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tv   Full Measure With Sharyl Attkisson  ABC  March 12, 2017 10:00am-10:30am EDT

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>> shame on you! shame on you! shame on you! scott: in south florida, temperatures were hotter inside than out, after the miami-dade commissioners signed off on the mayor's plan for the county to become less of a sanctuary. mayor gimenez: we are also a country of laws. if you are a criminal, if you are arrested, you will be treated like everyone else. scott: the mayor's new policy requires local law enforcement to keep anyone already arrested and jailed for an extra 48 hours if federal immigration authorities want to pick them up. cheryl little: i was shocked, when someone called me and said, "did you hear what mayor gimenez did?" i didn't believe it. chris christopherson: so if you think about this iceberg here as content up on the internet, the dark web or the deep web represents everything that's underneath that water level.
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sharyl: fbi special agent chris christopherson agreed to show us how the dark web works. chris christopherson: we put a site and banner to notify the people on the forum, on the marketplace, say "hey, we're investigating these things. it is illegal, and these are crimes, and you'll get punished for them." bruce klingner: four u.s. four star generals think north korea already has, or we have to assume they have for planning purposes, the ability to hit the united states today with a nuclear weapon. scott: that sounds daunting. bruce klingner: that's why you have growing discussion or perhaps advocacy for preemptive attacks. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] ♪ scott: hello, i'm scott thuman in for sharyl attkisson.
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the term "sanctuary city" has generated a lot of headlines and a lot of controversy. throughout his campaign, candidate trump spoke out against them, and less than a week after he was sworn in, signed an executive order to cut off federal funds to sanctuary cities. many local leaders responded by doubling down on their promise to protect undocumented residents. but one county in florida went the other way, immediately changing its policies. this week's cover story is "sanctuary shutdown." >> shame on you! shame on you! scott: in south florida, temperatures were hotter inside than out, after the miami-dade commissioners signed off on the mayor's plan for the county to become less of a sanctuary. president trump: we are going to get the bad ones out, the criminals and the drug dealers and gangs and gang members and cartel leaders. scott: 24 hours after president trump announced a plan to cut
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cities, mayor carlos gimenez became the first local leader to fall in line. mayor gimenez: we are an inclusive county, we are a county of immigrants, i am an immigrant to this great country. we are also a country of laws. ♪ scott: miami has one of the largest immigrant communities in the country. more than half its residents were born overseas. but an estimated 160,000 immigrants are in the county illegally, and how to handle the ones who have run afoul of the law has divided the community. cheryl little: and i can tell you, i was shocked, when someone called me and said, "did you just hear what mayor gimenez did?" i didn't believe it. scott: cheryl little runs americans for immigrant justice, a miami-based not-for-profit that provides legal aid for immigrants, those who are here legally and those who aren't.
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cheryl: i mean, this is an immigrant community and there's a real sense of betrayal here, and i don't know how long it's going to take us to get over it. scott: the mayor's new policy requires local law enforcement to keep anyone already arrested and jailed for an extra 48 hours if federal immigration authorities want to pick them up. for illegal immigrants, an arrest for drunken driving, robbery, or even disorderly conduct could get them on a fast-track to deportation. cheryl: what we're probably going to be looking at moving forward is that long term residents, people that have lived here for years, worked hard, paid taxes, have u.s. citizen children are going to be filling our immigration detention centers. families are going to be torn apart. monica: so basically, if my father gets stopped or any undocumented immigrant gets stopped at the moment, that could end them up in their country, just being deported. scott: monica is a client of little's. sh
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honduras at the age of nine. a so-called "dreamer," monica is protected under an executive order signed by president obama. but she worries about her father who has been living in the shadows for years. monica: a single dui checkpoint which, my father, you know, my father does not have to be drunk or anything or under the influence, but just the fact that he's being stopped because it's a checkpoint, he could end up in jail and then getting deported. scott: that's a point mayor gimenez strongly disputes. he says in miami-dade county, any non-arrestable crime, like a traffic violation or driving without a license, will result in a citation, not an arrest. mayor gimenez: those folks with minor crimes won't be arrested. and remember, we don't know if you are undocumented or illegal when you have an interaction with miami-dade police. we don't ask the question, it's frankly none of our concern. if, however, you commit a crime that anybody else would be arrested for, that's what you're go
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scott: according to data we obtain from miami-dade county, 60 individuals have been held since the policy changed. they have been arrested for serious crimes like first degree murder, aggravated assault, and burglary, but a handful of cases included lesser crimes like marijuana possession and aggressive panhandling. gimenez insists the policy is narrowly tailored and focuses on serious criminals. but at a meeting with the nation's police chiefs, president trump made it clear he wants law enforcement to cooperate with federal immigration officers. president trump: you know the bad ones, you know the good ones. i want you to turn in the bad ones. scott: president trump isn't just demanding that law enforcement hand over immigrants after they've been arrested. he also reinstated "secure communities," a program started in 2008 by president george w. bush that encouraged information sharing between local law enforcement and federal authorities.
