Skip to main content

tv   Mayors Press Availability  SFGTV  December 24, 2016 1:25pm-2:01pm PST

1:25 pm
agency has been working closely with the bicycle coalition and sf works really to make it easily for people to get around the city as you heard from the mayor and ed this is a critical spot that is an intersection where people connect to various neighborhood and market to downtown or up to the castro or towards the financial district our designers work and this is the first protected zone that we are rolling out there will be several and as you can see light areas for people that can feel safe when we cross the street and making that easier for people that are using this and so we've very, very happy to be part of the design you know it is what san francisco needs at that time more people are walking bicycling and our agency will continue to make our city safe
1:26 pm
we are a big supporter of vision zero policy and we'll continue to doing everything we can to make our city wonderful and more enjoyable for everyone temperatures. >> thank you, mohammed and the contractors to make that possible and all the leadership and is coordination from within city hall the real benefit of what is different vision zero is a community partnership with the city it is not just the city but our community groups it is the coalition of dozens of groups close recognizey and neighborhoods and business groups coming together to support vision zero and one of the lead voices particularly when it comes to bike safety it the san francisco bicycle coalition at the they've been relentless for safety and pushing us to do more faster and better and that's pressure that
1:27 pm
stays on us everyday helps us to get this done we appreciate the leadership and the pressure from the bicycle coalition and we're glad to be joined by executive director bryan. >> thanks ed. >> thank you ed reiskin and mohammed nuru and thank you, mayor ed lee for your living room in adopting the safety improvements that will make our streets safer and help us to chief /* achieve it. >> this will help to reduce the casinos of night vision and hopefully that will be embarrassed in other corridors across the city i want to applaud the staff of the sfmta so for grace's new ideas and
1:28 pm
xernts and looking forward to hearing from people that walk and bike and drive and seeing that feedback incorporated to the design i know many of the members of the bicycle coalition have excited about the redesign and it is working beautifully and the cars are making the right turns that slowing down behind you he before the redesign of this intersection cars with speed there and try to get across the bike lanes so we need more complete streets projects to protect and design and build xroiz for the health and safety of everyone that walks and drives with geneva and so the streets approaching the
1:29 pm
redesign protection should be considered along 80s coordinate in order to help the city improve the street safety and achieve vision zero. >> thanks bryan and as bryan said gathering we'll be feedback from people that bike through the z that walk and drive through it and as the mayor said we'll be doing an evaluation to see what is working and not and other parts of city finally i want to acknowledge the 0 folks out here with the jack hammers powerfully concrete and from a construction were the ones that were contracted to do this around the city and want to give them a shout out this project and many others and the other contractors that work with side
1:30 pm
benefit of all that work we're trading jobs for san francisco businesses that's it we look forward to seeing how this works and it seems to be working as designed works well and safely i hope to keep that that way everyone of the fatality collisions we hear and read about through throughout the year tragic and every one of them is preventable that is to help to prevent them along with educating people when the laws and about how to get around town safely and changing the laws but that work is important we can get to zero with projects like this thanks very much we appreciate everyone coming out
1:31 pm
>> hi everybody, we down here at the
1:32 pm
/ep is a center which is our pop up space down here in san francisco where we operate a store front to educate the policy from the home owner who has center which is our pop up space down here in san francisco where we operate a store front to educate the policy from the home owner who has never done anything in the house to the most advanced structure engineers we have working around here. we we're going to here from kelly to talk a little bit about san francisco. how are you doing kelly? >> very well, thank you for having us here. >> in front of us, we have a typical soft story building. when i see this, i think this is some of the most beautiful architecture our city has. a lot of people don't know these are problematic buildings. why don't you tell us about some of the risks he we have in these buildings? >> soft stories are vulnerable in past earthquakes and the northridge earthquake to this type of building and character of building. when we talk about the soft story, what we're talking about is generally a ground story that has less wall or
1:33 pm
