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tv   Interviews Culture Art Documentaries and Sports  RT  May 11, 2014 5:00pm-8:01pm EDT

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two people are killed in the eastern city of damascus after the ukrainian army sends in troops and disrupt autonomy referendum. despite days of military raids voting on self-determination concludes as people in ukraine's restive regions have their say on future relations with kiev. and other top stories from this week victims of a royal power play or martyrs for women's rights for saudi princes held hostage for over a decade by their own father. to us campaign who is prevented from going about our everyday business simply trying to keep our town cracking free .
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to look back at the past seven days top developments and the latest news this is the weekly on r.t. international and we start with the deadly violence in eastern ukraine that erupted during a referendum on moving towards greater autonomy from kiev may find some of the following images disturbing. pro-government forces entered the city of a mess in an attempt to disrupt the voting locals tried to stop them and here you can see troops shooting at a crowd of civilians one person died on the spot and another was injured a third man reportedly died on his way to hospital for schools serving as polling stations have been seized by government forces the voting had to be stopped early
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according to referendum organizers a sufficient number of ballots have already been cast. or getting news just in the interim authorities in the eastern ukrainian region of the net say that ninety percent of voters have said yes to greater autonomy from kiev in a local referendum and that's according to a preliminary count and the final results will be released on monday where voting is also taking place in the nearby lugansk region the turnout in both provinces was reported to be over seventy percent a poll in the country's industrial mostly russian speaking area comes after months of mass protests against the government in kiev and its policies and this is footage from some of the polling stations showing just how many people came to make their voices heard and that's despite consistent threats from kiev and the ongoing government military offensive in the area we talked to people queuing at polling stations about why they came out and here's what they had to say. but what are you voting for today. for our peoples.
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and we are against the security government that came to power on mind on. against this so-called government of ours. and see everybody go and what are you voting for today. it's my right not to say. i apologize i didn't mean to offend me but it really goes what are you voting for today. for russia. i go what are you voting for today because for what for the next national republican party's paulus lear who is in the next school now reports on what exactly those who organize a referendum are hoping to achieve. each of us is waging a war of their own i fight with a pen it is my weapon and more than three million people up poised today to use that same weapon residents of new guns and donetsk are holding
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a referendum that could have far reaching consequences to the mood among people is positive finally we'll have the chance to speak our mind in five weeks more than three million ballots have been printed and more than one thousand two hundred polling stations organized with the electoral roll has already been compiled people in eastern ukraine who had been involved in previous election campaigns helped us with that we had some serious problems including paper but we found ballots in the administration building that when you do go over financing was also a problem in the end it came from private donors and although no foreign observers are on hand to check the legality of the vote they were invited but neither washington nor the european union recognize this poll so how does the referendum work the question on the ballots page asks do you support the act of state self rule of the dinette people's republic or the new guns people's republic or.
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all we want is to declare our right to self-determination so after the referendum results are announced the status of the region will not change it will still be part of ukraine it won't become part of russia we will only let the world know that we want change we just want to be heard and to be able to determine our region's future and of that next step which result in autonomy people in these regions would claim the right to choose their own language and domestic policy the budget would no longer be controlled by the government in kiev and even foreign ties would be decided by local leaders because it's going to be our own free republic we will be free to choose and can leave like normal people our government called us all terrorists. yes terrorists with children and prams they might deny has the right to voice our opinions but let everyone have this opportunity today to say what they think what i saw in my gun is unacceptable i don't want this to be repeated but
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with rumors of a harsher military crackdown many fear that flow to peace could still be marred with chaos and bloodshed pointless lee r.t. eastern ukraine. international affairs experts here jette coverture i spoke to him earlier he believes the violence is the reason protesters in the east are defying have four fifths of the people of the region mainly do not quite know what do you want whether to be a communist within ukraine or to join with russia but certainly low what they would not get what they have in common is absolutely categorically rejection of the legitimacy of legality of the regime here and likewise in knows where some of these elected on maybe twenty eight or thirty two percent of the total vote of ukrainian citizens it will be showing the worst is a great and glorious victory for democracy mark my words how what may even if it's
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completely boycotted be in these even if it is only partially successful in the style in the sense that they will claim that ukraine now is the legitimate state and that head of state is a man who is committed to bio and who is the corrupt oligarchy and a puppet of the west the harkov region of eastern ukraine has also seen mass protests against the post-coup government in kiev it's also planned to hold a referendum but decided to suspend it just a few days ago the move followed the russian president's calls for delay until conditions improve and dialogue with kiev is possible. but we asked the representatives of southeastern ukraine and pro federalization supporters to postpone the referendum on the regional tanami scheduled for the eleventh of may this year. during a meeting with the current chief of the organization for security and cooperation in europe putin also assured russian troops are no longer near the ukrainian border
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and he also said that the key to resolving the tensions between the self east and kiev is for talks well political analyst and russia expert martin mccauley believes there are signs that something can be achieved the position seems to be that russia would welcome the elect the president then begin to negotiate with him negotiate a settlement to the to the crisis in ukraine it is the first glimmer of hope for a long time it looks like the situation will affect. the temperature will decline and hopefully more people will be killed. that we can look forward to a presidential election in the twenty fifth of may which will pass. freely and it will be an exercise in democracy and will be no conflict no no force no coercion used by anyone let's hope that ukraine now is seeing some light at the end of the
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tunnel both the e.u. and the us have dismissed the self-determination vote in eastern ukraine and illegal washington believes it will lead to more disorder and division as the state department reiterated its support for the interim government in kiev now this show of support came up as an issue this week when the assistant secretary of state appeared before congress. we did have a legitimate election before and the elected president was removed after we had major street violence there were pictures that people of people were running around with these that were we were told were male nazis. first of all the vast majority of those who participated on the my dawn were peaceful protesters if you had a chance to see the pictures and some many of us visited including many members here there were mothers and grandmothers and now that are in the main don't every
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day i have a lever however for you go on i saw those pictures as well i also saw a lot of pictures of people throwing firebombs a groups of policemen were huddled in the over in a corner where people were shooting into the ranks of police so yes there were mothers with flowers but there were also very dangerous street fighters were engaged in those demonstrations the question is were there a neo nazi groups involved in that. there were as i said almost every color of ukraine was represented including some including breaking answer is yes then. coming up here not international in the weekly the plight of saudi princesses look it's in a tele that's a more for you after the break. personel
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data are trusted a cloud service. that ensures protecting your privacy. could be arranged to randomly get stolen. or become a target of the n.s.a. . what if unclouded sky is right above the cloud. right. now and. what if the.
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sign. for princess is locked up in a sim waiting years to be set free not a fairy tale but a very reality in saudi arabia king abdullah's daughters used to lead a real life of royal opulence but their home was a multimillion dollar palace they had personal pads they joined shopping and going on holidays but all that was taken from them thirteen years ago when their father ordered them to be locked up for good and in my colleague andrew foreman got a firsthand account of the situation from two of the princess's. we are. actually. having. some expired.
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over the last few weeks you have had a lot of international exposure about your fate do you sense that that is helping it chilled when found where. i'm from cellphone. everyone and movement wires and all the human rights organization come out and actually home. and send. your parents. one of the most widely held theories is that the princess is being punished for supporting women's rights a longstanding issue in the country political commentator now see a lot of shared his thoughts on what's happening here. himself. is considered by many so days to be a reformer and it's hard to believe this when you see that his own daughters
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are actually being treated this way. just because his ex-wife refuses to return to. radio to be under his thumb i guess because he is an ex-wife. at the same time there are a lot of saudis who believe that king abdullah has has actually reformed. he talked at some point about allowing so do women to vote but things are extremely slow the mother of the imprisoned daughter says they are victims of a power struggle within the saudi rulers large family of thirty eight children. the chance for a little. his sons are definitely big and he was to cut it to the to do that by half brothers special in the pub and. who are up like
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this is his sister to be something. in the government in the future and they want the father to pay those bills although he has some reason i'm divorced so there's no one to just protect them or that of the father no it's not try so i'm far away we see them occasionally over our website of the moment accusations of mass surveillance forced canada to take action the government considers launching an investigation into claims its spy agencies have their secretive fiddling fingers inside the social media accounts of its citizens. plus in mexico thousands of vigilantes both young and old get a license to kill after joining the ranks of local police to battle a mighty drug cartel. considered a nuisance by u.s. castrating john very scroggins was barred from visiting her friends supermarkets
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and even the local hospital in her hometown in pennsylvania but she refused to give up her fight in mel a court has relented and loosen restrictions against the fierce anti fracking campaigner he's miniport now reports on her longtime struggle. pennsylvania resident nearest grogan's has spent more than five years leading up to public battle against one of the biggest and most controversial industries. to follow trucks around see where the fracking is going now i show them sites from the road whatever the different phases excavation drilling fracking flaring and then of course the compressor stations then the pipeline construction that's all over the place like a way like a spider web show them that and then i take them to people who have been harmed last year kaput or oil and gas corporation one of the biggest drillers in this state attempted to silence viera a court injunction brought in by the company stripped of her from entering upon more than three hundred square miles owned or least by cabot it's one of the most
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extreme measures ever taken against an anti fracking activist i couldn't go let's say to all the stores i normally go to i couldn't go to the new hospital nearby i couldn't go to say my vet for free well from my dog i can go to some of the restaurants that i was used to going to but vieira and the anti fracking opposition refused to back down and last month they finally prevailed a judge significantly eased the injunction we hope that protesters will understand and the cavite wonder stand to that there is a first amendment in this country protecting the rights of advocates even ones who have messages that become phonies like cabbage may not want to hear their right behind me is a fracking site in action water chemicals and sand being pumped into the ground in order for viewer to observe the action without violating her injunction she stands on the private property of a pennsylvania resident who happens to live right across the street from the
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fracking site when our team met up with hera she was touring a group of activists around the county exposing the dangers many experts have linked to fracking they want us. scare people into keeping quiet but it's not going to work according to reports kapit insists that beer is activism distracted employees from their work and interfere with natural gas production however this sixty three year old grandmother and fearless advocate says she refuses to be intimidated i will continue to do it as i live here i don't want to live with this and i don't want to for future generations i don't want it for my children or anyone i know. r.t.d. montrose pennsylvania. of course fear isn't the only one fighting against the industry and it's not the first time a drilling company has been stopped in its tracks by an activist either in texas a jury awarded three million dollars to two victims of fracking who prove their
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health was damaged by a nearby drilling site people in the moment managed to impose a complete ban becoming the first state to do that in the united states and the company in ohio was forced to suspend drilling off to the authorities launched an investigation into a connection between the operations and earthquakes caught up with anti fracking activists cutting let's go explained how she beat big business two thousand and six we had a drilling and fracking operation going on in ohio and as a result of that there were huge definition that ended up finishing actually having health effects myself and a lot of the neighbors here so that was my week a car was really confused honestly to have such an experience from an industrial operation right close to my home so that prompted me to look into it and to figure out how or why this was legal in two thousand and ten a bill passed in our government here in ohio which was the largest free are in oil
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and gas law in our state since one nine hundred sixty five so that was the most recent. improvement that was brought about in our law. in greece for the first time direct links are being drawn between financial hardship and suicide the number of those taking their own lives there was once the lowest in europe but that changed when the economy crashed it was a suicide nearly every day between two thousand and nine and two thousand and ten according to a new report really cost of us spoke to some of those driven to the edge by a sturdy. this will make. it hard to find a job they prefer to get migrants who are cheaper and don't ask for any benefits unlike us some greeks end up on the streets but others and uptake in their own life unable to handle the pressure and then growing numbers after that i came close to committing suicide and i believe many greeks found the same way and for the first
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time research shows that the rise in suicides here in recent years is the iraqi link to the spending cuts which have driven millions into unemployment when it comes to greece it's mainly men aged forty five to eighty nine who are at a greater risk people who lose their. identity. while there are so often. in conflict with the conditions of wards according would have been living their lives even with women but if not living bodies works for clinical an organization which offers free counseling to those thinking of taking their own lives lost consider doing just that when he lost everything a year ago could you tell us what made you tried to commit suicide. it's a tragic story i didn't have a place to live or somewhere to go and i was taken to
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a priest who ended up being weird took advantage of me in that moment i lost my mind because i was fifty three years old at the time and the experience was very shocking for me i didn't know what else to do in that moment i didn't know. five hundred fifty one men committed suicide in greece between two thousand and nine and two thousand and ten that's about one person a day when i spoke to people in athens none seemed too surprised according to the latest studies there were two suicides a day on average in greece in two thousand and ten and half of them were soley because of the economic crisis did you know that. if you don't have money to take your kids your family wants you through pressure would you feel good about yourself i've been on the employed for two years i've paid for everything yet i don't have insurance i don't have anything i have two kids to raise i understand why men
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especially through pressured men have more responsibility. because the. truth. be relevant. to the in the world today. that they feel the problem is that after six years of austerity there remains a lot of pain in greece and very few signs of hope to cling to more in the car serve our artsy athens. some other world news now on a world update this hour suicide attack in pakistan's restive city of peshawar killed five people a bomber entered a refugee registration facility and started firing at police officers before blowing himself up not knowing who's behind the attack but al qaeda insurgents have repeatedly targeted civilians and security officers in the area. of the collapse of the recycling plant in eastern china has killed at least eighteen people and injured three more it's believed heavy rain which is drenched the region in recent weeks caused the accident local government reports of forty people were
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in the building at the time. so. insurgents involves a brazen attack on a military base in northern iraq killing twenty soldiers at least eleven were shot dead from close range with their hands tied behind their backs is salt followed a spate of deadly attacks across the country that left nineteen dead iraq is witnessing the worst surge in violence since two thousand and eight with thousands having lost their lives since the start of this year. a tornado battered a small town in the us state of missouri damaging buildings but causing no injuries it downed power lines and written branches from trees on saturday local weather service has issued severe thunderstorm warnings for the region. brings up to date for the moment you know neal mccauley he'll be here with more news in just over half an hour from now in the meantime the story of the crimean city of service to poles heroic stand against nazi germany seven decades ago this is.