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many illegal immigrants makes a mockery of all those who are going through the process of immigrating legally. scott: president obama inherited secure communities and ran with it. the obama administration deported 2.4 million people, earning him the nickname by critics as "deporter in chief." but in 2014, the obama administration modified the program, opting for a more discriminating approach that prioritized the removal of violent criminals. scott: if this system were refined to the point that only the most dangerous convicted undocumented immigrants were deported, would there be anything wrong with that? cheryl: look, i want our community to be safe. i mean, every immigrant i know wants our community to be safe. what i don't understand is why we have to be spending taxpayer money rounding up people who've committed no crimes or who have been charged with petty offenses.
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scott: as his executive order makes clear, president trump is widening the net of who qualifies for deportation and also bringing back a controversial program called 287g, that deputized local police officers to ask residents about their immigration status. mayor gimenez is adamant that he is only complying with one portion of trump's executive order. mayor gimenez: we will not be immigration officers, i don't know how much clearer i can make this, okay, that miami-dade county police officers will not be immigration officers. period. scott: when you hear people on the other side of the argument say, look, it is a burden on our system, what do you say? monica: we are not a burden. the government gives me zero aid, i go to school, i pay everything out of pocket, i do not get any loans, any financial aid, i do not qualify for food stamps, i do not qualify for any relief on insurance. where is my help? how am i a burden to anyone in
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this country? if anything, i'm helping the economy. scott: in the weeks ahead, we'll visit a sanctuary city vowing to stand up against the executive order and federal authorities to shelter illegal immigrants. ahead on "full measure," a look inside the deepest, darkest parts of the internet.
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scott: the latest wikileaks revelations, purportedly revealing cia hacking tools and techniques, are a reminder of
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is. a big area of concern -- the so-called "dark web," a largely hidden online world where some of the most serious crimes are committed. the fbi has dedicated teams to battle cyber-criminals and one of their agents agreed to give sharyl an introduction to the dark web. chris christopherson: we work the national security side and we work the criminal side. sharyl: fbi special agent chris christopherson agreed to show us how the dark web works, inside the fbi's first regional computer forensics laboratory in san diego. s.a. christopherson: so if you think about this iceberg here as content up on the internet, the dark web or the deep web represents everything that's underneath that water level and then what we see on top of the water level is represented by content that google sees. so, things that you can access through regular search engines and then things that are underwater or on the deep web.