other /pwraeugs to resist the lateral forces that might be imposed by the earthquake. so we're looking for something that is particularly weak or soft in this ground story. now, this is a wonderful example of what some of the residential buildings that are soft stories in san francisco look like. and the 1 thing that i would point out here is that the upper force of this building have residential units. they have not only a fair amount of wall around the exterior of the building but they also have very extensive walls in the interior and bathrooms and bedrooms and corridors and everything that has a certificate amount of brazing yea it's significantly less country /srabl in those stories. now very often, we get even a garage or storage or sometimes
1:34 pm
commercial occupancy in this ground story. that very often not only has a whole lot less perimeter wall but it often has little or no wall on the interior. that wall is the earthquake bracing and so he see very significant bracing in the top floor and very little on the bottom. when the earthquake comes and hits, it tries to push that ground floor over and there's very little that keeps it from moving and degrading and eventually /paoerblly keeping it from a collapse occurring. so we know they're vulnerable because of this ground story collapsing >> is this only a problem we see in sentence france? san francisco? >> no, this is certainly a national problem. more acute in western but more up to california, washington, moving out into other states. this kind of building exist and this
1:35 pm
kind of building is vulnerable. >> when you're involved with the community safety, this is a different way of thinking about these types of things. we had a community group of over 100 people involved and upper 1 of them. tell us about * how that conversation went. why did we decide as a city or a community to start fixing these types of buildings? >> there were a lot of aspects that were considered well beyond just the engineering answer that these are vulnerable. and that effort brought in a lot of people from different aspects of the community that looked at the importance of these buildings to the housing stock and the possible ramifications of losing this /houbgs in the case of an earthquake. the financial implications, the historic preserve vacation s implication as you mentioned, these are very handsome looking buildings that are importance to the tourist city ask which
1:36 pm
make san francisco something that people are interested from outside in coming and visiting. >> it's such animation story when you think about the 10 years that the community spent talking about this /seurb but we actually did something about it. now we have an order unanimouses put in place to protect 100,000 residents in san francisco and retrospective in 2020. so on behalf of residents and employees in san francisco, we want to say thank you for the work you've done in pushing this forward and making people more aware of these issues. >> and it was a fantastic community effort. >> so in an earth quake, what happens in these kinds of buildings? >> what happens when an earthquake comes along is it moves the ground both horizontally and vertically. it's mostly the horizontal that we're worried about. it starts moving the building back and forth and pushing on it. when you see i'm pushing
1:37 pm
on it, the upper stiff of the wall stay straight up but the lower floors, they actually collapse just like i did there. >> luckily, we can put this building right back up where it came from so it's a lot easier. now kelly, obviously these aren't real frame walls here but when you talk about buildings, what makes the property for stiff? >> the easiest and most cost-effective type of bracing you can put in is either put in a brand new wall or to potentially go in and strengthen a wall that's already there where you don't need to have an opening is where you maybe have a garage door or access to commercial space, you might go to a steel frame or other types of bracing systems that provides the strength and stiff if necessary but at the same time, allows continued use of that area. but some
1:38 pm
combination of walls or frames or other tools that are in the tool kit that can bring the building up to the strength that's required in order to remove the vulnerability from the building so that when ground shaking comes, it in fact is a whole lot more resistant and less vulnerable. ideally, this story down here would be made as strong and stiff as the floors above. >> if i'm a property owner, what is the first thing i should do? >> the first thing you should do is find professional that can come in and help you evaluate your building in order to, 1, figure out that indeed it does need to be retro fitted and 2, give you some idea of what that retro fit might look like. and third, evaluation and design to help you determine the retro fit requirement. >> well kelly, i can't thank
1:39 pm
you enough for being here today. thank you so much for your wealth of information on how we can take care of our soft story problem in san francisco. and you the viewer, if you have any questions, please feel free to visit our website (clapping.) ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ i think we have more companies anywhere in the united states it's at the amazing statement we're not trying to be flashy or shocking just trying to create something new and original were >> one of the things about the conduct our you enter and turn your your back and just so the orchestra. the most contrary composer of this time if you accountability
1:40 pm