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the day wounds of a partner went to a waffle house to rob it he apparently didn't expect anyone there to have a concealed weapons permit but just in harrison did he waited for just the right moment drew his weapon and killed williams but woods is grieving family are now calling to change south carolina's concealed carry laws and are upset that harrison was not charged obviously right or wrong good or bad the family of williams has the right to feel sorrow for their loss but if it wasn't their loved one who was the robber i think they might feel very different this are bribery situation is the exact reason why concealed carry permits exist if you to be liberals about concealed carry they will always present some sort of fantasy situation where god
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wouldn't help you to prove that you don't need them what if a guy sticks up behind you then you're going to be totally worthless man you know guns aren't a magic answer to every crime situation but often they come in handy and they sure did for justin harrison when he was looking down the barrel of a criminal's gun so what kind of america do you want to live in one where you're helpless and have to beg for your life on the floor of a restaurant or in america where if you rob waffle house you're going to pay for it i think the choice is pretty obvious fascist my opinion. rather than recognizing just how far this is goes and seeing the damage that's being done and changing course people just point fingers and say what everyone does it says so why we.
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god was. serious to put it down on the net the way i understand this to. understand is that on one of those readers of this movie poster she was still quite sad it was somebody new and yes i saw mean to them. but it isn't been used like a lot of people it's a small e.c.s. . the. best open small shaking able to. open.
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plains can lead plug that assisting world on the news not doorstopper. what's going to go down i was up at the bella by show you. go. watch the team see about store but not so yeah you shim. school and i. will pray your school. to the. ship to let. for style of elite. what their little brains come forward
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i discuss all of it. i thought of. the as is mr layton much. more annoyed. but also a book. three did him good it's a bit more simple the subtle good old story the story of. the destroyed. mort the third isn't it's just a this is it of course the most the most of us crazy malone on this course could
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become that opossum you could meet the minimis not the other girl not the. ways of his ideas for truth and i was like yeah with sid you see a lot of show how deal a woman would miss because some of the table sorry cynical split in the b.b. . might include would it would be hard to miss it sold out and yeah sold out i don't know what that. kind of money was i guess i see with a zanny she it would seem to hell i mean that's cold but equally well you know when
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you see cereal well it's only a pickle sold yep luckily on their second child you blush plus you can i see a typical. one will pull up on piers is one of the ski lift but he's. not on the show so you know it was swell that also plays jewel up on my t.v. have anything anywhere on the spot so i just yell her official i hate when you speed you shook up what i was. still call me. and it got crushed when a goof up close i knew about all the wood from the width of the nation not sure you could do is this so please could really cool but politically to be who are going here but this should be mentioned in your because let me tell me you know. and we have seen the old commotion when it was most would consider if it's going to go he had to go with you paul could well known
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a simple because he knew more people didn't always seem it was lucky people that are so. you know who puts on months and. to cope with the issue good news. in this is just course under oath but he really ourselves said uni i'm sick of the shock so i said i don't think skin is the. here but there was some point if he were here and you know that's it question is. i'll call myself off the local you know and i thought you know what sort of i don't like about with myself. if you don't know what. they're going to hold off for us. at the master classes with what they call a senior i was with. him i said. to him that i was. just so selfless is the time i put all.
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our. economic house up all i knew how to get that it's a pretty. good producer it's a look you can see. how each of those is something only but by ok she is going to get to see all muslims because she told those you moos. with the ugly emotion with music and see through music do you cook you did you lose you know me i'm moved she did you know and you've done it jean. and he is a shell of lost and he's the only source the movie light is in and among. these you know money you know when you the newly fleeced slower.
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yeah. but you knew morgan not spoiled. enough. she was still playing. it with delivery you just. made. it you know you. know and yeah gene pool in the sun. there was no sun local. but i gave you. a yell.
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at a lot about only. sadness that on the. water was the worst on the substance. but i mean look. at the last.
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one we almost. so playing is the word so you see the plus the what the quarterly business she was a listener schooling mediums of. the month and it was out of this article what musical ability in the beauty can you say was a coincidentally come on this was when i seriously need come when you saw your running at the spit this is not good it was all right and it was the night associate especially good in that he said no but i'm just not as i'm with doc watson he would do to be what's in a lot of that you can spot this is not going to saluting yet another soon and i'm going to get a minute just need also to move us closer to what made them get my you or them as i'm doing as i want to go. through what they need those are the bridges the muscle mass we've really subsisted i see you got it in just. a. little bit but it was short but nearly in a good peachy. new method of being such
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a public school i mean yeah i was tossed. years ago and sure yeah i'm good oh yeah but i'm a short guys they. just built. for the real i guess i just. got to the only. poster you know you already. know this you put it as a why do you say it's going so you're. not done the one meal you said to just a week or two last also or some of the other day ordered to get really serious but let's not been in the aisle gaga not that i was. lost but you might say that it's a gimme other what up. one out there. i did throw in
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a sack the one most about the matzah well the came out of them you know starts a teacup. one out there that lets lenders are the. rule also known as are pretty hard to meddle. smeal is the way the. laws. are simple mr. ford.
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if this is the castle. for the on the on the. yet out of the way off the. disappearing utility cut the little known but the woman which. it with a more easy out that. way and this. in the face. of the new bills down. right you will bing as that you when you go to the news though i do believe renewable.
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will be. funny it's technology innovation called in these developments from around russia we've got the future covered. the future leaves the reviews economic up and downs in the find out how long they should learn to deal shanghai and the rest will be a few will be every week on t.v. . when your children have nothing to give twentieth children or your family is being killed i think most people in the world would agree that this is a bit more valuable than that you know there is
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a muse of political rights that's really what we saw with the arab spring of people saying that their past to be an alternative to all the extremes that have been presented to me that's what a generation after generation were raised as your dictatorship or you're going to fall into chaos you're either out of war or your inner peace without justice you're either poor or you're rich and the region is rejecting the extremes and saying we want new options and i think that is worth supporting.
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liz. rules in effect that means you can jump in anytime you want. personel data far trusted a cloud service. that ensures protecting your privacy. could be erased randomly get stolen. or become a target of the n.s.a. . what if unclouded sky is right above
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the clouds on our t.v. . right to see. first street view and i think picture. on our reporters twitter. and instagram. could be in the.
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let us go and look all the way i'm only. going to go. there when they are. going to go to when you put michelle. on this but also. good to those of them i was going. to get that they said what is this will. all that appeal that's. really been a mail order video board is three dollars but it was ok. when i heard you since you did three ideas to go above thirty is decent substantive issue with me. but so far. as the what that would mean we see
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a lot on this sort of get us up that all got the. sunday to say that. you see him getting all those who are to assist. when it is duty of water even other doesn't yet but i wish that he was one of the one you feel that they can both of your school well done is give them a what is a well digital machine i knew. but in your. school with because it was for those icy well secure when was the. brother the will of the. just the luckless but i do also think i. would also use to. forgive those who put it that is so to me a little good up to up. this if you're out there get up is up when she's watching was struck by i don't decide if. well there's
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a thought but i'll go with the suddenness i knew the question who cheats is simple she got to stop it to be. done. just. walk. the line you know. you hear. that. special busting ispell girl sister. the bull smilin at russian spy she was a. pretty good team said the boy. with the current environment around us. yes. that's the man i do you value that's all it.
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was do. you know it's not. all over the whole school. but you know to me it's a design it's. certainly was a good quarter they get a clue. the stuff just look. at the border.
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and that's up on google. door. so what i saw of the game was steve ma the way he did. it was that you could not get on the stall because the fact you just gave him some ugly story let. us stay no matter what except for the very we appreciate the. menu's nearly mutual with. jacob i mean we're here to larry and we dish don't record that you've been you know i didn't in fact i spoke about it it was almost a pretty in the actual age edge of the list of those to flex at that illiteracy. is not the worst it was at that was it done it and you'll just not in the us he had lowered you into mean yes there were early reviews. or you love to forgive me.
