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tv   Mayors Press Availability  SFGTV  December 31, 2016 1:25pm-2:01pm PST

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director mohammed nuru. >> (clapping.) >> thank you e line e ed and thank you, mayor ed lee since 2011 when we passed the road bond we really had quite a few a number of opportunities role to improve how people move around san francisco and seen more people bicycling and walking around the city our agency has been working closely with the bicycle coalition and sf works really to make it easily for people to get around the city as you heard from the mayor and ed this is a critical spot that is an intersection where people connect to various neighborhood and market to downtown or up to the castro or towards the financial district our designers work and this is the first protected zone that we are rolling out there will be several and as you can see light areas for people that can feel
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safe when we cross the street and making that easier for people that are using this and so we've very, very happy to be part of the design you know it is what san francisco needs at that time more people are walking bicycling and our agency will continue to make our city safe we are a big supporter of vision zero policy and we'll continue to doing everything we can to make our city wonderful and more enjoyable for everyone temperatures. >> thank you, mohammed and the contractors to make that possible and all the leadership and is coordination from within city hall the real benefit of what is different vision zero is a community partnership with the city it is not just the city but our community groups it is the coalition of dozens of groups
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close recognizey and neighborhoods and business groups coming together to support vision zero and one of the lead voices particularly when it comes to bike safety it the san francisco bicycle coalition at the they've been relentless for safety and pushing us to do more faster and better and that's pressure that stays on us everyday helps us to get this done we appreciate the leadership and the pressure from the bicycle coalition and we're glad to be joined by executive director bryan. >> thanks ed. >> thank you ed reiskin and mohammed nuru and thank you, mayor ed lee for your living room in adopting the safety improvements that will make our streets safer and help us to chief /* achieve it.
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>> this will help to reduce the casinos of night vision and hopefully that will be embarrassed in other corridors across the city i want to applaud the staff of the sfmta so for grace's new ideas and xernts and looking forward to hearing from people that walk and bike and drive and seeing that feedback incorporated to the design i know many of the members of the bicycle coalition have excited about the redesign and it is working beautifully and the cars are making the right turns that slowing down behind you he before the redesign of this intersection cars with speed there and try to
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get across the bike lanes so we need more complete streets projects to protect and design and build xroiz for the health and safety of everyone that walks and drives with geneva and so the streets approaching the redesign protection should be considered along 80s coordinate in order to help the city improve the street safety and achieve vision zero. >> thanks bryan and as bryan said gathering we'll be feedback from people that bike through the z that walk and drive through it and as the mayor said we'll be doing an evaluation to see what is working and not and other parts of city finally i want to acknowledge the 0 folks
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out here with the jack hammers powerfully concrete and from a construction were the ones that were contracted to do this around the city and want to give them a shout out this project and many others and the other contractors that work with side benefit of all that work we're trading jobs for san francisco businesses that's it we look forward to seeing how this works and it seems to be working as designed works well and safely i hope to keep that that way everyone of the fatality collisions we hear and read about through throughout the year tragic and every one of them is preventable that is to help to prevent them along with educating people when the laws
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and about how to get around town safely and changing the laws but that work is important we can get to zero with projects like this thanks very much we appreciate everyone coming out
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>> welcome to "culturewire." today we are at recology. they are celebrate 20 years of one of the most incredibly unique artist residency
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programs. we are here to learn more from one of the resident artists. welcome to the show, deborah. tell us how this program began 20 years ago. >> the program began 20 years ago. our founder was an environmentalist and an activist and an artist in the 1970's. she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked
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with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials that, and get to work. it is kind of like a reprieve, so they can really focus on their body of work. >> when you are talking about recology, do you have the only
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sculpture garden at the top? >> it is based on work that was done many years ago in new york. it is the only kind of structured, artist program. weit is beautiful. a lot of the plants you see were pulled out of the garbage, and we use our compost to transplant them. the pathway is lined with rubble from the earthquake from the freeways we tour about 5000 people a year to our facility, adults and children. we talk about recycling and conservation. they can meet the artists. >> fantastic. let's go meet some of your current artists. here we are with lauren. can you tell us how long have been here so far and what you're
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working on? >> we started our residency on june 1, so we came into the studio then and spent most of the first couple weeks just digging around in the trash. i am continuing my body of work, kind of making these hand- embroidered objects from our day-to-day life. >> can you describe some of the things you have been making here? this is amazing. >> i think i started a lot of my work about the qualities of light is in the weight. i have been thinking a lot about things floating through the air. it is also very windy down here. there is a piece of sheet music up there that i have embroidered third. there is a pamphlet about hearing dea -- nearing death. this is a dead rabbit. this is what i am working on now. this is a greeting card that i found, making it embroidered.
