to obama care. 50% said he knowingly lied when he said americans would be able to keep their plans and 58% thought his apology for breaking up was for political reasons. 38% said he was being sincere. >> the president obviously facing so many problems incoming
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from website. do you suspect that this broken promise is that most americans think it was a great challenge? >> it's a huge challenge. they had multiple challenges and they had to get things working to improve the numbers if they can. the credibility and they suffered and i think what bothers a lot of democrats is did they learn anything from this? i think this is a complex problem to begin with or it wasn't going go smoothly. it would have been much better if they hadn't been for the white house. they picked somebody to run this two years ago and that's what the others did. >> how did they do that? how does it lineup with other decisions? >> this is the bye word and has become more so. steven ratner who did a fabulous job with the automobiles could
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have run it. they don't turn to outside people because they are so insular. >> why is that? >> i thought when barack obama was elected, this was a mark of secure people. ronald reagan was a secure man. they turn to outside people. >> the greatest example is when reagan and james baker tried to beat ronald reagan in the primary and the second reagan ended up putting the primary, he turned to baker and said now run. >> he is the cold standard for chief of staff now. that's what i thought it would be more of in the beginning. steven ratner was an example. it department work out well. they circled and not just this issue, but even the people in their own administration. >> they obviously don't listen to republicans that much. the question is, are they going to listen to the house democrats who came over and are angry and
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are giving them an ultimatum. you need to fix this fast or we will go in our own direction and support the bills that will force you to keep their promise. >> this will come to a head quickly. you will have a vote on friday on the upton bill and a lot of democrats are saying we want you to come up with another solution. give us something else whether it's administrative or legislative. we haven't seen that from the white house. you will have the senate meeting and see a lot of push back from democrats as well. >> with respect to the white house. >> on a similar line than we hear from house democrats. give us another option. we are asking you for a fix. we haven't seen anything yet. >> some assurance that this will be fixed. the latest snapshot of the 2016 race is not looking good for vice president biden. 25% of people in a new poll said joe biden would make a good
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president. 54% say hillary clinton could handle the job. it shows chris christie and hillary clinton neck and neck and while clinton leads with women and christie with men, independent guess to christie by a margin of 60 points. yesterday senator rand paul took a shot at his possible 2016 opponent for federal spending on sandy and for including himself in post storm tourism ads. >> you have the governor running stronger than the storm using that through a political campaign. that's taxpayer money. federal taxpayer money. >> it should be against the law for a politician to put their image on tv at taxpayer expense. we have a 9% rating because people are unhappy about taxpayer money being used. particularly when it's one thing if you want to put your image on and say i will give a million dollars of my money, but you
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give somebody else's? >> with all due respect to your party, we were talking about whether democrats will learn their lesson. talk about not learning anything. come on. >> we will see what happens. rand paul said you shouldn't use taxpayer money to use that. rand paul is probably the exception to the rule. he must be the only member that doesn't do frankie. that's where you send letters to your constituents and puts your face in front with taxpayer money to do what he said. >> this is such an opportunity and i'm not happy about it, but such an opportunity given what happened with health care.
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>> especially because the fix to obama care is not simple. it more or less got obama care in terms of how the exchanges were. even what president clinton said is even very hard to implement. i don't understand the legislative politics. if the president comes up with a solution that requires legislation and goes up to the hill, maybe they pass it. hard to imagine the house passes it and this is what the republicans should be doing. purely political. they should be doing obama care, obama care and not shooting at each other. >> obsessing and three years away. if you are one of the key players and it keeps going back to sandy, it will be interesting when they are hit with a natural disaster and you see where they asked for support for the good people of kentucky or sits back and does nothing. >> with the exception of tom coburn who is consistent on the storm relief where he said he
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doesn't think the government has that big of a to play. >> i think to his credit, he is good to that and it wasn't as if he just decided to jump in with the christie criticism. you guys are right. at this moment in time, they would be rise to get out of the way. they are witnessing the lowest point politically for president obama. a continuous stream of bad news: steve hit the nail on the head. there legislative suggestions for how to fix this law, they are short-term political fixes that would cause policy disruption five or ten years down the road. it would create adverse selection in the exchanges and could derail health care. president obama has to figure out what he can get done legislatively that wouldn't necessarily tinker too much with them, but give them space. >> i agree with all of that, but it's not five or ten years down the road. it's like next year. most of these solutions -- obama
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care is very hated, but consider intricately constructed where each piece rests on another. you pull one piece out. >> the piece is that is out now is a website. people are getting cancellation letters. that could be solved if people were able to go on a website and say i can get this option or tax credit. i talked to a private insurance about this, private industry, not government who said he was not worried about the numbers and he is worried about the numbers in six months's time. i'm not sure if they can. >> put this into perspective for us. we showed poll numbers yesterday which were stunning that barack obama is where george w. bush was three months after katrina. the same approval ratings. that's the poll. put this into perspective. what does this crisis remind you of. we are not see saying more equivalent, but it impacts the
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impact of katrina and iran. where does it stand and what is the president doing to turn it around? >> i think katrina may be the best analogy. what is remarkable is that each party seems intent on throwing the other a lifeline when they are drowning. in early october there was all right problems with obama care. they had to shut down and they threw a lifeline to the democrats. then republicans at their lowest point ever, what has obama done now? thrown a line and both parties are in trouble, but obama is the president. >> we will get a look at the new politico magazine with john harris and glen thrush. just over a year after a prostitution scandal, new allegations of misconduct within the secret service like two agents have been pulled off the president's detail. you think opening up to smoking crack might be the low point. well, apparently it's not.