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but i'm used to most of those can use of fossil you thumb of metal things he didn't see it was he see me. signal to. the on the soul cause cream is good but to most of us the question. of the leak of the missile is bit of a so-called i think in a song as a poem. it is it almost also oh i only post this in the welcome when you know. the wall is a million machines or less abuse that we cannot heave to get money in with us he said was the biggest thing was but if it is about us the media which tell
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a creamy yes. us hopefully doesn't as lang a slave in the war new food she was. always just such but i wish the water through sky slowly. blew east it would you. so stop we will be sure crust until you just played it with the dust crossing the. door need your cup break you only much can you more here to this you know could you just live was seen sort of because only by the public good but what good does it do him any good should he go up in the face. of all of our not those who have to do what they are my own and one of us he was. this one also of all quotable of was
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a good one the color blue of his own work secretly is like a little looks like a ball up close though a super secret and one of them one of us still doesn't see it got a computer you know there's a chance there's a p.s. one more you call them beautiful he was will upload where there are more in your shit up because he really got it i wouldn't either maybe you can really see just listing what a new york woman you're looking for monthly but. yeah come on that i get me by doing a load groups so that you had to break to even though. it was red dog i mean a gun supposed to sydney done as your door to this bitch in clinton or. you want me so lame and so the weather would look nice leiber was a little got on the scene and you see a lot of it when i meant yesterday and you. get that he said he'd done mr. morsi just the same but he might hold me when i got a little boy so as long ago he was raising me if i was in so. the
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wrong he said to embolden the muscles exploiting a button on the slimy player with the right. now to syria at the last hour or dinner yet the most american seems not to lucian the rouge each. new poem my service to the new place she used to play. i need is not. that the new year got some a pleasure out of it but on the scars are still with us who are good at but the warden was a swell you know. as a korean called mccreary pleases the children and what if when i. cross that out and you come we will still. see unique that you have a are. shouldn't
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. you be. sitting there she. says or cscope. the pitch the. mood of the. store. with the green zero in the poorest you know wrote at the with her teachers remark conditions are pretty minimal. any reason year he. used to call. women your ward morrow's. talk the. young people will go with you what. he wants to teach some orchard. i didn't
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disclose or deal for august was a deal you're not. what. what. she just is bullshit you did not look good because that's what it took to release to school compulsory for teachers from. the easy to inquiries up to mrs tree. looked at the record. at its height. which is unlikely i'm going to give. him a smile as he's given. mission
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to teach me. why you should care.
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war is probably the most complex human activity. still locked up. in the phenomenon of friendly fire probably extends back to the invention of gunpowder. to kill a bunch of people who don't know if their families there are in the us people. reading. this some of the shoots my brother in the leg not intentional because it because it was night time for in the morning even the best given the mesh shoulders. are going to make mistakes does this whole idea of brotherhood an author and camaraderie in this sense it was in this context it has absolutely
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no place. in effect that means you can jump in anytime you want. the interview.
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feel good. rather than recognizing just how far all this is goes and seeing the damage that's being done and changing course people just point fingers and say what everyone does it so why are we.
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there are. two civilians were killed in eastern ukraine as government troops opened fire on voters i'd side a polling station during a referendum on moving towards greater local autonomy. despite days of military raids voting on self-determination goes ahead anyway with people in ukraine's rest of regions lining up at polling stations to have their say on future relations with kiev. led to know their stories from this week to saudi princesses say they've been held captive for the past thirteen years in their own palace for speaking out against the oppression of women. teammates and on to. fracking campaigner in the united states who's risking her freedom to keep her time and she'll free.
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but the big news stories from the week that was plus all to the minute developments you're watching the weekly on r t international i mean you know neal welcome and we start with the deadly violence in eastern ukraine which erupted during a referendum on seeking greater autonomy from kiev two people were killed some viewers may find the following images disturbing. money. there. government forces enter the city of crust there are maske to prevent voting from going ahead locals tried stopping them and here you can see soldiers shooting out a crowd of on armed civilians with live runs the man shown here is hit in the leg by the fleck did both at the video shows the same scene
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a little earlier. this month in a white top was shot and died seconds later one other person was wounded by gunfire and reportedly died on his way to hospital the voting had to be stopped early but according to referendum organizers a sufficient number of ballots had already been cast. so the referendum took place in two a string ukrainian provinces donetsk and lugansk interim authorities in the dinette screeches in say that ninety percent of voters have said yes to steps towards greater autonomy from kiev that is according to a preliminary kind the final results will be released on monday the turnout in both provinces was reported to be over seventy percent the pool in the industrial mostly russian speaking part of the country comes after months of protests against the post coup government in kiev on its policies now this is footage from some of the polling stations showing just how many people came to make their voices heard despite the threats from kiev on the ongoing military offensive we talked to people
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queuing at polling stations this is what they had to say. let me go what are you voting for today. for all of the votes. and we are against the security government that came to power on my down. against this so-called government of ours. who didn't see anybody go and what are you gloating for today. it's my right not to say. i apologize i didn't mean to offend me but we really go also what are you voting for to be. for russia. i go sort of what are you voting for today because you know for what for the next knesset out of public. artie's paula sillier who is now reports on what exactly those who organized the referendum are hoping to achieve. each of us is waging a war of their own i fight with
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a pen it is my weapon and more than three million people love poised today to use that same weapon residents have no guns and donetsk are holding a referendum that could have far reaching consequences which if the mood among people is positive finally we'll have the chance to speak our mind in five weeks more than three million ballots have been printed and more than one thousand two hundred polling stations organized with the electoral roll has already been compiled and people in eastern ukraine who had been involved in previous election campaigns helped us with that we had some serious problems including paper the found ballots in the ministration building that you do over financing was also a problem in the end it came from private donors and although no foreign observers are on hand to check the legality of the vote they were invited. but neither washington nor the european union recognized this poll so how does the referendum work the question on the ballots page asks do you support the act of state self
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rule of the dinette people's republic or the lugansk people's republic or. all we want is to declare our right to self-determination so after the referendum results are announced the status of the regions will not change it will still be part of ukraine it won't become part of russia not only let the world know that we want change we just want to be heard and to be able to determine our region's future and if that next step were to result in autonomy people in these regions would claim the right to choose their own language and domestic policy the budget would no longer be controlled by the government in kiev and even foreign ties would be decided by local leaders because it's going to be our own free republic or we will be free to choose and can leave like normal people our government called us all to terrorists. terrorists with children and friends might deny has the right to
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voice our opinions but let everyone have the certainty of the day to say what they think that's what i thought you know that is unacceptable i don't want this to be repeated but with rumors of a harsher military crackdown many fear that closure peace could still be marred with chaos and bloodshed point to see our team eastern ukraine. international affairs expert sorry believes the violent tactics being used are turning people in the east away from the kiev government. what they have in common is actually going to go to kl rejection of the legitimacy of legality of the regime here and likewise. when some of these elected on maybe twenty eight or thirty two percent of the total vote of ukrainian citizens it will be showing the worst is a great and glorious victory for democracy mark my words how what may even if it's
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completely blinkered to be in these even if it is only partially successful in the cell in the sense that they will claim that ukraine now has a legitimate state and that head of state is a man who is committed to a violinist who is a corrupt oligarchy and a puppet of the west the harkov region of eastern ukraine is also seen mass protests against the post-coup government in kiev it's also planned to hold a referendum but the sighted to suspend it just a few days ago the move followed the russian president's calls for a delay until conditions improve and dialogue with kiev is possible but with them but if we ask the representatives of southeastern ukraine and pro federalization supporters to perspire own the referendum on the regional autonomy for the eleventh of may this year. during a meeting with the current chief of the organization for security and cooperation in europe putin also assured russian troops are no longer near the ukrainian border
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he added they key to resolving tensions is for the rest of scythe east and kiev to talk political analyst on russia expert martin mccauley believes there are signs something can be achieved the position seems to be that russia would welcome the elected president and then begin to negotiate with him negotiated settlement to the crisis in ukraine it is the first glimmer of hope for a long time it looks like the situation will in fact. the temperature will decline and hopefully. people will be killed. that we can look forward to a presidential election in the twenty fifth of may which will pass. freely and it will be an exercise in democracy and will be no conflict no new force no coercion used by anyone let's hope that ukraine know is seeing some light at the end of the tunnel both the e.u.
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and the us have dismissed the self-determination vote in eastern ukraine as illegal washington believes it will lead to more disorder division as the state department reiterated its support for the interim government in kiev this show of support came up as an issue this week when the assistant secretary of state appeared before congress. we did have a legitimate election before. the elected president was removed after we had major street violence there were pictures that people of people were running around with these that were we were told were male nazis. first of all the vast majority of those who participated on the my dawn were peaceful protesters if you had a chance to see the pictures some many of us visited including many members here and there were mothers and grandmothers and that are in the main don't every day i have a lever however before you go on i saw those pictures as well i also saw
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a lot of pictures of people throwing fireballs a groups of policemen were huddled in the over in a corner where people would shoot even into the ranks of police so yes there were mothers with flowers but there were also very dangerous street fighters who were engaged in those demonstrations the question is were there a neo nazi groups involved in that. there were as i said almost every color of ukraine was represented including some including breaking answer is yes then. around four hundred mercenaries from the private u.s. security firm academy are involved in the operation against anti-government activists in ukraine that is according to a report in the german newspaper built sontag citing an intelligence source earlier that german intelligence service told the government about the mercian recent polls meant in the operation however it's not clear who commands and pays the private
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military contractors a cademy previously known as blackwater gained notoriety after alleged atrocities committed during the iraq war the firm had earlier been accused of involvement in the ukrainian crisis an unverified video that supposedly shows u.s. private contractors operating in the city of donetsk emerged in march this year to company has not commented on the latest revelations but previously denied any involvement in the ukrainian crisis. and i joined live by foreign policy expert danielle mccallum's to speak more on the subject hello to you what are your thoughts on these recent revelations why would the government in kiev involve foreign mercenaries well i think you have a lot of appointed oligarchs in the east who are very very wealthy and they have an interest in trying to quell this don't rest what's interesting about these last two stories we've seen about u.s. involvement is they both come from for major german newspapers and then make sure
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you wonder whether the germans are not getting nervous that the u.s. is pushing this too far we saw for example last week in build a story that dozens of cia officers were involved in helping put down the. rest in the east and now we see this other story in a german paper so i think under the surface you're seeing a lot of very concerned german and german businessman from what's happening what impact could the presence of these private contractors affect the situation in ukraine down the. well i think we've seen a change in the tactics of the you wouldn't call the military because every picture that i've seen they look like some sort of ragtag militia hurry violent but you see a change in their activities they're burning police stations down there are shooting i saw at least three unarmed people shot today on you tube there seems to be their their purpose is to foment chaos and to destabilize the east so they're
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not really about stable is the answer but. now as i mentioned earlier contractors from blackwater were accused of atrocities in iraq why would a company with such a track record be invited onto ukrainian soil in the first place well because they're not connected to governments they don't apply they don't feel they need to abide by international law they are able to use extruding violence we saw what happened in flew just you saw a city decimated by these people so i think that's when you want to have muscle that's not accountable that's who you hire. let's talk a little bit more about the western reaction to the developments in ukraine we've seen some disturbing images of government troops opening fire on unarmed civilians during the referendum are we going to see any condemnation from western states do you think. well as is the common practice when the u.s. doesn't like a vote it's coming out they've already condemned it beforehand the state department
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issued a press release yesterday saying that it condemned this referendum that was being held by quote armed separatist groups but anyone with a computer and an internet can see the armed opposition is our are not the people in the streets as i said i've seen at least three people killed today the these these militia were shutting down polling stations and shooting people i think the u.s. state department seems to be believing its own propaganda for some reason it's likely that they did support an armed insurrection in kiev where there was no election but you do have a protest in the east trying to hold an election the u.s. condemns that other circumstances are not great for the elections in the east of course but they will not be any better for the may twenty fifth presidential race and just briefly the u.s. and indeed the e.u. have said they won't recognize the referendum results why does the opinion of all these people not kind well the u.s. looks to support democracy except when there's
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a danger of people who are in the wrong way look what we saw in egypt not that awfully long ago you know it really is a hypocrisy on the part of u.s. government i think it's it's becoming more and more obvious to the rest of the world it's damaging our reputation down in the gallants executive director at the ron paul in should we thank you for your time thank you coming up the plight of saudi princesses locked in a tower that and more after a short break. when you were children have nothing to eat when your children or your family is being killed i think most people in the world would agree that this is. valuable you know those elusive political rights that's really what we saw with the arab spring as people saying that there should be an alternative to all the extremes that have been presented i mean that's what generation after generation were raised. in dictatorship or you're going to fall into chaos you're either war or you're in