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so what we're looking at here is a website where you can actually go ahead grab some software, this tor browser, that would enable you to go on the dark web or the deep web. the idea of tor is two parties, they don't know the other party in the communication. they're just communicating. so google actually doesn't know where to go, because everything is so anonymous, and the encryption, it's obfuscated, google just simply can't find it. sharyl: like the silk road website. s.a. christopherson: exactly. so google, if they could would index it, but at the end of the day if you don't know where it is, you can't find it and you can't search it. sharyl: silk road was an online black market launched on the dark web in 2011, primarily to sell illegal drugs. s.a. christopherson: we put up a site and banner to notify the people on the forum, on the marketplace, say "hey, we're investigating these things. it is illegal, and these are crimes, and you'll get punished for them." once we identify you. sharyl: if someone visiting that site went to it and saw this, i'm sure they'd be a little concer
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activity. s.a. christopherson: that's what we're hoping for. yeah exactly, yeah. sharyl: the fbi shut down silk road in 2013. its operator, ross ulbricht, was convicted of money laundering, computer hacking, and drug trafficking. s.a. christopherson: the guy that ran silk road is sentenced to a long prison sentence and so on. we've seen how the investigation has actually broke though some of those anonymity borders. where at the end of the day, drugs have to get sold and delivered. so even though this is online and anonymous, there still has to be some component that's real world and not anonymized. and that's where the fbi and other law enforcement agencies can kind of come in and identify the actors on this forum and others. sharyl: another crime found on the dark web involves cyber attackers who infect your computer with ransomware and encrypt your files and folders. you might not know it until you try to get data and see a computer message like this. s.a. christopherson: if you're infected with this ransomware and you start to utilize your computer, open files, you'll see
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and what you can kind of see at the top is that the ransom itself is $500 and you have a countdown timer here, so once that countdown timer hits zero, the ransom will double. so what they're trying to do is to ensure that sort of time sensitivity, so that you go through and go through the difficult process of finding one of these exchangers, getting bitcoins, and so on. sharyl: bitcoin is a payment system, a new kind of currency, that's anonymous, with no central authority. cyber-criminals holding information for ransom often demand payment on the dark web in bitcoin. s.a. christopherson: they'll have their bitcoin wallet information on there. they'll have information about how to pay the ransom. so this is something that they need to actually send out to all their victims anonymously. the internet with anonymous traffic is synonymous with the dark web. so the dark web iseally conducive with this kind of criminal activity. there are local bitcoins, as you see here, where i can actually meet face-to-face with someone in person, give them money, and get bitcoins from them.
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and then there are atm's, even here in san diego, where you can get bitcoins from the atm. so you can either purchase bitcoins in the atm or you can trade the bitcoins in for money. sharyl: but do the crooks then exchange it for cash and spend it or do they buy other illicit things with it? s.a. christopherson: mhmm. so that's a good question. "can i buy groceries with bitcoin?" and the answer is yes, you can in certain cities and places, you can buy subway, you can buy martinis, you can buy groceries. but at the end of the day, they're probably going to exchange it for cash. and so they can use these same exchangers to turn their bitcoin into euros, dollars, or whatever they're looking for. sharyl: when people have their emails stolen, their email addresses, and things like that from retail stores like we've heard of, is this what some of them are potentially used for? s.a. christopherson: exactly. so there will be certain trading on the dark web of email address of victims. there's also the potential that
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once someone pays a ransom once, their email address or some other identifier might be sold or traded on the dark web, and now they'll be targeted again. scott: to help protect against ransomware attacks, the fbi recommends backing up your data regularly and keeping the backups separate from your internet-connected computers. next on "full measure," north korea rattling its sabers. is it just to test president trump?
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scott: north korea conducted a new round of missile tests this week. at the same time, u.s. forces in south korea began deploying a controversial new missile defense system. we spoke with bruce klingner, a former cia deputy division chief for korea, about some support in congress for a pre-emptive strike. bruce klingner: we should always be very worried about north korea. as some on the peninsula have said, we're always you know sort of aec
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four u.s. four-star generals think north korea already has, or we have to assume they have for planning purposes, the ability to hit the united states today with a nuclear weapon. scott: that sounds daunting. bruce: it is. that's why you have growing discussion or perhaps advocacy for preemptive attacks. scott: at the beginning of the year, before his inauguration, president trump tweeted about north korea's efforts to build and deploy nuclear long-range missile. he said, quote, "it won't happen." is the president right to make a promise like that? bruce: the problem is, we don't know what he meant. even rex tillerson, his secretary of state, during his confirmation hearings, he was asked, does that mean mr. trump simply doesn't think north korea can do it? and he said, well, it could mean that. and then asked mr. tillerson, do you think he's drawing a red line that he might use military force? and he said, well, i don't think he meant that, but he could mean that, too. scott: so there's no way of knowing if that's a red line? bruce: it's the problem of