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>> really? >> what do you do? smoking crack? >> first, bill is here. >> it's great. we need the moment of four. >> he needs secret service protection. he needs a "morning joe" analysis. >> let's go to bill now. thank god we are in different cities. bill? >> good morning to you, mika. as far as today goes, a cold start and a beautiful sunrise. we hit the peak of this cold outbreak and now we want to warm it up and it should be a gorgeous afternoon. let's start with a roll cloud in texas. this was filled as the cold air was coming in. rare event. it doesn't happen that often. it's not attached to thunderstorms or anything. it happens occasionally on the
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leading front end of cold air. it looked beautiful. it rolls across the sky. as far as the cold front, it moved through and now it's gone and the warm air beginnings to return. the 24-hour temperature change is significant. in oklahoma city and kansas city and chicago and detroit. we will be about ten degrees warmer including d.c., richmond and through the ohio valley. a couple of clouds in the midwest and not too bad. we will continue to warm tup. notice 60 in d.c. and almost 60 in new york city. over the weekend, big storm in the middle of the country and severe weather and a lot of rain. unfortunately for chicago and st. louis. we will leave you with a shot of new york city on a beautiful morning. you are watching "morning joe". bl helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming.
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all right. time to take a look at the morning papers from the parade of papers. "the chicago tribune." the secret service reassigned two supervisors after inappropriate conduct involving women. reports indicate one of the accused left a bullet in a woman's hotel room after removing bullets from his gun. he tried to go back to retrieve it and both are suspected of sending sexually explicit e-mails to a female agent. they came 18 months after a prostitution scandal in columbia. >> the washington times. for the first time in nearly two
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decades, the united states is producing more crude oil than it imports. production hit a 24-year high while foreign imports are at a 17-year low. the petroleum they use keeps dropping. >> photo messages service snap chat has allegedly turn said down a $3 billion offer from facebook. reports say snap chat declined the offer because multiple investors are interested in the 2-year-old company. they believe facebook is looking to engage younger users who are flocking to other sites. >> someone offers me money, i take it. and the city council is asking the embattled mayor rob ford to step down. these people are simply not americans. yesterday the council voted to ask him to temporarily step down though they have no authority. ford declined repeatedly saying
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he is not addicted to alcohol or drugs and he admitted to using and purchasing drugs over the last two years. >> counsellor, it was not the reason i drink or drugs was not out of stress. it was sheer stupidity. >> a "new york times" painting. the 1963 painting by andy warhol sold for more than $104 million last night. that's the highest price ever paid for any warhol work. warhol's silver car crash has only been seen once in public over the past 20 years. it's the second time in two days a participating from the 60s sold for more than $100 million. >> kansas star star said ignorance is bliss.
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that may apply to the mcdonald's mcrib sandwich. a frozen taken of a frozen mcrib went viral. >> sweet jesus. is there no shame? >> mcdonald's said the patty is formed in the shape of traditional ribs and they flash freeze the meat before sending it out to the restaurants. >> that picture, i mean that hits me about the same way that time cover, is god dead. >> that's gross. there you go. you guys eat that? do you eat that? >> why would you? >> because it tastes delicious. not only that, it's good for you. >> no. >> yeah, it is. it has all the essential vitamins and nutrients. >> there is no reason to do that. i'm being honest. editor in chief john harris and senior staff writer glen thrush.