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a peace without justice you're either poor or you're rich in the region is rejecting the extremes and saying we want new options and i think that is worth supporting. them back to the program for princesses locked up in a palace and waiting years to be set free no not a fairy tale but
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a very modern reality in saudi arabia king abdullah as daughters used to live a life of royal opulence their home was a multi million dollar policy a personal hell and enjoyed shopping trips on holidays but all that was taken from them thirteen years ago when their father ordered them to be locked up for good or my colleague farmer got a firsthand account of the situation from two of the princess's. we are. actually. getting. some expired. over the last few weeks you have had a lot of international exposure about your fate do you sense that that is helping it chilled when found where. i'm from and i will call. everyone. many wires and all the human rights organization come out
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and actually hold. your parent. one of the most widely held theories is that the princesses are being punished for supporting women's rights a longstanding issue in the country political commentator nassir alomari shared his thoughts on what is happening. is considered by many so days to be a reformer and it's hard to believe this when you see that his own daughters are actually being treated this way. just because his ex-wife refuses to return to. radio to be under his thumb i guess because he is an ex-wife. at the same time there are a lot of saudis will believe that king abdullah has. actually reformed so
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he talked at some point about allowing so do women to vote but things are extremely slow the mother of the imprisoned daughters say they are victims of a power struggle within the saudi rulers large family of thirty eight children. and the chance for. his sons this from the team behind he was encouraged to do to do that by half brothers question in the pub and. up like this is his sisters to be something. in and the government in the future and they want the father to pay those girls although he has these an un divorce so there's no one to just protect them or that is the father know let's not try so i'm far away we see them occasionally the ukase booming
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cocaine habit is leaving its traces in the water supply according to a new study. water experts say the contamination levels pose no threat to human health but show the drug is more widely used than ever before for more on the story r t v dot com. also there are new york police department recruits of muslims from detention centers to spy in their communities and mosques get the full details on our website. and environmental campaigner in the u.s. state of pennsylvania is coming under intense legal pressure in our campaign against the shale gas industry sixty three year old activist. drilling technique known as fracking has caused devastation in her hometown marina portnoy reports on her battle against the corporate giants not. pennsylvania resident of nearest grogan's has spent more than five years leading up to public battle against one of the biggest and most controversial industries. to follow trucks around to see where
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the fracking is going now i show them sites from the road whatever the different phases excavation drilling fracking flaring and then of course the compressor stations then the pipeline construction that's all over the place like a way like a spider web show them and then i take them to people who have been harmed last year cabot or oil and gas corporation one of the biggest drillers in this state attempted to silence viera a court injunction brought in by the company to her from entering upon more than three hundred square miles owned or least by cabot it's one of the most extreme measures ever taken against an anti fracking activist i couldn't go let's say to all the stores i normally go to i couldn't go to the new hospital nearby i couldn't go to say my vet for a for a while for my dog i can go to some of the restaurants that i was used to going to but vera and the anti fracking opposition refused to back down and last month they
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finally prevailed a judge significantly eased the injunction we hope that protesters will understand and the cavite wonder stand to that there is a first amendment in this country protecting the rights of advocates even ones who have messages that become phonies like cabbage may not want to hear their right behind me is a fracking site in action water chemicals and sand being pumped into the ground in order for viewer to observe the action without violating her injunction she stands on the private property of a pennsylvania resident who happens to live right across the street from the fracking site when our team met up with hera she was touring a group of activists around the county exposing the dangers many experts have linked to fracking they want us. scare people into keeping quiet but it's not going to work according to reports cabot insists that beer is activism distracted
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employees from their work and interfere with natural gas production however this sixty three year old grandmother and fearless advocate says she refuses to be intimidated i will continue to do it because i live here i don't want to live with this and i don't want to for future generations i don't want to for my children or anyone i know. r.t. montrose pennsylvania. and of course vir isn't the only one fighting against the industry it's not indeed the first time a drilling company has been stopped in its trucks either by. an activist in texas a jury awarded three million dollars to two victims of fracking who prove their health was damaged by a nearby drilling site people in vermont managed to impose a complete bomb becoming the first state to do so on a company in ohio was also forced to suspend drilling after the authorities launched an investigation into a connection between the operations and earthquakes r t caught up with the fracking
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activist party must go explained how she beat big business. two thousand and six we had a drilling and fracking operation going on in ohio and as a result of that there were a fugitive commission that ended up finishing actually having how the fact myself and a lot of the neighbors here so that was my week a call was really confused honestly to have such an experience from an industrial operation right close to my home so that prompted me to look into it and to figure out how or why this was legal in two thousand and ten a bill passed in our government here in ohio which was the largest free our oil and gas law in our state the one nine hundred sixty five so that was the most recent. improvement that was brought about in our law time for more news from around the globe right now. protesters in vietnam helping rallying against the chinese or the
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reagan disputed waters hundreds gathered outside china's embassy in hull noise to voice the rangar over the huge drilling project in the side china sea the rig has prompted a furious reaction from vietnam which is part of the drilling site is within its territory. in saudi arabia the death toll from the murders respiratory virus has reached one hundred thirty nine the art brick was first detected in the country back in two thousand and twelve its spread rapidly reaching several nearby countries the disease can lead to kidney failure and pneumonia. insurgents have attacked a military base in northern iraq killing twenty soldiers at least eleven were shot dead from close range after they had been tied up the instant full speed of deadly assaults across the country that left nineteen people dead iraqis witnessing its worst surge in violence since two thousand and eight with thousands of deaths since the start of this year. still to come worlds
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apart whether our countries are ready for the revolutions that swept the region three years ago. they would have a partner went to a waffle house to rob it he apparently didn't expect anyone there to have a concealed weapons permit but just in harrison did he waited for just the right moment drew his weapon and killed williams but woods is grieving family are now calling to change south carolina's concealed carry laws and are upset that harrison was not charged obviously right or wrong good or bad the family of williams has the right to feel sorrow for their loss but if it wasn't their loved one who was the robber i think they might feel very differently this our bribery situation is the exact reason why concealed carry permits exist if you to be liberals about concealed carry they will always present some sort of fantasy situation where god wouldn't help you to prove that you don't need them what if like
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a guy sticks up behind you then you're going to be totally worthless man yeah guns aren't a magic answer to every crime situation but often they come in handy and they sure did for justin harrison when he was looking down the barrel of a criminal's gun so what kind of america do you want to live in one where you're helpless and have to beg for your life on the floor of a restaurant or in america where if you rob a waffle house you're going to pay for it i think the choice is pretty obvious fascist my opinion. is probably the most complex difficult if. not. the phenomenon of friendly fire probably extends back to the. densher
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gunpowder. sure but the people. there are. reading. this some. shoots my brother in the leg not in touch because of it because it was night time or in the morning even the best even the best soldiers. are going to make mistakes this is this whole idea of brotherhood author. and camaraderie in the sense that well in this context it has absolutely no place.
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hello and welcome to worlds apart and the old latin adage advises that anyone who wants peace should prepare for war a wisdom that has taken on a whole new meaning over the last few decades since humanitarian grounds became the reason for starting conflict is about peace still better than a good war well to discuss that i'm now joined by manalo amar associate weiss president for the middle east and africa center at the united states institute of peace thank you very much for joining us today thank you for having me now those issues of war and peace that i just mentioned have long been pertinent to the middle east but i think they have become even more so since this region and to these very dramatic period of transformation that people used to refer to as the arab spring now more and more people call it the arab spazzing and i think that's a very good indicator over where where one stands i would definitely refer to as the arab spring i think that what we witnessed a few years ago was
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a significant. shifts in terms of the citizenship in the region and also questions of accountability i would really argue that the expectations both in countries but as well as internationally were very unfair to expect such dramatic change in a period of two or three years what started was exciting but what was ahead was a long road and now this war in the spring presupposes something hopeful and you seem to be. very hopeful based on the interviews that i have seen and yet i would like to ask you what do you base your hope on because three years down the line we have three countries on the verge of becoming failed states hundreds of thousands of people killed millions driven from their homes and yet we still hear from you know lots of people around the world that you know there's still hold that hold dies last but in the context of the middle east i find this approach of hope dies last very sinister because many people have already died for that hope you know i
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agree with you that you know it's very important not to just present this hopeful optimistic viewpoint but to really be realistic about the challenges the challenges before each of these countries. is great i mean we're talking about a large investment in countries like iraq and afghanistan over a decade that still haven't been able to show progress with all types of international support and is still you know on a road towards really rebuilding a new country so something like a small country like libya or a larger country like egypt in two or three years i think we just have to be realistic about the challenges long it's difficult there are many obstacles there has been a change and the demand for something better in terms of moving forward the events in the middle east obviously attracted a lot of attention around a while then i think they elicited two types of reaction one espoused by the united
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states that we can. stand on this side we need to know how those people struggling for democracy and the other promoted by russia and to some extent china are seeing these events as domestic internal affairs and calling for noninterference now as an american citizen as an aid worker i suspect that you would probably sympathize with the american approach more closely but i wonder if you see any deficiency in you know in these desire of how i think that's a very good question and one thing i would say is it's very important to note that when you saw all the revolutions in the arab spring and you know i was into areas where i was in benghazi before khadafi fell i was in the square during the time call for change very few people were talking about democracy people want a better way of living and i think that's where the challenge with the arab spring is is a lot of people on the ground are saying we don't care what it looks like we just want to countability we want improve living and we want our voices to be heard and
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that concept is the strongest concept coming from the arab spring it was not merely about democracy and i think that's an important change when you're talking about what type of aid or what type of intervention to go into a country i'm a firm believer that you are in sovereignty and in the national interest and that you really have to take the cue from the countries internally and so one of the things that you look for is do you have partnerships in the formal government specially where dictators are but do you have partnerships in other institutions in an organized opposition and very importantly on the ground within civil society and that's the only time that i would advocate looking at supporting but man i think you can always find groups that would support any sort of agenda in any given country and you know the reason i'm asking you is because as a journalist i also spend a lot of time in the region and you know i firmly believe that it is these desire to help or these desire to intervene if the your ideas. so how things should look
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like that is all timidly responsible for derailing these very genuine grassroots movement that we saw in the middle is you know i have to say that it's much more challenging than that i think in an ideal world the organic natural grassroots movement would have enough of them and mentor them to create change the reality is that there is such a balanced power dynamic in each of these countries i mean the dictators got rid of institutions they were able to really monopolize resources they killed any opposition and so to expect these local powerless voices to be the only initiators of change i think is very unfair because of the way the power and resources are divided in the region like you said you can always find small pockets of opposition in any country and i would be very fearful of a president of finding isolating those pockets for larger foreign affairs agendas
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a lot of people as you know from your travels will say that they feel they're caught constantly in regional and international proxy wars so exactly why then to try to interfere over and over again and let's consider you know one case in point the case of iraq you spent a lot of time there both before the american invasion under saddam hussein and afterwards and i wonder if you believe that iraqis with saddam hussein add the lead of that country would still have been capable of making a change within dissected because let's face it face it i mean they they they were pretty sophisticated people by that time sure there was a dictatorship but they were a very advanced country in terms of education in terms of science in terms of health care in terms of women woman's rights there was also. a long tradition of sectarian coexistence and tolerance all of that is a by the way described in your book barefoot in baghdad by. i wonder if all those
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major socially chairmans haven't been sacrificed for the sake of making iraq a better place it reaches what essentially. the world has been presented with its iraq is a very complex situation in its you know a huge challenge particularly today as you see the violence on rising and escalating in iraq as they enter into elections i think the challenge is really looking you know the iraq that you described of the sixty's of the seventy's maybe into the eighty's highly educated a second world nation comparable to spain compared to other countries in europe not comparable to third world countries you know saddam hussein won the award in one nine hundred seventy nine eliminating illiteracy among women just clearly a country that had incredible potential but the reality is after the first gulf war in particular because ascensions of the ninety's you really saw iraq began to