his music you would think he's a camera come important he become ill and it was crazy he at the end of his life and pushed the boundary to think we're not acceptable at this point for sure it had a great influence he was a great influence on the harmonic language on the contemporary up to now. i thought it would be interesting because they have e he was contemporary we use him on this and his life was you kill our wife you get poisons all those things are great stories for on opera. i was leaving behind a little bit which those collaborative
1:41 pm
dancers i was really trying to focus on opera. a friend of mine said well, what would you really want to do i said opera what is it not opera parallel. why isn't it are that i have the support now we can do that. i realized that was something that wasn't being done in san francisco no other organization was doing this as opposed to contemporary we are very blessed in san francisco to have organizations well, i thought that was going to be our speciality >> you create a conceptual idea for setting the opera and you spear ahead and work with the
1:42 pm
other sdierndz to create an overview vision that's the final product felt opera. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> i was very inspired to work with him because the way he looked at the key is the way i looked at sports looking at the daily. >> so much our mandate is to try to enter disis particular work there's great dancers and theatre actresses and choirs we've worked with and great video artists is a great place to collect and collaborate. i had a model they have a professionally music yes, ma'am assemble and as a student i benefited from being around this
1:43 pm
professional on and on soccer ball and as a conductor i'd be able to work with them and it's helped my growth i had a dream of having a professional residential on and on soccer ball to be an imperial >> it operates as a laboratory we germ a national the ideas technically and work with activity artists and designers and video all over the on any given project to further the way we tell stories to improve our ability to tell stories on stage. that's part of the opera lab >> i was to investigate that aspect of renaissance and new work so that's why this piece it is important it was a
1:44 pm
renaissance composer. >> there were young people that are not interested in seeing traditional opera and like the quality and it's different it has a story telling quality every little detail is integrated and helps to capture the imagination and that's part of the opera how we can use those colors into the language of today. >> so one of the great things of the stories of opera and story combined with opera music it allows people to let go and be entertained and enjoy the music instead of putting on headphones.
1:45 pm
>> that's what is great about art sometimes everyone loves it because you have to, you know, really great you have to have both some people don't like it and some people do we're concerned about that. >> it's about thirty something out there that's risky. you know, disliked by someone torn apart and that's the whole point of what we're drying to do >> you never take this for granted you make sure it is the best if you can. >> ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
1:46 pm
1:47 pm
as a society we've basically failed big portion of our population if you think about the basics of food, shelter safety a lot of people don't have any of those i'm mr. cookie can't speak for all the things but i know say, i have ideas how we can address the food issue. >> open the door and walk
1:48 pm
through that don't just stand looking out. >> as they grew up in in a how would that had access to good food and our parent cooked this is how you feed yours this is not happening in our country this is a huge pleasure i'm david one of the co-founder so about four year ago we worked with the serviced and got to know the kid one of the things we figured out was that they didn't know how to cook. >> i heard about the cooking school through the larkin academy a. >> their noting no way to feed themselves so they're eating a lot of fast food and i usually eat whatever safeway is near my
1:49 pm
home a lot of hot food i was excited that i was eating lunch enough instead of what and eat. >> as i was inviting them over teaching them basic ways to fix good food they were so existed. >> particle learning the skills and the food they were really go it it turned into the is charity foundation i ran into my friend we were talking about this this do you want to run this charity foundations and she said, yes. >> i'm a co-found and executive director for the cooking project our best classes participation for 10 students are monday they're really fun their chief driven classes we have a different guest around the city
1:50 pm
they're our stand alone cola's we had a series or series still city of attorney's office style of classes our final are night life diners. >> santa barbara shall comes in and helps us show us things and this is one the owners they help us to socialize and i've been here about a year. >> we want to be sure to serve as many as we can. >> the san francisco cooking school is an amazing amazing partner. >> it is doing that in that space really elevates the space for the kids special for the chief that make it easy for them to come and it really makes the experience pretty special. >> i'm sutro sue set i'm a
1:51 pm