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they are launching the politico magazine. i need to see it. inside is glen's piece, locked in the cabinet, a revealing look at president obama's cabinet. this looks amazing. >> this is something to be excited about. what a story. >> it's something we are very proud of. politico trying to go deeper in addition what we do well. live in the moment. thrush here has taken us deeper. >> where is his hat? >> i don't know. i have never seen him this way. >> let's talk about your look at the obama cabinet and the description of a fun house mirror that has an idiosinks rattic style. >> it played with the o bam care roll out. the president started off in 2008 saying he wanted to have a
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team of rifles and bob gates and hill row clinton had that. when you have got below the headlines with the cabinet, they were systematically marginalize and they didn't have a lot of access to the president and by and large as you drifted closer to the campaign, the management from guys like this really just mandated a crack down on more or less everything. people had to clear their schedules and i think in one of the most telling problems they had, they clogged up a lot of regulations necessary to get the website going for months and months. >> it's a chaotic management style? >> it's a sealed management style with a west wing and a white house that functions competently and emptily that doesn't seek out as much as al said. that doesn't just hold true for people on the outside trying to
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get their equities weighed, but holds true for the cabinets that control enormous amounts of the federal government. >> john harris and glen thrush. john kerry joins us for an exclusive interview and we will ask him about the criticism over u.s. policy in iran. up next, clair mccaskill has a proposal about sexual results in the military. one of her fellow democrats has a different idea. what she says about the competing plans. bl ♪
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>> all right, joining us now democratic senator from missouri and member of the armed services committee. clair mccaskill. margaret carlson and steve ratner on the table as well. a lot to talk about. you have been busy doing incredible work on behalf of military women. i want to start with obama care. how do we get beyond this. how does this glitch, botched roll out, misleading messaging
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get behind us in the rear view mirror and people get signed up? >> it's very, very difficult. i think it's probably more than a glitch. >> democrats are getting upset. >> we have the store open and we locked the front door. it's really important that people get in the store because if they don't get in the store, the prices continue to go up for everyone who will shop later. how do we fix this and get around what has become the most popular political two by in a decade. that is obama care and the misinformation about obama care that is so prevalent out there. i think we can get it fixed, but i think we are going have to take some kind of repairative action to reassure people that we are trying to get it fixed. >> robert gibbs? >> good to see you. if the landrieu bill came to a
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vote today, where would you be and are you worried that that bill does a lot of harm as well as sort of fixing as mika said a messaging. >> there has to be something that allows a help to this situation. it may be that bill and it may be something else. what most people don't understand is the solution we are trying to craft for the independent market which are all those people out there in small businesses that don't have employer insurance that have been absolutely raked in the insurance market for decades is creating enough of a pool that it brings up the cost for everyone. if we delay, encouraging people to get in the pool, it has consequences for average americans who deserve that. >> i'm getting worried. you are next, but i asked this question last night and i deflat deflated. me.
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are we going to get around this? is this going to get behind us. can anybody give us confidence? >> i'm reassured when i read the roll out on medicare. it was a mess. we were a communist nation and we were all socialists and it was terrible. the doctors would leave the practice and i'm hopeful that we can -- >> the names being called. it's the launching of it. >> one thing is most people didn't have insurance. the whole point was to give them something they didn't have. here we are trying to get people who have something and give them something lightly different. the front door is locked. that's the website i assume you are talking about. the front door will get unlocked. we hope and believe that will happen. the question then is what happens in the store? what robert is alluding to is you say people who lose their