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cripple and the dictatorship in the authoritarian regime become harsher and harsher as you've mentioned i lived in iraq in ninety seven in ninety eight and you know it was a country on the brink of falling apart particularly every day iraqi citizens so in two thousand and three when i reentered iraq there was a lot of excitement about the intervention and the hopes and dreams of what iraq would be the reality is it's still far away from being achieved and the challenges are great i think it's just very hard to try and determine if the change within the dictatorship would have happened naturally the majority of iraqis have told me that they feel it could have only happened with intervention but. obviously i don't want to. produce an impression of hankering for saddam hussein obviously we're not talking about what it would have been better if he stayed in power what had really talking about is how realistic this concept. you know trying to how the country
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to progress towards dimmock. because the same type of rhetoric has been voiced in case of libya in case of syria and we have all seen what kind of ramifications it had back there is so it seems to me that the experience of iraq as horrendous as it was wasn't enough to persuade western leadership that you know these type of democracy building projects simply don't work i think the challenge is really how can we make it work because for a long time the region has been forced between extremes either we accept dictatorships like saddam hussein like khadafi with the order that they bring or we go into mass chaos and fear of minorities not being protected and the sectarian divides and what you're hearing and what was really at the root of the arab spring is people saying there needs to be a third alternative it can't be these only choices between extremes which is intervention and chaos on one side or a dictatorship and i think that's really what needs to be explored is how we intervene in the ways we can support legitimate national movements and not just
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choose the alternative of being apathetic and stand on the sidelines but you would still insists that the west the so-called international community still has these obligation to intervene rather than let society can develop. in its own way because. for example if we compare egypt and syria those two latest examples it could be argued that it was able of you know getting read of mubarak on its own accord but it was. a western desire to intervene in syria and to support a democratic or so called democratic forces there that led to these horrendous civil war and we actually allowed those countries a chance to make their own mistakes. just to be clear i believe strongly in their country's sovereignty and really strongly support civil societies ability to initiate change on their own i think realistically that means in turn. national
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support i'm not advocating for a specific specific form of intervention i think it's very important that is based on the national partnership but i also do feel strongly that you know at this point in time a week when you look at a case like libya i personally have no doubt that if there was no intervention that qaddafi would have gone in and we would have had a bloodbath in a massacre in benghazi you know watching iraq ten thirteen years of sanctions bringing an entire nation as you mentioned that was great to its knees punishing through economic sanctions and without exit or any end in sight i think is very difficult to continue to advocate for you know we do need to look at what types of intervention can happen to deal with the responsibility to protect to deal with really finding ways of supporting transitions peacefully without violence i think is a crucial challenge to the international community the only thing that i'm saying is the times of sitting back and pretending that these issues don't affect us here in
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the u.s. or anywhere internationally i think are over we know that there is an interdependent between nations between one issue to and you know in all fairness the united states has never sat back and said that we don't really care if it actually intervenes quite often and some would argue not very successfully and the other point i would like to make is that you just sad that the you know you were absolutely certain that gadhafi would. turned in gaza into a bloodbath and i find this. interesting to hear because just a couple of minutes ago you said that there is no way ofa learning whether the iraqi society could have dislodged saddam hussein on its own and he had to use it to be absolutely sure that you know off what he would do even though you know let's face it on to gadhafi libya if least on social and economic terms was a pretty advanced country people had sure they didn't have political freedoms but
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they had good. standards of living they had education they had medicine they had rule of law all those values that they would now long for and that leads me to ask you whether this current. western establishment that really appreciates the value of status quo you're describing the life of a very small number of elite i mean when i was in the you know again in benghazi i traveled all across the country very few people i mean there are two or three streets only in tripoli that have the lifestyle that you described to periphery was quite different and the same in iraq i mean baghdad was an amazing city even under sanctions a beauty but when you travel to the government's lack of electricity water all those challenges existed because saddam focused on the capital and not on the governor absolutely but unfortunately this situation now seems to be still much much wars than it was baghdad even as you say very few people enjoyed those
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good standards of living we have to take a very short break now but please stay with us who will get back to these heated conversation in just a few moments. crucial data trusted that cloud service. that ensures protecting your privacy. be erased randomly get stolen. or become a target of the. what if the sky is right.
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you're the one. you. should have you with us you're not see today on researcher. welcome back to worlds apart with discussing the concept of aid in more than geopolitics with manalo maher associate weiss president for the middle east and africa center at the united states institute of peace now. just before the break we
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were talking about the actions of american government and american military and i want to make clear that you the whole war for the american government. either you work for them merican military you are an aid worker who was driven to all those conflict zones by your own conscience but what i think interesting is that the these philosophy of aid is very similar to the broader philosophy of american foreign policy this insistence sometimes very self righteous insistence on helping others and i wonder if in your own experience you ever had. to step back and question whether your ideas of how people should be held to really correspond to you know that old ideas so how they should be how you're right it is a challenge i think internationally there is a very much smaller camp that really feels that they have the answers and they go with but more and more there's an emphasis are really list. you know
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a rights based approach in terms of it's the right of the citizens to really determine what programs look like i know that that's one of the key things that i've learned fifteen years traveling in the region is to stop and listen and like i said you know listen when they're saying we're not looking for democracy we're looking for an improvement in the way we live day to day listen to that so that our programs aren't focused only on governance but looking at the needs and the issues that people in country are asking for now in one of your interviews are heard you say that one of your motivations of going back to you iraq after the use invasion or was this believe that conflict presents a new opportunity that you know this entire social contract is being in agree negotiated and. gives you an opportunity to promote human rights or women's rights what what have you and i sympathize with this approach but it also looks very very similar to these clean slate doctrine that has been a spouse by the american military and financial establishment this idea of cashing
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in on chaos and i'm sure you are not making money in all those conflict zones but how is your approach different from these conscious desire to profiteer on chaos and ultimately people suffering because renegotiation of social contract involves a great degree of i think that's right i mean no country has gone through a transition or have been able to address really develop a constitution without some element of chaos i think that the difference is you're really looking at the internal conversation and not looking at an external so it really is about the new government the transition government that set up and the citizens of the country having dialogue you know the best case scenario is through a reconciliation and a national dialogue process unfortunately that step is often skipped and focused on but what that does is really allow the citizen and the new government to determine what is the social contract between the two what are their rights what are their responsibilities now speaking. about the social contract i think the the the most
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pressing case for. international aid now is syria and we all know that millions of people have been driven out of home hundreds of thousands go hungry every day not to mention all those killed and aid workers find it extremely difficult to to work there and yet. you know regardless of where you stand politically you have to admit that. with all his failures or with all his crimes the assad regime had a fairly good social contract with the syrian people it least in terms of again education health care women's rights. you know the the the mound of religious tolerance that was present in the country i wonder if. losing all of that was worth. the elusive dream this elusive hope that you alluded to all
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of making something better i think that it's very hard for you know either you or me to make a value on i think it's very much up to the syrians or to the libyans or to the iraqis i mean for them to really be able to value what they see is their freedom their right to be heard their right to dignity and their right to real better access to the most basic services health education. all the different elements that have really been the fuel for what we saw in the arab spring you know i i find it very difficult to continuously ask people in the region to choose again between a dictatorship that's just good enough you know just the right amount of survival you know feeding you just to a point where you're not starving but you're never really full or the chaos and the violence that they're seeing you know i i truly believe there has to be a third option for the people but many of those challenges that the aid
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organizations i deal. now both and in case of syria iraq wouldn't have been there if it wasn't for these. desire to know how because we can argue about what is the value of freedom but it's something that is. well very abstract but when your children have nothing to eat when your children or your family is being killed i think most people in the world would agree that this is a bit more valuable than you know those elusive political rights again i think that it really determines we would have had no change we would have had no revolutions you know historically people would have just accepted our patient people would have accepted dictatorships there is clearly something in human nature that resists and that dreams of something that may not be quantifiable in terms of maslow's hierarchy of needs saying that we want something better we want opportunity and that's what we saw i mean that's really what we saw with the arab spring is people saying that there has to be an alternative to all the extremes that have been
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presented i mean that's what a generation after generation raises you're either dictatorship or you're going to fall into chaos you're either at war or you're of peace without justice you're either poor or you're rich in the region is rejecting the extremes and saying we want new options and i think that is worth supporting on those extremes are actually being driven onto this region by the very same people who claim the desire to haue because i saw in your own website that they use institute for peace has been calling for more american activism in both syria and iraq and you know own what you call activism of course depends on the definition but one could argue that what john mccain is doing in syria talking to rebels and calling for arms also supposedly to further that democratic dream is not the kind of activism is very conducive to peace i slowly agree that we have to be very careful one. like
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you said a lot of the extremes are being fed by both regional and international players so i either i even when i speak with the local partners i tell them that you should be wary and concerned about foreign agendas coming into the country because it is fueling the conflict and it is pushing to the extreme i think we have no doubt of that when we look at you know particularly syria and iraq but the conflict in the region there's a lot of regional and international influence in the negative way i think that what i'm talking about is the positive and really finding those legitimate organizations and groups and particularly institution building that they themselves are initiating change i firmly do not believe that international organizations should ever be at the forefront we are always in the back supportive of local institutions and local partners moves not something that we develop our own and i'll let me bring one more country into the conversation and this is afghanistan i know about you have. experience there and it is also
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a country where these nation building experiment has been attempted there's been. which have been described as a success but i think it's probably too early to tell and when i talked to talked to the afghani people many of them said that we are not a perfect democracy we are not a democracy in the west and south of the world but we have our own system of governance we have these tribal rule rule reach may not be fair to all citizens of afghanistan which may not be fair to women of against them but at least it creates some sort of equilibrium rather than perpetual warfare and the question is whether i guess the international community can accept these system this imperfect unfair system as such or whether it should really continue trying to improve it and turn it into something that accords to the western image of a fair society again i think it's really up to the afghan citizens to decide what they accept and what they don't accept i don't think it's just. within the
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international community's role to accept i mean there are certain non-negotiable is that the international community should stand behind and agree on and i would say those are already in the. international declaration of human rights so you know that's really where the non-negotiable should come in but you know the informal sector particularly in the justice you know also in security there's an informal sector there as well have actually played some positive roles particularly in times of transition what i've heard in you know the context of you know it's got a son in iraq and across is a desire to see one system that rises above everyone and i think the way to do that is to broaden our interpretations of law that would then fold in and understand the informal justice sector particular religious and tribal courts you mentioned suddenly go. you know we should compromise upon an ad seem you would include women's rights into into that please but in a in the case of afghanistan this is
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a very tricky issue because on one hand women's rights are a president. the western sense of the world but on the other hand women who insist . on that ride in a man may be killed and they have been killed. in the past so i wonder how do you keep these a genuine desire how can those women from becoming a sort of white woman's burden when you essentially not only drive your own image on to them but put them into they never know it's particularly the danger issues a huge challenge i think it's just very important to pause and remember the great history that afghanistan and i would say a lot of countries with islamic traditions have on women's rights i mean this is definitely not a western agenda i mean this law you know afghanistan had a woman judge in the late one thousand nine hundred seventy there's a lot to be proud of in each of these countries really root back to freedom and you
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know women's liberation and women's rights that are you know within the context of the local community and more importantly or within the islamic tradition i think that the concept of women's rights being western is a dangerous fallacy and it tends to be used as you said to target women that they're part of the western gender when in fact what they're asking for is something that existed that was a race that said again how we define women's rights and the way it looks i do think it's important for the international community to open up their models and to let it be influenced by the national context and just wrapping up our conversation on the philosophy of aid or assistance we all know that medical students have to take these hippocratic oath of doing no harm do you ever feel that it relates to your field as well definitely there is a code of conduct that all angio aid workers ascribe to and the number one thing in the code of conduct is do no harm so there's always that battle in that question of really you know being conscious that you're not actually subsidizing or supporting
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the violence or the injustices it's always a question on. and my mind personally while i only wish that the governments who are just as passionate about making a change and how being others as you are with us to the same code of conduct of doing no harm because oftentimes unfortunately they do well we have to leave it here we are out of time but i appreciate you being on the show and to our viewers please keep the conversation going on our twitter you tube and facebook pages and i hope to see you again same place same time here on the wall the part of.