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it is for a very special friend. >> while we were looking at this, i glanced down and this is amazing, and it is on top of a book, it is ridiculous and amazing. >> i am interested in the serendipity of these still life compositions. when he got to the garbage and to see the arrangement of objects that is completely spontaneous. it is probably one of the least thought of compositions. people are getting rid of this stuff. it holds no real value to them, because they're disposing of it. >> we're here in another recology studio with abel. what attracted you to apply for this special program? >> who would not want to come to the dump? but is the first question. for me, being in a situation that you're not comfortable in has always been the best. >> what materials were you
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immediately attracted to when you started and so what was available here? >> there are a lot of books. that is one of the thing that hits me the most. books are good for understanding, language, and art in general. also being a graphic designer, going straight to the magazines and seeing all this printed material being discarded has also been part of my work. of course, always wood or any kind of plastic form or anything like that. >> job mr. some of the pieces you have made while you have been here. -- taught me through some of the pieces you have made while you have been here. >> the first thing that attracted me to this was the printed surface. it was actually a poster. it was a silk screen watercolor, about 8 feet long. in terms of the flatwork, i work with a lot of cloddish. so being able to cut into it come at into it, removed parts, it is part of the process of negotiating the final form.
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>> how do you jump from the two dimensional work that you create to the three-dimensional? maybe going back from the 3f to 2d. >> everything is in the process of becoming. things are never said or settled. the sculptures are being made while i am doing the collages, and vice versa. it becomes a part of something else. there's always this figuring out of where things belong or where they could parapets something else. at the end goal is to possibly see one of these collage plans be built out and create a structure that reflects back into the flat work. >> thank you so much for allowing "culturewire" to visit this amazing facility and to learn more about the artists in residence program. is there anything you like our viewers to know? >> we have art exhibitions every
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four months, and a win by the public to come out. everybody is welcome to come out. we have food. sometimes we have gains and bands. it is great time. from june to september, we accept applications from bay area artists. we encouraged artists from all mediums to apply. we want as many artists from the bay area out here so they can have the same experience. >> how many artists to do your host here? >> 6 artist a year, and we receive about 108 applications. very competitive. >> but everyone should be encouraged to apply. thank you again for hosting us. >> thank you for including us in "culturewire." ♪ as a society we've basically failed big portion of our population if you think about the basics of food, shelter
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safety a lot of people don't have any of those i'm mr. cookie can't speak for all the things but i know say, i have ideas how we can address the food issue. >> open the door and walk through that don't just stand looking out. >> as they grew up in in a how would that had access to good food and our parent cooked this is how you feed yours this is not happening in our country this is a huge pleasure i'm david one of the co-founder so about four year ago we worked with the serviced and got to know the kid one of the things we figured out was that they didn't know how to cook.
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>> i heard about the cooking school through the larkin academy a. >> their noting no way to feed themselves so they're eating a lot of fast food and i usually eat whatever safeway is near my home a lot of hot food i was excited that i was eating lunch enough instead of what and eat. >> as i was inviting them over teaching them basic ways to fix good food they were so existed. >> particle learning the skills and the food they were really go it it turned into the is charity foundation i ran into my friend we were talking about this this do you want to run this charity foundations and she said, yes.
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>> i'm a co-found and executive director for the cooking project our best classes participation for 10 students are monday they're really fun their chief driven classes we have a different guest around the city they're our stand alone cola's we had a series or series still city of attorney's office style of classes our final are night life diners. >> santa barbara shall comes in and helps us show us things and this is one the owners they help us to socialize and i've been here about a year. >> we want to be sure to serve as many as we can. >> the san francisco cooking school is an amazing amazing
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partner. >> it is doing that in that space really elevates the space for the kids special for the chief that make it easy for them to come and it really makes the experience pretty special. >> i'm sutro sue set i'm a chief 2, 3, 4 san francisco. >> that's what those classes afford me the opportunity it breakdown the barriers and is this is not scary this is our choice about you many times this is a feel good what it is that you give them is an opportunity you have to make it seem like it's there for them for the taking show them it is their and they can do that. >> hi, i'm antonio the chief in san francisco. >> the majority of kids at that age in order to get them into
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food they need to see something simple and the evidence will show and easy to produce i want to make sure that people can do it with a bowl and spoon and burner and one pan. >> i like is the receipts that are simple and not feel like it's a burden to make foods the cohesives show something eased. >> i go for vera toilet so someone can't do it or its way out of their range we only use 6 ingredients i can afford 6 ingredient what good is showing you them something they can't use but the sovereignties what are you going to do more me you're not
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successful. >> we made a vegetable stir-fry indicators he'd ginger and onion that is really affordable how to balance it was easy to make the food we present i loved it if i having had access to a kitchen i'd cook more. >> some of us have never had a kitchen not taught how to cookie wasn't taught how to cook. >> i have a great appreciation for programs that teach kids food and cooking it is one of the healthiest positive things you can communicate to people that are very young. >> the more programs like the cooking project in general that can have a positive impact how our kids eat is really, really
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important i believe that everybody should venting to utilize the kitchen and meet other kids their age to identify they're not alone and their ways in which to pick yours up and move forward that. >> it is really important to me the opportunity exists and so i do everything in my power to keep it that. >> we'll have our new headquarters in the heart of the tenderloin at taylor and kushlg at the end of this summer 2014 we're really excited. >> a lot of the of the conditions in san francisco they have in the rest of the country so our goal to 257bd or expand out of the san francisco in los angeles and then after that who know. >> we'd never want to tell
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people want to do or eat only provide the skills and the tools in case that's something people are 2rrd in doing. >> you can't buy a box of psyche you have to put them in the right vein and direction with the right kids with a right place address time those kids don't have this you have to instill they can do it they're good enough now to finding out figure out and find the future figure out and find the future for [horns honking] announcer: big dreams and good grades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org.

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