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existing policy, you can keep it for a year. obama care is a web of things. you take one thread out and you don't know what happens in these pools. he is asking and i'm asking you, are you in favor of the bill and how does this thing get solved? >> i don't know if it's going to pass and what will be the landry bill. we have to work at it to make it better. we are trying to do a free market. everyone who said obama care is evil, we are trying for every action in the free market there is a reaction. we have to be careful how we do this so we don't have unintended consequenc consequences. >> you write bill clinton's yawn rescue of obama care. bill clinton can be great and terrible. he means well and can't resist mischief. after he appeared at the convention, barack obama added him to his cabinet as the
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secretary of explaining stuff. did he hurt the case for obama care by saying that he should make good on his promise. it goes on and on. is anyone going to help out at this point or is it so convoluted that we are holding on to hope at this point? i believe in the concept of this law. >> i'm a believer, but as steve said, you pull the thread and the people who are locked out, the ones who have a plan they like, those people can never be made happy. the whole point of obama care is you are all in. they have crappy policies and they don't know it perhaps. they will be better off eventually. the fact that the store is locked, they can't find out there is something better. when you begin to toy with it, this is when you have problems. i think congress needs a vote for their own reelections to say listen, we want you and we want to carry out obama's promise to
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you so that you are not slammed in the election. innocent bill clinton knows above all people and he's an expert and he is the secretary of explaining stuff, you may never be able to do this. the reason we are hearing these is they can't get in the store. >> the one thing i want to do is go on local help.healthcare.gov. when i.on local help.healthcare.gov and put in my zip code, up came 60 places in st. louis where i could call and go for information. there is a lot of ways to window shop now. as people do that, americans are great shoppers. if they figure out that there alternatives to the crappy policies they have now that are affordable, some of this goes away. the question is how quickly and what are they? >> the only good individual policies are the ones that young
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healthy people have. the insurance companies cherry pick you out. >> there is no doubt as long as the store is closed, this problem is greatly exacerbated because even those that are in individual policies that want to get in new know ones are almost always going to go through this internet portal and if it is largely closed, it exacerbates the problem. >> you have been doing so much incredible work on behalf of women in the military and dealing with the sexual assault crisis and talk about you and the tale of two plans. where does it stand now? >> in the bill of historical forms. some of those have been lot of because there is one issue that we disagree on. i will tell you the narrative that this is about vehicles versus commanders. that's a false choice. i'm on the victim's side. i firmly believe that the reforms we are doing and things we add to the bill are going to be better for victims and that if we let the commanders off the
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hook, there such negative consequences for the culture of the military around this issue. i am handcuffed by hundreds of rape and sodomy cases i have personally handled and the victims that i have talked to and the women that are prosecuting these cases in the military. i will never let the commanders off the hook on this. they have got to get this right. it's much better today than years ago. it will be much better next year than now. >> thank you. at the playbook cocktails. they asked me my favorite member of congress and i asked your name and the room erupted. >> i know he's back managing the chris christie campaign. >> up next -- >> it was astounding the man crush. i'm afraid they will run off together. we do need to talk football. >> he is not picking his favorite. >> i had a few picks and he had a few. you were on my list.
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up next, like the world series matchup. we go from st. louis's clair mccaskill to boston's john kerry. secretary of state john kerry joins us for the "morning joe" exclusive in a moment. mine was earned orbiting the moon in 1971.
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but with less energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive,y first. i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron. the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about 2 weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women especially those who are or who may become pregnant and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk
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of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sperm count; ankle, feet or body swelling; enlarged or painful breasts; problems breathing while sleeping; and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting and increase in psa. ask your doctor about axiron. >> what a night. with us is secretary of state john kerry. thanks for being on the show. >> happy to be with you. welcome to washington. >> thanks very much. >> that doesn't sound enthusiastic. >> boston was funner. i think you agree. >> this is not a box seat at the red sox. that's for sure. >> no. it was a good night. >> it was 8 great night.