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the. technology innovation. developments around. the future covered. war is probably the most complex and difficult to human activity as. a. whole. lot. in the phenomenon of friendly fire probably extends back to the invention of gunpowder. just kill a bunch of people you don't know if you want there are no replies there or in the us people. right now writing. this son of a shoots my brother in the leg not intentional because of it because it was night
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times four in the morning even the best commander was given the mesh shoulder. are going to make mistakes this is this whole idea of brotherhood and author and camaraderie in this sense it was in this context that has absolutely no place. rather than recognizing just how far this is gus and seeing the damage that's being done and changing course people just point fingers and say whatever one does it says so why go home we. choose your language. we can't without any financial plan i say still sometimes. choose this is the consensus you can. choose to give to us that you think are great to. choose the stories that impact your life choose the access to
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to off. two civilians are killed in eastern ukraine as government troops opened fire on voters ite side a polling station during a referendum on moving towards greater local autonomy. despite days of military raids voting goes ahead anyway with people in ukraine's restive regions lining up at polling stations that have their say on future relations with. stories from this week to saudi princess is say they have been held captive for over a decade in their own palace for speaking out against the oppression of women. are teammates fracking campaigner in the united states risking her freedom in order to
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keep her she'll free. with the big new stories from the week that was plus up to the minute developments you're watching the weekly on our international. welcome and we start with the deadly violence in eastern ukraine which erupted during a referendum on seeking greater autonomy from kiev two people were killed some viewers may find the following images the stabbing. government forces entered the city of crust there are mates to prevent voting from going ahead locals tried to stop them and here you can see soldiers shooting at a crowd of unarmed civilians with live runs the man shown here is hit in the leg by
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a deflected bullet this video shows the same scene a little earlier the man wearing a white top was shot and died seconds later one other person was wounded by gunfire on reportedly died on his way to hospital voting had to be stopped early but according to referendum organizers a sufficient number of ballots had already been cast. in the referendum took place in two eastern ukrainian provinces dinette lugansk an interim authorities in the donetsk region they say that ninety percent of voters have said yes two steps towards greater autonomy from kiev dollars according to a preliminary current the final results will be released on monday the turnout in both provinces was reported to be over seventy percent the poll and the industrial mostly russian speaking part of the country comes after months of protests against the post-coup government in kiev and its policies this is footage from some of the polling stations showing just how many people came to make their voices heard us
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this by the threats from kiev on the ongoing military offensive we talked to people queuing up those polling stations and this is what they had to say. not me but you go what are you voting for today. for all of the vote. and we are against the security government that came to power in mind on. against this so-called government of ours i said let me be pretty girl also. i mean. it's sad. don't want to be told how to live our lives and what to do this is. not our government is that those are due to mr john howard not invest time. paul asli or his internet reports on what exactly those who organize a referendum are hoping to achieve. each of us is waging
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a war of their own i fight with a pen it is my weapon and more than three million people of poised today to use that same weapon residents of new guns and donetsk are holding a referendum that could have far reaching consequences and the mood among people is positive finally we'll have the chance to speak our mind in five weeks more than three million ballots have been printed and more than one thousand two hundred polling stations organized this. the electoral roll has already been compiled people in eastern ukraine who had been involved in previous election campaigns helped us with that we had some serious problems including paper but we found ballots in the administration building that we do go over financing was also a problem in the end it came from private donors and although no foreign observers are on hand to check the legality of the vote they were invited but neither washington nor the european union recognized this poll so how does the referendum
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work the question on the ballots page asks do you support the act of state self rule of the dinette people's republic or the new guns people's republic or. all we want is to declare our right to self-determination so after the referendum results are announced the status of the regions will not change it will still be part of ukraine it won't become part of russia who will only let the world know that we want change we just want to be heard and to be able to determine our regions future and if that next step were to result in autonomy people in these regions would claim the right to choose their own language and domestic policy the budget would no longer be controlled by the government in kiev and even foreign ties would be decided by local leaders because it's going to be our own free republic we will be free to choose and can leave like normal people our government called us all terrorists and look at us terrorists with children and trams they
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might deny has the right to voice our opinions but let everyone have this opportunity today to say what they think what i saw in a desert and my gun is unacceptable i don't want this to be repeated but with rumors of a harsher military crackdown many fear that flow to peace could still be marred with chaos and bloodshed paullus the r.t.e. east in ukraine. international affairs expert surgeon covert spoke to us earlier he believes the violent tactics being used against people in the east are turning them away from the kiev government. what they have in common is absolute good to article rejection of the legitimacy of legality of the regime here so i think that after that it will no longer be possible for the regime to say that they do not want to negotiate with terrorists because it will become obvious that the political
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consensus within at least the guns in donetsk the agents is such that they can no longer assume to speak for ukraine quote unquote as a whole they will be forced to knowledge internally lives they're facing the level of agreement among the people these eastern regions that will prove it rather difficult who to deal with by force. the harkov region of eastern ukraine has also seen mass protests against the post-coup government in kiev it plans to hold a referendum but the side to suspend it just a few days ago the move followed the russian president's calls for a delay on till conditions improve and dialogue with kiev as possible but with them but if they did we ask the representatives of southeastern ukraine and pro federalization supporters to postpone the referendum on the regional autonomy for the eleventh of may this year. and during
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a meeting with the current chief of the organization for security and cooperation in europe putin also assured russian troops are no longer near the ukrainian border he added the key to resolving tensions is for the rest of southeast un kiev to talk political analyst and russia expert martin mccauley believes there are signs something can be achieved. the position seems to be that russia would welcome the elected president and then begin to negotiate with him negotiated settlement to the to the crisis in ukraine it is the first glimmer of hope for a long time it looks like the situation will in fact. the temperature will decline and hopefully. people will be killed. that we can look forward to a presidential election hundred twenty fifth of may which will pass. freely and it will be an exercise in democracy and will be no conflict no new force no coercion used by anyone let's hope that ukraine now is seeing some light at the end
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of the tunnel both the e.u. and the us have dismissed the self-determination vote in eastern ukraine as illegal washington believes it will lead to more disorder and division as the state department reiterated its support for the interim government in kiev this show of support came up as an issue this week when the assistant secretary of state appeared before congress. we did have a legitimate election before and the elected president was removed after we had major street violence there were pictures that people of people were running around with these that were we were told remedial nazis. first of all the vast majority of those who participated on the my dawn were peaceful protesters if you had a chance to see the pictures and some many of us visited including many members
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here there were mothers and grandmothers and that are in the main don't every day i have a lever however for you go on i saw those pictures as well i also saw a lot of pictures of people throwing fireballs a groups of policemen were huddled in the over in a corner where people would shoot even into the ranks of police so yes there were mothers with flowers but there were also very dangerous street fighters who were engaged in those demonstrations the question is were there a neo nazi groups involved in the. there were as i said almost every color of ukraine was represented including some including breaking answer is yes then. around four hundred mercenaries from the private u.s. security firm academy are involved in the operation against anti-government activists in ukraine that is according to a report in the german newspaper bills. citing an intelligence source earlier the german intelligence service told the government about the mercenaries involvement
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in the operation however it's not clear who commands and pays the private military contractors a cow to me formerly known as blackwater gained notoriety after alleged atrocities were committed during the iraq war the firm had earlier being accused of involvement in the ukrainian crisis on verified video that supposedly shows us private contractors in the city of donetsk emerged in march the security company has not commented on the latest revelations but previously denied any involvement in training prices earlier i spoke to foreign policy expert daniel mcadams he thinks that using mercenaries is a way of avoiding accountability. seems to be there their purpose is to foment chaos and to destabilize the east you wouldn't call the military because every picture that i've seen they look like some sort of ragtag militia very violent they don't apply they don't feel a need to abide by international law they are able to use extreme violence we saw
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what happened in saluja you saw a city decimated by these people so i think that's when you want to have muscle that's not accountable that's who you hire coming up the plight of saudi princess is locked in their own policy and more after the break. personel data are trusted a cloud service. that ensures protecting your privacy. could be arranged to randomly get stolen. or become a target of the eno say. what if unclouded sky is
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right above the clouds on our t.v. . dramas that can't be ignored. stories others refuse to notice. the faces changing the world. so picture. from around the globe. to me. thirteen minutes past three welcome back to the program for princesses locked up in a palace and waiting years to be set free not a fairy tale but a very modern reality and saudi arabia king abdullah's daughters used to lead
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a life of royal opulence they had personally have a positive enjoyed extravagant shopping trips on luxury holidays ball that was taken away from them thirteen years ago when their father ordered them to be locked up for good or you're my colleague farmer got a firsthand account of the situation from two of the princess's. we are burning. and we ran out of water. would. actually. bring. some expired. what we confront over the last few weeks you have had a lot of international exposure about your fate do you sense that that is helping your children were found where. i'm from very still called. everyone and moved in many virus and all the human rights organization come out
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and actually hold. your care. now one of the most widely head theories is that the princess's are being punished for supporting women's rights a longstanding issue in the country political commentator nassir alomari shared his thoughts on what's occurring. himself. has is considered by many so days to be a reformer and it's hard to believe this when you see that his own daughters are actually being treated this way. just because his ex-wife refuses to return to. radio to be under his thumb i guess because he is an ex-wife. at the same time there are a lot of saudis who believe that king abdullah has. actually reformed so he talked at some point about allowing so do women to vote but things are
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extremely slow. now the mother of the imprisoned daughter says they are victims of a power struggle within the saudi rulers large family of thirty eight children. find a chance for. his sons this from the team behind he was to cut it to the to do that by half brothers specially in the pub and the poor up like this is his sister to be something. in the government in the future and they want the father to pay those bills although he has some reason i'm divorced so there's no one to just protect them or that of the father no it's not try so i'm far away we see them occasionally the ukase booming cocaine habit is leaving its traces in the water supply that's