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it leads itself to misinterpretation. scott: what have been some of the other administration's missed steps in handling north korea? and what could president trump do differently on that front? bruce: well, i think we first have to identify that there is no administration, no political party has a monopoly on good or bad ideas on north korea. experts have been trying to solve north korea for decades, so we need to realize that north korea is the problem, it's not a specific u.s. administration. scott: president bush's administration removed north korea from the list of state sponsors of terrorism. bruce: correct. scott: that was in an effort to get them to play along a little bit. is it time they go back on that list? bruce: i think it is. there's actually been a really long list of actions by north korea since they were removed from the list in 2008, which i believe, qualifies them for that. there's been shipments of conventional arms to terrorist groups, hezbollah and hamas. there have been attempted
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assassinations or successful assassinations of north korean defectors in south korea and russia and china and now malaysia. also, you know, if we think back to when north korea conducted the cyber hack on the sony studios, not only was it the hacking, it was the threats of 9/11 style attacks on any theatre and theatre-goers that went to see the movie, "the interview." that's a threat of a terrorist act. scott: president obama reportedly on his way out of office had warned incoming president trump that this was going to be one of his greatest concerns, if not one of his top priorities. is that a fair assessment? bruce: i think it's very fair. north korea really is a broad spectrum of military threat. it's got the nuclear weapons, it's got the missile means to deliver them, as well as deliver conventional high explosive warheads. it also has 5,000 tons of chemical agent, we estimate. it has a biological weapons program. it has a million-man army forward deployed near the
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south korea. south korea's capital, seoul, is within artillery range of perhaps 10,000 artillery systems. north korea also is the counterfeiter of our currency. it produces and distributes illegal drugs. money laundering, it really is. scott: it's a long list. bruce: it's sort of don corleone with nuclear weapons. scott: a footnote. at a recent white house dinner for a small group of journalists, president trump told me and others the north korea situation "has to be dealt with soon very soon." still ahead on "full measure," we'll take you on a little vertical escape from our hyper political world.
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scott: many of you who watch "full measure" tell us we share stories you won't see anywhere else. we wanted to take that one step higher. after the election, i thought i'd try to get as far from politics as possible. for those of you who could use a little break as well, here's the short version of a long climb up mount kilimanjaro. just moments into our journey to the top of the world's tallest freestanding mountain, mother nature reminded us that she was in charge. fortunately, we were led on this week-long odyssey by paul, serafin, and johnny, who were as much gurus as they were guides. and my fellow climbers and i, only hours before complete st
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>> everyone wave. yeah! scott: tent life was often dictated by conditions, often frosty ones that somehow melted away with early morning song. [singing] ♪ >> what you doing now? hiking. >> what you doing? scott: though trekking up to africa's rooftop is no walk in the park, one of our porters was struck with malaria and injuries easily pile up. and the high-wire balancing act of our tireless crew never ceased to amaze. we dubbed them "super heros." unbeknownst to me they'd knicknamed me too, i was "jesus" due to the beard. [laughter] scott: the terrain at times seemed other-worldly. the famed, daunting, and dangerous baranco wall was a challenge, and at the same time the ultimate playground. what's that up there?
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[laughter] >> you are the ceo, my friend. [laughter] scott: an arduous but breathtaking five days on the books, the trophy was finally in sight, and with a whipping wind and plummeting temperatures, we left our skyline setup for the final flight. in a body- and mind-numbing midnight start, we moved at snail's pace, headlamps and six layers of clothes, one monotonous step after another, seeing only the feet in front of us. it went on for seven silent hours. we pressed on beyond any hypothermia and altitude sickness and the dawn delivered our first real reason to smile -- the sun over africa's horizon. we'd reached stella's point, but our goal was uhuri peak and, at 19,341 feet, with 37 miles behind us and glaciers now gracing us, we were finally
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rewarded with that iconic wooden sign. summit success, where the hugs were plentiful, the pain disappeared, and fatigue never felt so good. sometimes a week without cell service can be just what the doctor ordered. and next week on "full measure," sharyl attkisson will be back, reporting on one of the most vexing questions in modern medicine. why do the prices of prescription drugs vary so much? sharyl: what determines the pricing of drugs? barbara anthony: it depends on a number of things. number one, you have the price that the manufacturer sells to wholesalers. then wholesalers sell to other middlemen and other middlemen, it eventually goes down to the drugstore. everybody on the chain marks up. scott: some answers -- on the next "full measure." until then, thanks for watching, i'm scott thuman.
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"government matters" with francis rose. >> wikileaks publishes the c.i.a.'s playbook for espionage. we tell you what and who to watch.the national security agency is giving away some of its most important code on purpose. the leader of n.s.a.'s technology transfer program on how the agency is going open source. and on the federal beat round table. how big is the problem and when will the offices be filled? "government matters" starts right now. >> thanks for watching the weekend edition of "government matters" featuring the latest topics that matter to the

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