chief 2, 3, 4 san francisco. >> that's what those classes afford me the opportunity it breakdown the barriers and is this is not scary this is our choice about you many times this is a feel good what it is that you give them is an opportunity you have to make it seem like it's there for them for the taking show them it is their and they can do that. >> hi, i'm antonio the chief in san francisco. >> the majority of kids at that age in order to get them into food they need to see something simple and the evidence will show and easy to produce i want to make sure that people can do it with a bowl and spoon and burner and one pan. >> i like is the receipts that
1:52 pm
are simple and not feel like it's a burden to make foods the cohesives show something eased. >> i go for vera toilet so someone can't do it or its way out of their range we only use 6 ingredients i can afford 6 ingredient what good is showing you them something they can't use but the sovereignties what are you going to do more me you're not successful. >> we made a vegetable stir-fry indicators he'd ginger and onion that is really affordable how to balance it was easy to make the food we present i loved it if i having had access to a kitchen
1:53 pm
i'd cook more. >> some of us have never had a kitchen not taught how to cookie wasn't taught how to cook. >> i have a great appreciation for programs that teach kids food and cooking it is one of the healthiest positive things you can communicate to people that are very young. >> the more programs like the cooking project in general that can have a positive impact how our kids eat is really, really important i believe that everybody should venting to utilize the kitchen and meet other kids their age to identify they're not alone and their ways in which to pick
1:54 pm
yours up and move forward that. >> it is really important to me the opportunity exists and so i do everything in my power to keep it that. >> we'll have our new headquarters in the heart of the tenderloin at taylor and kushlg at the end of this summer 2014 we're really excited. >> a lot of the of the conditions in san francisco they have in the rest of the country so our goal to 257bd or expand out of the san francisco in los angeles and then after that who know. >> we'd never want to tell people want to do or eat only provide the skills and the tools in case that's something people are 2rrd in doing. >> you can't buy a box of psyche you have to put them in the right vein and direction
1:55 pm
with the right kids with a right place address time those kids don't have this you have to instill they can do it they're good enough now to finding out figure out and find the future for all right. on 5, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 you innovation on or was on over 200 years they went through extensive innovations to the existing green new metal gates were installed our the perimeter 9 project is funded inform there are no 9 community opportunity and our capital improvement plan
1:56 pm
to the 2008 clean and safe neighborhood it allows the residents and park advocates like san franciscans to make the matching of the few minutes through the philanthropic dungeons and finished and finally able to pull on play on the number one green a celebration on october 7, 1901, a skoovlt for the st. anthony's formed a club and john then the superintendent the golden gate park laid out the bowling green are here sharing meditates a permanent green now and then was opened in 1902 during the course the 1906 san francisco earthquake that citywide much the city the greens were left that with an ellen surface and
1:57 pm
not readers necessarily 1911 it had the blowing e bowling that was formed in 1912 the parks commission paid laying down down green number 2 the san francisco lawn club was the first opened in the united states and the oldest on the west their registered as san francisco lark one 101 and ti it is not all fierce competition food and good ole friend of mine drive it members les lecturely challenge the stories some may be true some not memories of past winners is reversed presbyterian on the wall of champions. >> make sure you see the one in to the corner that's me and.
1:58 pm
>> no? not bingo or scrabble but the pare of today's competition two doreen and christen and beginninger against robert and others easing our opponents for the stair down is a pregame strategy even in lawn bowling. >> play ball. >> yes. >> almost. >> (clapping). >> the size of tennis ball the object of the game our control to so when the players on both
1:59 pm
sides are bold at any rate the complete ends you do do scoring it is you'll get within point lead for this bonus first of all, a jack can be moved and a or picked up to some other point or move the jack with i have a goal behind the just a second a lot of elements to the game. >> we're about a yard long. >> aim a were not player i'll play any weighed see on the inside in the goal is a minimum the latter side will make that arc in i'm right-hand side i play my for hand and to my left if i wanted to acre my respect i extend so it is arced to the right have to be able to pray both hands.
2:00 pm
>> (clapping.) who one. >> nice try and hi, i'm been play lawn bowling affair 10 years after he retired i needed something to do so i picked up this paper and in this paper i see in there play lawn bowling in san francisco golden gate park ever since then i've been trying to bowl i enjoy bowling a very good support and good experience most of you have of of all love the people's and have a lot of have a lot of few minutes in mr. mayor the san francisco play lawn bowling is in golden gate park we're sharing meadow for more information about the club including free lessons log

5 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on