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according to a new study. water experts say the contamination levels pose no threat to human health but show the drug is more widely used than ever before for more on that story head to our web site r.t. dot com. also while you're there the new york police department recruits muslims from detention centers to spy on their communities and their mosques get the full details on our website. an environmental campaigner in the u.s. state of pennsylvania is coming under intense legal pressure in her companion against the shield gas industry sixty three year old activist. drilling technique known as fracking has caused devastation in her hometown maria delves into her battle against the corporate giants. pennsylvania resident nearest grogan's has spent more than five years leading up to public battle against one of the biggest and most controversial industries. to follow trucks around to see where the
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fracking is going now i show them sites from the road whatever the different phases excavation drilling fracking flaring and then of course the compressor stations then the pipeline construction that's all over the place like a word like a spider web show them and then i take them to people who have been harmed last year cabot or oil and gas corp one of the biggest drillers in this state attempted to silence viera a court injunction brought in by the company stripped of her from entering upon more than three hundred square miles owned or least by cabot it's one of the most extreme measures ever taken against an anti fracking activist i couldn't go let's say to all the stores i normally go to i couldn't go to the new hospital nearby i couldn't go to say my vet for a for a while for my dog i can go to some of the restaurants that i was used to going to but viera and the anti fracking opposition refused to back down and last month they
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finally prevailed a judge significantly eased the injunction we hope that protesters will understand and the cavite wonder stand to that there is a first amendment in this country protecting the rights of advocates even ones who have messages that become phonies like cabbage may not want to hear their right behind me is a fracking site in action water chemicals and sand being pumped into the ground in order for a viewer to observe the action without violating her injunction she stands on the private property of a pennsylvania resident who happens to live right across the street from the fracking site when our team met up with veera she was touring a group of activists around the county exposing the dangers many experts have linked to fracking they want us. scare people into keeping quiet but it's not going to work according to reports kept it insists that there is activism distracted
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employees from their work and interfered with natural gas production however this sixty three year old grandmother and fearless advocate says she refuses to be intimidated i will continue to do it because i live here i don't want to live with this and i don't want to for future generations i don't want to for my children or anyone i know. montrose pennsylvania. of course fear isn't the only one fighting against the industry on this not the first time a drilling company has been stopped in its tracks by an activist either in texas a jury awarded three million dollars to two victims of fracking who prove their health was damaged by a nearby drilling site people in vermont managed to impose a complete ban becoming the first state to do so on a company in ohio was forced to suspend drilling after the authorities launched an investigation into a connection between the operations earthquakes are tea cup of tea fracking activist corey must go explained how she beat big business two thousand and six we
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had a drilling and fracking operation going on in ohio and as a result of that there were a fugitive commission that ended up fitting actually having health effects on myself and a lot of the neighbors here so that was my wake up call was really confused honestly to have such an experience from an industrial operation right close to my home so that prompted me to look into it and to figure out how or why this was legal in two thousand and ten a bill passed in our government here in ohio which was the largest we are in oil and gas in our state the one nine hundred sixty five that was the most recent. improvement that was brought about in our law. increase a new study has pointed to links between the economic downturn and the growing suicide rate the number of those taking their own lives in greece was once the lowest in europe but that changed when the economy crashed in two thousand and
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eight over the two years that followed there was one suicide almost every day on average. spoke to some of those pushed the brink by financial hardship. this will make. it hard to find a job they prefer to get migrants who are cheaper and don't ask for any benefits unlike us some greeks end up on the streets but others and uptake in their own life unable to handle the pressure and then growing numbers after that i came close to committing suicide and i believe many greeks feel the same way and for the first time research shows that the rise in suicides here in recent years is the iraqi link to the spending cuts which have driven millions into unemployment when it comes to greece it's mainly men aged forty five to eighty nine who are at a greater risk people who lose their. identity they. will live there. and it will with the conditions of wards
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according would have been living their lives even would make them prefer not to live but is works for clinical an organization which offers free counseling to those thinking of taking their own lives lost consider doing just that when he lost everything a year ago could you tell us what made you tried to commit suicide. it's a tragic story i didn't have a place to live or somewhere to go and i was taken to a priest who ended up being weird into could vantage of me in that moment i lost my mind because i was fifty three years old at the time and the experience was very shocking for me i didn't know what else to do in that moment i didn't know. five hundred fifty one man committed suicide in greece between two thousand and nine and
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two thousand and ten that's about one person a day when i spoke to people in athens none seemed too surprised according to the latest studies there were tissue. besides a day on average in greece in two thousand and ten and half of them were soley because of the economic crisis did you know that. if you don't have money to take your kids your family won't you feel pressure would you feel good about yourself i've been on the employed for two years i've paid for everything yet i don't have insurance i don't have anything i have two kids to raise i understand why men especially through pressured men have more responsibility. because the feelings of. being violent people are doomed to the want to. the brain the feeling the problem is that after six years of austerity there remains a lot of pain in greece and very few signs of hope to cling to marina cos serve our
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artsy athens. edging towards the half hour mark here in our international plea for we have a break it's time for some more news from around the globe. protesters in vietnam have been rallying against the chinese all raygun this we did waters hundreds gathered outside china's embassy in one noise to voice their anger over the huge drilling project in the site china sea the rig has prompted a furious reaction from vietnam which says part of the drilling site is within its territory. in saudi arabia the death toll from the mers respiratory virus has reached one hundred thirty nine the arc break was first detected in the country back in two thousand and twelve it's since spread rapidly reaching several nearby countries the disease can lead to kidney failure and pneumonia. insurgents have attacked a military base in northern iraq killing twenty soldiers at least eleven were shot
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dead from close range after they had been tied up the instant followed by a spate of deadly assaults across the country that left nineteen people dead iraq is witnessing its worst surge in violence since two thousand and eight with thousands of deaths since the start of this year alone. up next we continue our report on family shattered by military deaths due to friendly fire this is our teacher. they wounded a partner went to a waffle house to rob it he apparently didn't expect anyone there to have a concealed weapons permit but justin harrison did it waited for just the right moment drew his weapon and killed williams but woods is grieving family are now calling to change south carolina's concealed carry laws are upset that harrison was
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not charged obviously right or wrong good or bad the family of williams has the right to feel sorrow for their loss but if it wasn't their loved one who was the robber i think they might feel very different this are bribery situation is the exact reason why concealed carry permits exist if you to be liberals about concealed carry they will always present some sort of fantasy situation where god wouldn't help you to prove that you don't need them what if like a guy sticks up behind you then you're going to be totally worthless ban guns aren't a magic answer to every crime situation but often they come in handy and they sure did for justin harrison when he was looking down the barrel of a criminal's gun so what kind of america do you want to live in one where you're helpless and have to beg for your life on the floor of a restaurant or in america where if you rob a waffle house you're going to pay for it i think the choice is pretty obvious fascist my opinion.
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little. crosstalk rules in effect that means you can jump in anytime you want. army grieve the loss of every soldier. his mother father brothers and wife will forever grieve as was. grief that was
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compound about the failing of his army. we have a duty to all families of our fallen soldiers give them the truth the best we know it's passes we can't.
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rule. it was a crazy one steve warning. my house will work midnights us home the first. we were good new carpet installed upstairs i was getting ready to babysit my grandson because my daughter had a whole point so it's
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a crazy crazy morning and. i thought it was and she forgot she forgot her key or had something. in. the soldier stand and. i just looked bored and. i looked at amber and she said peggy and i want to have slick. one opened the door. my mom said get here something's wrong with. that i pull up and there is. a car out there with cover plates on it they said just you killed. the full paragraph and that's all you know. the family began hearing details about the circumstances surrounding jessie's death within days of the official
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announcement they had said that. just. his humvee was struck. broke the checkpoint had the torch just to be hit just to be tipped just a humvee. and jesse came out of the top of the turret and they think that he had broken his neck. and that was it was a little. within an hour of the incident just the arrived at the thirty first combat support hospital in baghdad where he died on the operating table as doctors tried to save his life jesse was pronounced dead at two thirty five that morning from what doctors at the scene described as. massive blunt abdominal trauma the result of being thrown from the humvee that evening when the doctor examined the results of the post-mortem cat scan he noticed the presence of a bullet in just these back but did not fill out the paperwork to correct the death certificate later in a sworn statement he claimed that jessie did in fact die as
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a result of a gunshot wound or g s w the final autopsy was performed on jessie's body at dover air force base during the autopsy the doctor discovered that jessie had not died from a trauma but from a penetrating gunshot wound to the back the issued a new certificate of death the media please although jessie's officers in iraq were alerted to the change in status the family continued to believe that their son was killed in a traffic accident. on the day of the funeral jessie's family and friends were joined by thousands of canton residents who pay their respects for the funeral it was amazing i mean i've never. been to a funeral where even i literally felt the love from the people around the community helped raise him in the community bury him within hours of learning that jessie died from a bullet lodged in his back army officers in iraq knew that jessie was killed by either us or polish forces who opened fire when the driver of the dump truck failed
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to slow down or heed warnings to stop as gunfire rang out across the traffic circle the driver was shot and killed sending his truck careening into jesse's humvee. the search conducted on the dump truck revealed that the driver had no weapons thus officers inferred that the fatal gunshots must have come from u.s. and polish forces firing from positions behind just the army officers launched an immediate investigation into the friendly fire incident including a ballistics analysis by the u.s. army criminal investigative laboratory within weeks the laboratory confirmed that the bullets extracted from jesse's back contain sufficient i do. characteristics for comparison purposes and advised of the weapons used by u.s. and polish forces be collected. the final report disclosed that the shots likely came from the sector manned by polish forces the report concluded however that
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polish forces could not be held accountable for just because the army was concerned about international repercussions in other words because the polish were the third largest contingent in the coalition of the willing the army was hesitant to lay blame and anger their allies as a result the invest. it wasn't joe i bear just. the end of july. i got a copy of the casualty. in the cause of penetrating. that's first i heard that jesse was shot. by friendly fire. i mean really start calling you know the army was shot he said shot him calling us commanders the moist. state did you know just.