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>> talking about the iran nuclear talks. there were so many signs of hope and positive signs. what's the status at this point? >> we are still hopeful. i think what's critical is to focus first of all on the president's policy. the president's policy is that under no circumstances will iran get a nuclear weapon. that is a centerpiece of obama foreign policy. he made that pledge a number of times and that is the policy that we are pursuing. i was in the senate. i was chairman of the foreign relations committee at the time we passed the bill. i helped to pass it and believe in them. the reason we passed the sanctions was to be able to negotiate. the sanctions are working. we are now able to negotiate. what we are really asking the congress to do is give us the time to be able to negotiate and
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present a good deal that would be able to protect israel and protect our interest and the region and guarantee, i mean guarantee fail that iran will not be able to get a nuclear weapon. it's a simple proposition. >> i understand that simple math you are doing. yesterday you told everyone, you told reporters and everybody that they need to calm down about the prospect of postponing new sanctions on iran. some might ask why we would even be considering easing sanctions. >> in fact the core sanctions regime does not really get eased. 95% or more of the current sanctions will remain in place. iran was bringing in about 110 billion or 120 billion a year in income from the oil revenues from banking and so forth. that has been knocked down to about 40 to 45 billion now
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because of the sanctions and that 45 billion is frozen in banks around the world. they can't access it. all we are talking about doing is a tiny portion of that would be released because you have to do something to make it worth wile for them to say yes, we are going to lock our program where it is today and actually roll it back. the president's plan on iran would actually expand the current break out time. if we don't negotiate and don't get this agreement, the exact opposite happens. the break out time contracts and the world becomes more dangerous. there is nothing to suggest that iran is going to up and say okay, we are going to do this because you have increased your sanctions in fact increasing sanctions would be viewed as a bad faith step by the united
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states and it will encourage them to hold them accountable for dealing with us at all because we don't operate in good faith. then we are locked into the next whatever number of years of the standoff, but a standoff in this circumstance which becomes far more dangerous for israel and our ally and friend, far more dangerous for the region and may even push other countries to nuclearize and could result in the requirement that we have to rather than have it negotiated with a peaceful resolution and take military action to cure our goals. >> robert gibbs. >> mr. secretary, you have a week before the next round of talks. you had this back and forth between some saying the french decided this wasn't a good deal. the united states did or even iran may have walked away. i am interested in how do you talk to and what do you say to
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prime minister netanyahu between now and the beginning of the talks next week that the path that you are pursuing is best for them and what do you say specifically around iran's continued enrichment abilities or continued to build a nuclear reactor for plutonium enrichment? >> we are not going to let them do that first of all. we made it clear to friends up on the hill that each of those critical enrichment facilities are part of this agreement. none of them will be able to progress further if we get this first step. that's how we begin to roll back the program and hold it where it is. that's an essential component of this. i had several conversations with prime minister netanyahu this week and in fact literally just before coming here i hung up the phone with prime minister netanyahu. we are having a very friendly and civil conversation about this.
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i respect completely his deep concerns as a prime minister of israel should have. about the exteshl nature of this threat to israel. we understand that. that's why president obama has made this firm commitment that iran will never get a nuclear weapon. what we disagree on is not the goal. we agree on the goal. we disagree on a tactic. we believe that you need to take this first step and you will not get iran to simply surrender and believe you are dealing in good faith after two years of negotiating you don't follow-through on what's on the table. but the prime minister netanyahu believes that you can increase the sanctions, put the pressure on even further and somehow that's going to force them to do what they haven't been willing to do any time previously. we don't agree with that. i don't want to go into that. what's important here is we
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stand with israel firmly. 100%. no distance between us about the danger of the program and the end game for us is exactly the same. iran cannot have a peaceful nuclear program. that is in fact a deceptive program or program here to allow them break out. they have to be fail safe and clarity about the processes which will guarantee it is a peaceful program. that's our mutual goal. >> mr. secretary. city of ratner has a case. >> you laid out your case very clearly and logically. why are you having so much trouble with so many of your former colleagues including senator corker and the democrats and so forth? >> there a lot of reasons for that, steve. i'm not going to enumerate all of them now except so to say
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every senator is entitled to be skeptical and to ask tough questions. they did and will and we will answer them. we will answer the questions and i will continue to talk to senators in the next days. i believe that what we are doing is and the president believes this very deeply. the best first step that will actually make israel safer, it will extend the break out time if we don't get this first step, not only will that break out time shrink, but iran may interpret the congressional reaction of wanting to increase sanctions as bad faith on our part and unwillingness to in fact negotiate and my drive the hard liners more into the commitment that they have to have the weapon. these are difficult judgments. you come to the table with our input and our information. i respect their positions, but we respectfully believe that the
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executive branch of government under the constitution deserves the right to negotiate and property them with something and this is not the moment to second-guess that process when two years have gone in to creating the trust and common understanding that has been building to bring us to this moment. we believe we ought to be able to get the first step and again i reiterate. our goal is the same. no nuclear weapon capacity. they must adhere to the strictest standards. >> john kerry, thank you very much for being on the show this morning. look forward to meeting another kerry soon. vanessa kerry. we will be doing that. business is next on "morning joe." charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month.
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that's why i stopped working at the old brokerage, and started working for charles schwab. avo: what kind of financial consultant are you looking for? talk to us today. . >> kelly, go. >> good morning. we have over a half hour to go before the opening bell. they are matching the headlines we have seen from the art market and the gem market lately. i digress. keep an eye on wal-mart. they came out with warnings and they warned about consumer weakness. the payroll tax cut is hitting. no wonder they are opening at 6:00 on thanksgiving. >> thank you. up next. what if anything did we learn today?
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