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confirm anything. like in february i get the autopsy. and you know it describes all jesse's injuries and under circumstances such as friendly fire that's first we heard from lee fire like nine months after i ask the house was just a good soldier to people like. how could they make the mistake of not telling us it was shot not no one is the war. until i read everything over and seen that the weapons were never collected and i knew they had to get it properly. in hopes of satisfying peggy's questions investigators held a powerpoint briefing for the family the presentation reiterated the army's position that the shots most likely came from the polar sector but that it remained inconclusive they did not mention that a ballistics test would have conclusively identified which weapon fired the fatal bullet during the same presentation the officers noted that the family had been
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informed that friendly fire was involved within days of the incident immediately peggy challenge the officers that's wrong. and they could not prove they could not show anywhere in the notes we want to the second investigation prove that to me show me the casualty assistance officer document every thing everything out of the be documented and show me where we were officially told me that. this was friendly fire they couldn't show it because it never happened. never what i've been trying for a year to find out if indeed my son is shot if they anybody from the army had told me he was shot nobody nobody frustrated that the army seemed to be evading the truth he turned to the press. for more than a year and a half the mother of
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a fallen ohio soldier has been trying to learn the truth about her son's death jessie's mom doesn't know exactly what to believe the family was told he died from internal injuries after a dump truck crashed into his humvee months later she saw all this stuff to get their training gunshot to the back what's more it was friendly fire. in response to the press coverage of peggy's story the secretary of the army directed the inspector general to open a new investigation into jesse's case in the midst of the new investigation one officer stated that he felt the case had been swept under the rug and other officers said he thought investigative officers were walking on egg shells because they felt they couldn't say anything bad about the polls. when the new investigators sought to retrieve the bullets for ballistics testing they made an unnerving discovery that they threw away the bill. they would treat the bullet from . the bullet they found the bullet would get the army i don't think they do
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anything out without a novel of regulations they probably can order toilet do and. they have a soldier that hopes. for questions they give a medal and say was a hero be good enough for which part of the lie am i supposed to believe. for every body there is a next of kin and for every next of kin a telegram from the adjutant general to mrs rebecca. the secretary of the army has asked me to express his deep regret that your husband. died in vietnam on fourteen november one thousand nine hundred sixty five throughout history families have waited anxiously for word about the health and well being of their loved ones on the front lines during world war one the war department introduced a formal policy for informing families when a loved one was lost in battle to my knowledge they received
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a telegram saying the secretary of war is quite sorry that your loved one has been killed in action just what happened was a soldier in that unit would write the family and say johnny really got shot by. in which case then the family would start asking questions demand an investigation or or an official explanation. the famous incident carol burnett made to tell polish a movie i think that's what happened there if i recall correctly somebody in the unit communicated with the family and they subsequently went questions of the military as to what to what happened. and similar instances. where the families did become involved and did ask questions. probably brought this change of policy in the movie friendly fire starring carol burnett appeared on
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a.b.c. in the fall of one thousand nine hundred seventy nine based on the struggles of iowa farmers peg and gene mall in the film depicts their fight to obtain information about their son's tragic death in a foxhole in vietnam as a result of shrapnel from a u.s. artillery barrage. garnering an emmy for outstanding drama friendly fire raise public awareness. about the lack of information provided the families of the fallen and likely was the driving force behind the subsequent changes in policy instituted by the department of defense within five years of the film's release the pentagon established casualty reporting regulations that specifically addressed friendly fire for the first time regulations dictated that the army inform families of the inflicting force involved and stipulated that reports should include circumstantial evidence as long as it's made clear where facts and supposition begins the army was now mandated to notify families of situations where friendly fire was even
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suspected. the integrity of this new policy would be tested in gulf war one. i. think you need. economic ups and downs in the final months day the london deal sank night and the rest of the life they meet making it will be every week on a. personal data far trusted cloud service. that
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ensures protecting your privacy. could be arranged randomly get stolen. or become a target of the n.s.a. . what if unclouded sky is right above the clouds on our t.v. . do we speak your language of the will or not advanced. news programs and documentaries in spanish what matters to you breaking news a little turn to angles stories. you hear. detroit all teach spanish find out more visit. rather than recognizing just how far this is got some seeing the damage that's being done and changing course people just point fingers and say whatever one does
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it's so why go away. and. by the time the vietnam war ended. the image of the united states military in american society was that the military was rather bumbling incompetent ineffective institution and the officer corps in the couple of decades following the vietnam war was absolutely committed to. changing that image and restoring the reputation of the american military in the eyes of the american people get really stuck in you know like who cares about the war. to a great degree that effort achieved success by the time of operation desert storm in
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early one thousand nine hundred many commentators had expected the war against iraq to be a long drawn out bloody some people said another vietnam this was a great triumph in the eyes of the officer corps a triumph not simply that. kuwait had been liberated a great triumph in the reputation carried over from vietnam days was seemingly buried once and for all. the one blemish on operation desert storm. was that. a substantial proportion of the small number of u.s. casualties suffered occurred as a consequence of friendly fire that's the fundamental lesson of vietnam for much of the military at the time we're talking about and so they were determined to maintain public support to show a new face to show success to show the recall the talk about smart the
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precipitation and training and professionalization of their force and they were determined to control the facts that. fed that story line by any military standard gulf war one was a stunning victory by u.s. and coalition forces in the midst of such overwhelming success however reporters at the pentagon began to hear rumors about friendly fire washington post pentagon correspondent barton gellman was the first journalist to thoroughly cover rumors about friendly fire so it took about six months after the war for us to find enough people find enough data pieced together enough information from public records and the spaces inside them that we could do the story and the story was stunning frankly the army and marines agreed and the army upheld it to the letter that they would tell no family. about a friendly fire casualty and until they could tell all of them in
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a synchronized matter that was intended to set up the press conference the next day so it was decreed that always fell five pm would be the time that thirty five casualty officers would show up on the doorsteps of thirty five next of kin and tell them that their loved ones had been killed by american forces and no one was to be told before that even if there was categorical evidence months before as there as there was in many cases the army held a formal press conference on aug twelfth at five pm announcing that thirty five of the one hundred forty eight american servicemen and women who died on the battlefield in the gulf war were killed and it vertically by their comrades for many families like the family of captain lance fielder the army's public relations strategy left them disconcerted douglas fielder everyone called him lance he was a combat engineer. the basic facts are that his truck broke down he was waiting for repair another unit from across a boundary which was
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a little bit lost on the map stumbled across and thought that he and his guys were actually s. and killed a lieutenant colonel named john daley understood at the scene as soon as he got out of his bradley fighting vehicle that he had ordered his gunner to open fire and that the casualties were very good as he'd only knew it was friendly fire he did it . and yet the casualty officers went back and they reported to the family that their head son had died in an encounter with a republican guard it was just made up out of whole cloth. it was only when they got back to saudi arabia that the soldiers had access to phones and field as best friends of the unit called the family and told them what really happened to. the two soldiers the illicit guys who called fielder's family told their unit commander. low ranking officer and they wouldn't say who they were afraid of getting in trouble as a lieutenant or
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a captain. what they told of evelyn and he told them to shut up that if they said anything more they'd be court martialled. that this was way above their pay grade and they'd better not do it again despite the family's six month campaign for information about the circumstances surrounding lance's death the army refused to confirm whether fielder had been killed by friendly fire until the joint notifications on aug twelfth at five pm the army had a clear direct explicit regulation six hundred something that said that the families shall be notified promptly in any case and which has determined that the soldier died in friendly fire and the three star general who was in charge of personnel for the army in a two hour interview with me said that he is obliged to follow regulations but he's also applies to deviate from them when he feels he has a good reason which is the usual understanding of regulations. he flat out
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admitted that he had broken the rules. within six months of the end of combat operations the army had clear evidence that friendly fire was involved in every one of the thirty five incidents and yet they failed to follow explicitly defined army regulations to notify families when defense secretary dick cheney appeared before us. senate panel he acknowledged that the families had to wait months for information about the deaths of their loved ones but defended the delays stating that it takes a few months to get a full and complete accounting is just a normal natural part of the process. and even within the officer corps people began to say how could this be this is unacceptable. and senior members of the officer corps. embarked upon a major project. the declared purpose of which was to ensure that in future conflicts there would be no fratricide as it was as it was called. and i
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think that. in essence in declaring friendly fire casualties to be unacceptable despite the fact that they have been commonplace throughout all of military history. the military itself therefore set the bar that much higher in terms of what the public would expect. from that point forward due to issues in the handling of friendly fire cases during the gulf war the army completely revised regulations regarding the casualty reporting a friendly fire regulations now require that families be informed and accurate and timely manner when friendly fire is suspected further the army must notify families within days of an investigation into a suspected friendly fire incident i think the phenomenon of friendly fire probably extends back to the invention of gunpowder war is probably the most complex and
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difficult to pass. such world war two. we've invented a lot of technological means to assist us in overcoming that fog of war. but even so it doesn't it's still haven't gotten to one hundred percent even the best command given the best soldier. going to make mistakes the deadliest occurrence in u.s. military history is believed to be an incident during operation cobra in world war two when allied bombing raids missed enemy targets and killed over five hundred soldiers in a single day. when army regulation shifted and required that families be informed of friendly fire casualties the attitude toward friendly fire incidents also transformed in the new era of public disclosure friendly fire incidents were cast
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as criminal and accompanied by a campaign to demonize the responsible parties or even court martial during gulf war one an incident involving nineteen year u.s. army veteran lieutenant colonel ralph alles became the first high profile case resulting from the change in friendly fire policy. on the night of february sixteenth one thousand nine hundred one hails took command of his apache helicopter to check on two iraqi vehicles believed to be a mile north of the american line. the flying conditions that night were less than optimal it was dark and there was a sandstorm growing. concerned about his true position on the battlefield males ask for clarification. and i don't want to bet that they could go i gave that the arab red line. roger could everybody be right so they're going to take him out although hales identified what he believed were iraqi vehicles he became concerned when his apaches fire control computer contradicted the grid coordinates provided
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by the troops on the ground relying on his battlefield instincts and commanding officers directions males prepared to fire on the vehicles. but they it's hard to pull the trigger back me up a little bit here tell me how far ahead here are seven zero forty eight hundred meters. before firing hale's attempted to lock on the vehicle but since they were friendly vehicles that failed to engage. the plan. to. help us up and go. up once again you could see that it was like a second one. that completely destroyed the record what. the second was feel. like i want to get back and vehicle. but it took them
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a credit in the back which. we did we get the car gets. me when i needed anything at around the vehicle there are no hard and i've got you know we're going to walk away from the car and. sure you got good. i got it there was. a fair bit. of that really afraid of that. fire fire fire. that right there i think that one. that i want to.
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see but they go. from country. to kill a bunch of people in. the. u.s. people. that night to u.s. army soldiers were killed and six wounded the day afterwards mills was relieved of duty within a week reports of the event appeared in the press including unidentified sources within the pentagon to describe hales as a cowboy and as someone who was looking for a fight and several months later hills defended himself noting that the army abandoned me they sold me to the press to make themselves look good. when your children have nothing to eat when your children or your family is being
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killed i think most people in the world would agree that this is. you know those elusive political rights that's really what we saw with the arab spring of people saying that their past to be an alternative to all the extremes that have been presented i mean that's what i generation after generation were raised is you're either in dictatorship or you're going to fall into chaos you're either out war or you're in a peace without justice. they're poor and the region is rejecting the extremes and saying we want new options and i think that is worth supporting. the. lead. the lead suggests goal lisa tried to. play polo to be.
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more. like for the changing every minute of the leg luck may the last lap the weapons. like the luckiest thing since the molten lead squeezes the most elite blood slaves sometimes for nothing and the length of this season and its importance to the teams look just eat up the story he will be just if you see the stage again to eight looking beings absolutely but the target was still in the lead . to the lead. economic red tape for him. to.
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play the lead. player optimists now a. part. of what if the republic of signing. very. lucky. right from the scene. of the first strike. and i think that you're. on a reporter's. instrument. to be in the. lead.
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to civilians are killed in eastern ukraine as government troops opened fire on voters outside a polling station during a referendum on moving towards greater autonomy. despite days of military raids voting goes ahead anyway with people in ukraine's restive regions lining up at polling stations that have their say on future relations with kiev. you know their stories from this week to saudi princesses speak out against the oppression of women in their homeland after being held captive for over a decade in their policies. and also in the program our team meets an empty fracking campaigner in the united states who is risking her freedom in order to keep her time and she'll for.

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